Date   

Re: Israel cemetery search #general

Asher <aarbit1@...>
 

The first place to look for burials in Israel is BillionGraves.com.
Although work continues, the majority of the gravestones in the country
have been photographed and transcribed.

Searches are free. You must type the name in the language that appears
on the gravestone, which is usually Hebrew.

Asher Arbit
Jerusalem


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Israel cemetery search #general

Asher <aarbit1@...>
 

The first place to look for burials in Israel is BillionGraves.com.
Although work continues, the majority of the gravestones in the country
have been photographed and transcribed.

Searches are free. You must type the name in the language that appears
on the gravestone, which is usually Hebrew.

Asher Arbit
Jerusalem


Re: Israel cemetery search #general

Dahn Cukier
 

Hello,

At any time after 1950, the person would probably be buried in Jerusalem.
Mt of Olives, which is/was listed online. There is a group photographing
the graves. The index may be offset >from the actual photo by a few graves.
If the grave was destroyed by Jordan between 1948-1967. there may not
be records.

Sanhedria was very close to the ceasefire line and use was being
discontinued since 1948. A number of small cemeteries were opened and
closed. The grave were supposed to be moved to Har Hamenuchot, but not
all were moved.

The only way to find a Jerusalem grave is to call the 10+
burial societies (chavri kadisha).

There are 3 Ashkanazi and a general Jerusalem.

If a person has family elsewhere, they may be buried at a local cemetery.
Did the person have family outside Jerusalem? Remember that in those
years the trip to Jerusalem >from Lod was over 90 minutes

I once looked for a grave in Yavneh >from 1952. There is no listing of graves
from those years, so I walked around the small old Yavneh cemetery
until I found a grave marker with the first and father's name and a date.
There was no family name.

Please contact me off-list.

Searching and photography of graves by request is a hobby.
But I cannot get to Jerusalem, and I still have to get myself to Metulla.

Dani

Dahn Cukier
BRIEFF, LISS, CUKIER, ZUCKER, SKLAVOUR


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Israel cemetery search #general

Dahn Cukier
 

Hello,

At any time after 1950, the person would probably be buried in Jerusalem.
Mt of Olives, which is/was listed online. There is a group photographing
the graves. The index may be offset >from the actual photo by a few graves.
If the grave was destroyed by Jordan between 1948-1967. there may not
be records.

Sanhedria was very close to the ceasefire line and use was being
discontinued since 1948. A number of small cemeteries were opened and
closed. The grave were supposed to be moved to Har Hamenuchot, but not
all were moved.

The only way to find a Jerusalem grave is to call the 10+
burial societies (chavri kadisha).

There are 3 Ashkanazi and a general Jerusalem.

If a person has family elsewhere, they may be buried at a local cemetery.
Did the person have family outside Jerusalem? Remember that in those
years the trip to Jerusalem >from Lod was over 90 minutes

I once looked for a grave in Yavneh >from 1952. There is no listing of graves
from those years, so I walked around the small old Yavneh cemetery
until I found a grave marker with the first and father's name and a date.
There was no family name.

Please contact me off-list.

Searching and photography of graves by request is a hobby.
But I cannot get to Jerusalem, and I still have to get myself to Metulla.

Dani

Dahn Cukier
BRIEFF, LISS, CUKIER, ZUCKER, SKLAVOUR


Re: Naming Pattern among Ashkenazic Jews #general

hfpjc
 

The tradition of parents alternating when choosing names (mother
first, father second and so on) is very popular among many Hassidic
communities. The tradition goes even further to the second generation,
i.e. when a son/daughter gets a turn to name a baby >from his/her
family, the grandparents choose the name according to the above
pattern, except if there was a recent death in the family.

Rifky Gelbman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Naming Pattern among Ashkenazic Jews #general

hfpjc
 

The tradition of parents alternating when choosing names (mother
first, father second and so on) is very popular among many Hassidic
communities. The tradition goes even further to the second generation,
i.e. when a son/daughter gets a turn to name a baby >from his/her
family, the grandparents choose the name according to the above
pattern, except if there was a recent death in the family.

Rifky Gelbman


Re: Naming pattern among Ashkenazic Jews #general

Adam Cherson
 

Dear Herbert,

Thanks for this summary.

I wonder what is the convention for a son's name if the father's father
is still alive, or mother's mother is still alive in the case of a
daughter?

Would it be the father's paternal grandfather's name for the son or the
mother's maternal grandmother's for the daughter?

Thanks,
Adam Cherson
NY, NY

---
From: Herbert Lazerow <lazer@sandiego.edu>
Date: Tue, 4 Dec 2018 11:34:34 -0800

The naming pattern for eastern European Ashkenazi Jews was:
1. A child is named for a deceased ancestor or a deceased highly
respected person, but never for a living person. Subject to that rule:
2. The first son is named for its father's father; the second son
for its mother's father.
3. The first daughter is named for its mother's mother; the second
daughter for its father's mother.
4. If someone cannot have a namesake in the normal order of rules
2 or 3 because they are still alive at the appropriate time, the next
baby of the appropriate sex to be born after the death of that person
will be named for that person.
5. When the child's father dies during the pregnancy, the child is
named after the child's father if the child is a boy.
After that, I do not think there was a rule.
One must remember that this is only a custom. Individuals could,
and sometimes did, disregard custom.
Bert


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Naming pattern among Ashkenazic Jews #general

Adam Cherson
 

Dear Herbert,

Thanks for this summary.

I wonder what is the convention for a son's name if the father's father
is still alive, or mother's mother is still alive in the case of a
daughter?

Would it be the father's paternal grandfather's name for the son or the
mother's maternal grandmother's for the daughter?

Thanks,
Adam Cherson
NY, NY

---
From: Herbert Lazerow <lazer@sandiego.edu>
Date: Tue, 4 Dec 2018 11:34:34 -0800

The naming pattern for eastern European Ashkenazi Jews was:
1. A child is named for a deceased ancestor or a deceased highly
respected person, but never for a living person. Subject to that rule:
2. The first son is named for its father's father; the second son
for its mother's father.
3. The first daughter is named for its mother's mother; the second
daughter for its father's mother.
4. If someone cannot have a namesake in the normal order of rules
2 or 3 because they are still alive at the appropriate time, the next
baby of the appropriate sex to be born after the death of that person
will be named for that person.
5. When the child's father dies during the pregnancy, the child is
named after the child's father if the child is a boy.
After that, I do not think there was a rule.
One must remember that this is only a custom. Individuals could,
and sometimes did, disregard custom.
Bert


Re: Naming pattern among Ashkenazic Jews #general

Jenny Schwartzberg
 

Re the naming pattern for Ashkenazi Jews, I have a question. My
family has assumed that my great-grandparents Schwartzberg's first
two children, Sam and Sara, born in Gniewoszow/Granica, Russia-Poland,
in the 1890s, were named for my great-grandmother's parents, since she
was an orphan and my great-grandfather's parents were still living at
that time.

They were pretty religious >from all accounts since they brought two
Torahs with them to the US and had a mikveh bath in the basement of
their home in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan.

Does the religiosity mean that they were more likely to have named for
the father's side of the family first?

Yours,
Jenny Schwartzberg
Chicago, IL


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Naming pattern among Ashkenazic Jews #general

Jenny Schwartzberg
 

Re the naming pattern for Ashkenazi Jews, I have a question. My
family has assumed that my great-grandparents Schwartzberg's first
two children, Sam and Sara, born in Gniewoszow/Granica, Russia-Poland,
in the 1890s, were named for my great-grandmother's parents, since she
was an orphan and my great-grandfather's parents were still living at
that time.

They were pretty religious >from all accounts since they brought two
Torahs with them to the US and had a mikveh bath in the basement of
their home in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan.

Does the religiosity mean that they were more likely to have named for
the father's side of the family first?

Yours,
Jenny Schwartzberg
Chicago, IL


Chanukah in Galicia #galicia

Sharon Taylor
 

I am currently researching the celebration of Chanukah in Galicia. I
am looking for specifics, preferably >from first hand accounts. Does
anyone know of any family pages, Yizkor books or websites that
might have this specific information? My family was >from rural
eastern Galicia, so accounts >from that area would be especially
useful.

Many thanks!
Sharon Taylor
stay9045@verizon.net

Researching Nemeth, Ingier, Ungar, Kastenbaum, Wiesner and Fleissig


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Chanukah in Galicia #galicia

Sharon Taylor
 

I am currently researching the celebration of Chanukah in Galicia. I
am looking for specifics, preferably >from first hand accounts. Does
anyone know of any family pages, Yizkor books or websites that
might have this specific information? My family was >from rural
eastern Galicia, so accounts >from that area would be especially
useful.

Many thanks!
Sharon Taylor
stay9045@verizon.net

Researching Nemeth, Ingier, Ungar, Kastenbaum, Wiesner and Fleissig


JGSGP (Philadelphia) December 2018 Meeting #general

Marilyn Golden <mazergoldenjgsgp@...>
 

Date: Sunday, December 16, 2018
Time: 3:30 pm
Place: Reform Congregation Keneseth Israel
8339 Old York Road
Elkins Park, PA 19027
Speaker: Jeffrey Cymbler
Program: Topic: Passports for Life: The Bernese Group Rescue of
Polish Jews in WWII

Jeff earned his BA >from Yeshiva University and a JD degree >from Boston
University School of Law. A child of Holocaust survivors, he has been
an avid genealogist since 1983. Jeff was co-chair of the 11th Annual
Conference on Jewish Genealogy and Program Chairman of the 19th Annual
Conference on Jewish Genealogy. He was on the Editorial Boards of both
Jewish Roots in Ukraine and Moldova: Pages >from the Past and Archival
Inventories and Jewish Roots in Poland: Pages >from the Past and
Archival Inventories and authored chapter one of the latter book,
entitled, "Introduction to Polish-Jewish Genealogical Research."

Passports for Life is a presentation dedicated to the Polish
Envoy in Bern, Aleksander Lados, his subordinates, and members of the
Jewish community in Switzerland who in the war-time period acted hand
in hand in saving hundreds of European Jews. The members of the so
called "Bernese Group" embarked on an illicit operation aim=
ed at
massive forging of passports of Latin American countries and smuggling
them to the ghettos in Poland, Holland, France and other places in the
German-occupied Europe. A noticeable, yet differential, number of
bearers of the passports managed to survive the war. Some of survivors
are still alive today.
The presentation will depict the origins of the covert operation,
its protagonists, division of work among the members (half of them
were Polish Jews), modus operandi of the group and consequences of
their activity. A significant number of widely unknown documents and
photographs will accompany the presentation, including forged
passports, Nazi era postal communications >from Polish ghettos to
Switzerland, a database which is being developed of the passports,
diplomatic correspondence and ledgers of the names and personal data
of Jews for whom passports were procured.

Marilyn Golden
mazergoldenjgsgp@gmail.com


JGS of Georgia meeting Sun, Dec 16, 2018 #general

Peggy Freedman <peggyf@...>
 

On Sunday, December 16, Professor Ellie Schainker of Emory University
will speak to the JGS of Georgia on "Researching 19th Century Jewish
Life in the Russian Archives: Converts, Missionaries, and Religious
Disputes."

Professor Ellie Schainker has studied lives of ordinary Jews living in
Imperial Russia who chose to convert to Christianity. Using rare
materials >from archives in Russia and the United States, she has studied
converts >from among the lower classes and rural populations. These are
not successful professionals who converted to Christianity to pursue a
career, but cases of love with a Christian neighbor, people influenced
by missionaries, and people escaping bad marriages. Rather than being
expelled >from the community, many of these converts continued to live
near their parents and family.

Professor Schainker will share with us the kinds of material that can be
found in Russian Archives and the stories that she found while doing the
research for her book. This is a rare opportunity to hear about archival
research in Russia.

The meeting will be held at The Breman Museum, 1440 Spring Street,
Atlanta, GA. There will be mentoring and social time beginning at
1:00. Professor Schainker's talk will begin at 2:00.

The meeting is free for Members. For visitors, participation in this
event is included in the cost of general museum admission.

Peggy Mosinger Freedman
Jewish Genealogical Society of Georgia
http://jgsg.org/


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGSGP (Philadelphia) December 2018 Meeting #general

Marilyn Golden <mazergoldenjgsgp@...>
 

Date: Sunday, December 16, 2018
Time: 3:30 pm
Place: Reform Congregation Keneseth Israel
8339 Old York Road
Elkins Park, PA 19027
Speaker: Jeffrey Cymbler
Program: Topic: Passports for Life: The Bernese Group Rescue of
Polish Jews in WWII

Jeff earned his BA >from Yeshiva University and a JD degree >from Boston
University School of Law. A child of Holocaust survivors, he has been
an avid genealogist since 1983. Jeff was co-chair of the 11th Annual
Conference on Jewish Genealogy and Program Chairman of the 19th Annual
Conference on Jewish Genealogy. He was on the Editorial Boards of both
Jewish Roots in Ukraine and Moldova: Pages >from the Past and Archival
Inventories and Jewish Roots in Poland: Pages >from the Past and
Archival Inventories and authored chapter one of the latter book,
entitled, "Introduction to Polish-Jewish Genealogical Research."

Passports for Life is a presentation dedicated to the Polish
Envoy in Bern, Aleksander Lados, his subordinates, and members of the
Jewish community in Switzerland who in the war-time period acted hand
in hand in saving hundreds of European Jews. The members of the so
called "Bernese Group" embarked on an illicit operation aim=
ed at
massive forging of passports of Latin American countries and smuggling
them to the ghettos in Poland, Holland, France and other places in the
German-occupied Europe. A noticeable, yet differential, number of
bearers of the passports managed to survive the war. Some of survivors
are still alive today.
The presentation will depict the origins of the covert operation,
its protagonists, division of work among the members (half of them
were Polish Jews), modus operandi of the group and consequences of
their activity. A significant number of widely unknown documents and
photographs will accompany the presentation, including forged
passports, Nazi era postal communications >from Polish ghettos to
Switzerland, a database which is being developed of the passports,
diplomatic correspondence and ledgers of the names and personal data
of Jews for whom passports were procured.

Marilyn Golden
mazergoldenjgsgp@gmail.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGS of Georgia meeting Sun, Dec 16, 2018 #general

Peggy Freedman <peggyf@...>
 

On Sunday, December 16, Professor Ellie Schainker of Emory University
will speak to the JGS of Georgia on "Researching 19th Century Jewish
Life in the Russian Archives: Converts, Missionaries, and Religious
Disputes."

Professor Ellie Schainker has studied lives of ordinary Jews living in
Imperial Russia who chose to convert to Christianity. Using rare
materials >from archives in Russia and the United States, she has studied
converts >from among the lower classes and rural populations. These are
not successful professionals who converted to Christianity to pursue a
career, but cases of love with a Christian neighbor, people influenced
by missionaries, and people escaping bad marriages. Rather than being
expelled >from the community, many of these converts continued to live
near their parents and family.

Professor Schainker will share with us the kinds of material that can be
found in Russian Archives and the stories that she found while doing the
research for her book. This is a rare opportunity to hear about archival
research in Russia.

The meeting will be held at The Breman Museum, 1440 Spring Street,
Atlanta, GA. There will be mentoring and social time beginning at
1:00. Professor Schainker's talk will begin at 2:00.

The meeting is free for Members. For visitors, participation in this
event is included in the cost of general museum admission.

Peggy Mosinger Freedman
Jewish Genealogical Society of Georgia
http://jgsg.org/


ITMAN - JewishGen and Yad Vashem #general

Angie Elfassi
 

Hi,

On JewishGen, I have found the death of a relative
Itman, Jankelis s/o Abramas Ickas and Sore Etel died in Stakliskes
died 11th November 1930, aged 68 years.

On Yad Vashem I have found the death of
Chaim Yakov, born about 1882, husband of Henia, nee FINK. He was
murdered in 1942.

According to my records, 'my' Chaim Yankel ITMAN was married to Gena
Funkaite/Funk.

My records are taken >from JewishGen.

Any suggestion would be much appreciated about when Chaim Yakov actually
died.

Regards
Angie Elfassi
Yehud, Israel

Searching:
RAYKH-ZELIGMAN/RICHMAN, Stakliskes, Lithuania/Leeds
COHEN, Sakiai, Lithuania/Leeds
MAGIDOWITZ, Jurbarkas, Lithuania/Leeds
KASSIMOFF, Rezekne, Latvia/Leeds
ITMAN, Stakliskes, Lithuania/USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ITMAN - JewishGen and Yad Vashem #general

Angie Elfassi
 

Hi,

On JewishGen, I have found the death of a relative
Itman, Jankelis s/o Abramas Ickas and Sore Etel died in Stakliskes
died 11th November 1930, aged 68 years.

On Yad Vashem I have found the death of
Chaim Yakov, born about 1882, husband of Henia, nee FINK. He was
murdered in 1942.

According to my records, 'my' Chaim Yankel ITMAN was married to Gena
Funkaite/Funk.

My records are taken >from JewishGen.

Any suggestion would be much appreciated about when Chaim Yakov actually
died.

Regards
Angie Elfassi
Yehud, Israel

Searching:
RAYKH-ZELIGMAN/RICHMAN, Stakliskes, Lithuania/Leeds
COHEN, Sakiai, Lithuania/Leeds
MAGIDOWITZ, Jurbarkas, Lithuania/Leeds
KASSIMOFF, Rezekne, Latvia/Leeds
ITMAN, Stakliskes, Lithuania/USA


Re: Naming Pattern among Ashkenazic Jews #general

Judith Singer
 

I have never heard of a tradition that the mother could choose the
name of the first child and the father the second, or vice versa.
Among Eastern European Jews, most important was the custom that a
child not be named after a living relative - though two cousins might
both be named after the same grandfather, so duplication existed.
Generally, the first son was named after the paternal grandfather (if
he had died). In some families, the sons tended to be named after the
deceased relatives of the father and the girls after the deceased
relatives of the mother, in the order of grandparents first,
particularly revered ancestors next, then uncles and aunts of the
parents. In other families, all the children were named after the
deceased relatives of the father, leading to very clear naming
patterns detectable in successive generations. My experience is mainly
with Litvaks and the customs among Ukrainian or Romanian Jews or among
Chasidim might have been somewhat different.

JewishGen has some information about this at
https://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/GivenNames/slide7.html and a few
subsequent slides. Both you and JewishGen refer to naming traditions
among "Ashkenazic Jews", but the Ashkenazim include German Jews, who
by the 19th century did not adhere strongly to naming traditions, and
a variety of Eastern and Central European Jews. Customs differed
somewhat >from region to region.

Judith Singer


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Naming Pattern among Ashkenazic Jews #general

Judith Singer
 

I have never heard of a tradition that the mother could choose the
name of the first child and the father the second, or vice versa.
Among Eastern European Jews, most important was the custom that a
child not be named after a living relative - though two cousins might
both be named after the same grandfather, so duplication existed.
Generally, the first son was named after the paternal grandfather (if
he had died). In some families, the sons tended to be named after the
deceased relatives of the father and the girls after the deceased
relatives of the mother, in the order of grandparents first,
particularly revered ancestors next, then uncles and aunts of the
parents. In other families, all the children were named after the
deceased relatives of the father, leading to very clear naming
patterns detectable in successive generations. My experience is mainly
with Litvaks and the customs among Ukrainian or Romanian Jews or among
Chasidim might have been somewhat different.

JewishGen has some information about this at
https://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/GivenNames/slide7.html and a few
subsequent slides. Both you and JewishGen refer to naming traditions
among "Ashkenazic Jews", but the Ashkenazim include German Jews, who
by the 19th century did not adhere strongly to naming traditions, and
a variety of Eastern and Central European Jews. Customs differed
somewhat >from region to region.

Judith Singer

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