Date   

*re: Tombsone question #hungary

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

Hello Debbi,

Two possible explanations:

1. Originally those people were Sephardim or for some reason followed Sephardic customs. Sephardim use the form [name ben or bat mother's-name].

2. Those people were very sick when they died or suffered an accident. It is a Jewish custom, even between Ashkenazim, to say the healing blessing or prayer for sick people (misheberah avoteinu v'imoteinu - see http://www.jewishealing.com/healingprayer.html) using the mother's name instead the one of the father.

I suggest you submit this question to the General List, because there you will find rabbis and other very knowledgeable people about Jewish naming customs.

Regards
Tom

At 23:05 -0600 13.11.2006, H-SIG digest wrote:
Subject: Tombsone question
From: "Kormans" <korman3@...>
Date: Sat, 11 Nov 2006 14:29:47 -0800
X-Message-Number: 3

I have two tombstones, a husband and wife who died in the early 20th century
in Esztergom. What surprised me is that the Hebrew names are Chaim son of
Raisal, and Beila daughter of Hannah. No mention of the father's names, only
the mother's names.

Usually the father's names, and not the mother's names, are on the
tombstones. Is there something that I am missing? I know who the parents of
both persons were.

Debbi Korman
Portland, Oregon
Moderator: As Tom suggests, please direct questions about Jewish customs and practices not specifically or uniquely associated with Hungarian Jews to JewishGen's general mail-list.


Melykut - closest synagogue? #hungary

Joseph Lonstein
 

Hello,

My great-grandfather, Isidore KLEIN (1868-1929), was born in Melykut,
Bacs-Bodrog megye to Josef KLEIN and Lena EISLER. I'm again trying to find
more information on Melykut and its Jewish community, to determine if there
were possibly other siblings in this family that I don't yet know about.
Unfortunately, there is not much to be found on the web about Melykut. Can
anyone with access to the Dvorszak 1877 Gazetteer please tell me where this
presumably small Jewish community worshipped, and where its records might
have been held, if not in Melykut? The last time I went to use the online
Gazetteer, it was no longer accessible.

Thanks for all of your help,

Joe Lonstein
East Lansing, MI


Hungary SIG #Hungary *re: Tombsone question #hungary

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

Hello Debbi,

Two possible explanations:

1. Originally those people were Sephardim or for some reason followed Sephardic customs. Sephardim use the form [name ben or bat mother's-name].

2. Those people were very sick when they died or suffered an accident. It is a Jewish custom, even between Ashkenazim, to say the healing blessing or prayer for sick people (misheberah avoteinu v'imoteinu - see http://www.jewishealing.com/healingprayer.html) using the mother's name instead the one of the father.

I suggest you submit this question to the General List, because there you will find rabbis and other very knowledgeable people about Jewish naming customs.

Regards
Tom

At 23:05 -0600 13.11.2006, H-SIG digest wrote:
Subject: Tombsone question
From: "Kormans" <korman3@...>
Date: Sat, 11 Nov 2006 14:29:47 -0800
X-Message-Number: 3

I have two tombstones, a husband and wife who died in the early 20th century
in Esztergom. What surprised me is that the Hebrew names are Chaim son of
Raisal, and Beila daughter of Hannah. No mention of the father's names, only
the mother's names.

Usually the father's names, and not the mother's names, are on the
tombstones. Is there something that I am missing? I know who the parents of
both persons were.

Debbi Korman
Portland, Oregon
Moderator: As Tom suggests, please direct questions about Jewish customs and practices not specifically or uniquely associated with Hungarian Jews to JewishGen's general mail-list.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Melykut - closest synagogue? #hungary

Joseph Lonstein
 

Hello,

My great-grandfather, Isidore KLEIN (1868-1929), was born in Melykut,
Bacs-Bodrog megye to Josef KLEIN and Lena EISLER. I'm again trying to find
more information on Melykut and its Jewish community, to determine if there
were possibly other siblings in this family that I don't yet know about.
Unfortunately, there is not much to be found on the web about Melykut. Can
anyone with access to the Dvorszak 1877 Gazetteer please tell me where this
presumably small Jewish community worshipped, and where its records might
have been held, if not in Melykut? The last time I went to use the online
Gazetteer, it was no longer accessible.

Thanks for all of your help,

Joe Lonstein
East Lansing, MI


Re: Tombstone question #hungary

tom klein <h-sig@...>
 

It is customary to pray for a person who is sick using their mother's name. (i vaguely recall hearing an explanation for this, but i don't remember it.) if prayers were said for their recovery, then these might be the names that were known.

i have run into situations where a person, belonging to a small shul, has passed away and nobody knew his proper hebrew name. (sometimes even their family doesn't know.) but omitting a patronymic entirely is very unusual.

(on some stones, the mother's name is also recorded, although often it is right at the bottom, below the dates and the benediction, almost as an afterthought, and takes the form of "and the name of his mother was [mother's name]". it's almost never written as "son of [father's name] and [mother's name]", at least not until very recently.)

is it possible that they died suddenly, such as in a car crash, or far >from home, and the people who ordered the stones didn't know their fathers' names? (early 20th century might have been during the flu epidemic, which may have been a factor.)


....... tom klein, toronto

"Kormans" <korman3@...> wrote:
I have two tombstones, a husband and wife who died in the early 20th century
in Esztergom. What surprised me is that the Hebrew names are Chaim son of
Raisal, and Beila daughter of Hannah. No mention of the father's names, only
the mother's names.

Usually the father's names, and not the mother's names, are on the
tombstones. Is there something that I am missing? I know who the parents of
both persons were.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Tombstone question #hungary

tom klein <h-sig@...>
 

It is customary to pray for a person who is sick using their mother's name. (i vaguely recall hearing an explanation for this, but i don't remember it.) if prayers were said for their recovery, then these might be the names that were known.

i have run into situations where a person, belonging to a small shul, has passed away and nobody knew his proper hebrew name. (sometimes even their family doesn't know.) but omitting a patronymic entirely is very unusual.

(on some stones, the mother's name is also recorded, although often it is right at the bottom, below the dates and the benediction, almost as an afterthought, and takes the form of "and the name of his mother was [mother's name]". it's almost never written as "son of [father's name] and [mother's name]", at least not until very recently.)

is it possible that they died suddenly, such as in a car crash, or far >from home, and the people who ordered the stones didn't know their fathers' names? (early 20th century might have been during the flu epidemic, which may have been a factor.)


....... tom klein, toronto

"Kormans" <korman3@...> wrote:
I have two tombstones, a husband and wife who died in the early 20th century
in Esztergom. What surprised me is that the Hebrew names are Chaim son of
Raisal, and Beila daughter of Hannah. No mention of the father's names, only
the mother's names.

Usually the father's names, and not the mother's names, are on the
tombstones. Is there something that I am missing? I know who the parents of
both persons were.


Hungarian Jewish Archives #hungary

Judy Young <jy-abcd@...>
 

Hi all,

My response to this issue is a bit late because I was out of town last week:
On Nov 5th Adam Smith asked about the Jewish Archives in Hungary. My
experience is now about three years old but it would not surprise me if it's
still relevant. Last time I commented, our then moderator excised my
comments as too negative. So I will be restrained. My experience in person
was not very successful as the hours of operation and the assistance given
depended pretty much on the one person who is the archivist. This person was
also part time employed at the offices of the community in Sip St (mostly
birth, death, marriage records) and was therefore not easy to track down.

I assume you are attempting to go and visit the archives in person? But in
any case, I would suggest you write beforehand to the Director of the Jewish
Museum under whose authority the archives fall. This is Dr Robert Turan (or
now Dr Robert Ben Turan) whose e-mail is: museum@... and explain
what your interests are. This may be a general e-mail and may not
immediately reach Dr Turan (perhaps put his name into the subject line). I
do not have a personal one for him.

The Museum's website (English version) is at :
http://www.museum.hu/search/museum_en.asp?id=92

where you see that it's called "Museum and Archives." There are also some
phone numbers given on the home page and you may be able to call Dr Turan
(be prepared for people answering at the other end who cannot necessarily
speak English. Dr Turan of course can). The person in charge of the archives
I believe is still Zsuzsanna Toronyi. The archives used to be at the
Rabbinical School until a few years ago when the Museum took it over and
moved the contents to its present location above the Jewish Museum. They
have a lot of material about the Rabbinical School and also quite a few
birth death and marriage registry books >from different Jewish communities
across Hungary. There is not a great deal of space to be working there and a
few years ago the organization of the archives needed much work. Perhaps
this has improved in the meantime. I believe someone on this list at some
point has provided info about the contents of the archives which can perhaps
be found on the website of the National Archives of Hungary - which is worth
a try also. http://www.mol.gov.hu/

There is now, in addition, the archives at the new Holocaust Memorial Centre
in Budapest, mostly related to Holocaust matters. Their website is
http://www.hdke.hu/en/

Judy Young
Ottawa


Hungarian Moses Friedman Family, Washington Township, Bergen County, New Jersey #hungary

David Randall <withywindle@...>
 

I’m looking for descendants/information about the family of Moses
(Morris) Friedman, the brother of my great-grandfather Herman Bernard
Friedman. He was >from Hungary, very probably >from Maramaros-Sziget,
later a farmer in Washington Township, Bergen County, New Jersey in the
1890s and 1900s, and he or his family moved to California at some later
point. The information I’ve assembled is below.

Hopefully,
David Randall
withywindle@...

MOSES (MORRIS) FRIEDMAN, born November 1866 in [Maramaros-Sziget,]
Hungary; still living 1910 in Washington Township, Bergen County, New
Jersey. He was the son of Gedaliah the Levi [Marton Friedman] and [Ella
Friedman]. He married Annie Maurer June 24, 1888 in Manhattan, New York,
New York.

Annie Maurer, born July 1867 in Hungary; still living 1910 in Washington
Township, Bergen County, New Jersey. She was the daughter of Sam Marer
and Tani (Maria) Fox.

Moses was a butcher in 1888, 1889, and 1890, and a storekeeper in 1894,
probably in Manhattan the entire time. My mother recollects that her
grandfather “had an older brother, who was given his passport so he
could leave without serving in the army. The brother lived in New
Jersey, I believe, and then went to Los Angeles.” Family lore states
that Morris may have come to the US in 1880, but both the 1900 and 1910
Censuses gives his arrival date at 1887. As of 1900 and 1910, he was a
farmer in Washington Township, Bergen County, New Jersey. He was
naturalized by 1900. Annie Fox was >from Baltimore. According to the 1900
Census, she arrived in the US in 1882; according to the 1910 Census, she
arrived in the US in 1884. Her mother, Tani (Maria) Fox Maurer, was born
in Hungary in July 1830, of parents born in Hungary, and came to the
United States in 1883. My mother’s family (Rosenbaum) visisted Friedman
cousins in California ca. 1948; the little girl in the family wanted to
be an actress.

<>Children of Moses Friedman and Annie Maurer are:

i. Ella Friedman, born July 21, 1889 in Manhattan, New York, New York.
She had two sons named Herman and Morris.

ii. Sam Friedman, born December 13,1890 in Manhattan, New York, New York.

<>iii. Jacob L. Friedman, born November 1892 in New Jersey. [In 1930, he
may have been the Jacob Friedman living in Long Beach, California,
working as a bookkeeper; with wife Frieda born 1895 in New York, and
twin daughters Ruth P. and Doris C., born 1922 in California.]

iv. Rosa Friedman, born December 11, 1894 in Manhattan, New York, New York.

<>v. Max Friedman, born October 1896 in New Jersey.

vi. Jennie Friedman, born September 1898 in New Jersey. <>

vii. Herman Friedman, born about 1902 in New Jersey. <>

viii. Bertha Friedman, born about 1904 in New Jersey.

ix. Frieda Friedman, born about 1905 in New Jersey.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Hungarian Jewish Archives #hungary

Judy Young <jy-abcd@...>
 

Hi all,

My response to this issue is a bit late because I was out of town last week:
On Nov 5th Adam Smith asked about the Jewish Archives in Hungary. My
experience is now about three years old but it would not surprise me if it's
still relevant. Last time I commented, our then moderator excised my
comments as too negative. So I will be restrained. My experience in person
was not very successful as the hours of operation and the assistance given
depended pretty much on the one person who is the archivist. This person was
also part time employed at the offices of the community in Sip St (mostly
birth, death, marriage records) and was therefore not easy to track down.

I assume you are attempting to go and visit the archives in person? But in
any case, I would suggest you write beforehand to the Director of the Jewish
Museum under whose authority the archives fall. This is Dr Robert Turan (or
now Dr Robert Ben Turan) whose e-mail is: museum@... and explain
what your interests are. This may be a general e-mail and may not
immediately reach Dr Turan (perhaps put his name into the subject line). I
do not have a personal one for him.

The Museum's website (English version) is at :
http://www.museum.hu/search/museum_en.asp?id=92

where you see that it's called "Museum and Archives." There are also some
phone numbers given on the home page and you may be able to call Dr Turan
(be prepared for people answering at the other end who cannot necessarily
speak English. Dr Turan of course can). The person in charge of the archives
I believe is still Zsuzsanna Toronyi. The archives used to be at the
Rabbinical School until a few years ago when the Museum took it over and
moved the contents to its present location above the Jewish Museum. They
have a lot of material about the Rabbinical School and also quite a few
birth death and marriage registry books >from different Jewish communities
across Hungary. There is not a great deal of space to be working there and a
few years ago the organization of the archives needed much work. Perhaps
this has improved in the meantime. I believe someone on this list at some
point has provided info about the contents of the archives which can perhaps
be found on the website of the National Archives of Hungary - which is worth
a try also. http://www.mol.gov.hu/

There is now, in addition, the archives at the new Holocaust Memorial Centre
in Budapest, mostly related to Holocaust matters. Their website is
http://www.hdke.hu/en/

Judy Young
Ottawa


Hungary SIG #Hungary Hungarian Moses Friedman Family, Washington Township, Bergen County, New Jersey #hungary

David Randall <withywindle@...>
 

I’m looking for descendants/information about the family of Moses
(Morris) Friedman, the brother of my great-grandfather Herman Bernard
Friedman. He was >from Hungary, very probably >from Maramaros-Sziget,
later a farmer in Washington Township, Bergen County, New Jersey in the
1890s and 1900s, and he or his family moved to California at some later
point. The information I’ve assembled is below.

Hopefully,
David Randall
withywindle@...

MOSES (MORRIS) FRIEDMAN, born November 1866 in [Maramaros-Sziget,]
Hungary; still living 1910 in Washington Township, Bergen County, New
Jersey. He was the son of Gedaliah the Levi [Marton Friedman] and [Ella
Friedman]. He married Annie Maurer June 24, 1888 in Manhattan, New York,
New York.

Annie Maurer, born July 1867 in Hungary; still living 1910 in Washington
Township, Bergen County, New Jersey. She was the daughter of Sam Marer
and Tani (Maria) Fox.

Moses was a butcher in 1888, 1889, and 1890, and a storekeeper in 1894,
probably in Manhattan the entire time. My mother recollects that her
grandfather “had an older brother, who was given his passport so he
could leave without serving in the army. The brother lived in New
Jersey, I believe, and then went to Los Angeles.” Family lore states
that Morris may have come to the US in 1880, but both the 1900 and 1910
Censuses gives his arrival date at 1887. As of 1900 and 1910, he was a
farmer in Washington Township, Bergen County, New Jersey. He was
naturalized by 1900. Annie Fox was >from Baltimore. According to the 1900
Census, she arrived in the US in 1882; according to the 1910 Census, she
arrived in the US in 1884. Her mother, Tani (Maria) Fox Maurer, was born
in Hungary in July 1830, of parents born in Hungary, and came to the
United States in 1883. My mother’s family (Rosenbaum) visisted Friedman
cousins in California ca. 1948; the little girl in the family wanted to
be an actress.

<>Children of Moses Friedman and Annie Maurer are:

i. Ella Friedman, born July 21, 1889 in Manhattan, New York, New York.
She had two sons named Herman and Morris.

ii. Sam Friedman, born December 13,1890 in Manhattan, New York, New York.

<>iii. Jacob L. Friedman, born November 1892 in New Jersey. [In 1930, he
may have been the Jacob Friedman living in Long Beach, California,
working as a bookkeeper; with wife Frieda born 1895 in New York, and
twin daughters Ruth P. and Doris C., born 1922 in California.]

iv. Rosa Friedman, born December 11, 1894 in Manhattan, New York, New York.

<>v. Max Friedman, born October 1896 in New Jersey.

vi. Jennie Friedman, born September 1898 in New Jersey. <>

vii. Herman Friedman, born about 1902 in New Jersey. <>

viii. Bertha Friedman, born about 1904 in New Jersey.

ix. Frieda Friedman, born about 1905 in New Jersey.


SINNREICH_ GLASGOW #unitedkingdom

Lydia Speakman <lydia.speakman@...>
 

I am trying to learn more about my great grandfather Rev. Dr Joseph
Sinnreich who was born in Sniatyn in 1875 and was originally a rabbinical
candidate. He went on to do a PhD at the University of Bern before leaving
to study at Cambridge University.

We know he was interned on the Isle of Man In WW1, an experienced which
forced him to declare himself single to secure his early release which meant
that he was never openly able to live with his wife and daughter who at the
time were living in Vienna. He was actively involved in Jewish- Christian
reconciliation through the International Hebrew Christian Alliance and was
then later involved in the Scottish Free Church.

My mother is convinced he died in 1942 in Glasgow, possibly in the Blitz. My
grandfather (paternal) records in his autobiography that his father in law
lived in a small bed-sit in a very poor part of Glasgow, but neither of my
grandparents ever explained to my mother how or when Joseph died. I have
checked the Scottish death records and he doesn't seem to be listed at all.
I wondered whether this might be because he was an Austrian passport holder
and still regarded as an alien. I am also not sure if he would have had a
Christian or Hebrew burial, given his close affiliation with the Free Church
and his use of the title Rev.

I wondered if anyone might have some advice on where I might be able to find
more about the circumstances of his death.

Many thanks

Lydia Speakman
Newcastle upon Tyne UK


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom SINNREICH_ GLASGOW #unitedkingdom

Lydia Speakman <lydia.speakman@...>
 

I am trying to learn more about my great grandfather Rev. Dr Joseph
Sinnreich who was born in Sniatyn in 1875 and was originally a rabbinical
candidate. He went on to do a PhD at the University of Bern before leaving
to study at Cambridge University.

We know he was interned on the Isle of Man In WW1, an experienced which
forced him to declare himself single to secure his early release which meant
that he was never openly able to live with his wife and daughter who at the
time were living in Vienna. He was actively involved in Jewish- Christian
reconciliation through the International Hebrew Christian Alliance and was
then later involved in the Scottish Free Church.

My mother is convinced he died in 1942 in Glasgow, possibly in the Blitz. My
grandfather (paternal) records in his autobiography that his father in law
lived in a small bed-sit in a very poor part of Glasgow, but neither of my
grandparents ever explained to my mother how or when Joseph died. I have
checked the Scottish death records and he doesn't seem to be listed at all.
I wondered whether this might be because he was an Austrian passport holder
and still regarded as an alien. I am also not sure if he would have had a
Christian or Hebrew burial, given his close affiliation with the Free Church
and his use of the title Rev.

I wondered if anyone might have some advice on where I might be able to find
more about the circumstances of his death.

Many thanks

Lydia Speakman
Newcastle upon Tyne UK


JGS of Michigan, Sunday, November 19, 2006 #general

Irwin S. Alpern
 

"Dad's Journey"

Sunday, November 19, 2006
1:00 - 3:00 PM
Farmington Hills Library
12 Mile Rd. between Orchard Lake and Farmington Roads

Esther Ingber, long time member and Daughter of a Holocaust survivor
shares her Father's first visit to Poland since 1945."

In September 2006, Zygie Allweiss, 79, returned to Poland to see the
places of his youth. Esther Allweiss Ingber who made the trip with her
father, will speak and show her video.
Alweiss was born May 8, 1927, in Jaslany that had approximately 74 Jews
in 1939. Jaslany is located near the Wistula River in southern Poland.
Zygie and his brother, the late Sol Allweiss, were the sole survivors
from their family of nine children. The teenaged brothers escaped
separately >from a forced labor camp on March 7, 1943 -- the day of its
liquidation.

Janek and Janina Dudzik, a Polish Catholic couple, hosted the Detroiters
at their home in Mielec, Poland, a city near Jaslany. Janek was 5 years
old when his parents, the late Macieij and Zofia Dudzik, sheltered the
Allweiss brothers for more than a year (1943-1944) on the family's farm
in Chajkowa, Poland.

In 1999, a Dudzik granddaughter living in America found the Allweiss
brothers on the Internet, although she did not know their last name.
Since then, members of both families living in Detroit and Chicago have
shared a warm relationship. This feeling of being among relatives
extended to Allweiss' and Ingber's stay with their Dudzik hosts in Poland.

Along with showing the video, Ingber will share her genealogical
discoveries.

Don't miss this exciting story and video presentation

Members free

Guests welcome - $5 donation suggested


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGS of Michigan, Sunday, November 19, 2006 #general

Irwin S. Alpern
 

"Dad's Journey"

Sunday, November 19, 2006
1:00 - 3:00 PM
Farmington Hills Library
12 Mile Rd. between Orchard Lake and Farmington Roads

Esther Ingber, long time member and Daughter of a Holocaust survivor
shares her Father's first visit to Poland since 1945."

In September 2006, Zygie Allweiss, 79, returned to Poland to see the
places of his youth. Esther Allweiss Ingber who made the trip with her
father, will speak and show her video.
Alweiss was born May 8, 1927, in Jaslany that had approximately 74 Jews
in 1939. Jaslany is located near the Wistula River in southern Poland.
Zygie and his brother, the late Sol Allweiss, were the sole survivors
from their family of nine children. The teenaged brothers escaped
separately >from a forced labor camp on March 7, 1943 -- the day of its
liquidation.

Janek and Janina Dudzik, a Polish Catholic couple, hosted the Detroiters
at their home in Mielec, Poland, a city near Jaslany. Janek was 5 years
old when his parents, the late Macieij and Zofia Dudzik, sheltered the
Allweiss brothers for more than a year (1943-1944) on the family's farm
in Chajkowa, Poland.

In 1999, a Dudzik granddaughter living in America found the Allweiss
brothers on the Internet, although she did not know their last name.
Since then, members of both families living in Detroit and Chicago have
shared a warm relationship. This feeling of being among relatives
extended to Allweiss' and Ingber's stay with their Dudzik hosts in Poland.

Along with showing the video, Ingber will share her genealogical
discoveries.

Don't miss this exciting story and video presentation

Members free

Guests welcome - $5 donation suggested


Photograph of three soldiers placed on ViewMate #belarus

KAGSEF@...
 

My name is Kathy Sefton. I have posted a photograph on ViewMate. The number
is VM8835, and below is a direct link to the photo.

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=8835

I am trying find out whatever I can about the people and/or uniforms they are
wearing. The soldier on the left is my grandfather. He is >from
Telekhan/Telachan. His name in America was Harry GREBETZ. He went by the name HILLER.
On his Ellis Island ship manifest, his name was spelled GRYBETZ. He had one
sister named Fejga and another sister who died in childbirth in Telekhan. He
considered himself a Litvak, although Telekhan is now in Belarus. He left for
the States in 1920. This photo must date between 1910-1920.

Anyone with information can respond to me privately.

Thank you,
Kathy Sefton
Chicago, IL
MODERATOR NOTE: Please capitalize only surnames. Have you entered your names and
towns in the JewishGen Family Finder and searched it for others who are researching
the same names and towns? It's at www.jewishgen.org/jgff


Belarus SIG #Belarus Photograph of three soldiers placed on ViewMate #belarus

KAGSEF@...
 

My name is Kathy Sefton. I have posted a photograph on ViewMate. The number
is VM8835, and below is a direct link to the photo.

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=8835

I am trying find out whatever I can about the people and/or uniforms they are
wearing. The soldier on the left is my grandfather. He is >from
Telekhan/Telachan. His name in America was Harry GREBETZ. He went by the name HILLER.
On his Ellis Island ship manifest, his name was spelled GRYBETZ. He had one
sister named Fejga and another sister who died in childbirth in Telekhan. He
considered himself a Litvak, although Telekhan is now in Belarus. He left for
the States in 1920. This photo must date between 1910-1920.

Anyone with information can respond to me privately.

Thank you,
Kathy Sefton
Chicago, IL
MODERATOR NOTE: Please capitalize only surnames. Have you entered your names and
towns in the JewishGen Family Finder and searched it for others who are researching
the same names and towns? It's at www.jewishgen.org/jgff


New File for Lask, Poland vital records #general

Roni S. Liebowitz
 

Dear Lask Researchers,

We are very happy to announce that we have just received a
new database for Lask vital records. It covers years to
1905.

The file originally had 8,170 entries. There are now another
3,005(or an increase of almost 40%) This combines the data
received at the end of 2005 and the new data just received.
The surnames with more than 16 entries each starting with
the most frequently listed surnames are: JAKUBOWICZ, KLAJN,
BIALEK, LEWKOWICZ, WIDAWSKI, LEWI, ROZENBLUM, SIJERADZKI,
BORNSZTEJN, GERSZKOWICZ, MANDEL,SZER, KORN, MARKOWICZ, FUKS,
KOCHMAN, GRYNBERG, NAJMAN, SIJERADZSKI, GOLDBERG, LIBERMAN,
BERKOWICZ, DAWIDOWICZ, GRYNER, KUPERWASSER, MOSKOWICZ,
URBACH, BRESLER, GLIKSMAN

As Mark Halpern announced, JRI-Poland is planning to take
the online ordering system down for a system overhaul in the
very near future. Therefore, we want this information to get
to Lask researchers now. We expect the system to be taken
down on Friday, November 17, 2006. As a result, all orders
from these indices must be submitted before that date.
Contact me ASAP for more information about this file.

Sorry to rush you, but I'd hate for you to miss out on the
chance to order records of interest.

All the best,
Roni

Mrs. Roni Seibel Liebowitz
Lodz Archive Coordinator, JRI-Poland


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen New File for Lask, Poland vital records #general

Roni S. Liebowitz
 

Dear Lask Researchers,

We are very happy to announce that we have just received a
new database for Lask vital records. It covers years to
1905.

The file originally had 8,170 entries. There are now another
3,005(or an increase of almost 40%) This combines the data
received at the end of 2005 and the new data just received.
The surnames with more than 16 entries each starting with
the most frequently listed surnames are: JAKUBOWICZ, KLAJN,
BIALEK, LEWKOWICZ, WIDAWSKI, LEWI, ROZENBLUM, SIJERADZKI,
BORNSZTEJN, GERSZKOWICZ, MANDEL,SZER, KORN, MARKOWICZ, FUKS,
KOCHMAN, GRYNBERG, NAJMAN, SIJERADZSKI, GOLDBERG, LIBERMAN,
BERKOWICZ, DAWIDOWICZ, GRYNER, KUPERWASSER, MOSKOWICZ,
URBACH, BRESLER, GLIKSMAN

As Mark Halpern announced, JRI-Poland is planning to take
the online ordering system down for a system overhaul in the
very near future. Therefore, we want this information to get
to Lask researchers now. We expect the system to be taken
down on Friday, November 17, 2006. As a result, all orders
from these indices must be submitted before that date.
Contact me ASAP for more information about this file.

Sorry to rush you, but I'd hate for you to miss out on the
chance to order records of interest.

All the best,
Roni

Mrs. Roni Seibel Liebowitz
Lodz Archive Coordinator, JRI-Poland


DIAMANT to US from Romania - Town of starting #general

Barbara Zimmer <bravo.zulu@...>
 

On 27 July 1889 Marie DIAMANT arrives in New York aboard the Columbia
with her two children, Clara age 4 and Elias 11 months old. The
town that she says she started her travels >from looks like
"Rotoscharn", possibly in Romania. Can anyone tell me what town
this might be?

I know that Elias was born in Bucharest (or so it says on his WWI
draft registration where he is listed as Harry Elias DIMOND.)

This is the family of my grandmother's brother Aaron KREMNITZER, who
obviously changed his name **before arriving in the US. Perhaps he
took his wife's last name. (My cousin did just that, about 30 years
ago.)

Barbara Zimmer
Virginia


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen DIAMANT to US from Romania - Town of starting #general

Barbara Zimmer <bravo.zulu@...>
 

On 27 July 1889 Marie DIAMANT arrives in New York aboard the Columbia
with her two children, Clara age 4 and Elias 11 months old. The
town that she says she started her travels >from looks like
"Rotoscharn", possibly in Romania. Can anyone tell me what town
this might be?

I know that Elias was born in Bucharest (or so it says on his WWI
draft registration where he is listed as Harry Elias DIMOND.)

This is the family of my grandmother's brother Aaron KREMNITZER, who
obviously changed his name **before arriving in the US. Perhaps he
took his wife's last name. (My cousin did just that, about 30 years
ago.)

Barbara Zimmer
Virginia