Date   

Descendants of the Cracow Kornitzer family in New York #rabbinic

Neil@...
 

Trying to make contact with the desendants of Aaron Binyamin Zeev Wolf
Kornitzer and his siblings (which include Yosef Nechemiah Eisenstadt,
R. Simon Kornitzer of Brooklyn, died in 1989, and his children of the
Cohen, Farber and Bronner of Antwerp families)

Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately.


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Descendants of the Cracow Kornitzer family in New York #rabbinic

Neil@...
 

Trying to make contact with the desendants of Aaron Binyamin Zeev Wolf
Kornitzer and his siblings (which include Yosef Nechemiah Eisenstadt,
R. Simon Kornitzer of Brooklyn, died in 1989, and his children of the
Cohen, Farber and Bronner of Antwerp families)

Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately.


Tames and Salomon families #rabbinic

Neil@...
 

Trying to make contact with the Tames and Salomon families. Two
sisters were Judy (married Walter Zev Tames - parents of Elizabeth
Tames of Lebanon, PA and Joanne of Sprinfield) and Eva (married Rabbi
Jeremiah Salomon of Lawrence, NY - parents of Rabbi Jacob Baruch
Salomon, married Susan Briener of Bridgeport, CT, R. Joseph Meir
Salomon and Esther Reizel, married R. Baruch Rabinowitz.
Their main ancestry traces back to the Klein of Selles (Selish) and
Horowitz levite families.

Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately.


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Tames and Salomon families #rabbinic

Neil@...
 

Trying to make contact with the Tames and Salomon families. Two
sisters were Judy (married Walter Zev Tames - parents of Elizabeth
Tames of Lebanon, PA and Joanne of Sprinfield) and Eva (married Rabbi
Jeremiah Salomon of Lawrence, NY - parents of Rabbi Jacob Baruch
Salomon, married Susan Briener of Bridgeport, CT, R. Joseph Meir
Salomon and Esther Reizel, married R. Baruch Rabinowitz.
Their main ancestry traces back to the Klein of Selles (Selish) and
Horowitz levite families.

Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately.


Re: DNA Matches #dna

David Goldman
 

Greetings, everyone. I hate to say that I think the matches I am provided
through the various sites are driving me batty. I realize that in most of
them called "third cousin" the longest segment is only around 10 at the
most, with the "overlap" varying below and above 100, but why does the
system proclaim a cousinhood of third cousin or such when this surely
doesn't mean that in most cases?!! All it means is that two people have some
common genetic background at some time in the distant past that is retained
in us, even where some of my matches are with non-Jews who probably had had
a Jewish ancestor in the distant past. But this doesn't translate into a
third or fourth cousin.

I am just about ready to give up contacting the vast majority of matches I
am provided with by the various sites. It just doesn't mean anything for
family genealogy within the past one or two centuries. Some of my own
relatives keep asking me, "How far back do you want to do this?! Of course
we are all related at some point, what's the big deal?!" Sometimes I have no
answer for such questions.

David Goldman
NYC


DNA Research #DNA RE: DNA Matches #dna

David Goldman
 

Greetings, everyone. I hate to say that I think the matches I am provided
through the various sites are driving me batty. I realize that in most of
them called "third cousin" the longest segment is only around 10 at the
most, with the "overlap" varying below and above 100, but why does the
system proclaim a cousinhood of third cousin or such when this surely
doesn't mean that in most cases?!! All it means is that two people have some
common genetic background at some time in the distant past that is retained
in us, even where some of my matches are with non-Jews who probably had had
a Jewish ancestor in the distant past. But this doesn't translate into a
third or fourth cousin.

I am just about ready to give up contacting the vast majority of matches I
am provided with by the various sites. It just doesn't mean anything for
family genealogy within the past one or two centuries. Some of my own
relatives keep asking me, "How far back do you want to do this?! Of course
we are all related at some point, what's the big deal?!" Sometimes I have no
answer for such questions.

David Goldman
NYC


JGSNY Meeting May 19 #general

Harriet Mayer
 

Jewish Genealogical Society New York Meeting
Sunday, May 19 at 2 PM
at the Center for Jewish History, 15 West 16th St., New York

Program: What's in a Name? A Case Study of (Re)discovering Jewish Identity on (and
off) an Unlikely African Archipelago
Speaker: Alma Gottlieb

Co-sponsored with the American Sephardi Federation

from Poland to Brazil to New Mexico, many individuals, families, and communities
around the world are discovering that they have Jewish ancestors who renounced
and/or suppressed their religious identity. What happens when Christians today
learn that some of their long-ago relatives were Jewish? The West African island
nation of Cabo Verde offers an especially compelling place >from which to explore
this intriguing process because of the unexpected convergence of Jews and Africans
on a remote archipelago in the North Atlantic.

In this talk, Professor Gottlieb will discuss her research with Cabo Verdeans on
and off the islands who are, in a variety of ways, reconnecting with their Jewish
heritage. What parallels-and differences-do we find linking them with the global
trend of reconnecting with lost Jewish ancestry?

Alma Gottlieb is an award-winning cultural anthropologist who has lectured and
conducted research around the world. She is author or co-author of nine books and
many scholarly articles. Since 2006, she has been researching the West African
island nation of Cabo Verde. Her talk draws >from her book-in-progress, "Africa
Across the Seder Table: Jewish Identity in Cabo Verde and Its Diaspora."
She has held teaching and research appointments at Princeton University, Ecole des
Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales (Paris), and Catholic University of Leuven
(Belgium). Currently she is Professor Emerita >from the University of Illinois at
Champaign-Urbana and a Visiting Scholar in Anthropology at Brown University.

No charge for JGS and ASF members; guests welcome, $5 at the door.

The Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at CJH will be open starting at 11 AM.

More information available at our website: jgsny.org

Submitted by Harriet Mayer
JGSNY VP Communications
New York, NY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGSNY Meeting May 19 #general

Harriet Mayer
 

Jewish Genealogical Society New York Meeting
Sunday, May 19 at 2 PM
at the Center for Jewish History, 15 West 16th St., New York

Program: What's in a Name? A Case Study of (Re)discovering Jewish Identity on (and
off) an Unlikely African Archipelago
Speaker: Alma Gottlieb

Co-sponsored with the American Sephardi Federation

from Poland to Brazil to New Mexico, many individuals, families, and communities
around the world are discovering that they have Jewish ancestors who renounced
and/or suppressed their religious identity. What happens when Christians today
learn that some of their long-ago relatives were Jewish? The West African island
nation of Cabo Verde offers an especially compelling place >from which to explore
this intriguing process because of the unexpected convergence of Jews and Africans
on a remote archipelago in the North Atlantic.

In this talk, Professor Gottlieb will discuss her research with Cabo Verdeans on
and off the islands who are, in a variety of ways, reconnecting with their Jewish
heritage. What parallels-and differences-do we find linking them with the global
trend of reconnecting with lost Jewish ancestry?

Alma Gottlieb is an award-winning cultural anthropologist who has lectured and
conducted research around the world. She is author or co-author of nine books and
many scholarly articles. Since 2006, she has been researching the West African
island nation of Cabo Verde. Her talk draws >from her book-in-progress, "Africa
Across the Seder Table: Jewish Identity in Cabo Verde and Its Diaspora."
She has held teaching and research appointments at Princeton University, Ecole des
Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales (Paris), and Catholic University of Leuven
(Belgium). Currently she is Professor Emerita >from the University of Illinois at
Champaign-Urbana and a Visiting Scholar in Anthropology at Brown University.

No charge for JGS and ASF members; guests welcome, $5 at the door.

The Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at CJH will be open starting at 11 AM.

More information available at our website: jgsny.org

Submitted by Harriet Mayer
JGSNY VP Communications
New York, NY


Viewmate Translation Request -- Russian #lithuania

Todd Brody
 

I've posted a vital record in Russian for which I need a translation. This
is the death record for the person I believe is my gr-gr-grandfather.

It is on ViewMate at the following address:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM73210

Any help you could give would be greatly appreciative. I am particularly
interested in the words that don't seem to be part of the regular record.

Thank you very much,

Todd Brody

(looking for Zakher/Zacher/Shakher/Shachar in Telsiai, Raseiniai, and
Tytuveniai)

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately or on the Viewmate form.


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Viewmate Translation Request -- Russian #lithuania

Todd Brody
 

I've posted a vital record in Russian for which I need a translation. This
is the death record for the person I believe is my gr-gr-grandfather.

It is on ViewMate at the following address:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM73210

Any help you could give would be greatly appreciative. I am particularly
interested in the words that don't seem to be part of the regular record.

Thank you very much,

Todd Brody

(looking for Zakher/Zacher/Shakher/Shachar in Telsiai, Raseiniai, and
Tytuveniai)

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately or on the Viewmate form.


Offering Photos / Research at Mount Carmel / New Mount Carmel Cemetery, Glendale, Queens, New York #general

A. E. Jordan
 

I think my next cemetery visit / research will be the at Mount Carmel in Glendale,
Queens, New York. I will probably be focusing on Sections 1, 2, and 3 known as
Old Mount Carmel and New Mount Carmel. I might go next weekend but of course it is
dependent on weather.

I am happy to look for graves and take photos provided you can ID the appropriate
person. Mount Carmel has a database where you can start with your research.

I am pretty good at finding my way around in Mount Carmel. However they are not
particularly good at sharing plot maps so sometimes it can be a real challenge.

Infants, babies and children are the most difficult because a lot of times they did
not have as significant stones and they do not survive the years. If you are
looking for a child's grave please tell me in advance.

Please be specific in your requests because I can not help you if you write with a
common name and say can you find for example Harry Cohen.... you can guess how many
there are in this cemetery. Mount Carmel has more than 100,000 burials.

I do appreciate but do not demand a few dollars in return to help off set the cost
of doing these search for everyone and to make it possible for me to continue to
offer this as a service to the community. As you can understand the costs of these
repeated searches add up on me.

I am also happy to offer advice online if you email me.

Allan Jordan


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Offering Photos / Research at Mount Carmel / New Mount Carmel Cemetery, Glendale, Queens, New York #general

A. E. Jordan
 

I think my next cemetery visit / research will be the at Mount Carmel in Glendale,
Queens, New York. I will probably be focusing on Sections 1, 2, and 3 known as
Old Mount Carmel and New Mount Carmel. I might go next weekend but of course it is
dependent on weather.

I am happy to look for graves and take photos provided you can ID the appropriate
person. Mount Carmel has a database where you can start with your research.

I am pretty good at finding my way around in Mount Carmel. However they are not
particularly good at sharing plot maps so sometimes it can be a real challenge.

Infants, babies and children are the most difficult because a lot of times they did
not have as significant stones and they do not survive the years. If you are
looking for a child's grave please tell me in advance.

Please be specific in your requests because I can not help you if you write with a
common name and say can you find for example Harry Cohen.... you can guess how many
there are in this cemetery. Mount Carmel has more than 100,000 burials.

I do appreciate but do not demand a few dollars in return to help off set the cost
of doing these search for everyone and to make it possible for me to continue to
offer this as a service to the community. As you can understand the costs of these
repeated searches add up on me.

I am also happy to offer advice online if you email me.

Allan Jordan


COHEN from Drechin Grodno Gubernia/Scotland #belarus

arnold friedman <afriedman21@...>
 

hi,

I am researching family that moved to scotland around 1902.

solomon COHEN abt 1871 older brother samuel abt 1859
bessie COHEN (possible maiden names lens, sravitski lenzewitski) abt 1875
maybe dinah COHEN abt 1895 daughter
maybe hanah COHEN abt 1896 daughter
issac COHEN 1900 his naturalization papers show derechin. son

there is a family thought (unverified) that the family changed their
name to cohen when moving to scotland. So would look at births,
marriages and deaths >from 1855 to 1920 and try to match up times.
maybe first names.

from what i have looked so far, did not see anyone with last name
COHEN in the area.

what is the best site to find family information. the 1897 census
could be very helpful, but i could not figure out how to access the
information online.

appreciate any advice on how to proceed.

best,

arnold friedman

MODERATOR NOTE: General information may be posted. Please reply privately
with specific family information,


Belarus SIG #Belarus COHEN from Drechin Grodno Gubernia/Scotland #belarus

arnold friedman <afriedman21@...>
 

hi,

I am researching family that moved to scotland around 1902.

solomon COHEN abt 1871 older brother samuel abt 1859
bessie COHEN (possible maiden names lens, sravitski lenzewitski) abt 1875
maybe dinah COHEN abt 1895 daughter
maybe hanah COHEN abt 1896 daughter
issac COHEN 1900 his naturalization papers show derechin. son

there is a family thought (unverified) that the family changed their
name to cohen when moving to scotland. So would look at births,
marriages and deaths >from 1855 to 1920 and try to match up times.
maybe first names.

from what i have looked so far, did not see anyone with last name
COHEN in the area.

what is the best site to find family information. the 1897 census
could be very helpful, but i could not figure out how to access the
information online.

appreciate any advice on how to proceed.

best,

arnold friedman

MODERATOR NOTE: General information may be posted. Please reply privately
with specific family information,


www.landesarchiv-bw.de help #germany

Richard <r.d.oppenheimer@...>
 

Hello All,

In the past I was able to use the site www.landesarchive-bw.de to search for
BMD records by the starting letter of a town name in Baden Wuerttemburg..
The site seems to be changing, and I can no longer seem to find what I am
looking for. I used to be able to search Bestande und bestellung, click on
J, enter 386, then select Bu 15 and get to the list of towns.

Can anyone provide me with a primer on how to continue to use this site.

Thanks, Best regards, Richard D. Oppenheimer r.d.oppenheimer@gmail.com


German SIG #Germany www.landesarchiv-bw.de help #germany

Richard <r.d.oppenheimer@...>
 

Hello All,

In the past I was able to use the site www.landesarchive-bw.de to search for
BMD records by the starting letter of a town name in Baden Wuerttemburg..
The site seems to be changing, and I can no longer seem to find what I am
looking for. I used to be able to search Bestande und bestellung, click on
J, enter 386, then select Bu 15 and get to the list of towns.

Can anyone provide me with a primer on how to continue to use this site.

Thanks, Best regards, Richard D. Oppenheimer r.d.oppenheimer@gmail.com


Call for nominations for the IAJGS Stern and John Stedman Memorial Awards #germany

JewishGen German Research Division Coordinator
 

[John Stedman was an active member of GerSIG.}

The call for submissions for the 2019 Rabbi Malcolm Stern Grant and
the John Stedman Memorial Fund Award is open. The purpose of these grants
is to encourage institutions or organizations to pursue projects,
activities and acquisitions that provide new or enhanced resources
to benefit those researching Jewish Genealogy.

Please refer to
http://www.iajgs.org/blog/awards/iajgs-award-nominations/
for the Nomination Rules and Grant Criteria.

At:
http://www.iajgs.org/blog/awards/rabbi-malcolm-stern-grant/
there is a list of past grant award recipients, and at:

http://www.iajgs.org/blog/awards/stern-nomination-form/
is the Stern and Stedman Grant Nomination form. The grants may
only be awarded to a not-for-profit institution or organisation
or charity, and may not be awarded to individuals.

Nominations may be submitted by any individual or organization, and
self-nomination by organisations is permitted.

The deadline for submitting the Stern and Stedman Grant Nomination form
and any supporting documentation is Friday 31 May 2019 at
7 pm EDT (USA). The grants awarded will be announced on 1 August 2019.
If further information is required, please contact me using
Laurence.Harris@iajgs.org
Laurence Harris (Chair, IAJGS Stern/Stedman Grant Committee)


German SIG #Germany Call for nominations for the IAJGS Stern and John Stedman Memorial Awards #germany

JewishGen German Research Division Coordinator
 

[John Stedman was an active member of GerSIG.}

The call for submissions for the 2019 Rabbi Malcolm Stern Grant and
the John Stedman Memorial Fund Award is open. The purpose of these grants
is to encourage institutions or organizations to pursue projects,
activities and acquisitions that provide new or enhanced resources
to benefit those researching Jewish Genealogy.

Please refer to
http://www.iajgs.org/blog/awards/iajgs-award-nominations/
for the Nomination Rules and Grant Criteria.

At:
http://www.iajgs.org/blog/awards/rabbi-malcolm-stern-grant/
there is a list of past grant award recipients, and at:

http://www.iajgs.org/blog/awards/stern-nomination-form/
is the Stern and Stedman Grant Nomination form. The grants may
only be awarded to a not-for-profit institution or organisation
or charity, and may not be awarded to individuals.

Nominations may be submitted by any individual or organization, and
self-nomination by organisations is permitted.

The deadline for submitting the Stern and Stedman Grant Nomination form
and any supporting documentation is Friday 31 May 2019 at
7 pm EDT (USA). The grants awarded will be announced on 1 August 2019.
If further information is required, please contact me using
Laurence.Harris@iajgs.org
Laurence Harris (Chair, IAJGS Stern/Stedman Grant Committee)


(US) National Archives Civil War Research Guide #usa

Jan Meisels Allen
 

For those researching their ancestors in the Civil War this may be of
interest. The (US) National Archives has a Civil War research guide
available at:
https://www.archives.gov/research/military/civil-war/resources. It covers
both Union and Confederate records, where and how to find the records,
pension records and more. Pension records are very interesting as they
provide information on what the soldier did during the war.

A new feature is that Civil War paper pension records can now be ordered
online: https://tinyurl.com/2slr6f
Original url:
https://eservices.archives.gov/orderonline/start.swe?SWECmd=Start&;SWEHo=eser
vices.archives.gov

Jews and the Civil War

It is estimated that 10,000 Jewish soldiers fought in the Civil War: about
7,000 for the Union and 3,000 for the Confederacy, with some 600 Jewish
soldiers killed in battle.
(Donald Altschiller, "Jews," Encyclopedia of the American Civil War: A
Political, Social, and Military History, eds. David Stephen Heidler, Jeanne
T. Heidler, and David J. Coles (2000). W. W. Norton, p. 1070-1071.)

There were nine Jewish generals and 21 Jewish colonels participating in the
war.

Judah Benjamin served as the second Confederate States Secretary of War and
Secretary of State. Before the Civil War, Benjamin was the first Jewish
Cabinet member in a North American government.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Updates Holocaust Database #usa

Nolan Altman
 

JewishGen.org is pleased to announce the completion of its most recent
update to the JewishGen Holocaust Database. The database can be accessed
directly at https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/ The database now
includes more than 2.75 million records >from approximately 200 component
databases.

All component databases (individual data sets) have a project introduction.
The introduction gives you further information about the historical
background of the data, location of the original source document, fields
used in the database, translation aides when applicable and acknowledgments
to those that helped with data entry, validation and online preparation of
the data set.

A listing of each of the component databases can be found by scrolling down
the main search page. All data can be searched in one database-wide search
from the Holocaust Database home page.
The database continues to grow, thanks in large part to partnerships with
other organizations and receiving interesting original research by JewishGen
users and academicians. We believe JewishGen is an ideal location for the
preservation and "publishing" of these pieces.

Selected new additions include:

Czudec, Poland - Residents Lists, Birth and Death Records: An index
of 1,215 Jewish residents >from 1940-1942, and 14 birth and death records.
Rzeszow, Poland - Registration, ID Cards, and Marriage Certificates:
101 Registration and ID cards >from 1919-1942, and 134 Marriage records from
1939-1942
Nowy Sacz, Poland - Forced Labor and Punishment Book Listings: An
index of 1,345 Jews forced to report for work in the Stadtische Werkstatten
(Municipal Workshops) in 1942, and an index of 1,883 Jews who received
punishments for various alleged offenses between January 1940 and September
1942.
Mielec, Poland - Jewish Residents: 2,320 inhabitants of Mielec,
Poland, dated August 15, 1940.
Lublin, Poland - Seized Property Cards: 5,081 records of confiscated
Jewish property in the Lublin area.
Szeged, Hungary - Deportations and Survivors: Survivors of the three
transports that liquidated the town and those that survived after the war.
More than 7,000 records.
Medzilaborce, Slovakia - Census List: Names of family members taken
from the folder named 'Verzeichniss der Juden in Medzilaborce' found at
Jewish Community office in Kosice.
Bekescsaba, Hungary - Victims: Holocaust victims >from two different
death registers 1941 - 1945.
Gross Rosen Camp Transport Records: Transport list of Jews
transported to Gross Rosen >from south Belgium and northern France.
Nisko, Poland - Transport Lists: Jews >from Czechoslovakia and
Austria, sent >from Vienna in October 1939 to a rural marshy area near Nisko,
where they were to establish a camp.
Reichsvereinigung - Update. The collection now includes more than
23,000 records of German Jews >from cards where the family name begins with
the letters A-R.
Kovno Cemetery File - Update. Updated and corrected listings from
the Viliampole Chevra Kadisha register for those who died in the Kovno
Ghetto between 18 August 1941 and 31 December 1943
Hachshara in Havelberg - 124 members of this Zionist youth
organization in Havelberg, Saxony-Anhalt.
German Mischlingen in Nazi Germany: Sitzensdorf: 203 mixed-race
forced laborers at Sitzendorf concentration camp in Thuringia.
Wallenberg Passport Records - Update: Updated file containing 5,642
Hungarian Jews who received a protective document >from the Swedish embassy.
Parschnitz Forced Labor Transport: 910 female prisoners at
Parschnitz forced-labor camp, October 1944.
Leova Mayoral Election List: 1,929 citizens of Leova, Moldova
registered to vote in the 1937 election for mayor.

To see descriptions of all the new and pre-existing component databases,
please visit: https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/

We would also like to extend our thanks to all of the volunteers who have
assisted in making this data available to you. Their names are listed in
the individual project introductions.

If you are interested in assisting data entry or have a database at you
think would be appropriate for the JewishGen Holocaust Database, please
contact me directly at NAltman@JewishGen.org

Nolan Altman
JewishGen VP for Data Acquisition
JewishGen Holocaust Database - Coordinator
May 2019

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