Date   

Do you have a connection to the Polish shtetl Polaniec (Planch, Plontch) ? #general

gottlm@...
 

The First Plancher Benevolent Society, founded in 1919, is a
still-functioning "landsleit" society. We have regular meetings in
NYC and will soon host an anniversary banquet.

The Anniversary Banquet is fast approaching - Sunday, November
12, in Queens, NYC. We will begin with our annual Yizkor
Commemmoration at 11:30am, followed by the dinner.

I am the president of the society and also the webmaster of a site
devoted to the history and memory of the shtetl. Please visit at
www.plontch.net.

Regards,
Michael Gottlieb
gottlm@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Do you have a connection to the Polish shtetl Polaniec (Planch, Plontch) ? #general

gottlm@...
 

The First Plancher Benevolent Society, founded in 1919, is a
still-functioning "landsleit" society. We have regular meetings in
NYC and will soon host an anniversary banquet.

The Anniversary Banquet is fast approaching - Sunday, November
12, in Queens, NYC. We will begin with our annual Yizkor
Commemmoration at 11:30am, followed by the dinner.

I am the president of the society and also the webmaster of a site
devoted to the history and memory of the shtetl. Please visit at
www.plontch.net.

Regards,
Michael Gottlieb
gottlm@...


Importance of SIGs for specialist postings - with ref. to Austria -Czech SIG #general

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

In the latest edition of NU - the Avotaynu E-zine of Jewish Genealogy, [Vol 7
No 17 Oct 29th], Gary Mokotoff, the Editor has a section entitled: <"The
Importance of Special Interest Groups"..... There is an aspect of Jewish
genealogy, Special Interest Groups (SIGs), that I have avoided covering in Nu?
What's New? on the grounds that anyone doing Jewish research is aware of them,
...... I now realize this is wrong, because many people doing Jewish research
are not aware of SIGs....."> see: http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/sigs.htm

As a keen member of the Austria-Czech SIG:
http://www.jewishgen.org/austriaczech/
I have long been aware of this gaping hole - and this is once again highlighted
today by two postings on the General Dicussion Group which are so specialised
that their home territory really ought to be the Austria-Czech SIG. We do have
over 700 members who have a wide knowledge in this geographic area of the
Habsburg Empire and you are unlikely to find this on the General Discussion
Group. Furthermore, many of our members [probably the majority] do not get the
General Discussion Group postings, so they would not be in a position to reply.
Personal links may therefore be lost.

One of these postings is entitled: Origin of surname LUNDENBURG, where Larry
Hlasav asks: <Can anyone help me with a question regarding the 1787 edict of
Emperor Joseph (Austria) requiring Jewish families to adopt German surnames in
his Empire?> And the question continues on the subject of LUNDENBURG as a
toponymic. Answer: Yes, I can certainly attempt to answer this question, but I
wonder if the General Discussion Group is the place for a detailed answer?

The second is BAK / BACK and TRISCH / FRISCH, in Prague, Zlatniky and Slatiny,
Czech Republic where Gabriela Novak is seeking any information on these family
members who lived in Prague and in the town of Zlatniky and Slatiny, near
Prague. Gabriela has posted information on Roots web, but so far I have seen
nothing on the Austria-Czech SIG. It is well-worth a try!

BTW I am delighted to say that one of our active and best-informed Siggers* on
the subject of the town of Lundenburg [Breclav], Moravia is our nonagenarian
from Lundenburg, who entertained our SIG members royally at his home in Herzlia
last March!

Celia Male [U.K.]

PS: For our new correspondents: a Sigger is a Jewishgen term for a member of a
SIG!


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Importance of SIGs for specialist postings - with ref. to Austria -Czech SIG #general

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

In the latest edition of NU - the Avotaynu E-zine of Jewish Genealogy, [Vol 7
No 17 Oct 29th], Gary Mokotoff, the Editor has a section entitled: <"The
Importance of Special Interest Groups"..... There is an aspect of Jewish
genealogy, Special Interest Groups (SIGs), that I have avoided covering in Nu?
What's New? on the grounds that anyone doing Jewish research is aware of them,
...... I now realize this is wrong, because many people doing Jewish research
are not aware of SIGs....."> see: http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/sigs.htm

As a keen member of the Austria-Czech SIG:
http://www.jewishgen.org/austriaczech/
I have long been aware of this gaping hole - and this is once again highlighted
today by two postings on the General Dicussion Group which are so specialised
that their home territory really ought to be the Austria-Czech SIG. We do have
over 700 members who have a wide knowledge in this geographic area of the
Habsburg Empire and you are unlikely to find this on the General Discussion
Group. Furthermore, many of our members [probably the majority] do not get the
General Discussion Group postings, so they would not be in a position to reply.
Personal links may therefore be lost.

One of these postings is entitled: Origin of surname LUNDENBURG, where Larry
Hlasav asks: <Can anyone help me with a question regarding the 1787 edict of
Emperor Joseph (Austria) requiring Jewish families to adopt German surnames in
his Empire?> And the question continues on the subject of LUNDENBURG as a
toponymic. Answer: Yes, I can certainly attempt to answer this question, but I
wonder if the General Discussion Group is the place for a detailed answer?

The second is BAK / BACK and TRISCH / FRISCH, in Prague, Zlatniky and Slatiny,
Czech Republic where Gabriela Novak is seeking any information on these family
members who lived in Prague and in the town of Zlatniky and Slatiny, near
Prague. Gabriela has posted information on Roots web, but so far I have seen
nothing on the Austria-Czech SIG. It is well-worth a try!

BTW I am delighted to say that one of our active and best-informed Siggers* on
the subject of the town of Lundenburg [Breclav], Moravia is our nonagenarian
from Lundenburg, who entertained our SIG members royally at his home in Herzlia
last March!

Celia Male [U.K.]

PS: For our new correspondents: a Sigger is a Jewishgen term for a member of a
SIG!


Gailzion Kroenlande, Austria #general

Bubylu@...
 

I just came across some papers listing my grandfather coming >from Gailzion
Kroenlande, Austria. I tried doing a look up on this and came up empty handed.
I was hoping that someone could help me locate this town.

Thank you in advance.
Wishing us all good luck on our searches

Lois Segall Friedman
Bubylu@...
Delray Beach, FL
formally >from NJ


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Gailzion Kroenlande, Austria #general

Bubylu@...
 

I just came across some papers listing my grandfather coming >from Gailzion
Kroenlande, Austria. I tried doing a look up on this and came up empty handed.
I was hoping that someone could help me locate this town.

Thank you in advance.
Wishing us all good luck on our searches

Lois Segall Friedman
Bubylu@...
Delray Beach, FL
formally >from NJ


Re: Botosani #romania

Eugene Vaynshteyn <vaynshteyn@...>
 

My paternal grandmother's maiden name was BATUSHANSKY. Her family is >from
Alexandreni, near Balti. She and her surviving siblings lived in Balti after
WWII, but even her grandmother who died earlier and never lived in Balti was
burried there. Perhaps, that was the closest Jewish cemetery? Does anyone
know where to find a directory of Jewish cemeteries for different historical
periods? Also, the surname reflects Botosani origin (in Russian it means,
"of Botosani"), but must have been given to her ancestors who settled
elsewhere. There is an unrelated family with the same name on my mother's
side as well. Is it possible to trace them to any "wave" of Botosani
migrants and to determine the time period when they left Botosani?

Eugene Vaynshteyn
Passaic, NJ
MODERATOR NOTE: The IAJGS cemetery database is available on JewishGen. It is under
the heading "Hosted Organizations" on the JewishGen home page. Also remember to
check our own JOWBR registry.


Romania SIG #Romania RE: Botosani #romania

Eugene Vaynshteyn <vaynshteyn@...>
 

My paternal grandmother's maiden name was BATUSHANSKY. Her family is >from
Alexandreni, near Balti. She and her surviving siblings lived in Balti after
WWII, but even her grandmother who died earlier and never lived in Balti was
burried there. Perhaps, that was the closest Jewish cemetery? Does anyone
know where to find a directory of Jewish cemeteries for different historical
periods? Also, the surname reflects Botosani origin (in Russian it means,
"of Botosani"), but must have been given to her ancestors who settled
elsewhere. There is an unrelated family with the same name on my mother's
side as well. Is it possible to trace them to any "wave" of Botosani
migrants and to determine the time period when they left Botosani?

Eugene Vaynshteyn
Passaic, NJ
MODERATOR NOTE: The IAJGS cemetery database is available on JewishGen. It is under
the heading "Hosted Organizations" on the JewishGen home page. Also remember to
check our own JOWBR registry.


Seeking plot in Vienna Zentralfriedhof #austria-czech

robert fraser <robertandginafraser@...>
 

Dear SIGers -

This must be a classic example of serendipity. Looking through
my copy of "Beruria" (see earlier messages), I discovered written in very
faint pencil on the back page two grave plot references. One I knew, that
of my grandfather, Oskar Nowak, but I had never noticed the other one.

So, if some very kind person will be visiting the Vienna Zentralfriedhof
Tor 4 some time (no hurry at all), I'd be very very grateful if they'd look
up this one:
Paul NOWAK - DOD 22/01/1926. He's at Tor 4, Gruppe 10a, Reihe 13, Grab 24.

A digital photo would be highly appreciated. If only I'd known when I was
there last May...............

Incidentally, thia points up a vagary of the IKG Cemetery Database.
Plug in the name Paul Nowak, and nothing comes up. But plug in the
plot details, if one has them, and.. hey presto...up comes Paul Nowak.
Go figure!

Robert Fraser
Dianella, Western Australia
robertandginafraser@...
Searching:
NOWAK - Moravia, Austria/Vienna - >
EISINGER - Moravia - >
FINKELSTEIN - Galicia, Poland
NAGEL - Austria
KRAUTERBLUTH - ? Galicia


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Seeking plot in Vienna Zentralfriedhof #austria-czech

robert fraser <robertandginafraser@...>
 

Dear SIGers -

This must be a classic example of serendipity. Looking through
my copy of "Beruria" (see earlier messages), I discovered written in very
faint pencil on the back page two grave plot references. One I knew, that
of my grandfather, Oskar Nowak, but I had never noticed the other one.

So, if some very kind person will be visiting the Vienna Zentralfriedhof
Tor 4 some time (no hurry at all), I'd be very very grateful if they'd look
up this one:
Paul NOWAK - DOD 22/01/1926. He's at Tor 4, Gruppe 10a, Reihe 13, Grab 24.

A digital photo would be highly appreciated. If only I'd known when I was
there last May...............

Incidentally, thia points up a vagary of the IKG Cemetery Database.
Plug in the name Paul Nowak, and nothing comes up. But plug in the
plot details, if one has them, and.. hey presto...up comes Paul Nowak.
Go figure!

Robert Fraser
Dianella, Western Australia
robertandginafraser@...
Searching:
NOWAK - Moravia, Austria/Vienna - >
EISINGER - Moravia - >
FINKELSTEIN - Galicia, Poland
NAGEL - Austria
KRAUTERBLUTH - ? Galicia


[Austria-Czech]Zamberk Jewish cemetery follow-up. #austria-czech

Lisa Feder <lfeder@...>
 

Hello,

I recently posted a report that the Jewish cemetery in
Zamberk had been vandalized.

I wanted to post a follow up. I just heard >from a
colleague that the offender was caught and charged by
police. He is a 14 year old boy with mental health
problems.

It is very sad as the cemetery, wall and mortuary had
been restored. The Jewish community is waiting to hear
how much of the cost will be covered by insurance.

Lisa Feder,
Fox Lake, IL
www.chaiworks.org


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech [Austria-Czech]Zamberk Jewish cemetery follow-up. #austria-czech

Lisa Feder <lfeder@...>
 

Hello,

I recently posted a report that the Jewish cemetery in
Zamberk had been vandalized.

I wanted to post a follow up. I just heard >from a
colleague that the offender was caught and charged by
police. He is a 14 year old boy with mental health
problems.

It is very sad as the cemetery, wall and mortuary had
been restored. The Jewish community is waiting to hear
how much of the cost will be covered by insurance.

Lisa Feder,
Fox Lake, IL
www.chaiworks.org


Judaica Bohemiae #austria-czech

E. Randol Schoenberg
 

I just discovered that you can purchase specific articles >from
Judaica Bohemiae (1999-2004) at
http://www.ceeol.com/aspx/publicationdetails.aspx?publicationid=6d774f40-f98
1-4909-a867-948e2bff0ee2.

Randy Schoenberg
Los Angeles, CA


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Judaica Bohemiae #austria-czech

E. Randol Schoenberg
 

I just discovered that you can purchase specific articles >from
Judaica Bohemiae (1999-2004) at
http://www.ceeol.com/aspx/publicationdetails.aspx?publicationid=6d774f40-f98
1-4909-a867-948e2bff0ee2.

Randy Schoenberg
Los Angeles, CA


Re: the second in a sephardic community #germany

Christopher Massur <cmassur@...>
 

Dear genners,
while in Germany men would distinguish themselves >from another with the same
name or within the family with the addition "II." (and this custom is
practized widely now in the United States), in the sephardic communities in
the Caribbean you had a similar custom. I found different "senior" and
"junior" after the actual names and especially confusing in the combination
Senior junior or Senior senior. In a particular case I also found the
addition "fils". In this particular case it concerns a gentleman who in the
official papers with the community/government would specify: My name is such
and such, but I will sign such and such "fils". Another variation I found,
is the addition of "cadet", which in France would be used for the second
child, but was obviously also used to distinguish >from an older family member.

Christopher Massur, Curaçao <cmassur@...>


German SIG #Germany RE: the second in a sephardic community #germany

Christopher Massur <cmassur@...>
 

Dear genners,
while in Germany men would distinguish themselves >from another with the same
name or within the family with the addition "II." (and this custom is
practized widely now in the United States), in the sephardic communities in
the Caribbean you had a similar custom. I found different "senior" and
"junior" after the actual names and especially confusing in the combination
Senior junior or Senior senior. In a particular case I also found the
addition "fils". In this particular case it concerns a gentleman who in the
official papers with the community/government would specify: My name is such
and such, but I will sign such and such "fils". Another variation I found,
is the addition of "cadet", which in France would be used for the second
child, but was obviously also used to distinguish >from an older family member.

Christopher Massur, Curaçao <cmassur@...>


Cemetery Memorial #general

AllanDolgow@...
 

I have read recent comments on indexing cemeteries worldwide that
underscored once again by a report of another cemetery having been
desecrated. However, there must be a number of unmarked mass
graves of Jews of Jews murdered by the Nazis.

Recently it was brought to my attention, by Leonid Kogan, there was a
mass at in Kamenny Brod, Ukraine. My maternal grandparents emigrated
from Kamenny Brod emigrated >from there in the early 1900's. My cousins
agreed to financially support a project to erect a memorial in Kamenny
Brod to honor those murdered.

In the International Jewish Cemetery Project Kogan described the site. "The
mass grave is located at northeast, 500m >from faience factory. The
unlandmarked, Hasidic mass grave was dug in 1941.No Jews >from other
towns or villages were murdered here."

Is there any local organization that identifies unmarked mass graves manage
projects of this sort? My current contacts seem slow in responding. The last
I heard , it would take 17 signatures by officials for this proposal. I am
not sure if it is a complicated bureaucracy or interference.

My family we have collected money to complete this project. Now we are
trying to total cost estimates on alternative monument proposals. We need some
local management.

Allan B Dolgow
West Sacramento, CA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Cemetery Memorial #general

AllanDolgow@...
 

I have read recent comments on indexing cemeteries worldwide that
underscored once again by a report of another cemetery having been
desecrated. However, there must be a number of unmarked mass
graves of Jews of Jews murdered by the Nazis.

Recently it was brought to my attention, by Leonid Kogan, there was a
mass at in Kamenny Brod, Ukraine. My maternal grandparents emigrated
from Kamenny Brod emigrated >from there in the early 1900's. My cousins
agreed to financially support a project to erect a memorial in Kamenny
Brod to honor those murdered.

In the International Jewish Cemetery Project Kogan described the site. "The
mass grave is located at northeast, 500m >from faience factory. The
unlandmarked, Hasidic mass grave was dug in 1941.No Jews >from other
towns or villages were murdered here."

Is there any local organization that identifies unmarked mass graves manage
projects of this sort? My current contacts seem slow in responding. The last
I heard , it would take 17 signatures by officials for this proposal. I am
not sure if it is a complicated bureaucracy or interference.

My family we have collected money to complete this project. Now we are
trying to total cost estimates on alternative monument proposals. We need some
local management.

Allan B Dolgow
West Sacramento, CA


Los Angeles-Nov.16th-HIAS/Valery Bazarov JGLSA Program #general

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

If you live in the greater Los Angeles area, the Jewish Genealogical Society
of Los Angeles cordially invites you to a very special program with Mr.
Valery Bazarov, Family History Specialist for HIAS - The Hebrew Immigrant
Aid Society:

Thursday, November 16, 2006, 7:30 p.m..

Skirball Cultural Center, Magnin Auditorium, 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd., Los
Angeles, CA

Program: The Genealogist as a Detective: Mining the Records of HIAS and YIVO

from the first flood Eastern European Jewry in the 1880s to the rescue of
the remaining Jews of Iraq during the last conflict, the Hebrew Immigrant
Aid Society has been instrumental in bringing about four million Jews to the
United States. During the Holocaust HIAS played a major role in an organized
rescue operation, working in territories occupied by the Nazis, and after
the war, it was instrumental in bringing thousands of displaced Jews to the
United States. In the 1970s they facilitated the massive exodus of Jews >from
the Soviet Union.

How can a genealogical researcher make use of these records to learn more
about relatives who might have been helped by HIAS? Mr. Bazarov will show
how genealogy and detective investigation have more than a superficial
similarity, and how--with the help of archival documents--one can fill in
the blanks and reconnect with missing family. In addition to offering case
studies he will demonstrate the scope of HIAS and YIVO archives so
researchers can learn the best methods for beginning their own research.

Speaker: Valery Bazarov was born in Russia in 1942 and immigrated to the
United States in 1988. He holds two graduate degrees >from Odessa State
University (1969) and Hunter College of the City University of New York
(1994). Mr. Bazarov joined the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society in 1988 and over
the next decade assisted the arrival of more than 200,000 Jewish refugees
who came to the United States under HIAS auspices. He is currently
responsible for the HIAS Location and Family History Service, helping
immigrants of different generations find family members and friends – often
in other countries – with whom they’ve lost contact over the years…sometimes
decades. He is especially committed to finding and honoring the heroes who
rescued European Jews during the Holocaust. Mr. Bazarov also researches HIAS
history, presents his findings in lectures and publications and is a
frequent lecturer at the international seminars on Jewish genealogy. He
travels frequently to Eastern Europe ( Poland and Ukraine) where he works in
various archives to locate documents related directly to HIAS activities,
spanning the last 100 years.

Please Note: This meeting will take place on a Thursday, when the Skirball
exhibitions are open and free of charge, >from noon to 9 p.m.

Current exhibits: “On the Couch: Cartoons >from The New Yorker” and “Visions
and Values: Jewish Life >from Antiquity to America," and "Hanukkah Lamps >from
Italy." For more details go to:
http://www.skirball.org.

Come early to tour the galleries and enjoy a light dinner >from the Skirball
food cart prior to our program.

The JGSLA's Spiszman traveling library, offering a range of books useful for
Jewish genealogical research will be available, with our volunteers on hand
to answer your questions, >from 6:45PM - 7:30PM in the auditorium.

There is no charge for members. Guests are welcome. There is a $5.00 fee for
guests, which can be applied to JGSLA membership dues. Membership is based
on the calendar year, but new memberships will extend through 2007 and
include the 2006 issues of the JGSLA Journal, Roots-Key.

Directions and further information are available at:

JGSLA Home Page: http://www.jgsla.org
Meeting Info:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgsla/Meeting%20Pages/Nov_16_2006_Mtg.htm
HIAS info: http://www.hias.org
YIVO info: http://www.yivo.org

We look forward to welcoming you at this informative program.

Pamela Weisberger
Program Chair, JGSLA
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Los Angeles-Nov.16th-HIAS/Valery Bazarov JGLSA Program #general

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

If you live in the greater Los Angeles area, the Jewish Genealogical Society
of Los Angeles cordially invites you to a very special program with Mr.
Valery Bazarov, Family History Specialist for HIAS - The Hebrew Immigrant
Aid Society:

Thursday, November 16, 2006, 7:30 p.m..

Skirball Cultural Center, Magnin Auditorium, 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd., Los
Angeles, CA

Program: The Genealogist as a Detective: Mining the Records of HIAS and YIVO

from the first flood Eastern European Jewry in the 1880s to the rescue of
the remaining Jews of Iraq during the last conflict, the Hebrew Immigrant
Aid Society has been instrumental in bringing about four million Jews to the
United States. During the Holocaust HIAS played a major role in an organized
rescue operation, working in territories occupied by the Nazis, and after
the war, it was instrumental in bringing thousands of displaced Jews to the
United States. In the 1970s they facilitated the massive exodus of Jews >from
the Soviet Union.

How can a genealogical researcher make use of these records to learn more
about relatives who might have been helped by HIAS? Mr. Bazarov will show
how genealogy and detective investigation have more than a superficial
similarity, and how--with the help of archival documents--one can fill in
the blanks and reconnect with missing family. In addition to offering case
studies he will demonstrate the scope of HIAS and YIVO archives so
researchers can learn the best methods for beginning their own research.

Speaker: Valery Bazarov was born in Russia in 1942 and immigrated to the
United States in 1988. He holds two graduate degrees >from Odessa State
University (1969) and Hunter College of the City University of New York
(1994). Mr. Bazarov joined the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society in 1988 and over
the next decade assisted the arrival of more than 200,000 Jewish refugees
who came to the United States under HIAS auspices. He is currently
responsible for the HIAS Location and Family History Service, helping
immigrants of different generations find family members and friends – often
in other countries – with whom they’ve lost contact over the years…sometimes
decades. He is especially committed to finding and honoring the heroes who
rescued European Jews during the Holocaust. Mr. Bazarov also researches HIAS
history, presents his findings in lectures and publications and is a
frequent lecturer at the international seminars on Jewish genealogy. He
travels frequently to Eastern Europe ( Poland and Ukraine) where he works in
various archives to locate documents related directly to HIAS activities,
spanning the last 100 years.

Please Note: This meeting will take place on a Thursday, when the Skirball
exhibitions are open and free of charge, >from noon to 9 p.m.

Current exhibits: “On the Couch: Cartoons >from The New Yorker” and “Visions
and Values: Jewish Life >from Antiquity to America," and "Hanukkah Lamps >from
Italy." For more details go to:
http://www.skirball.org.

Come early to tour the galleries and enjoy a light dinner >from the Skirball
food cart prior to our program.

The JGSLA's Spiszman traveling library, offering a range of books useful for
Jewish genealogical research will be available, with our volunteers on hand
to answer your questions, >from 6:45PM - 7:30PM in the auditorium.

There is no charge for members. Guests are welcome. There is a $5.00 fee for
guests, which can be applied to JGSLA membership dues. Membership is based
on the calendar year, but new memberships will extend through 2007 and
include the 2006 issues of the JGSLA Journal, Roots-Key.

Directions and further information are available at:

JGSLA Home Page: http://www.jgsla.org
Meeting Info:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgsla/Meeting%20Pages/Nov_16_2006_Mtg.htm
HIAS info: http://www.hias.org
YIVO info: http://www.yivo.org

We look forward to welcoming you at this informative program.

Pamela Weisberger
Program Chair, JGSLA
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@...