Date   

Re: Correct Spelling of Masha #general

jeremy frankel
 

I would like to support David Kravitz in his assertion that there was
no right or wrong, but additionally perhaps some people couldn't even
read what was before their very eyes,

My paternal grandfather was born in London, England, in 1892 and on
his civil birth certificate, it states quite simply that he was Isaac
Frankel. His Hebrew name was Gershon Yitzhack (ben Moishe Dovid).
Later on in his life, during his late teens, he must have been
troubled by the "fact" that he didn't have an English equivalent for
Gershon, so he called himself Gustavus Isaac Frankel, and was forever
known as Gussie.

His wife, Millie, died in 1944 and her gravestone, quite rightly
stated that she was the wife of Gustavus Isaac Frankel. But when
Gussie died the following year I find it hard to believe that no-one
looked that closely at her grave (for they are the same design), but
his inscription gives his name as Gustav Isaac Frankel!

Jeremy G Frankel
ex Edgware, London, England
Berkeley, California, USA

EBIN: Russia -> New York, USA
FRANKEL: Poland -> London, England
GOLD (RATH): Praszka, Poland -> London, England
KOENIGSBERG: Vilkaviskis, Lithuania -> London, England -> NYC, NY, USA
LEVY (later LEADER): Kalisz, Poland -> London, England
PRINCZ/PRINCE: Krakow, Poland -> London, England -> NYC, NY, USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Correct Spelling of Masha #general

jeremy frankel
 

I would like to support David Kravitz in his assertion that there was
no right or wrong, but additionally perhaps some people couldn't even
read what was before their very eyes,

My paternal grandfather was born in London, England, in 1892 and on
his civil birth certificate, it states quite simply that he was Isaac
Frankel. His Hebrew name was Gershon Yitzhack (ben Moishe Dovid).
Later on in his life, during his late teens, he must have been
troubled by the "fact" that he didn't have an English equivalent for
Gershon, so he called himself Gustavus Isaac Frankel, and was forever
known as Gussie.

His wife, Millie, died in 1944 and her gravestone, quite rightly
stated that she was the wife of Gustavus Isaac Frankel. But when
Gussie died the following year I find it hard to believe that no-one
looked that closely at her grave (for they are the same design), but
his inscription gives his name as Gustav Isaac Frankel!

Jeremy G Frankel
ex Edgware, London, England
Berkeley, California, USA

EBIN: Russia -> New York, USA
FRANKEL: Poland -> London, England
GOLD (RATH): Praszka, Poland -> London, England
KOENIGSBERG: Vilkaviskis, Lithuania -> London, England -> NYC, NY, USA
LEVY (later LEADER): Kalisz, Poland -> London, England
PRINCZ/PRINCE: Krakow, Poland -> London, England -> NYC, NY, USA


Searching NADELSTECHER and FEIT #general

Myrna Levin <mlevin1412@...>
 

I am trying to find out if Tonia Nadelstecher FEIT of Sanok, Poland that I
saw in the Yad Vashem pages of testimony is my father's sister. She was
married to Abraham FEIT.

How would I be able to find out what her parents names were?

I am also searching for my father's other siblings:
Abraham NADELSTECHER and David NADELSTECHER
as well as his mother, Hannah Bertinthal NADELSTECHER, all of Sanok.

Thank you,
Myrna Nadel Levin
mlevin1412@sprynet.com
McAllen, Texas USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching NADELSTECHER and FEIT #general

Myrna Levin <mlevin1412@...>
 

I am trying to find out if Tonia Nadelstecher FEIT of Sanok, Poland that I
saw in the Yad Vashem pages of testimony is my father's sister. She was
married to Abraham FEIT.

How would I be able to find out what her parents names were?

I am also searching for my father's other siblings:
Abraham NADELSTECHER and David NADELSTECHER
as well as his mother, Hannah Bertinthal NADELSTECHER, all of Sanok.

Thank you,
Myrna Nadel Levin
mlevin1412@sprynet.com
McAllen, Texas USA


Searching for Misha FRIEDLANDER of Buenos Aires, Argentina #latinamerica

tina levine
 

In the Yizkor Book compiled by the Brisk Society in
Buenos Aires in 1953, I came across a name in the
Necrology List that is of interest to me.

The person being memorialized was:

Gittel Friedlander, nee Pachter, spouse of Pesach,
family condition Mother.
There were 2 other memorials: one for Pesach, her
spouse and for Hiltcha, her son.

The donor of this information was Misha Friedlander,
son and brother of these 3 Friedlander family members.

My question is: How would I go about trying to find
Misha Friedlander, assuming he is even still alive as
the Yizkor Book was compiled in 1953?

Is the society still in existence? Are there records
that would have an address for Misha Friedlander?

My maiden name is Pachter and my family came from
Siemiatycze which was close to Brest-Litovsk.

I am trying to find out the name of Gittel Pachter
Friedlaner's Father. Perhaps he was related in some
way to my Pachter family.

Thanks for any assistance you can provide.

Tina Pachter Levine
New York City, USA

Searching: PACHTER-Siemiatycze, KIRZNER-Nesvizh,
ZOLONDEK-Wawolnica/Warsaw, ROSENBERG-Wawolnica


Latin America #LatinAmerica Searching for Misha FRIEDLANDER of Buenos Aires, Argentina #latinamerica

tina levine
 

In the Yizkor Book compiled by the Brisk Society in
Buenos Aires in 1953, I came across a name in the
Necrology List that is of interest to me.

The person being memorialized was:

Gittel Friedlander, nee Pachter, spouse of Pesach,
family condition Mother.
There were 2 other memorials: one for Pesach, her
spouse and for Hiltcha, her son.

The donor of this information was Misha Friedlander,
son and brother of these 3 Friedlander family members.

My question is: How would I go about trying to find
Misha Friedlander, assuming he is even still alive as
the Yizkor Book was compiled in 1953?

Is the society still in existence? Are there records
that would have an address for Misha Friedlander?

My maiden name is Pachter and my family came from
Siemiatycze which was close to Brest-Litovsk.

I am trying to find out the name of Gittel Pachter
Friedlaner's Father. Perhaps he was related in some
way to my Pachter family.

Thanks for any assistance you can provide.

Tina Pachter Levine
New York City, USA

Searching: PACHTER-Siemiatycze, KIRZNER-Nesvizh,
ZOLONDEK-Wawolnica/Warsaw, ROSENBERG-Wawolnica


Hungarian Census Records, 1781-1850 #hungary

Eric M. Bloch
 

Great news! The Hungarian Census Records, 1781-1850 database
<http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Hungary/CensusOther.htm> has been
updated with the addition of 6,000 more entries. Updated counties
include Lipto, Maramaros, Moson, Saros, Szabolcs, Szepes, and Zemplen.
Once again, thanks to the dedicated team of volunteers who have worked
so diligently to transcribe this data.

Happy hunting!

Eric M. Bloch, Coordinator
Milwaukee, WI


ADLER family from CABAJ in Slovakia #hungary

Greenhut <greenhut@...>
 

Dear all,

After analyzing the data I gathered in the last few months I discovered that
I've roots also in the village of CABAJ/CZABAJ in Slovakia.

My great-grandmother, Estela/Ester/Netti ALT, was born there in 1855. My
ggg-grandfather, Herman ALT, died there and probably his wife Tereza.

My gg-grandmother, Rozalia ALT, died in the CABAJ in 1860/1861, she was born
to the ADLER family.

I found in the 1869 Hungarian census two ADLER families in CABAJ. I suspect
that Rozalia ALT is connected to this family.

Does someone >from the H-SIG members is researching the ADLER family from
CABAJ/CZABAJ (now called CABAJ-CAPOR)?

Someone knows about the ADLER family >from CABAJ/CZABAJ?

Any information is appreciated.

Eli Greenhut
Israel


Hungary SIG #Hungary Hungarian Census Records, 1781-1850 #hungary

Eric M. Bloch
 

Great news! The Hungarian Census Records, 1781-1850 database
<http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Hungary/CensusOther.htm> has been
updated with the addition of 6,000 more entries. Updated counties
include Lipto, Maramaros, Moson, Saros, Szabolcs, Szepes, and Zemplen.
Once again, thanks to the dedicated team of volunteers who have worked
so diligently to transcribe this data.

Happy hunting!

Eric M. Bloch, Coordinator
Milwaukee, WI


Hungary SIG #Hungary ADLER family from CABAJ in Slovakia #hungary

Greenhut <greenhut@...>
 

Dear all,

After analyzing the data I gathered in the last few months I discovered that
I've roots also in the village of CABAJ/CZABAJ in Slovakia.

My great-grandmother, Estela/Ester/Netti ALT, was born there in 1855. My
ggg-grandfather, Herman ALT, died there and probably his wife Tereza.

My gg-grandmother, Rozalia ALT, died in the CABAJ in 1860/1861, she was born
to the ADLER family.

I found in the 1869 Hungarian census two ADLER families in CABAJ. I suspect
that Rozalia ALT is connected to this family.

Does someone >from the H-SIG members is researching the ADLER family from
CABAJ/CZABAJ (now called CABAJ-CAPOR)?

Someone knows about the ADLER family >from CABAJ/CZABAJ?

Any information is appreciated.

Eli Greenhut
Israel


Trip to Hungary #hungary

mimi simon
 

Hi Genners,
We just returned >from a trip to Berlin, Prague,
Vienna, and Budapest. While in Budapest we went to
the village where my maternal grandmother had lived
prior to coming to the U.S. in 1903. We had arranged
for an English-speaking driver and car to take us
there. (The gentleman was very accommodating, bright,
helpful and I would recommend him highly, if anyone is
interested. Contact me privately for this
information. He speaks English, Hungarian, Russian,
Ukrainian, and other languages and can arrange and
conduct trips also.)
The village of Ke'ked, currently of about 342
inhabitants, is in north east Hungary, a stone's throw
from the Slovakia border. We were looking for the inn
and farm that my great grandparents had owned. We were
also looking for the Jewish cemetery in Abaujvar, the
next village, where my great grandparents may be
buried.
The drive was about 3 hours - 2 hours on the
motorway and another hour on good local roads. We
came to Abaujvar first and our driver asked an elderly
man on the street where the cemetery might be. He
told him to look for a water tower. We found the
water tower after driving around curving roads,
parked, and walked to the cemetery. The cemetery was
next to a group of abandoned collective farm buildings
from the Soviet days. We trudged down a slope and up
another slope to the spot where we could see
tombstones. It had rained earlier so the weeds and
ground were wet and muddy. The cemetery was exactly
as it had been described in the jewishgen cemetery
project as previously reported. Many stones were
upright and many were on the ground. There are no
Jews nearby to take care of the cemetery so it has
fallen into disrepair. We took photos of tombstones
that were legible and will have them translated from
the Hebrew. There were a few with Hungarian names in
addition to the Hebrew but not of my family.
We then went to Ke'ked and visited the mayor
(polgarmeister) to whom I had written about our visit.
He told us, through our driver, that a certain
building had been an inn prior to WWII, according to
the elderly people in the village. Someone, not clear
whom, owns it but may not live there, may rent rooms
in summer, but it was all vague. They, or someone
previously, had renovated the small one-story building
and it was in excellent condition but we weren't able
to go inside.
The woman who lives next to the former inn said that
her grandmother, who died in 2000 at age 96, said that
the Klein girls were pretty. They would have been my
great aunts, Hermina and Ilona, both of whom perished
in Auschwitz.
A bonus was the village monument honoring the dead
of WWI and WWII. My great uncle, Lajos Klein, had
been a medical student, drafted as a "litter bearer,"
and had died in almost the first battle he attended.
His name was listed. Under the WWII names was the
Klein Family, which must have been the village's way
of honoring the family members who died in Auschwitz,
since none of them were military.
All in all, it was a very satisfying visit. One
question remains, however. A nephew by marriage had
requested permission to retrieve the property >from the
government after he had returned >from a work camp and
found the family had all perished. He wanted to sell
it and leave for Israel, we think. The question is
whether he was able to retrieve the property because
by the time he returned, in 1945 probably, the
communist government owned all properties. In 1989 or
1990 after the collapse of the Soviet Union, people
did buy property >from the government so it may never
have been returned to the family. Is there any way to
find out what actually happened to the property
without having a deed available? It is my
understanding that it is very difficult to locate such
deeds.
Regards,
Mimi (Weiss) Simon
KLEIN - Ke'ked, Hungary
ROTH - Olaszliszka, Hungary
WEISS - Ordarma, Hungary (now Storozhnitsa, Hungary)
all immigrated to Western Pennsylvania


Re: Hungarian Yizkor Book on Well-known online auction site #hungary

tom klein <h-sig@...>
 

obviously, there are more areas of the site that i need to explore!

the list is great and has lots of good information, however, there are relatively few yiddish names listed, many of which are virtually the same as the hungarian (i.e. "munkatsch" for munkacs), and transliterated back into latin letters, which also introduces errors. (in the specific case of "kalov", the file shows "kalev", which is a misspelling and therefore would not have matched this specific book title.) and there are also some useful names that are just plain missing, such as "offen" (buda!).

i think it would be much more helpful to retain hebrew spellings, with or without the transliteration, and to add more names, particularly where they are significantly different >from the hungarian. to avoid font issues, it may be necessary to store hebrew spellings as small graphic files, but that's an issue for the webmaster. and it would also be helpful if this list were a real server database, rather than a pdf file, both for maintainability and to save bandwidth (downloading a 129-page file just to look up an entry or two is cumbersome).

if one of our members buys this particular book, i would be happy to transcribe that page of town names >from it.


....... tom klein, toronto


ps. tzelem was used to refer to deutschkreuz in austria, once known as keresztur. it is a common hebrew euphemism for crucifix.

"Carol J. Robinson" <caroljr@alamedanet.net> wrote:

The cross-reference guide on the H-SIG website was created to support
research efforts and includes Hebrew/Yiddish names in cases where they
were available to us. The cross reference guide is found on the Methods
page of the website (http://www.jewishgen.org/Hungary/methods.htm). In
addition to providing alternative names, it also lists the synagogue
with which the town was associated (which is useful for searching for
vital records).

Carol Robinson
Research Coordinator
Alameda, CA
caroljr@alamedanet.net

tom klein wrote:
i had a quick look at that auction (it's a 1-week listing), and in case it helps anyone, the hebrew title is: "the tzadik of kalov and his congregation". it refers to nagykallo (aka kalov).

the listing of towns is titled "the foreign spelling of place names mentioned in the book", and probably contains little information pertaining to most of the towns listed, outside the area of nagykallo.

i think that such a listing of hungarian place names in hebrew/yiddish would make a very useful research tool for the h-sig web site. (many yiddish names are confusingly different >from their hungarian equivalents, e.g. "altoffen" or "tzelem" or "presburg", for various reasons.)


....... tom klein, toronto


Re: h-sig digest: May 22, 2007 #hungary

A. Marmorstein <mehadrin@...>
 

There is a fairly good list of such place names at the front of the
book Chachmei Hungaria by Rabbi Y Y Cohen, and published by Machon
Yerusholayim (about 1990), it is in 3 columns, name as written in
Hebrew letters and documents, name in Hungarian and name in other
languages (Romanian or Slovak or otehr local language used after 1918
and the breakup of greater hungary). If the copyright issue could be
resolved, it would be a useful addition to the website.
A. MArmorstein
New York City

On May 23, 2007, at 2:04 AM, H-SIG digest wrote:

i think that such a listing of hungarian place names in hebrew/
yiddish would make a very useful research tool for the h-sig web
site. (many yiddish names are confusingly different >from their
hungarian equivalents, e.g. "altoffen" or "tzelem" or "presburg",
for various reasons.)


Hungary SIG #Hungary Trip to Hungary #hungary

mimi simon
 

Hi Genners,
We just returned >from a trip to Berlin, Prague,
Vienna, and Budapest. While in Budapest we went to
the village where my maternal grandmother had lived
prior to coming to the U.S. in 1903. We had arranged
for an English-speaking driver and car to take us
there. (The gentleman was very accommodating, bright,
helpful and I would recommend him highly, if anyone is
interested. Contact me privately for this
information. He speaks English, Hungarian, Russian,
Ukrainian, and other languages and can arrange and
conduct trips also.)
The village of Ke'ked, currently of about 342
inhabitants, is in north east Hungary, a stone's throw
from the Slovakia border. We were looking for the inn
and farm that my great grandparents had owned. We were
also looking for the Jewish cemetery in Abaujvar, the
next village, where my great grandparents may be
buried.
The drive was about 3 hours - 2 hours on the
motorway and another hour on good local roads. We
came to Abaujvar first and our driver asked an elderly
man on the street where the cemetery might be. He
told him to look for a water tower. We found the
water tower after driving around curving roads,
parked, and walked to the cemetery. The cemetery was
next to a group of abandoned collective farm buildings
from the Soviet days. We trudged down a slope and up
another slope to the spot where we could see
tombstones. It had rained earlier so the weeds and
ground were wet and muddy. The cemetery was exactly
as it had been described in the jewishgen cemetery
project as previously reported. Many stones were
upright and many were on the ground. There are no
Jews nearby to take care of the cemetery so it has
fallen into disrepair. We took photos of tombstones
that were legible and will have them translated from
the Hebrew. There were a few with Hungarian names in
addition to the Hebrew but not of my family.
We then went to Ke'ked and visited the mayor
(polgarmeister) to whom I had written about our visit.
He told us, through our driver, that a certain
building had been an inn prior to WWII, according to
the elderly people in the village. Someone, not clear
whom, owns it but may not live there, may rent rooms
in summer, but it was all vague. They, or someone
previously, had renovated the small one-story building
and it was in excellent condition but we weren't able
to go inside.
The woman who lives next to the former inn said that
her grandmother, who died in 2000 at age 96, said that
the Klein girls were pretty. They would have been my
great aunts, Hermina and Ilona, both of whom perished
in Auschwitz.
A bonus was the village monument honoring the dead
of WWI and WWII. My great uncle, Lajos Klein, had
been a medical student, drafted as a "litter bearer,"
and had died in almost the first battle he attended.
His name was listed. Under the WWII names was the
Klein Family, which must have been the village's way
of honoring the family members who died in Auschwitz,
since none of them were military.
All in all, it was a very satisfying visit. One
question remains, however. A nephew by marriage had
requested permission to retrieve the property >from the
government after he had returned >from a work camp and
found the family had all perished. He wanted to sell
it and leave for Israel, we think. The question is
whether he was able to retrieve the property because
by the time he returned, in 1945 probably, the
communist government owned all properties. In 1989 or
1990 after the collapse of the Soviet Union, people
did buy property >from the government so it may never
have been returned to the family. Is there any way to
find out what actually happened to the property
without having a deed available? It is my
understanding that it is very difficult to locate such
deeds.
Regards,
Mimi (Weiss) Simon
KLEIN - Ke'ked, Hungary
ROTH - Olaszliszka, Hungary
WEISS - Ordarma, Hungary (now Storozhnitsa, Hungary)
all immigrated to Western Pennsylvania


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Re: Hungarian Yizkor Book on Well-known online auction site #hungary

tom klein <h-sig@...>
 

obviously, there are more areas of the site that i need to explore!

the list is great and has lots of good information, however, there are relatively few yiddish names listed, many of which are virtually the same as the hungarian (i.e. "munkatsch" for munkacs), and transliterated back into latin letters, which also introduces errors. (in the specific case of "kalov", the file shows "kalev", which is a misspelling and therefore would not have matched this specific book title.) and there are also some useful names that are just plain missing, such as "offen" (buda!).

i think it would be much more helpful to retain hebrew spellings, with or without the transliteration, and to add more names, particularly where they are significantly different >from the hungarian. to avoid font issues, it may be necessary to store hebrew spellings as small graphic files, but that's an issue for the webmaster. and it would also be helpful if this list were a real server database, rather than a pdf file, both for maintainability and to save bandwidth (downloading a 129-page file just to look up an entry or two is cumbersome).

if one of our members buys this particular book, i would be happy to transcribe that page of town names >from it.


....... tom klein, toronto


ps. tzelem was used to refer to deutschkreuz in austria, once known as keresztur. it is a common hebrew euphemism for crucifix.

"Carol J. Robinson" <caroljr@alamedanet.net> wrote:

The cross-reference guide on the H-SIG website was created to support
research efforts and includes Hebrew/Yiddish names in cases where they
were available to us. The cross reference guide is found on the Methods
page of the website (http://www.jewishgen.org/Hungary/methods.htm). In
addition to providing alternative names, it also lists the synagogue
with which the town was associated (which is useful for searching for
vital records).

Carol Robinson
Research Coordinator
Alameda, CA
caroljr@alamedanet.net

tom klein wrote:
i had a quick look at that auction (it's a 1-week listing), and in case it helps anyone, the hebrew title is: "the tzadik of kalov and his congregation". it refers to nagykallo (aka kalov).

the listing of towns is titled "the foreign spelling of place names mentioned in the book", and probably contains little information pertaining to most of the towns listed, outside the area of nagykallo.

i think that such a listing of hungarian place names in hebrew/yiddish would make a very useful research tool for the h-sig web site. (many yiddish names are confusingly different >from their hungarian equivalents, e.g. "altoffen" or "tzelem" or "presburg", for various reasons.)


....... tom klein, toronto


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: h-sig digest: May 22, 2007 #hungary

A. Marmorstein <mehadrin@...>
 

There is a fairly good list of such place names at the front of the
book Chachmei Hungaria by Rabbi Y Y Cohen, and published by Machon
Yerusholayim (about 1990), it is in 3 columns, name as written in
Hebrew letters and documents, name in Hungarian and name in other
languages (Romanian or Slovak or otehr local language used after 1918
and the breakup of greater hungary). If the copyright issue could be
resolved, it would be a useful addition to the website.
A. MArmorstein
New York City

On May 23, 2007, at 2:04 AM, H-SIG digest wrote:

i think that such a listing of hungarian place names in hebrew/
yiddish would make a very useful research tool for the h-sig web
site. (many yiddish names are confusingly different >from their
hungarian equivalents, e.g. "altoffen" or "tzelem" or "presburg",
for various reasons.)


Re: Geza #hungary

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

to answer:

<<Can anyone tell me if the name Geza is a nickname for a longer name, or
> simply a name on its own?>>

If a Hungarian woman was known as "Geza," she most likely had the full given
name of "Gizella," a popular Magyar name given to Jewish women in the 19th
and early 20th centuries.

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@hotmail.com


The Given Name Geza #hungary

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Suzanne Kemeny Riddle posted as follows:

"Can anyone tell me if the name Geza is a nickname for a longer name, or
simply a name on its own?"


The Hungarian given name Geza (for a male) was used many centuries ago in
Hungary, by Hungarians, as a stand-alone given name. The use of the name
was taken up by Jews in later centuries in significant frequencies, and in
particular in the 19th century.

However, statistical studies of the frequencies in which secular names were
adopted by Jews show that this use of the name Geza by Jews was less than
for other more popular Hungarian names like Andras, Antal, Eugen, Bela,
Bernat, Bodog, Dezso, Ede, Elek, Erno, Farkas, and others. For these
latter names the rabbis of that period authorized the use of these
Hungarian secular names as secular kinuim for Hebrew names, but Geza was
not included in this list. Thus, for a Jew who had the secular Hungarian
name Bela and the Hebrew name Avraham, his Legal Jewish name (written in a
Get, a Jewish divorce contract) would be:

Avraham haMechune Bela ben Ploni

But the Hungarian given name Geza did not enjoy this privilege. (Ploni is
the Jewish given name of his father.)

These authorized secular names can be seen in the JewishGen Given Names
Data Base for Hungary, at this web site:

< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames/ >



--
Professor G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel
jerry@vms.huji.ac.il


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Geza #hungary

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

to answer:

<<Can anyone tell me if the name Geza is a nickname for a longer name, or
> simply a name on its own?>>

If a Hungarian woman was known as "Geza," she most likely had the full given
name of "Gizella," a popular Magyar name given to Jewish women in the 19th
and early 20th centuries.

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@hotmail.com


Hungary SIG #Hungary The Given Name Geza #hungary

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Suzanne Kemeny Riddle posted as follows:

"Can anyone tell me if the name Geza is a nickname for a longer name, or
simply a name on its own?"


The Hungarian given name Geza (for a male) was used many centuries ago in
Hungary, by Hungarians, as a stand-alone given name. The use of the name
was taken up by Jews in later centuries in significant frequencies, and in
particular in the 19th century.

However, statistical studies of the frequencies in which secular names were
adopted by Jews show that this use of the name Geza by Jews was less than
for other more popular Hungarian names like Andras, Antal, Eugen, Bela,
Bernat, Bodog, Dezso, Ede, Elek, Erno, Farkas, and others. For these
latter names the rabbis of that period authorized the use of these
Hungarian secular names as secular kinuim for Hebrew names, but Geza was
not included in this list. Thus, for a Jew who had the secular Hungarian
name Bela and the Hebrew name Avraham, his Legal Jewish name (written in a
Get, a Jewish divorce contract) would be:

Avraham haMechune Bela ben Ploni

But the Hungarian given name Geza did not enjoy this privilege. (Ploni is
the Jewish given name of his father.)

These authorized secular names can be seen in the JewishGen Given Names
Data Base for Hungary, at this web site:

< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames/ >



--
Professor G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel
jerry@vms.huji.ac.il