Date   

New LDS data now on the JRI-Poland database #general

hadassahlipsius
 

The Jewish Records Indexing-Poland database was recently updated with data
indexed >from the LDS Microfilms of Jewish Vital Records >from Poland. I
would like to thank our wonderful team of volunteers who worked tirelessly
to make the Shtetl CO-OP Project such a success.

Four town projects, Lublin, Radzyn Podlaski, Zamosc and Gowarczow, are now
totally complete, which means that all the available LDS data has been
indexed. Additional data has been added for Warszawa and Sandomierz.

Over 35,000 new indices are now available and 20 additional microfilms have
been completed.

Many thanks to the following Coordinators and leaders; Coby Goldwasser,
Kirsten Gradel, Robinn Magid, Shelley Pollero, Dolores Ring, Lancy Spalter,
Greg Tuckman.

Watch for announcements over the next few weeks for more additions to the
JRI-Poland database.

Hadassah Lipsius
JRI-Poland
Shtetl CO-OP Coordinator


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen New LDS data now on the JRI-Poland database #general

hadassahlipsius
 

The Jewish Records Indexing-Poland database was recently updated with data
indexed >from the LDS Microfilms of Jewish Vital Records >from Poland. I
would like to thank our wonderful team of volunteers who worked tirelessly
to make the Shtetl CO-OP Project such a success.

Four town projects, Lublin, Radzyn Podlaski, Zamosc and Gowarczow, are now
totally complete, which means that all the available LDS data has been
indexed. Additional data has been added for Warszawa and Sandomierz.

Over 35,000 new indices are now available and 20 additional microfilms have
been completed.

Many thanks to the following Coordinators and leaders; Coby Goldwasser,
Kirsten Gradel, Robinn Magid, Shelley Pollero, Dolores Ring, Lancy Spalter,
Greg Tuckman.

Watch for announcements over the next few weeks for more additions to the
JRI-Poland database.

Hadassah Lipsius
JRI-Poland
Shtetl CO-OP Coordinator


Re: The common name for Nesanajl #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Wed, 13 Dec 2006 01:13:26 UTC, jrw@brown.edu (Judith Romney Wegner)
opined:

At 10:54 PM +1100 12/12/06, Charles and Perla Leinkram wrote:
My husband's grandfather's first name was Nesanajl. Is that the same as
Nathan or Nathaniel?
Thanking you in anticipation.
Perla Leinkram
No it is not Nathan, but yes it is Nathaniel.
That is the stadard English transliteration for
the Hebrew biblical name pronounced Ne-san-'el
by Ashkenazim. The main Biblical Nesan'el is
the one named in the Torah as a leader of the
tribe of Issachar at Numbers 1,8 and several more
times in the book of Numbers. (A different and
much later Nesan'el is mentioned in the
post-exilic books of Ezra, Nehemiah and
Chronicle, but your husband's ancestor.

Nathan is quite a different biblical character.
Several Nathans are mentioned in the bible but
the only important one is the prophet Nathan in
the time of King David, mentioned several times
in 2 Samuel and 1 Kings

Judith Romney Wegner
Actually, the real name of the various Biblical "Nathans" was almost
certainly "Nataniel" too (or "Nataniyah"), both theophoric names, and
"Natan". "Natan" means "he gave", but on the pattern of most other Biblical
names, it should state WHO gave, and the missing donor is specified by
either of the complete names, "God gave".

The Bible has many such examples. "Micha" ("Micah", for instance, is not a
name; his name was "Michayahu". The name of Baruch ben Neriya, secretary of
the prophet Jeremiah was "Berachiahu", on the evidence of his seals
("bullae") which were found some years ago in Jerusalem. Nicknames are not a
new invention. There is less reason to make a distinction between "Natan"
and "Nataniel" than is apparent at first glance.

Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form
there.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: The common name for Nesanajl #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Wed, 13 Dec 2006 01:13:26 UTC, jrw@brown.edu (Judith Romney Wegner)
opined:

At 10:54 PM +1100 12/12/06, Charles and Perla Leinkram wrote:
My husband's grandfather's first name was Nesanajl. Is that the same as
Nathan or Nathaniel?
Thanking you in anticipation.
Perla Leinkram
No it is not Nathan, but yes it is Nathaniel.
That is the stadard English transliteration for
the Hebrew biblical name pronounced Ne-san-'el
by Ashkenazim. The main Biblical Nesan'el is
the one named in the Torah as a leader of the
tribe of Issachar at Numbers 1,8 and several more
times in the book of Numbers. (A different and
much later Nesan'el is mentioned in the
post-exilic books of Ezra, Nehemiah and
Chronicle, but your husband's ancestor.

Nathan is quite a different biblical character.
Several Nathans are mentioned in the bible but
the only important one is the prophet Nathan in
the time of King David, mentioned several times
in 2 Samuel and 1 Kings

Judith Romney Wegner
Actually, the real name of the various Biblical "Nathans" was almost
certainly "Nataniel" too (or "Nataniyah"), both theophoric names, and
"Natan". "Natan" means "he gave", but on the pattern of most other Biblical
names, it should state WHO gave, and the missing donor is specified by
either of the complete names, "God gave".

The Bible has many such examples. "Micha" ("Micah", for instance, is not a
name; his name was "Michayahu". The name of Baruch ben Neriya, secretary of
the prophet Jeremiah was "Berachiahu", on the evidence of his seals
("bullae") which were found some years ago in Jerusalem. Nicknames are not a
new invention. There is less reason to make a distinction between "Natan"
and "Nataniel" than is apparent at first glance.

Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form
there.


Searching KUJAWSKI family Shoah survivors #general

Naidia Woolf <rnwoolf@...>
 

I'm trying to determine whether any of my KUJAWSKI ancestors survived the
Shoah. My grandfather Simon (Yehoshuah Wolf KUJAWSKI) emigrated >from Poland
for England circa 1895. He left behind his parents Itko and Raca, one
brother and two sisters.

I just discovered that my father's cousin Jakob KUJAWSKI, who was born in
Lodz in 1891, immigrated to the U.S. in 1920. There he stayed with an uncle
(Jakob SUSSMAN) in Paterson, NJ. (Jakob may have changed his surname to
WINTER after settling in the U.S.) Jakob's brother Wolf (known as Willie)
KUJAWSKI and wife Ryfka (Regina) immigrated to the US in 1940, after a
year's stay in England, arriving at the Port of New York in September of
that year.

Finding my father's two cousins in the US was the first proof I've had that
*any* of the KUJAWSKI family left Europe before the the 2nd world war.

For several years I've been trying to determine whether any other members
of the family survived the Holocaust and, most especially, if any of their
descendants are still alive ... and, if so, who they are and where.

Please contact me privately.

Naidia Woolf
rnwoolf@earthlink.net
San Francisco, CA
Formerly >from Birmingham, England

Researching:
BRYL: Skerabz, Poland DROZDIASZ (or variants) /ROSE: Karczew, Poland
GRINBERG, Milosna, Poland ISAACS (family of Solomon & Sarah): Poland (town - Mlawa?)/Birmingham,
England KUJAWSKI: Lodz, Poland/State of New Jersey, USA
MIKHALSON: Karczew, Poland SAFIRSTEIN/SZAFIRSTEIN (or variants): Karczew, Poland
SHORN (family of Morris & Yetta), Poland (town unknown)
SUMMERS: Poland?/State of New Jersey WINTER: Lodz, Poland/State of New Jersey, USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching KUJAWSKI family Shoah survivors #general

Naidia Woolf <rnwoolf@...>
 

I'm trying to determine whether any of my KUJAWSKI ancestors survived the
Shoah. My grandfather Simon (Yehoshuah Wolf KUJAWSKI) emigrated >from Poland
for England circa 1895. He left behind his parents Itko and Raca, one
brother and two sisters.

I just discovered that my father's cousin Jakob KUJAWSKI, who was born in
Lodz in 1891, immigrated to the U.S. in 1920. There he stayed with an uncle
(Jakob SUSSMAN) in Paterson, NJ. (Jakob may have changed his surname to
WINTER after settling in the U.S.) Jakob's brother Wolf (known as Willie)
KUJAWSKI and wife Ryfka (Regina) immigrated to the US in 1940, after a
year's stay in England, arriving at the Port of New York in September of
that year.

Finding my father's two cousins in the US was the first proof I've had that
*any* of the KUJAWSKI family left Europe before the the 2nd world war.

For several years I've been trying to determine whether any other members
of the family survived the Holocaust and, most especially, if any of their
descendants are still alive ... and, if so, who they are and where.

Please contact me privately.

Naidia Woolf
rnwoolf@earthlink.net
San Francisco, CA
Formerly >from Birmingham, England

Researching:
BRYL: Skerabz, Poland DROZDIASZ (or variants) /ROSE: Karczew, Poland
GRINBERG, Milosna, Poland ISAACS (family of Solomon & Sarah): Poland (town - Mlawa?)/Birmingham,
England KUJAWSKI: Lodz, Poland/State of New Jersey, USA
MIKHALSON: Karczew, Poland SAFIRSTEIN/SZAFIRSTEIN (or variants): Karczew, Poland
SHORN (family of Morris & Yetta), Poland (town unknown)
SUMMERS: Poland?/State of New Jersey WINTER: Lodz, Poland/State of New Jersey, USA


Re: Origin of PINCHERLE of Italy #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 12/12/2006 10:05:14 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
celiamale@yahoo.com writes:

<< I discovered today that the real name of Alberto Moravia, the
Italian novelist and writer, was actually PINCHERLE. His father was Carlo
PINCHERLE - architect and painter.

<< We have recently had some discussion on our AustriaCzech SIG:
http://www.jewishgen.org/austriaczech re the migration of Jews between
Italy and Bohemia/Moravia [both directions]. There were definitely PINK and
PINKAS living in Bohemia and most probably Moravia too in the late 1700s.
Could PINCHERLE be a diminutive? Did these Italian PINCHERLE originally come
from Bohemia or Moravia? >>
Menk's dictionary of German-Jewish surnames refers Pincherle to
Pinkerle.
He attributes that name to Pincus [i.e. Pinchas] and says that Judah Loebel
ben Nathan PINKERLE was the father of Glueckel von Hameln (b 1645). He
gives a 1630 appearance of the name in Friuli-Venezia [Italy], a 1665
occurrence in Vienna, and a 1682 occurrence in Amsterdam (originating >from
Vienna.)

enc judaica:says that ALBERTO MORAVIA (Pincherle), (1907-1990)
was born in Rome, and took his pen name >from his immigrant father's
country of origin.

Michael Bernet, New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Origin of PINCHERLE of Italy #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 12/12/2006 10:05:14 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
celiamale@yahoo.com writes:

<< I discovered today that the real name of Alberto Moravia, the
Italian novelist and writer, was actually PINCHERLE. His father was Carlo
PINCHERLE - architect and painter.

<< We have recently had some discussion on our AustriaCzech SIG:
http://www.jewishgen.org/austriaczech re the migration of Jews between
Italy and Bohemia/Moravia [both directions]. There were definitely PINK and
PINKAS living in Bohemia and most probably Moravia too in the late 1700s.
Could PINCHERLE be a diminutive? Did these Italian PINCHERLE originally come
from Bohemia or Moravia? >>
Menk's dictionary of German-Jewish surnames refers Pincherle to
Pinkerle.
He attributes that name to Pincus [i.e. Pinchas] and says that Judah Loebel
ben Nathan PINKERLE was the father of Glueckel von Hameln (b 1645). He
gives a 1630 appearance of the name in Friuli-Venezia [Italy], a 1665
occurrence in Vienna, and a 1682 occurrence in Amsterdam (originating >from
Vienna.)

enc judaica:says that ALBERTO MORAVIA (Pincherle), (1907-1990)
was born in Rome, and took his pen name >from his immigrant father's
country of origin.

Michael Bernet, New York


Breslau marriage records for 1880 #austria-czech

Oliver Bryk <oliverbryk@...>
 

As far as I know my widowed ggf married his second wife in Breslau in 1880.
I am hoping that the record of their marriage would provide some details of
her ancestry and place of birth. Can anyone suggest a point of contact for
the Jewish community of the former Breslau, now Wroclaw?
Oliver Bryk, San Francisco


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Breslau marriage records for 1880 #austria-czech

Oliver Bryk <oliverbryk@...>
 

As far as I know my widowed ggf married his second wife in Breslau in 1880.
I am hoping that the record of their marriage would provide some details of
her ancestry and place of birth. Can anyone suggest a point of contact for
the Jewish community of the former Breslau, now Wroclaw?
Oliver Bryk, San Francisco


PINCHERLE #austria-czech

Micheline GUTMANN
 

The name PINCHERLE was found everywhere (everybody knows Gutteln HAMELN
nee PINCHERLE) and it was very frequent in Italy.So, I suggest it was perhaps
related with Hebrew?

In Montparnasse cemetery, Paris, we can find at list one grave with these
names

GENTILI PINCHERLE Stella b. Venise 21.10.1798/03.04.1875 Paris
PINCHERLE L=E9on b. Venise 17.07.1814/05.03.1882 Paris
CERVETTI Girolamo b. Venise 28.11.1810/30.08.1898 Paris
CERVETTI Emile b. Verone 21.05.1842/25.10.1905 Paris
CERVETTI nee BUCHERE Marie 1849/1930

I have been aware of 3 ketuboth in Italia:
(wife - husband- date-town - province)
Pincherle - Alpron 1753 - Ceneda in com. Vittorio Veneto - TV
Pincherle - Jacur 1839 - Verona -VR
Pincherle - Pincherle 1774 Ceneda in com. Vittorio Veneto - TV

Best regards.

Micheline GUTMANN, Paris, France
Web site GenAmi www.genami.org


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech PINCHERLE #austria-czech

Micheline GUTMANN
 

The name PINCHERLE was found everywhere (everybody knows Gutteln HAMELN
nee PINCHERLE) and it was very frequent in Italy.So, I suggest it was perhaps
related with Hebrew?

In Montparnasse cemetery, Paris, we can find at list one grave with these
names

GENTILI PINCHERLE Stella b. Venise 21.10.1798/03.04.1875 Paris
PINCHERLE L=E9on b. Venise 17.07.1814/05.03.1882 Paris
CERVETTI Girolamo b. Venise 28.11.1810/30.08.1898 Paris
CERVETTI Emile b. Verone 21.05.1842/25.10.1905 Paris
CERVETTI nee BUCHERE Marie 1849/1930

I have been aware of 3 ketuboth in Italia:
(wife - husband- date-town - province)
Pincherle - Alpron 1753 - Ceneda in com. Vittorio Veneto - TV
Pincherle - Jacur 1839 - Verona -VR
Pincherle - Pincherle 1774 Ceneda in com. Vittorio Veneto - TV

Best regards.

Micheline GUTMANN, Paris, France
Web site GenAmi www.genami.org


important news about Danzig records #danzig #gdansk #germany #poland

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

Dear SIG members,

This message asks for your input about an important development in Danzig
Jewish genealogical research.

Funding for our project to index the Archives of the Jewish Community of
Danzig at the CAHJP in Jerusalem (www.jewishgen.org/danzig/project3.php) now
allows us to begin ordering material >from CAHJP for digitization and
distribution to volunteer indexers! The first phase of the project consists
of the following files, only a small part of what survives at the CAHJP:

Altschottland: cemetery register 1720-1874, 232 pages Hebrew and German
Altschottland: burial register 1838-1846, 10 pages in a large format, German
Langfuhr: list of members of Chevra Kadisha, minutes and accounts, and maybe
deaths 1765-1849, 50 pages Hebrew
Mattenbuden: birth register 1832-1846, 20 pages German
Mattenbuden: memorbuch 1826-1883, 40 pages Hebrew and German
Weinberg: list of members 1817-1881, about 52 pages in a very large format,
German
Breitgasse: memorbuch 1845-1903, about 10 pages Hebrew

If you have a preference about the order in which these files should be
ordered, please indicate it. Much greater weight will be given to the
preferences of those who have contributed financially to this project or
have volunteered for the SIG.

It is not too late to contribute to this important project. While we are
able to start ordering, we are still a little short of our fundraising goal.
Also, note that this is only the first phase of the project...if successful,
we can proceed with other parts of the huge (2000 files) Danzig collection
at CAHJP, and that will require additional funding. If you want to support
Danzig Jewish genealogical research, I urge you to contribute (even the
minimum of $10) now via our JewishGen-erosity page:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=31
. Contributions are tax-deductible for U.S. and Canadian citizens. If you
contribute before the end of 2006, please notify me privately (for temporary
administrative reasons, I might not otherwise quickly learn of your
contribution). Consider it a Chanukah gift to all of your fellow Danzigers.

If you are not able to contribute financially, please do not do nothing.
Please volunteer to help with our FHL indexing project
(www.jewishgen.org/danzig/project4.php), or ask me about other ways you can
help. Even small contributions of money or time >from all of our members
would greatly advance our research.

Thanks again to those who have already contributed towards this project, and
best wishes to all for a Happy Chanukah.

Logan Kleinwaks
Coordinator, JewishGen Danzig/Gdansk SIG
kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu
near Washington, D.C.


Danzig/Gedansk SIG #Danzig #Gdansk #Germany #Poland important news about Danzig records #danzig #gdansk #germany #poland

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

Dear SIG members,

This message asks for your input about an important development in Danzig
Jewish genealogical research.

Funding for our project to index the Archives of the Jewish Community of
Danzig at the CAHJP in Jerusalem (www.jewishgen.org/danzig/project3.php) now
allows us to begin ordering material >from CAHJP for digitization and
distribution to volunteer indexers! The first phase of the project consists
of the following files, only a small part of what survives at the CAHJP:

Altschottland: cemetery register 1720-1874, 232 pages Hebrew and German
Altschottland: burial register 1838-1846, 10 pages in a large format, German
Langfuhr: list of members of Chevra Kadisha, minutes and accounts, and maybe
deaths 1765-1849, 50 pages Hebrew
Mattenbuden: birth register 1832-1846, 20 pages German
Mattenbuden: memorbuch 1826-1883, 40 pages Hebrew and German
Weinberg: list of members 1817-1881, about 52 pages in a very large format,
German
Breitgasse: memorbuch 1845-1903, about 10 pages Hebrew

If you have a preference about the order in which these files should be
ordered, please indicate it. Much greater weight will be given to the
preferences of those who have contributed financially to this project or
have volunteered for the SIG.

It is not too late to contribute to this important project. While we are
able to start ordering, we are still a little short of our fundraising goal.
Also, note that this is only the first phase of the project...if successful,
we can proceed with other parts of the huge (2000 files) Danzig collection
at CAHJP, and that will require additional funding. If you want to support
Danzig Jewish genealogical research, I urge you to contribute (even the
minimum of $10) now via our JewishGen-erosity page:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=31
. Contributions are tax-deductible for U.S. and Canadian citizens. If you
contribute before the end of 2006, please notify me privately (for temporary
administrative reasons, I might not otherwise quickly learn of your
contribution). Consider it a Chanukah gift to all of your fellow Danzigers.

If you are not able to contribute financially, please do not do nothing.
Please volunteer to help with our FHL indexing project
(www.jewishgen.org/danzig/project4.php), or ask me about other ways you can
help. Even small contributions of money or time >from all of our members
would greatly advance our research.

Thanks again to those who have already contributed towards this project, and
best wishes to all for a Happy Chanukah.

Logan Kleinwaks
Coordinator, JewishGen Danzig/Gdansk SIG
kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu
near Washington, D.C.


Accounts of the Alter Rebbe's Death #rabbinic

Dov & Varda Epstein <yknow@...>
 

Often, the students of an important rabbi will write about the
rabbi's last moments. I would like to track down such a written
account of the Alter Rebbe of Lubavitch's death. Does anyone know
of such an account?

Varda Epstein
Efrat, Israel


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Accounts of the Alter Rebbe's Death #rabbinic

Dov & Varda Epstein <yknow@...>
 

Often, the students of an important rabbi will write about the
rabbi's last moments. I would like to track down such a written
account of the Alter Rebbe of Lubavitch's death. Does anyone know
of such an account?

Varda Epstein
Efrat, Israel


Re: Hebrew chronology #dna

Sean Silver <Sean_Silver@...>
 

On 2006.11.16, Danielle James <daniandw@aanet.com.au> wrote:

I am very interested in Sean Silver's research into the Kohanim line.
As there is much debate about whether Hebrews emerged >from the Haburi,
[...] I imagine that the Kohanim line would provide some evidence
of the origins of the Jews.
I apologize for the belated reply to this thread, Danielle!

I appreciate your interest in my particular research. It actually
extends to those of the R1b haplogroup who have an uninterrupted
history of Jewish lineage without the knowledge of conversion. Our
results have been surprising, to say the least, seemingly countering
the theories that most R1b came as a result of European admixture.

I have to admit that I am neither an anthropologist nor a historian,
though I do have a strong grasp of the history of the Hebrew/Jewish
people. I've gained the latter >from a lifetime study of my religion
as well as historical supplementation due to the nature of my
genetic genealogical project. I also am not a scientist, though
Bennett Greenspan and some prominent geneticists have helped me in
this endeavor.

In terms of the Kohanim, what Danielle is likely referring to is
that 11 members of my project (roughly 1/6th) have a confirmed oral
tradition of being Cohanim. Of those, all have a DYS 393 (a marker
with an extremely low mutation rate) value of 12 and can be
separated into two distinctly related groups. All individuals within
each group have a likely common ancestor within 1,000 years and it
seems that the two groups have a common ancestor within 3,000 years.
Furthermore, none of the individuals have any genetic matches within
Western Europe (outside of Spain and Portugal). Studies such as
Cinnioglu et. Al and others theorize of an Eastern R1b with the
greatest genetic diversity in eastern Anatolia, what is now modern
day Turkey.

This marker can also be found within Armenia, Iran and among the
Iraqi Kurds and has a direct geographic correlation with haplogroup
J in terms of genetic diversity and frequency. In otherwords, it is
extremely rare in Western Europe and uncommon in Eastern Europe.
Rather the closer one approaches the Near and Middle East, the
greater the frequency and genetic diversity, thus hinting at the
ancient origins of both.

One theory shared by Bennett Greenspan and I is the likelihood of
an R1b tribe, or tribes, that shared in either the early history
(perhaps even in the origin) of the Hebrew people. This might
account for at least a portion of the Jewish R1b, though we have
found far fewer hints of admixture than expected among the project
as a whole, which is pleasantly surprising. This seems to indicate
that the R1b portion was likely isolated >from common European or
native admixture amid the Diaspora.

However, this has yet to be substantiated by a greater amount of
samples necessary in my study.

Thanks again for your interest!

Sincerely,
Sean Silver


DNA Research #DNA RE: Hebrew chronology #dna

Sean Silver <Sean_Silver@...>
 

On 2006.11.16, Danielle James <daniandw@aanet.com.au> wrote:

I am very interested in Sean Silver's research into the Kohanim line.
As there is much debate about whether Hebrews emerged >from the Haburi,
[...] I imagine that the Kohanim line would provide some evidence
of the origins of the Jews.
I apologize for the belated reply to this thread, Danielle!

I appreciate your interest in my particular research. It actually
extends to those of the R1b haplogroup who have an uninterrupted
history of Jewish lineage without the knowledge of conversion. Our
results have been surprising, to say the least, seemingly countering
the theories that most R1b came as a result of European admixture.

I have to admit that I am neither an anthropologist nor a historian,
though I do have a strong grasp of the history of the Hebrew/Jewish
people. I've gained the latter >from a lifetime study of my religion
as well as historical supplementation due to the nature of my
genetic genealogical project. I also am not a scientist, though
Bennett Greenspan and some prominent geneticists have helped me in
this endeavor.

In terms of the Kohanim, what Danielle is likely referring to is
that 11 members of my project (roughly 1/6th) have a confirmed oral
tradition of being Cohanim. Of those, all have a DYS 393 (a marker
with an extremely low mutation rate) value of 12 and can be
separated into two distinctly related groups. All individuals within
each group have a likely common ancestor within 1,000 years and it
seems that the two groups have a common ancestor within 3,000 years.
Furthermore, none of the individuals have any genetic matches within
Western Europe (outside of Spain and Portugal). Studies such as
Cinnioglu et. Al and others theorize of an Eastern R1b with the
greatest genetic diversity in eastern Anatolia, what is now modern
day Turkey.

This marker can also be found within Armenia, Iran and among the
Iraqi Kurds and has a direct geographic correlation with haplogroup
J in terms of genetic diversity and frequency. In otherwords, it is
extremely rare in Western Europe and uncommon in Eastern Europe.
Rather the closer one approaches the Near and Middle East, the
greater the frequency and genetic diversity, thus hinting at the
ancient origins of both.

One theory shared by Bennett Greenspan and I is the likelihood of
an R1b tribe, or tribes, that shared in either the early history
(perhaps even in the origin) of the Hebrew people. This might
account for at least a portion of the Jewish R1b, though we have
found far fewer hints of admixture than expected among the project
as a whole, which is pleasantly surprising. This seems to indicate
that the R1b portion was likely isolated >from common European or
native admixture amid the Diaspora.

However, this has yet to be substantiated by a greater amount of
samples necessary in my study.

Thanks again for your interest!

Sincerely,
Sean Silver


ViewMate 9051-2: Russian translation for Tashkent refugee cards #general

paulkozo@...
 

After last week's posting by Rose Feldman (thank you!) on the US Holocaust
Museum's index of Jewish refugees in Tashkent
(http://resources.ushmm.org/uzbekrefugees), I looked and found
three possible cousins on two cards.

I'd be grateful for any help in translation >from the Russian

To see the images:
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/toview.html VM9051 and VM 9052

or directly:
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=9052
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=9051

Please respond privately,

Paul K. Hattori, London UK
paulkozo@aol.com

Researching SHADUR, SADUR Salakas MINDEL Vyzuonos,
Utena FELLER Pabdrade


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate 9051-2: Russian translation for Tashkent refugee cards #general

paulkozo@...
 

After last week's posting by Rose Feldman (thank you!) on the US Holocaust
Museum's index of Jewish refugees in Tashkent
(http://resources.ushmm.org/uzbekrefugees), I looked and found
three possible cousins on two cards.

I'd be grateful for any help in translation >from the Russian

To see the images:
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/toview.html VM9051 and VM 9052

or directly:
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=9052
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=9051

Please respond privately,

Paul K. Hattori, London UK
paulkozo@aol.com

Researching SHADUR, SADUR Salakas MINDEL Vyzuonos,
Utena FELLER Pabdrade