Date   

Alexandre ARON #france

Eve Line Blum <eve.line.blum@...>
 

The picture of the grave of Charlotte Ascher
(spouse of Alexandre ARON, great-grandparents of
Marc BLOCH) was not published in the Revue du
Cercle de Genealogie Juive, but in the Bulletin
of Cercle Genealogique d'Alsace, n=B0 155, page
755, with a long article 9 pages) concerning Marc
BLOCH's ancestors, as it was answered to you in
October 2006. That article includes several
other photos. The photo of Charlotte Ascher's
grave is quite clear, except that we can't read
the text written on it. As you may know, there is
a copyright about such photos and articles, and
nobody is allowed to copy them. But it's not sure
that this text would bring you more information
than what is written close to the photo in the
Bulletin. Anyway, the only way to obtain a
clearer photo (and to ask whether the text is
legible) is to write directly the Cercle
Genealogique d'Alsace.

On the other hand, in the Revue du Cercle de
Genealogie Juive, Nr 87 (July-September 2006),
there's a very important article (11 pages)
written by Bernard LYON-CAEN, member of the
Cercle, concerning Marc BLOCH's ancestors, with
his story and a long family tree. Gathering these
two different articles, you have got the best
documentation you can wish on that subject. You
can buy copies ot that article at the Cercle de
Genealogi Juive. Just go on their site
http://www.convoi73.org (English version) and
click on "Our library".
--
Eve Line Blum-Cherchevsky
Besancon (France)
http://www.convoi73.org
and also
Cercle de Genealogie Juive (International JGS in Paris)
http://www.genealoj.org


French SIG #France Alexandre ARON #france

Eve Line Blum <eve.line.blum@...>
 

The picture of the grave of Charlotte Ascher
(spouse of Alexandre ARON, great-grandparents of
Marc BLOCH) was not published in the Revue du
Cercle de Genealogie Juive, but in the Bulletin
of Cercle Genealogique d'Alsace, n=B0 155, page
755, with a long article 9 pages) concerning Marc
BLOCH's ancestors, as it was answered to you in
October 2006. That article includes several
other photos. The photo of Charlotte Ascher's
grave is quite clear, except that we can't read
the text written on it. As you may know, there is
a copyright about such photos and articles, and
nobody is allowed to copy them. But it's not sure
that this text would bring you more information
than what is written close to the photo in the
Bulletin. Anyway, the only way to obtain a
clearer photo (and to ask whether the text is
legible) is to write directly the Cercle
Genealogique d'Alsace.

On the other hand, in the Revue du Cercle de
Genealogie Juive, Nr 87 (July-September 2006),
there's a very important article (11 pages)
written by Bernard LYON-CAEN, member of the
Cercle, concerning Marc BLOCH's ancestors, with
his story and a long family tree. Gathering these
two different articles, you have got the best
documentation you can wish on that subject. You
can buy copies ot that article at the Cercle de
Genealogi Juive. Just go on their site
http://www.convoi73.org (English version) and
click on "Our library".
--
Eve Line Blum-Cherchevsky
Besancon (France)
http://www.convoi73.org
and also
Cercle de Genealogie Juive (International JGS in Paris)
http://www.genealoj.org


Re: Jewish Cemetery in Bratislava #hungary

Tomas Lang <tlang@...>
 

To all SIG-Hers who are interested in issue of Hatam Sofer´s Tomb and
Memorial I recommend to contact the Bratislava Jewish Community at
esal@vodotika.sk


Tomi LANG
Nove Zamky JewCom
Slovakia
=================

----- Original Message -----
From: <KLOOGWEIN@aol.com>
To: "H-SIG" <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Friday, March 16, 2007 3:59 AM
Subject: [h-sig] Jewish Cemetery in Bratislava


Hi H-SIG members,

On page 107 of Hugo Gold's book Die Juden und die Judengemeinde
Bratislava
in Vergangenheit and Gengenwart is a photo of the Jewish cemetery in
Bratislava. This is not the cemetery where the Hatam Sofer is buried, but
a
slightly more recent one. Does anyone know the address or location of
this
cemetery? Is there a cemetery office to contact about names of people
buried there
and locations of graves? Is there anyone reading this message who would
be
willing to photograph one of the graves there for me?

Many thanks.

Judith Kloogman Weinstein
Great Neck, NY USA

Searching: KLUGMANN- Monastyriska, Ukr; Vienna; Sniatyn, Ukr; Graz,
Aust.
KIMEL - Monasyriska, Ukr; Buczacz, Ukr; Bolechow, Ukr; BETTELHEIM -
Bratislava; Sopron, Hung. WEISZ - Velky Meder, Slvk; Bratislava, Vienna.
SZALCZER -
Velky Meder, Slvk. KLABER - Sopron, Hung. FEINTUCH - Vienna. KAROLYI -
Vienna; Shanghai. HALBERG - Buczacz, Ukr; Romania; SOMERSTEIN -
Buczacz, Ukr;
Monastyriska, Ukr.

Moderator: Have you checked the International Jewish Cemetery Register at
http://www.jewishgen.org/cemetery/e-europe/slov-a-l.html? It suggests
that information about the cemetery may be available >from the Central
Union of the Jewish Communities in the Slovak Republic, 81447 Bratislava,
Kozia Ul 21 may have more information. Go to the website for more
information about this cemetery and contact information. Website entry
says that an underground mausoleum contains the graves of 18 famous rabbis
including Rabbi Moses Sofer "Chatam Sofer" (1762-1839)


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Jewish Cemetery in Bratislava #hungary

Tomas Lang <tlang@...>
 

To all SIG-Hers who are interested in issue of Hatam Sofer´s Tomb and
Memorial I recommend to contact the Bratislava Jewish Community at
esal@vodotika.sk


Tomi LANG
Nove Zamky JewCom
Slovakia
=================

----- Original Message -----
From: <KLOOGWEIN@aol.com>
To: "H-SIG" <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Friday, March 16, 2007 3:59 AM
Subject: [h-sig] Jewish Cemetery in Bratislava


Hi H-SIG members,

On page 107 of Hugo Gold's book Die Juden und die Judengemeinde
Bratislava
in Vergangenheit and Gengenwart is a photo of the Jewish cemetery in
Bratislava. This is not the cemetery where the Hatam Sofer is buried, but
a
slightly more recent one. Does anyone know the address or location of
this
cemetery? Is there a cemetery office to contact about names of people
buried there
and locations of graves? Is there anyone reading this message who would
be
willing to photograph one of the graves there for me?

Many thanks.

Judith Kloogman Weinstein
Great Neck, NY USA

Searching: KLUGMANN- Monastyriska, Ukr; Vienna; Sniatyn, Ukr; Graz,
Aust.
KIMEL - Monasyriska, Ukr; Buczacz, Ukr; Bolechow, Ukr; BETTELHEIM -
Bratislava; Sopron, Hung. WEISZ - Velky Meder, Slvk; Bratislava, Vienna.
SZALCZER -
Velky Meder, Slvk. KLABER - Sopron, Hung. FEINTUCH - Vienna. KAROLYI -
Vienna; Shanghai. HALBERG - Buczacz, Ukr; Romania; SOMERSTEIN -
Buczacz, Ukr;
Monastyriska, Ukr.

Moderator: Have you checked the International Jewish Cemetery Register at
http://www.jewishgen.org/cemetery/e-europe/slov-a-l.html? It suggests
that information about the cemetery may be available >from the Central
Union of the Jewish Communities in the Slovak Republic, 81447 Bratislava,
Kozia Ul 21 may have more information. Go to the website for more
information about this cemetery and contact information. Website entry
says that an underground mausoleum contains the graves of 18 famous rabbis
including Rabbi Moses Sofer "Chatam Sofer" (1762-1839)


South Africa Antisemitism #southafrica

Saul Issroff <saul@...>
 

This website
<http://www.infoisrael.net/cgi-local/text.pl?source=2/a/vii/110320071>
of the Israel Hasbara Committee <http://www.infoisrael.net/index.htm>,
details a South Africa Antisemitism Report, 06, for The Institute of
Contemporary Antisemitism and Racism at *Tel Aviv University.

In my opinion this has relevance to contemporary South African family
history and genealogy studies.

Saul Issroff


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica South Africa Antisemitism #southafrica

Saul Issroff <saul@...>
 

This website
<http://www.infoisrael.net/cgi-local/text.pl?source=2/a/vii/110320071>
of the Israel Hasbara Committee <http://www.infoisrael.net/index.htm>,
details a South Africa Antisemitism Report, 06, for The Institute of
Contemporary Antisemitism and Racism at *Tel Aviv University.

In my opinion this has relevance to contemporary South African family
history and genealogy studies.

Saul Issroff


Treasure trove of records #southafrica

Arlene Beare <arl@...>
 

A donation of $100 to the Litvak SIG for the Panevys records has been
money really well spent. I have been amazed at the wealth of records
that I have received. There are marriage records,births, deaths
and revision lists to name a few. As with any records you will find
details of other places as well and this will be of help in extending
the boundaries of your research.
I heartily recommend that you donate money to Panevys or the region
of your research as you will be delighted with the data that you
receive. I personally think that I have received a treasure trove and
congratulate the SIG in making this data available to us.

Arlene Beare
UK


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica Treasure trove of records #southafrica

Arlene Beare <arl@...>
 

A donation of $100 to the Litvak SIG for the Panevys records has been
money really well spent. I have been amazed at the wealth of records
that I have received. There are marriage records,births, deaths
and revision lists to name a few. As with any records you will find
details of other places as well and this will be of help in extending
the boundaries of your research.
I heartily recommend that you donate money to Panevys or the region
of your research as you will be delighted with the data that you
receive. I personally think that I have received a treasure trove and
congratulate the SIG in making this data available to us.

Arlene Beare
UK


Datterode, Hessen visit #germany

Elizabeth Levy <levyliz@...>
 

Dear Friends,

I will be in Germany in June and I want to stop by Datterode, Hessen, the
area my LOEBENSTEIN family comes from.

Has anyone been to Datterode? Does anyone know someone in town who is
familiar with the Jewish history of the town? Any advice for our very short
(one day) visit? Thanks.

Elizabeth Levy Israel <levyliz@smile.net.il>


German SIG #Germany Datterode, Hessen visit #germany

Elizabeth Levy <levyliz@...>
 

Dear Friends,

I will be in Germany in June and I want to stop by Datterode, Hessen, the
area my LOEBENSTEIN family comes from.

Has anyone been to Datterode? Does anyone know someone in town who is
familiar with the Jewish history of the town? Any advice for our very short
(one day) visit? Thanks.

Elizabeth Levy Israel <levyliz@smile.net.il>


Re: RIJONUE #germany

Andreas Schwab <andreas.schwab@...>
 

RIJONUE is a website about the Jews of Nuremberg by Susanne Rieger
and Gerhard Jochem.
Michael Bernet gave the wrong address. The correct address is:

http://www.rijo.homepage.t-online.de/

Andreas Schwab, Quebec, Canada, andreas.schwab@mcgill.ca


German SIG #Germany Re: RIJONUE #germany

Andreas Schwab <andreas.schwab@...>
 

RIJONUE is a website about the Jews of Nuremberg by Susanne Rieger
and Gerhard Jochem.
Michael Bernet gave the wrong address. The correct address is:

http://www.rijo.homepage.t-online.de/

Andreas Schwab, Quebec, Canada, andreas.schwab@mcgill.ca


Re: Yeshivot in Fuerth, and Schwabach (Middle Franconia), 18th century #germany

Alan Kolnik <alan.kolnik@...>
 

I have a letter >from the Stadt Nuremberg archive which says my wife's
distant relative, Samuel Geiringer, came there in 1866 as a
"Rabbinatskandidat" and married Amalie Rohrbach, daughter of Selig Rohrbach
from Furth. It appears he must have come there >from Galanta, in present day
Slovakia (then Austria-Hungary) to study at a rabbinical institute.

I mention this because you may wish to research records in Nuremberg, as
Furth, Schwabach, and Nuremberg are and maybe were viewed as one "metro"
area (like Washington DC, parts of Maryland and Virginia in the US today).

Alan Kolnik Bethesda, MD <alan.kolnik@verizon.net>


Re: Fuerth Yeshiva #germany

Gerrard Salomon <jerrysalomon@...>
 

The entity which knows most about these institutions
is the following: Landesverband der Israelitischen
Kultusgemeinden in Bayern (Regional Association of
Jewish Congregations in Bavaria), Effnerstrasse 68,
Munich 81925. I have no email address of theirs. They
have helped me in getting documents.

Gerrard Salomon, La Jolla, CA jerrysalomon@sbcglobal.net


German SIG #Germany Re: Yeshivot in Fuerth, and Schwabach (Middle Franconia), 18th century #germany

Alan Kolnik <alan.kolnik@...>
 

I have a letter >from the Stadt Nuremberg archive which says my wife's
distant relative, Samuel Geiringer, came there in 1866 as a
"Rabbinatskandidat" and married Amalie Rohrbach, daughter of Selig Rohrbach
from Furth. It appears he must have come there >from Galanta, in present day
Slovakia (then Austria-Hungary) to study at a rabbinical institute.

I mention this because you may wish to research records in Nuremberg, as
Furth, Schwabach, and Nuremberg are and maybe were viewed as one "metro"
area (like Washington DC, parts of Maryland and Virginia in the US today).

Alan Kolnik Bethesda, MD <alan.kolnik@verizon.net>


German SIG #Germany Re: Fuerth Yeshiva #germany

Gerrard Salomon <jerrysalomon@...>
 

The entity which knows most about these institutions
is the following: Landesverband der Israelitischen
Kultusgemeinden in Bayern (Regional Association of
Jewish Congregations in Bavaria), Effnerstrasse 68,
Munich 81925. I have no email address of theirs. They
have helped me in getting documents.

Gerrard Salomon, La Jolla, CA jerrysalomon@sbcglobal.net


Re: dates in wedding rings #germany

Christopher Massur <cmassur@...>
 

Hi Karen,
dates in German wedding rings were/are customary engagement and marriage.
Because the dates in "your" rings are so close together, I imagine they are
the civil and the Jewish marriage. Engagement in those days would have been
at least one year or more before the marriage.
Christopher Massur, Curaçao

Subject: Significance of 2 dates inscribed on wedding rings 1890
From: khsmus@aol.com
Date: Fri, 16 Mar 2007 15:27:43 -0400
The dates were: 9/11/1890-8/2/1891 (9 Nov 1890-8 Feb 1891).


German SIG #Germany RE: dates in wedding rings #germany

Christopher Massur <cmassur@...>
 

Hi Karen,
dates in German wedding rings were/are customary engagement and marriage.
Because the dates in "your" rings are so close together, I imagine they are
the civil and the Jewish marriage. Engagement in those days would have been
at least one year or more before the marriage.
Christopher Massur, Curaçao

Subject: Significance of 2 dates inscribed on wedding rings 1890
From: khsmus@aol.com
Date: Fri, 16 Mar 2007 15:27:43 -0400
The dates were: 9/11/1890-8/2/1891 (9 Nov 1890-8 Feb 1891).


IAJGS Salutes #ukraine

Lyn Blyden <lyn@...>
 

March, 2007
Dr. Steve Lasky of New York has been selected for an IAJGS Salute for his
virtual Museum of Family History, created with dedication and diligence "to
honor and preserve the memory of our ancestors for present and future
generations."

The site was constructed to educate and inform readers about the history of
the Jewish people as seen through the eyes of our families, and >from the
families' sojourn in Eastern Europe through the years in countries which
would eventually be their new homes.

When we visit his museum, we learn of the collective struggles and the
triumphs of the Jewish people, and gain insight and understanding of the
world in which they lived. The site strives to be an everlasting tribute to
all our families, to their traditions and their way of life. The stories
told add greater meaning to historic events that have dominated Jewish
history for nearly two hundred years.

There are many facets to the site. The "Postcards >from Home" exhibit
includes photographs and documents contributed by Steve's own family and
others with a keen interest in this worthwhile project. Our family history,
according to Steve, is sacred and he encourages us to preserve our own
cherished family memories for future generations. Storytelling, he says,
from grandparents and parents to their children in the time-honored oral
tradition, adds to identity and continuity. He hopes to inspire readers to
do more to transmit their own family memories to future generations.
The Museum of Family History, www.museumoffamilyhistory.com, offers a site
map that provides visitors with a useful navigation tool to either browse,
or use as an index to find specific material.

The site features many exhibitions and topics of interest. Steve has created
three Links pages, the largest of which contains more than four hundred
hyperlinks to sites of interest for Jewish genealogists, as well as two
additional pages for Holocaust-related sites and Yiddish theater and
culture.

The Education and Research Center provides examples and explains documents
available to the Jewish genealogist. Visitors should frequently check the
Recent Updates page for a listing of new material and exhibitions. He
depends on the Jewish genealogical community to contribute photographs,
stories and material to supplement the exhibitions. Check the Opportunities
Page under Call Box for specific needs.

The matzeva (gravestone) offers important genealogical information for
researchers. Steve has photographed more than 85,000 gravestones over a
two-year period in the New York metro area, and has created an impressive
Cemetery Project with this information. He is always willing to do lookups
for researchers and provide photographs of gravestones if he has them. Also
available are unique surname lists for cemetery society plots. Researchers
can check surnames lists for specific towns and may contact him for more
information.

His dedication to Jewish genealogy and his desire to make material
interesting and accessible inspires genealogists to continue their
investigations, while involving individuals more directly in their own
family research.

Thank you, Steve, for your devotion and determination in creating a useful
asset for all genealogists.

Lyn Blyden
Chair, IAJGS Salutes


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine IAJGS Salutes #ukraine

Lyn Blyden <lyn@...>
 

March, 2007
Dr. Steve Lasky of New York has been selected for an IAJGS Salute for his
virtual Museum of Family History, created with dedication and diligence "to
honor and preserve the memory of our ancestors for present and future
generations."

The site was constructed to educate and inform readers about the history of
the Jewish people as seen through the eyes of our families, and >from the
families' sojourn in Eastern Europe through the years in countries which
would eventually be their new homes.

When we visit his museum, we learn of the collective struggles and the
triumphs of the Jewish people, and gain insight and understanding of the
world in which they lived. The site strives to be an everlasting tribute to
all our families, to their traditions and their way of life. The stories
told add greater meaning to historic events that have dominated Jewish
history for nearly two hundred years.

There are many facets to the site. The "Postcards >from Home" exhibit
includes photographs and documents contributed by Steve's own family and
others with a keen interest in this worthwhile project. Our family history,
according to Steve, is sacred and he encourages us to preserve our own
cherished family memories for future generations. Storytelling, he says,
from grandparents and parents to their children in the time-honored oral
tradition, adds to identity and continuity. He hopes to inspire readers to
do more to transmit their own family memories to future generations.
The Museum of Family History, www.museumoffamilyhistory.com, offers a site
map that provides visitors with a useful navigation tool to either browse,
or use as an index to find specific material.

The site features many exhibitions and topics of interest. Steve has created
three Links pages, the largest of which contains more than four hundred
hyperlinks to sites of interest for Jewish genealogists, as well as two
additional pages for Holocaust-related sites and Yiddish theater and
culture.

The Education and Research Center provides examples and explains documents
available to the Jewish genealogist. Visitors should frequently check the
Recent Updates page for a listing of new material and exhibitions. He
depends on the Jewish genealogical community to contribute photographs,
stories and material to supplement the exhibitions. Check the Opportunities
Page under Call Box for specific needs.

The matzeva (gravestone) offers important genealogical information for
researchers. Steve has photographed more than 85,000 gravestones over a
two-year period in the New York metro area, and has created an impressive
Cemetery Project with this information. He is always willing to do lookups
for researchers and provide photographs of gravestones if he has them. Also
available are unique surname lists for cemetery society plots. Researchers
can check surnames lists for specific towns and may contact him for more
information.

His dedication to Jewish genealogy and his desire to make material
interesting and accessible inspires genealogists to continue their
investigations, while involving individuals more directly in their own
family research.

Thank you, Steve, for your devotion and determination in creating a useful
asset for all genealogists.

Lyn Blyden
Chair, IAJGS Salutes