Date   
Re: Are these surnames CHAVATSIK, QUACHICK, SWARTCHIK typically Jewish/Russian? #general

Alain SIELIONTCHIK <dominoman@...>
 

If it can help you, my name is SIELIONTCHIK (original spelling SELONCZYK or
SELUNCZYK following the signature on the wedding certificate of my
grandparents and on the birth certificate of my fathter) and my father's
family were Jewish people >from a part of ancient Poland which is now in
Ukraine.

As far as I also found some SHELONSHIK on JRI Poland, who were obviously
relatives of my grand father, it seems that a lot of spelling can exist for
a given surname.

Alain SIELIONTCHIK
Charleroi
Belgium

Hi
I recently posted a message about my ancestors surnames but unfortunately
received no replies, so am now trying to look at it >from a different angle.
So, my apologies to everyone for the similarities to my previous message.
My great grandmothers given name was Valia (I also can't find the meaning of
this) and the problem I'm encountering is the surname variations I have for
her. On her marriage cert it says her maiden name was CHAVATSIK?, her
fathers name is MARK? CHAVALICK? - both these spellings are based on my own
interpretation of the handwritting on the cert so obviously may be
incorrect. It then becomes confusing as on her childrens birth certs it says
her maiden name was QUACHICK, QUARCHICK, SWARTCHIK. I am currently waiting
for a further 2 birth certs, but I'm not sure these will help, especially if
the surnames are completely different again! Valia originated form
Vinnitsa, Russia (now the Ukraine I think), and came over to the UK in
approx. 1907.
What I am wondering and would like some help with is whether the surnames I
have stated can be classed as typically Jewish/Russian? If not, do
experienced genners have any idea what the original surname may have been
bearing in mind the area she came from? I realise that many surnames were
mistranscribed due to the language barrier and the fact that many people
were unable to read or write English so if a mistake was made they would be
unaware of this. I have tried my best to imagine how the surname would have
sounded spoken in broken English and all the variants this may have thrown
up but I'm not having much luck. I have tried all the above surnames in many
search engines and sites and haven't found anything.
Incidentally, Valia also had siblings ( I believe sisters) who emigrated to
America. Correspondence was continued up until WWII but then lost.
Unfortunately I haven't found anything out about them because the letters
have been lost and of course the surname problems.
Any help would be greatly appreciated
Many thanks
Michelle Chaffey

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Are these surnames CHAVATSIK, QUACHICK, SWARTCHIK typically Jewish/Russian? #general

Alain SIELIONTCHIK <dominoman@...>
 

If it can help you, my name is SIELIONTCHIK (original spelling SELONCZYK or
SELUNCZYK following the signature on the wedding certificate of my
grandparents and on the birth certificate of my fathter) and my father's
family were Jewish people >from a part of ancient Poland which is now in
Ukraine.

As far as I also found some SHELONSHIK on JRI Poland, who were obviously
relatives of my grand father, it seems that a lot of spelling can exist for
a given surname.

Alain SIELIONTCHIK
Charleroi
Belgium

Hi
I recently posted a message about my ancestors surnames but unfortunately
received no replies, so am now trying to look at it >from a different angle.
So, my apologies to everyone for the similarities to my previous message.
My great grandmothers given name was Valia (I also can't find the meaning of
this) and the problem I'm encountering is the surname variations I have for
her. On her marriage cert it says her maiden name was CHAVATSIK?, her
fathers name is MARK? CHAVALICK? - both these spellings are based on my own
interpretation of the handwritting on the cert so obviously may be
incorrect. It then becomes confusing as on her childrens birth certs it says
her maiden name was QUACHICK, QUARCHICK, SWARTCHIK. I am currently waiting
for a further 2 birth certs, but I'm not sure these will help, especially if
the surnames are completely different again! Valia originated form
Vinnitsa, Russia (now the Ukraine I think), and came over to the UK in
approx. 1907.
What I am wondering and would like some help with is whether the surnames I
have stated can be classed as typically Jewish/Russian? If not, do
experienced genners have any idea what the original surname may have been
bearing in mind the area she came from? I realise that many surnames were
mistranscribed due to the language barrier and the fact that many people
were unable to read or write English so if a mistake was made they would be
unaware of this. I have tried my best to imagine how the surname would have
sounded spoken in broken English and all the variants this may have thrown
up but I'm not having much luck. I have tried all the above surnames in many
search engines and sites and haven't found anything.
Incidentally, Valia also had siblings ( I believe sisters) who emigrated to
America. Correspondence was continued up until WWII but then lost.
Unfortunately I haven't found anything out about them because the letters
have been lost and of course the surname problems.
Any help would be greatly appreciated
Many thanks
Michelle Chaffey

New IAJGS Conference Story on Ynet News #general

Joy Rich <joyrichny@...>
 

A new article about the IAJGS conference (August 13th-18th in Manhattan, NY)
is now online at Ynet News at
http://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7340,L-3244407,00.html.

The article, "It's All Relative: Getting down to it. Global Jewish genealogists
prepare for an intense annual event offering 180-plus programs," written by
Schelly Talalay Dardashti, describes the depth and breadth of
the conference, which includes topics ranging >from toYizkor books to using
Geographic Information System (GIS) tools to teaching family history to children
and adults to klezmer music to Turkish marriage and burial
records to restoring Jewish cemeteries in Poland to...just about anything else
you can think of.

I think you'll find the article - and the conference - of great interest.

Joy

Joy Rich
Co-chair, Repositories Committee
International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies
26th Annual Conference on Jewish Genealogy
New York City
August 13-18, 2006

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen New IAJGS Conference Story on Ynet News #general

Joy Rich <joyrichny@...>
 

A new article about the IAJGS conference (August 13th-18th in Manhattan, NY)
is now online at Ynet News at
http://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7340,L-3244407,00.html.

The article, "It's All Relative: Getting down to it. Global Jewish genealogists
prepare for an intense annual event offering 180-plus programs," written by
Schelly Talalay Dardashti, describes the depth and breadth of
the conference, which includes topics ranging >from toYizkor books to using
Geographic Information System (GIS) tools to teaching family history to children
and adults to klezmer music to Turkish marriage and burial
records to restoring Jewish cemeteries in Poland to...just about anything else
you can think of.

I think you'll find the article - and the conference - of great interest.

Joy

Joy Rich
Co-chair, Repositories Committee
International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies
26th Annual Conference on Jewish Genealogy
New York City
August 13-18, 2006

Establishing who is a convert #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 4/27/2006 8:04:47 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
julierog@... writes:

< Well, the first step is to determine what country and, if possible, what
city the person lived in around that time.

< Next, share with others (say, this mailing list) the reasons that you
believe this person did or did not convert, along with any other
information you think might be useful--such as the names of relatives,
spouses, etc.

< With such information in hand, some of us might be able to give you
assistance. >

==Traditional Judaism says that it is a grievous sin to remind a person that
[s]he is a convert. It is possible that this is so only if the reminder is
meant to castigate or humiliate the convert, but in general, it is something
that traditional Jews avoid. I assume that inquiring whether a person is a
convert, or assisting such an inquiry, does not rank high on the list of virtue.
[I used the word "Traditional" advisedly. I am not familiar with the rules
of the reformed branches of Judaism.]

==While that information may be essential for some strictly ritual purposes
(e.g. for matters of marriage, divorce and status of children) official and
quasi official record keepers would share their information only on a
need-to-know basis.

==If you think that someone in your ancestral line may have been born into a
gentile family, you could check out the birth family and see what other
family records exist, especially church or parish records.

==For ritual purposes, it is common for a convert to adopt the patronymic
"ben/bat Avraham Avinu" [son/daughter of our Patriarch Abraham] and the
matronymic "ben/bat Sarah Immeinu" [son/daughter of our Matriarch Sarah].
That name may be entered in a ketubah or on a tombstone, and would serve as a
obvious clue.

Michael Bernet, New York

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Establishing who is a convert #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 4/27/2006 8:04:47 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
julierog@... writes:

< Well, the first step is to determine what country and, if possible, what
city the person lived in around that time.

< Next, share with others (say, this mailing list) the reasons that you
believe this person did or did not convert, along with any other
information you think might be useful--such as the names of relatives,
spouses, etc.

< With such information in hand, some of us might be able to give you
assistance. >

==Traditional Judaism says that it is a grievous sin to remind a person that
[s]he is a convert. It is possible that this is so only if the reminder is
meant to castigate or humiliate the convert, but in general, it is something
that traditional Jews avoid. I assume that inquiring whether a person is a
convert, or assisting such an inquiry, does not rank high on the list of virtue.
[I used the word "Traditional" advisedly. I am not familiar with the rules
of the reformed branches of Judaism.]

==While that information may be essential for some strictly ritual purposes
(e.g. for matters of marriage, divorce and status of children) official and
quasi official record keepers would share their information only on a
need-to-know basis.

==If you think that someone in your ancestral line may have been born into a
gentile family, you could check out the birth family and see what other
family records exist, especially church or parish records.

==For ritual purposes, it is common for a convert to adopt the patronymic
"ben/bat Avraham Avinu" [son/daughter of our Patriarch Abraham] and the
matronymic "ben/bat Sarah Immeinu" [son/daughter of our Matriarch Sarah].
That name may be entered in a ketubah or on a tombstone, and would serve as a
obvious clue.

Michael Bernet, New York

Re: Once Upon A Time in Lithuania; Book and Exhibition by Naomi Alexander #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

"Saul Issroff" <saul@...> wrote
JGSGB member Naomi Alexander has produced a book : "Once Upon A Time in
Lithuania". Sketches and paintings. There is also an exhibition that will
show old Jewish homes and synagogues of Lithuania.
Note: JGSGB = Jewish Genealogy Society of Great Britain

--
Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland) WEITZMAN (Cracow), WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany)
KOHN/WEISSKOPF (Wallerstein and Kleinerdlingen,Germany) LANDAU (only adopted
on leaving Belarus or later)/FREDKIN (?) (Gomel, Mogilev, Chernigov, Belarus)

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Once Upon A Time in Lithuania; Book and Exhibition by Naomi Alexander #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

"Saul Issroff" <saul@...> wrote
JGSGB member Naomi Alexander has produced a book : "Once Upon A Time in
Lithuania". Sketches and paintings. There is also an exhibition that will
show old Jewish homes and synagogues of Lithuania.
Note: JGSGB = Jewish Genealogy Society of Great Britain

--
Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland) WEITZMAN (Cracow), WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany)
KOHN/WEISSKOPF (Wallerstein and Kleinerdlingen,Germany) LANDAU (only adopted
on leaving Belarus or later)/FREDKIN (?) (Gomel, Mogilev, Chernigov, Belarus)

Re: Your New Haven Roots - city directories #general

beyesn@...
 

I also have ancestors >from New Haven, CT (Glattsteins who became
Gladstones). In regards to City Directories for New Haven, Ancesty.com
does indeed have several available online. I can't recall what years
they have, but I found my ancestors listed in the city directories for
1903-1911. The listings are alphabetical and provide street address and
occupation. If someone departed the city, the next year's directory
lists them with a note reading something like "departed for New York
City" -- which my great-grandfather, the paternal head of the family,
did indeed do. This was interesting to read because I could also see
that his oldest son remained in New Haven.

Barry Eisenberg
Rockville, MD USA
Searching: EISENBERG, FREEDMAN, GLATTSTEIN/GLADSTONE, KLIGER,
MENKOWITZ, ROTHSTEIN, SAMURIN, UGER

-----Original Message-----
From: Joseph Fibel <jfibel@...>
Sent: Thu, 27 Apr 2006 11:39:40 -0400

Dear Martha,

It occurs to me that if you can't find any Census traces of the family that
you knew was there, that they might have been using some other surname.
Is this possible?

Alternately, I would be looking for N.H> City Directories for those years
although I don't know how you would get them in Israel. Here, they are
available in big city and University Libraries and of course the Library of
VCongress and they are also available thru the Mormon Family History
Libraries.

There is also a book called The Jews in New Haven, a publication of the
Jewish Historical Society of New Haven 1978, which Society you might also
contact. This info >from Hal Bookbinder and Joan Rimmon's listing of North
American Community Books >from the Syllabus of the J G Seminar for the 2000
Seminar which has now been transferred to the iajgs.org site and additional
books have been added.

If you know their Synagogue you could contact them also. Maybe somebody
made a history of the Synagogue.

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Your New Haven Roots - city directories #general

beyesn@...
 

I also have ancestors >from New Haven, CT (Glattsteins who became
Gladstones). In regards to City Directories for New Haven, Ancesty.com
does indeed have several available online. I can't recall what years
they have, but I found my ancestors listed in the city directories for
1903-1911. The listings are alphabetical and provide street address and
occupation. If someone departed the city, the next year's directory
lists them with a note reading something like "departed for New York
City" -- which my great-grandfather, the paternal head of the family,
did indeed do. This was interesting to read because I could also see
that his oldest son remained in New Haven.

Barry Eisenberg
Rockville, MD USA
Searching: EISENBERG, FREEDMAN, GLATTSTEIN/GLADSTONE, KLIGER,
MENKOWITZ, ROTHSTEIN, SAMURIN, UGER

-----Original Message-----
From: Joseph Fibel <jfibel@...>
Sent: Thu, 27 Apr 2006 11:39:40 -0400

Dear Martha,

It occurs to me that if you can't find any Census traces of the family that
you knew was there, that they might have been using some other surname.
Is this possible?

Alternately, I would be looking for N.H> City Directories for those years
although I don't know how you would get them in Israel. Here, they are
available in big city and University Libraries and of course the Library of
VCongress and they are also available thru the Mormon Family History
Libraries.

There is also a book called The Jews in New Haven, a publication of the
Jewish Historical Society of New Haven 1978, which Society you might also
contact. This info >from Hal Bookbinder and Joan Rimmon's listing of North
American Community Books >from the Syllabus of the J G Seminar for the 2000
Seminar which has now been transferred to the iajgs.org site and additional
books have been added.

If you know their Synagogue you could contact them also. Maybe somebody
made a history of the Synagogue.

May Meeting of Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Philadelphia #general

JGLois@...
 

May Meeting of Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Philadelphia


Date: Monday, May 8, 2006
Time: 7:45 PM
Place: The Newman Building at Gratz College
Old York Road & Melrose Avenue
Melrose Park, PA 19027

Speaker: Mark Halpern, President of the Jewish Genealogical Society
of Greater Philadelphia

Topic: "Research in Poland: JRI-Poland, The Records, and More"

Our speaker's major emphasis will be: How can family historians identify,
then acquire, and then translate records to further their research? The
history of Poland will be covered briefly, but the main focus will be on
researching Jewish roots in four distinct pre-World War I areas of the
current country of Poland - Austrian Galicia, Prussian Poland, Russian
Pale of Settlement, and Congress or Russian Poland.

In addition to being president of our society, Mark is a board member of
Jewish Records Indexing-Poland. He coordinates the JRI-Poland ordering
process, the indexing of eastern Galician records at the AGAD archives
in Warsaw and the indexing at the Bialystok Archives. Mark has been
actively researching his Polish and Galician roots for the last ten years.
He also is the originator and coordinator of BIALYGen, the Bialystok Region

Jewish Genealogy group, and coordinates a project to index and restore the
Jewish cemetery in Bialystok, Poland. Mark has written many articles for
the Galitzianer, Chronicles, Roots Key, and Avotaynu. He recently returned
from his seventh trip to Poland.
****
For all who are researching Philadelphia roots and need information on
local resources; cemeteries, funeral directors, repositories (and much
more) please visit the JGSGP website: http://www.jewishgen.org/jgsp

****
Q and A Sessions: There will be a 30 minute Question and Answer
session preceding all general meetings.

****
Interested friends are always welcome!
There is a $2.00 admission charge for non-members.
Refreshments will be served following the meeting
****
Special Announcements:

Hurray! The library is back!
Our JGSGP library collection is once again available in the Tuttleman
Library at Gratz College during regular library hours and prior to JGSGP
meetings when they are held at Gratz. A listing of our collection is
maintained on our JGSGP website http://www.jewishgen.org/jgsp;
in addition, our records are on the Gratz library computer.

Russian Special Interest Group (RIG): Next meeting is
scheduled for Sunday, May 21 at 1:30 pm, at the home of Judy Becker.
For more current information, please contact David Brill at
brilldr@...

Affiliates
Delaware County main line affiliate:
Tuesday, June 13, 7:30 pm
Speaker: Dr. Reena Sigman Friedman
Topic: East European Immigrant Jewish Family Life

****
Lois Sernoff [JGS GreaterPhiladelphia]
<JGLois@...>

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen May Meeting of Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Philadelphia #general

JGLois@...
 

May Meeting of Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Philadelphia


Date: Monday, May 8, 2006
Time: 7:45 PM
Place: The Newman Building at Gratz College
Old York Road & Melrose Avenue
Melrose Park, PA 19027

Speaker: Mark Halpern, President of the Jewish Genealogical Society
of Greater Philadelphia

Topic: "Research in Poland: JRI-Poland, The Records, and More"

Our speaker's major emphasis will be: How can family historians identify,
then acquire, and then translate records to further their research? The
history of Poland will be covered briefly, but the main focus will be on
researching Jewish roots in four distinct pre-World War I areas of the
current country of Poland - Austrian Galicia, Prussian Poland, Russian
Pale of Settlement, and Congress or Russian Poland.

In addition to being president of our society, Mark is a board member of
Jewish Records Indexing-Poland. He coordinates the JRI-Poland ordering
process, the indexing of eastern Galician records at the AGAD archives
in Warsaw and the indexing at the Bialystok Archives. Mark has been
actively researching his Polish and Galician roots for the last ten years.
He also is the originator and coordinator of BIALYGen, the Bialystok Region

Jewish Genealogy group, and coordinates a project to index and restore the
Jewish cemetery in Bialystok, Poland. Mark has written many articles for
the Galitzianer, Chronicles, Roots Key, and Avotaynu. He recently returned
from his seventh trip to Poland.
****
For all who are researching Philadelphia roots and need information on
local resources; cemeteries, funeral directors, repositories (and much
more) please visit the JGSGP website: http://www.jewishgen.org/jgsp

****
Q and A Sessions: There will be a 30 minute Question and Answer
session preceding all general meetings.

****
Interested friends are always welcome!
There is a $2.00 admission charge for non-members.
Refreshments will be served following the meeting
****
Special Announcements:

Hurray! The library is back!
Our JGSGP library collection is once again available in the Tuttleman
Library at Gratz College during regular library hours and prior to JGSGP
meetings when they are held at Gratz. A listing of our collection is
maintained on our JGSGP website http://www.jewishgen.org/jgsp;
in addition, our records are on the Gratz library computer.

Russian Special Interest Group (RIG): Next meeting is
scheduled for Sunday, May 21 at 1:30 pm, at the home of Judy Becker.
For more current information, please contact David Brill at
brilldr@...

Affiliates
Delaware County main line affiliate:
Tuesday, June 13, 7:30 pm
Speaker: Dr. Reena Sigman Friedman
Topic: East European Immigrant Jewish Family Life

****
Lois Sernoff [JGS GreaterPhiladelphia]
<JGLois@...>

3000 more vital records added to the JewishGen 's Lithuanian #general

roetenberg aaron <aaronr@...>
 

The JewishGen Lithuanian vital records translation project
has added 3000 more records >from Zemelis, Silale, Linkuva
district and Panevezys. The Panevezys records also include
the 1925-1928 birth records. To see a full list:
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Lithuania/VitalRecs.htm .
Please consider a donation at
<
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=17
and select the Lithuanian Jewish vital records box.
To search these records- Please visit the JewishGen All
Lithuania database at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Lithuania/

Aaron – project co-chair – aaronr@...

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen 3000 more vital records added to the JewishGen 's Lithuanian #general

roetenberg aaron <aaronr@...>
 

The JewishGen Lithuanian vital records translation project
has added 3000 more records >from Zemelis, Silale, Linkuva
district and Panevezys. The Panevezys records also include
the 1925-1928 birth records. To see a full list:
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Lithuania/VitalRecs.htm .
Please consider a donation at
<
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=17
and select the Lithuanian Jewish vital records box.
To search these records- Please visit the JewishGen All
Lithuania database at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Lithuania/

Aaron – project co-chair – aaronr@...

"Tolerated Farmers" #romania

ajs1pres@...
 

Dear Group,

I am looking for assistance. I have located a listing called "Tolerated
Jewish Farmers in the Bukowina (1808)".
On this list are names and a place presumably where they lived. Two
names I am very interested in are:

Name: Place:

Juda DORF Wassileu

Abraham DORF Zastawna

I know that my grandfather Harry (Chiam) DORF grew up on a farm. Many
years ago, I visited one of my grandfather's nieces (who was about the
same age as my grandfather), who mentioned a town called Vasilev. Could
this be Wassileu?

Does anyone know anything about these names or these towns? Any ideas
on where I could go to get more information on these names?

Thank you.

Bruce Wexler
Jackson, NJ

Romania SIG #Romania "Tolerated Farmers" #romania

ajs1pres@...
 

Dear Group,

I am looking for assistance. I have located a listing called "Tolerated
Jewish Farmers in the Bukowina (1808)".
On this list are names and a place presumably where they lived. Two
names I am very interested in are:

Name: Place:

Juda DORF Wassileu

Abraham DORF Zastawna

I know that my grandfather Harry (Chiam) DORF grew up on a farm. Many
years ago, I visited one of my grandfather's nieces (who was about the
same age as my grandfather), who mentioned a town called Vasilev. Could
this be Wassileu?

Does anyone know anything about these names or these towns? Any ideas
on where I could go to get more information on these names?

Thank you.

Bruce Wexler
Jackson, NJ

volunteers needed for Published by JewishGen Project #hungary

Carol W. Skydell <cskydell@...>
 

Dear JewishGenner's
We have need for volunteers with very specific skills and experience.
Please review this list of
"help wanted" and let us know if you would like to offer your time to the
Published by JewishGen project.

1. Editor and proofreader : This requires previous experience as an
editor because the role can be challenging. It involves editing material
originally written in another language and then translated into English.
The end goal is to come up with a document that maintains the integrity
and style of the writer, but observes basic English grammar. Is this
something you can do while working in a word processing program that
will ultimately be converted to a pdf file for delivery to the printer?

2. Layout editor who can take the above described material and convert it
to a pdf file following the requirements for printing.

3. Graphics editor who will take on the responsibility of designing the
cover of a book, selection of font and style and "look" of the finished product

4. Experienced advertising writer who can provide messages promoting the
finished product, not only to our own constituency but to libraries
that maintain collections relating to the topics of our publications.

If you have an interest and previous experience, please let us hear >from
you.

Carol

Carol W. Skydell, Published by JewishGen Project Manager
Vice President, JewishGen Special Projects

New Jersey Cemetery - Workmen's Circle Plot #general

Eden Joachim
 

Does anyone know of a cemetery in New Jersey which only allows flat grave markers?
My cousin, Audrey MORRIS PEDDY, dec. 1971, is buried in a Workmen's Circle plot
somewhere in New Jersey, probably central or northern part of the state, in a
cemetery that doesn't allow upright grave markers.

Any assistance is appreciated.

Eden Joachim
Pomona, New York
esjoachim@...

Hungary SIG #Hungary volunteers needed for Published by JewishGen Project #hungary

Carol W. Skydell <cskydell@...>
 

Dear JewishGenner's
We have need for volunteers with very specific skills and experience.
Please review this list of
"help wanted" and let us know if you would like to offer your time to the
Published by JewishGen project.

1. Editor and proofreader : This requires previous experience as an
editor because the role can be challenging. It involves editing material
originally written in another language and then translated into English.
The end goal is to come up with a document that maintains the integrity
and style of the writer, but observes basic English grammar. Is this
something you can do while working in a word processing program that
will ultimately be converted to a pdf file for delivery to the printer?

2. Layout editor who can take the above described material and convert it
to a pdf file following the requirements for printing.

3. Graphics editor who will take on the responsibility of designing the
cover of a book, selection of font and style and "look" of the finished product

4. Experienced advertising writer who can provide messages promoting the
finished product, not only to our own constituency but to libraries
that maintain collections relating to the topics of our publications.

If you have an interest and previous experience, please let us hear >from
you.

Carol

Carol W. Skydell, Published by JewishGen Project Manager
Vice President, JewishGen Special Projects

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen New Jersey Cemetery - Workmen's Circle Plot #general

Eden Joachim
 

Does anyone know of a cemetery in New Jersey which only allows flat grave markers?
My cousin, Audrey MORRIS PEDDY, dec. 1971, is buried in a Workmen's Circle plot
somewhere in New Jersey, probably central or northern part of the state, in a
cemetery that doesn't allow upright grave markers.

Any assistance is appreciated.

Eden Joachim
Pomona, New York
esjoachim@...