Date   

Russian to English Translation #general

JJacobs704@...
 

Hello genners:
I would appreciate your help with the translation >from Russian to English of
a marriage document which has just been posted on Viewmate # 9213 The
document is the 1871 Kalisz record of the marriage between Juda Laib Jakubowicz
and Ester Bluma Kroll. The document maybe viewed on Viewmate directly as
follows:
http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=9213
Thanks for your help with this.
Please respond directly to me at my email address: JJACOBS704@aol.com
Jerrold Jacobs
Williamstown, Massachusetts


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Russian to English Translation #general

JJacobs704@...
 

Hello genners:
I would appreciate your help with the translation >from Russian to English of
a marriage document which has just been posted on Viewmate # 9213 The
document is the 1871 Kalisz record of the marriage between Juda Laib Jakubowicz
and Ester Bluma Kroll. The document maybe viewed on Viewmate directly as
follows:
http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=9213
Thanks for your help with this.
Please respond directly to me at my email address: JJACOBS704@aol.com
Jerrold Jacobs
Williamstown, Massachusetts


Washington Cemetery #general

Gladys Paulin <paulin@...>
 

All of what Allan has written is very thoughtful and a positive way to
continue your research.

*But*, not everyone buried in a particular cemetery died in the same
jurisdiction, Kings county, or even in New York City.

My great uncle died in Albany, New York and is buried in Washington Cemetery
in Brooklyn. New York City does not have his death certificate, Albany does.
Here in Orlando, I have seen a burial in a synagogue cemetery showing a date
of death in the 1930's. Not only did the cemetery not exist then, neither
did that synagogue, although it was a local death.

When contacting a cemetery, always try to find out if they have the date and
place of death in their records; also ask what section the individual is
buried in, whether that synagogue or society is still active and the name of
the last contact for such synagogue, organization or landsmanshaftn. Also
ask for the name of the undertaker and whether they are still in business,
or who took over >from them. And don't forget to ask if they will take a
picture of the tombstone(for a fee/donation), or if they know someone who
provides that service. Jewish tombstones sometimes have information you will
not find anywhere else.

I recently was put on hold by a Midwestern cemetery secretary; when she came
back, she apologized that she had to go into her archives; she then read the
entire record providing names of both parents. The town of birth in Latvia,
and much more.

The trick is to be pleasant and ask for help; do not demand anything--it is
not your right. Cemetery records are private and they do not have to
disclose anything to a telephone request. But usually the people are most
helpful.

Gladys
Gladys Friedman Paulin, CG
Winter Springs, FL

Editor "OnBoard the Newsletter of the Board for Certification of
Genealogists"
Member: Association of Professional Genealogists (APG)

CG, Certified Genealogist, is a Service Mark of the Board for Certification
of Genealogists and is used under license by Board-certified persons who
meet program standards and periodic rigorous evaluations.

Allan Jordan wrote, in part:

With this information Rabbi you can call the cemetery and with the date
they should be able to tell you if the person is intered at their
cemetery. Or you can go to the Manucipal Archives in New York
City and get the certificate or you can mail away for it. On the
certificate you should be able to find the cemetery name as well as
other helpful information.


Look for a "Entries added/changed since..." feature for Yad Vashem site. #general

Cindy Gallard <cmgcmg@...>
 

I understand that the Yad Vashem site is constantly adding more
files to its database. While this is positive >from a research point of
view, it does present me with a problem. How can I access the new
information without having sort through all the information I have
already downloaded? Given the amount of data I have already found this
would be an impossible task. I guess what I am looking for is a feature
such as found on the JewishGen site that allow one to search only for
information which was add to the site after a specific date. Any
suggestions?
Cindy Gallard
Denver, CO


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Washington Cemetery #general

Gladys Paulin <paulin@...>
 

All of what Allan has written is very thoughtful and a positive way to
continue your research.

*But*, not everyone buried in a particular cemetery died in the same
jurisdiction, Kings county, or even in New York City.

My great uncle died in Albany, New York and is buried in Washington Cemetery
in Brooklyn. New York City does not have his death certificate, Albany does.
Here in Orlando, I have seen a burial in a synagogue cemetery showing a date
of death in the 1930's. Not only did the cemetery not exist then, neither
did that synagogue, although it was a local death.

When contacting a cemetery, always try to find out if they have the date and
place of death in their records; also ask what section the individual is
buried in, whether that synagogue or society is still active and the name of
the last contact for such synagogue, organization or landsmanshaftn. Also
ask for the name of the undertaker and whether they are still in business,
or who took over >from them. And don't forget to ask if they will take a
picture of the tombstone(for a fee/donation), or if they know someone who
provides that service. Jewish tombstones sometimes have information you will
not find anywhere else.

I recently was put on hold by a Midwestern cemetery secretary; when she came
back, she apologized that she had to go into her archives; she then read the
entire record providing names of both parents. The town of birth in Latvia,
and much more.

The trick is to be pleasant and ask for help; do not demand anything--it is
not your right. Cemetery records are private and they do not have to
disclose anything to a telephone request. But usually the people are most
helpful.

Gladys
Gladys Friedman Paulin, CG
Winter Springs, FL

Editor "OnBoard the Newsletter of the Board for Certification of
Genealogists"
Member: Association of Professional Genealogists (APG)

CG, Certified Genealogist, is a Service Mark of the Board for Certification
of Genealogists and is used under license by Board-certified persons who
meet program standards and periodic rigorous evaluations.

Allan Jordan wrote, in part:

With this information Rabbi you can call the cemetery and with the date
they should be able to tell you if the person is intered at their
cemetery. Or you can go to the Manucipal Archives in New York
City and get the certificate or you can mail away for it. On the
certificate you should be able to find the cemetery name as well as
other helpful information.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Look for a "Entries added/changed since..." feature for Yad Vashem site. #general

Cindy Gallard <cmgcmg@...>
 

I understand that the Yad Vashem site is constantly adding more
files to its database. While this is positive >from a research point of
view, it does present me with a problem. How can I access the new
information without having sort through all the information I have
already downloaded? Given the amount of data I have already found this
would be an impossible task. I guess what I am looking for is a feature
such as found on the JewishGen site that allow one to search only for
information which was add to the site after a specific date. Any
suggestions?
Cindy Gallard
Denver, CO


Plock address #general

lili susser <susserl@...>
 

Hello and happy New Year to all,

I have 2 street addresses >from Plock, Poland which are similar. One is Rynek
the other Stary Rynek. One is >from the late 1800 the other the early 1900.
does anyone know if those could be 2 different addresses or one and the
same ?

Thank you
Lili Susser
Susserl@comcast.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Plock address #general

lili susser <susserl@...>
 

Hello and happy New Year to all,

I have 2 street addresses >from Plock, Poland which are similar. One is Rynek
the other Stary Rynek. One is >from the late 1800 the other the early 1900.
does anyone know if those could be 2 different addresses or one and the
same ?

Thank you
Lili Susser
Susserl@comcast.net


Shtetl Zidiki #southafrica

Beryl. B <balden@...>
 

I am helping a person living in Israel with
information on family who went to South Africa.

Firstly, does anyone know if there were people
from the Shtetl Zidiki who came to South Africa?
Secondly, Leopold Greenberg, became a Justice in
the Johannesburg Bar on 1st November 1924.
Is there anyone who perhaps has some information
on him. If so, could you please point me in the
correct direction?

Many thanks.

Beryl Baleson
Israel.
balden@zahav.net.il


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica Shtetl Zidiki #southafrica

Beryl. B <balden@...>
 

I am helping a person living in Israel with
information on family who went to South Africa.

Firstly, does anyone know if there were people
from the Shtetl Zidiki who came to South Africa?
Secondly, Leopold Greenberg, became a Justice in
the Johannesburg Bar on 1st November 1924.
Is there anyone who perhaps has some information
on him. If so, could you please point me in the
correct direction?

Many thanks.

Beryl Baleson
Israel.
balden@zahav.net.il


Umlauts: how to read them, write them, pronounce them, index them #germany

MBernet@...
 

OK, this is your first German lesson for 2007.

Umlauts are the two little dots that Germans occasionally put on the letters
a, o, and u.

They can be written instead, virtually interchangably, with the help of the
letter e, placed to the right of the a, o, or u, instead of the dots on top.

In dictionaries, indexes and telephone books, they can be found ordered in
any of at least three ways:
* mingled in their proper order among the regular (not-umlauted) letters,
as if they were spelled with a plain a, o, or u
* as a bunch after the respective, regular letters as if they were a totally
distinct new letter (e.g. ba umlaut would follow badz, but precede baf
* mingled individually within the oe group of words as if an umlaut spelling

and an +e spelling were the same
You have to figure out each index; Hopefully, each index will be consistent
throughout.

Pronouncing is not too difficult. You have to shape your lips as if you're
pronouncing one letter, then cheat and pronounce another. Here goes:

ae or a-umlaut: get ready to say "a" as in "at" and then say "et" instead
oe or o-umlaut: get ready to say "o" as in "hot" and then say "het" instead
ue or u-umlaut: get ready to say "u" as in "put" and then say "pit" instead
This last is also how to pronounce certain "u" letters in French, eg azure

The eu combination, as in Europa, Feuer, Freund, Feuer, has a good
American-Yiddish sound, "Oy" as in "Oy Vey"

In transliteration, the ae or a-umlaut was usually rendered in Germany as an
`ayin.
oe or o-umlaut was rendered either as an `ayin or as an alef with umlaut on top
ue or u-umlaut was rendered with a yod, or with an umlaut over a vav

In some older German scripts, it is hard to distinguish two ns >from an m, or
from a string of r, e, or i. The u is written just like an n. Fortunately
it was customary to make an inverted (bowl-shaped) crescent over the lower
case u to indicate it is not an n. Then you look at the whole word carefully.
Is there a dot? That shows where the i is. Now figure out where there might
be an e or an r. Now count out the remaining letters that form a jungle of
inverted vs. Two of these suggest an n, three suggest an m, one suggest an i,
and two with the crescent get you the u. It's really quite simple.

Fortunately, I have never seen a u sound rendered in Hebrew script or
engraving as a nun with crescent topping

If all this drives you nuts, consult a follower of Sigmund Freud (as in
Froyd)

Michael Bernet, New York MBernet@aol.com


German SIG #Germany Umlauts: how to read them, write them, pronounce them, index them #germany

MBernet@...
 

OK, this is your first German lesson for 2007.

Umlauts are the two little dots that Germans occasionally put on the letters
a, o, and u.

They can be written instead, virtually interchangably, with the help of the
letter e, placed to the right of the a, o, or u, instead of the dots on top.

In dictionaries, indexes and telephone books, they can be found ordered in
any of at least three ways:
* mingled in their proper order among the regular (not-umlauted) letters,
as if they were spelled with a plain a, o, or u
* as a bunch after the respective, regular letters as if they were a totally
distinct new letter (e.g. ba umlaut would follow badz, but precede baf
* mingled individually within the oe group of words as if an umlaut spelling

and an +e spelling were the same
You have to figure out each index; Hopefully, each index will be consistent
throughout.

Pronouncing is not too difficult. You have to shape your lips as if you're
pronouncing one letter, then cheat and pronounce another. Here goes:

ae or a-umlaut: get ready to say "a" as in "at" and then say "et" instead
oe or o-umlaut: get ready to say "o" as in "hot" and then say "het" instead
ue or u-umlaut: get ready to say "u" as in "put" and then say "pit" instead
This last is also how to pronounce certain "u" letters in French, eg azure

The eu combination, as in Europa, Feuer, Freund, Feuer, has a good
American-Yiddish sound, "Oy" as in "Oy Vey"

In transliteration, the ae or a-umlaut was usually rendered in Germany as an
`ayin.
oe or o-umlaut was rendered either as an `ayin or as an alef with umlaut on top
ue or u-umlaut was rendered with a yod, or with an umlaut over a vav

In some older German scripts, it is hard to distinguish two ns >from an m, or
from a string of r, e, or i. The u is written just like an n. Fortunately
it was customary to make an inverted (bowl-shaped) crescent over the lower
case u to indicate it is not an n. Then you look at the whole word carefully.
Is there a dot? That shows where the i is. Now figure out where there might
be an e or an r. Now count out the remaining letters that form a jungle of
inverted vs. Two of these suggest an n, three suggest an m, one suggest an i,
and two with the crescent get you the u. It's really quite simple.

Fortunately, I have never seen a u sound rendered in Hebrew script or
engraving as a nun with crescent topping

If all this drives you nuts, consult a follower of Sigmund Freud (as in
Froyd)

Michael Bernet, New York MBernet@aol.com


Re: LOEWENSTEIN in Nassau #germany

buckidstein@...
 

Sally Bruckheimer wrote:

"Roger Lustig said that you would have leads to my g grandmother, Rachel
LOWENSTEIN. She was born, she said on her marriage record, Mar. 4, 1842 in
Nassau. Her parents were Haim LOWENSTEIN and Rosa FULD. She came to the US in
1864 or so; she married in 1870 in NYC. ---"

I strongly assume that she is identical with
Reiz LOEWENSTEIN, born on 25.02.1842 in Langendernbach (near Limburg on the
Lahn) in the Duchy of Nassau;
parents Heyum David,since 1841 Heyum Loewenstein (born 1808) and Reis or
Roeschen or Rosalie Abraham, since 1841 Roeschen nee Fuld (1814 - 1910).

As it happened so often, she will have dropped her German (but not used by
Germans) name Reiz for the better known Rachel. Birth dates are often
inaccurate in later sources. My date is >from the birth register. Fuld is
a rare name in this region and lead to the conclusion.

Her mother is the most impressive Jewish person I ever found in the 19th
century. Between 1835 and 1860 she got twenty children, and in 1910 she died age
96. More about her in my article in Stammbaum #28, 2006.

Gerhard Buck, Idstein, Germany buckidstein@aol.com

MODERATOR NOTE: Back issues of "Stammbaum" are available- see:
http://www.jewishgen.org/stammbaum/subscriptions.html


German SIG #Germany Re: LOEWENSTEIN in Nassau #germany

buckidstein@...
 

Sally Bruckheimer wrote:

"Roger Lustig said that you would have leads to my g grandmother, Rachel
LOWENSTEIN. She was born, she said on her marriage record, Mar. 4, 1842 in
Nassau. Her parents were Haim LOWENSTEIN and Rosa FULD. She came to the US in
1864 or so; she married in 1870 in NYC. ---"

I strongly assume that she is identical with
Reiz LOEWENSTEIN, born on 25.02.1842 in Langendernbach (near Limburg on the
Lahn) in the Duchy of Nassau;
parents Heyum David,since 1841 Heyum Loewenstein (born 1808) and Reis or
Roeschen or Rosalie Abraham, since 1841 Roeschen nee Fuld (1814 - 1910).

As it happened so often, she will have dropped her German (but not used by
Germans) name Reiz for the better known Rachel. Birth dates are often
inaccurate in later sources. My date is >from the birth register. Fuld is
a rare name in this region and lead to the conclusion.

Her mother is the most impressive Jewish person I ever found in the 19th
century. Between 1835 and 1860 she got twenty children, and in 1910 she died age
96. More about her in my article in Stammbaum #28, 2006.

Gerhard Buck, Idstein, Germany buckidstein@aol.com

MODERATOR NOTE: Back issues of "Stammbaum" are available- see:
http://www.jewishgen.org/stammbaum/subscriptions.html


Re: Newcastle-upon-Tyne - 1910 #unitedkingdom

BP Bergman <bergville@...>
 

<unable to look
after a new born baby; a 2 year old daughter and a
6 year old son and at the same time work to make a
living. >

It is not impossible that he had a housekeeper. Indeed, in some families
who were hit by tragedy of this nature, the housekeeper later became the
second wife. It was not necessary to be wealthy to have domestic assistance
and many families on very modest incomes had one or two domestic staff.

My great-great grandfather lost his wife shortly after the birth of her
sixth child (she was only 28 years old), and remarried just under a year
later to a lady who was an "older spinster" - I do not know whether she had
come to help him look after the house but it is not impossible. Either way,
there is no evidence that the children went into any sort of care during the
intervening period, and it is quite likely that the community would have
rallied round to help. There would only be official records if the children
went into an orphanage, and even then only if the records had survived (and
are not still subject to 100 years closure!).

Beverly Bergman
Camberley UK


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Re: Newcastle-upon-Tyne - 1910 #unitedkingdom

BP Bergman <bergville@...>
 

<unable to look
after a new born baby; a 2 year old daughter and a
6 year old son and at the same time work to make a
living. >

It is not impossible that he had a housekeeper. Indeed, in some families
who were hit by tragedy of this nature, the housekeeper later became the
second wife. It was not necessary to be wealthy to have domestic assistance
and many families on very modest incomes had one or two domestic staff.

My great-great grandfather lost his wife shortly after the birth of her
sixth child (she was only 28 years old), and remarried just under a year
later to a lady who was an "older spinster" - I do not know whether she had
come to help him look after the house but it is not impossible. Either way,
there is no evidence that the children went into any sort of care during the
intervening period, and it is quite likely that the community would have
rallied round to help. There would only be official records if the children
went into an orphanage, and even then only if the records had survived (and
are not still subject to 100 years closure!).

Beverly Bergman
Camberley UK


Hoosick Falls, New York - Upstate New York Jewish Community - Lost email #general

Alexandra Alznauer <petiealznauer@...>
 

Someone wrote me this last week about his family coming >from Hoosick Falls,
New York. I wanted to write back and send information on this community and
on my own family. Unfortunately, I accidentally and permanently deleted
this email.

Would this Jewishgenner please contact me again?

Alexandra Alznauer
SILVERMAN, LURIE, BLOOM/BLUME - Hoosick Falls, New York; SILVERMAN, Troy,
Amsterdam, and Fort Edward, New York; ALEXANDER, Troy, New York,
EPSTEIN/LEVIN-EPSTEIN, Amsterdam, New York; LEVINE, Greene, Hancock,
Liberty, New York; LEVINE, Scranton, Pennsylvania


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Hoosick Falls, New York - Upstate New York Jewish Community - Lost email #general

Alexandra Alznauer <petiealznauer@...>
 

Someone wrote me this last week about his family coming >from Hoosick Falls,
New York. I wanted to write back and send information on this community and
on my own family. Unfortunately, I accidentally and permanently deleted
this email.

Would this Jewishgenner please contact me again?

Alexandra Alznauer
SILVERMAN, LURIE, BLOOM/BLUME - Hoosick Falls, New York; SILVERMAN, Troy,
Amsterdam, and Fort Edward, New York; ALEXANDER, Troy, New York,
EPSTEIN/LEVIN-EPSTEIN, Amsterdam, New York; LEVINE, Greene, Hancock,
Liberty, New York; LEVINE, Scranton, Pennsylvania


Posowina, Galicia #galicia

Talila Stan
 

Dear Geners,

I tried to look for Posowina, Galicia, >from where my grandfather
emigrated in 1906 to the US, but I can not find it.

I will very much appreciate help.

I wish you a Happy New Year,

Talila

Researching
Freudenthal, Schwager - Galicia
Pasternak - Tula (Russia), Galicia

MODERATOR'S NOTE: In messages asking for town locations, please help
others help you. Provide details about the record, in case a reader
wants to view it, and mention where you have looked for information
about the town.


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Posowina, Galicia #galicia

Talila Stan
 

Dear Geners,

I tried to look for Posowina, Galicia, >from where my grandfather
emigrated in 1906 to the US, but I can not find it.

I will very much appreciate help.

I wish you a Happy New Year,

Talila

Researching
Freudenthal, Schwager - Galicia
Pasternak - Tula (Russia), Galicia

MODERATOR'S NOTE: In messages asking for town locations, please help
others help you. Provide details about the record, in case a reader
wants to view it, and mention where you have looked for information
about the town.