Date   

Announcing the publication of the Yekaterinoslav-Dnepropetrovsk Memorial Book (Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine) #general

Joel Alpert
 

The Yizkor-Books-In-Print Project of JewishGen is proud to announce
the publication of its 76th title,Yekaterinoslav-Dnepropetrovsk
Memorial Book (Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine)

This is a hard cover book, 11 inches by 8.5 inches with 284 pages.

Project Coordinator and Translator: Gloria Berkenstat Freund
Layout: Joel Alpert
Cover Design: Rachel Kolokoff Hopper

This book is a translation of Sefer Yekaterinoslav-Dnepropetrovsk
Original written in Hebrew
Edited by Zvi Harkavi and Yaakov Goldburt
Published by Yekaterinoslav-Dnepropetrovsk Society
Jerusalem-Tel Aviv 1973
Primary Translator: Yocheved Klausner
Cover Design:Rachel Kolokoff Hopper
Translation Project Coordinator: Marilyn Levinson
List price:$43.95 Available on Amazon for around $32 may have lower
prices elsewhere

For more information go to:
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Dnipropetrovsk.html

Detail: Jews first settled in Dnipropetrovsk (Ukraine) after its
foundation in 1778, and in 1804 the town was included in the Pale of
Settlement. The community numbered 376 in 1805 and 1,699 in 1847. With
the growth of the city in the second half of the 19th century Jews
began to move there >from other parts of Russia and played an important
role in its commerce and industry.

Pogroms occurred in Dnepropetrovsk and the vicinity on July 20-21,
1883, in which 350 homes and many Jewish shops were looted and destroyed.

By 1897 the Jewish population had increased to 41,240. Most of the
shops and houses in the city center were owned by Jews. There were
three Talmud Torah schools with 500 pupils, 885 studied in the
hadarim, and a yeshivah and 16 private schools were in operation. In
1860 a hospital was founded with 14 beds, growing to 29 in 1886. In
1880 an old age home was opened for the poor.

Pogroms again broke out on October 21=E2=80=9323, 1905, and 74 Jews were
killed, hundreds injured, and much property was looted and destroyed.
Local self-defense was organized in 1904, comprising 600 members. It
did much to protect the community.

In World War I and the civil war in Russia, thousands of Jews took
refuge in Dnepropetrovsk, which numbered 72,928 Jews in 1920. In the
Civil War (1917-20) the city changed hands a number of times,
suffering >from tributes, looting, rape, and murder. In June 1919 the
Denikin army raped about 1,000 women and in May 1919 the Grigoryev
band killed 150 Jews. After the establishment of Soviet rule, Jewish
community life ceased there as elsewhere in the Soviet Union. Zionist
activity was forbidden, and on September 18, 1922 about 1,000 were
arrested. The Jewish population numbered 62,073 in 1926

Dnepropetrovsk was occupied by the Germans on August 25, 1941. Thanks
to evacuation and flight, only about 17,000 Jews remained. In
September 179 were killed. On October 13, 13,000 Jews were
assembled and led to the botanical gardens, where they were murdered.
The remaining 2,000 Jews were executed at the end of 1941 and the
beginning of 1942. At the end of summer 1943 a unit of Operation Group
1005 opened the mass graves, burned the bodies, and dispersed the ashes.

The city was liberated on October 25, 1943, and many Jews returned.
According to the 1959 census there were 53,400 Jews living in
Dnepropetrovsk. In 1970 there was one synagogue still functioning in
the city. Subsequent census figures put the Jewish population at
45,622 in 1979 and 17,869 in 1989. Immigration to Israel diminished
the number significantly during the 1990s.

Alternate names: Dnipro [Ukr, since 2016], Dnipropetrovsk [Ukraine,
until 2016], Dnepropetrovsk [Russia, since 1926], Ekaterinoslav
[Russia, before 1926], Yekaterinoslav [Yiddish], Jekaterynoslaw,
Iekaterinoslav, Dniepropietrowsk [Polish], Dnjepropetrowsk,
Dniepropetrovsk, Dniepropetrovsk, Ekaterinoslav, Jekaterynoslaw,
Keterinoslav, Sicheslav [Russia, 1917-18], Secheslav, Siczeslaw

Dnipro, Ukraine is located at 48' N, 34' E 8240 miles ESE of
Kiev, on the Dnieper. Ukraine's fourth-largest city.

Nearby Jewish Communities:
Nizhnedneprovsk 5 miles NE
Ihren 10 miles E
Novomoskovsk 15 miles NE
Dniprodzerzhynsk 17 miles W
Synelnykove 26 miles ESE

Researchers and descendants of the town will want to have this book.

For more information go to:
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Dnipropetrovsk.html

The Yizkor-Books-In-Print Project now has 76 titles available. To see
all the books, go to: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/ybip.html

We hope you find this of interest for you and your family in
discovering the history of your ancestors. This would make a birthday
gift for a loved one.

For orders 4 or more books to one address in the US, UK, Canada or
Australia, we can offer you a significantly reduced price of $23 per
book including shipping (Amazon discount price is about $32 plus
shipping). Email to ybip@jewishgen.org

Email to ybip@jewishgen.org to get prices for other locations outside of the US.

Joel Alpert, Coordinator of the Yizkor-Books-In-Print Project


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Announcing the publication of the Yekaterinoslav-Dnepropetrovsk Memorial Book (Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine) #general

Joel Alpert
 

The Yizkor-Books-In-Print Project of JewishGen is proud to announce
the publication of its 76th title,Yekaterinoslav-Dnepropetrovsk
Memorial Book (Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine)

This is a hard cover book, 11 inches by 8.5 inches with 284 pages.

Project Coordinator and Translator: Gloria Berkenstat Freund
Layout: Joel Alpert
Cover Design: Rachel Kolokoff Hopper

This book is a translation of Sefer Yekaterinoslav-Dnepropetrovsk
Original written in Hebrew
Edited by Zvi Harkavi and Yaakov Goldburt
Published by Yekaterinoslav-Dnepropetrovsk Society
Jerusalem-Tel Aviv 1973
Primary Translator: Yocheved Klausner
Cover Design:Rachel Kolokoff Hopper
Translation Project Coordinator: Marilyn Levinson
List price:$43.95 Available on Amazon for around $32 may have lower
prices elsewhere

For more information go to:
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Dnipropetrovsk.html

Detail: Jews first settled in Dnipropetrovsk (Ukraine) after its
foundation in 1778, and in 1804 the town was included in the Pale of
Settlement. The community numbered 376 in 1805 and 1,699 in 1847. With
the growth of the city in the second half of the 19th century Jews
began to move there >from other parts of Russia and played an important
role in its commerce and industry.

Pogroms occurred in Dnepropetrovsk and the vicinity on July 20-21,
1883, in which 350 homes and many Jewish shops were looted and destroyed.

By 1897 the Jewish population had increased to 41,240. Most of the
shops and houses in the city center were owned by Jews. There were
three Talmud Torah schools with 500 pupils, 885 studied in the
hadarim, and a yeshivah and 16 private schools were in operation. In
1860 a hospital was founded with 14 beds, growing to 29 in 1886. In
1880 an old age home was opened for the poor.

Pogroms again broke out on October 21=E2=80=9323, 1905, and 74 Jews were
killed, hundreds injured, and much property was looted and destroyed.
Local self-defense was organized in 1904, comprising 600 members. It
did much to protect the community.

In World War I and the civil war in Russia, thousands of Jews took
refuge in Dnepropetrovsk, which numbered 72,928 Jews in 1920. In the
Civil War (1917-20) the city changed hands a number of times,
suffering >from tributes, looting, rape, and murder. In June 1919 the
Denikin army raped about 1,000 women and in May 1919 the Grigoryev
band killed 150 Jews. After the establishment of Soviet rule, Jewish
community life ceased there as elsewhere in the Soviet Union. Zionist
activity was forbidden, and on September 18, 1922 about 1,000 were
arrested. The Jewish population numbered 62,073 in 1926

Dnepropetrovsk was occupied by the Germans on August 25, 1941. Thanks
to evacuation and flight, only about 17,000 Jews remained. In
September 179 were killed. On October 13, 13,000 Jews were
assembled and led to the botanical gardens, where they were murdered.
The remaining 2,000 Jews were executed at the end of 1941 and the
beginning of 1942. At the end of summer 1943 a unit of Operation Group
1005 opened the mass graves, burned the bodies, and dispersed the ashes.

The city was liberated on October 25, 1943, and many Jews returned.
According to the 1959 census there were 53,400 Jews living in
Dnepropetrovsk. In 1970 there was one synagogue still functioning in
the city. Subsequent census figures put the Jewish population at
45,622 in 1979 and 17,869 in 1989. Immigration to Israel diminished
the number significantly during the 1990s.

Alternate names: Dnipro [Ukr, since 2016], Dnipropetrovsk [Ukraine,
until 2016], Dnepropetrovsk [Russia, since 1926], Ekaterinoslav
[Russia, before 1926], Yekaterinoslav [Yiddish], Jekaterynoslaw,
Iekaterinoslav, Dniepropietrowsk [Polish], Dnjepropetrowsk,
Dniepropetrovsk, Dniepropetrovsk, Ekaterinoslav, Jekaterynoslaw,
Keterinoslav, Sicheslav [Russia, 1917-18], Secheslav, Siczeslaw

Dnipro, Ukraine is located at 48' N, 34' E 8240 miles ESE of
Kiev, on the Dnieper. Ukraine's fourth-largest city.

Nearby Jewish Communities:
Nizhnedneprovsk 5 miles NE
Ihren 10 miles E
Novomoskovsk 15 miles NE
Dniprodzerzhynsk 17 miles W
Synelnykove 26 miles ESE

Researchers and descendants of the town will want to have this book.

For more information go to:
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Dnipropetrovsk.html

The Yizkor-Books-In-Print Project now has 76 titles available. To see
all the books, go to: http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/ybip.html

We hope you find this of interest for you and your family in
discovering the history of your ancestors. This would make a birthday
gift for a loved one.

For orders 4 or more books to one address in the US, UK, Canada or
Australia, we can offer you a significantly reduced price of $23 per
book including shipping (Amazon discount price is about $32 plus
shipping). Email to ybip@jewishgen.org

Email to ybip@jewishgen.org to get prices for other locations outside of the US.

Joel Alpert, Coordinator of the Yizkor-Books-In-Print Project


(US-Kansas) Early Jewish (US) Prairie Settlements #usa

Jan Meisels Allen
 

In the 1882 before the Baron de Hirsh Fund launched the Jewish Agricultural
Society, the Beersheeba colony in Kansas was funded and conceived by the
Hebrew Union Agricultural Society. This was the brainchild of Rabbi Isaac
Mayer Wise, founder of the American Jewish Reform Movement. Jews had to
flee Russia after Czar Alexander lll rescinded the more lenient Jewish
policies developed by his late father. Under the new edicts, Jews were
prohibited >from owning or leasing land and subject to pogroms.

Rabbi Wise funded the resettlement program with appeals through the American
Israelite publication. The US government promised via the Homestead Act,
160 acres to any citizen or would-be citizen who improved their acreage,
built a dwelling or resided there for five years. Beersheba community
members would homestead in Southwestern Kansas. By July 1882, 59 families
were selected by the Society to populate the settlement.

Beersheeba was not the only farming community to be established for Jews in
the Western U.S. Communities were settled in Colorado, North Dakota, and in
Oregon. Due to disputes the Beersheeba community started to seek their
fortunes elsewhere- although about half stayed in Beersheeba, but it ended
in 1887, but six other short-lived agricultural communities, were
established between 1883 and 1890 .

To read the Tablet article on these early American Jewish agricultural
settlements in the mid-west and west see:
https://www.tabletmag.com/jewish-life-and-religion/275065/jews-on-the-prairie

Jan Meisels Allen Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Early American SIG #USA (US-Kansas) Early Jewish (US) Prairie Settlements #usa

Jan Meisels Allen
 

In the 1882 before the Baron de Hirsh Fund launched the Jewish Agricultural
Society, the Beersheeba colony in Kansas was funded and conceived by the
Hebrew Union Agricultural Society. This was the brainchild of Rabbi Isaac
Mayer Wise, founder of the American Jewish Reform Movement. Jews had to
flee Russia after Czar Alexander lll rescinded the more lenient Jewish
policies developed by his late father. Under the new edicts, Jews were
prohibited >from owning or leasing land and subject to pogroms.

Rabbi Wise funded the resettlement program with appeals through the American
Israelite publication. The US government promised via the Homestead Act,
160 acres to any citizen or would-be citizen who improved their acreage,
built a dwelling or resided there for five years. Beersheba community
members would homestead in Southwestern Kansas. By July 1882, 59 families
were selected by the Society to populate the settlement.

Beersheeba was not the only farming community to be established for Jews in
the Western U.S. Communities were settled in Colorado, North Dakota, and in
Oregon. Due to disputes the Beersheeba community started to seek their
fortunes elsewhere- although about half stayed in Beersheeba, but it ended
in 1887, but six other short-lived agricultural communities, were
established between 1883 and 1890 .

To read the Tablet article on these early American Jewish agricultural
settlements in the mid-west and west see:
https://www.tabletmag.com/jewish-life-and-religion/275065/jews-on-the-prairie

Jan Meisels Allen Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Issue 136 of Genealo-J has just been published #germany

Georges Graner
 

/Genealo-J, /publication of the Jewish Genealogical Society of France,
Issue 136, Winter 2018 has just been published.

The present issue contains a eulogy of Daniel Leeson, recently
deceased. He was not only a musician and musicologist but also an active
genealogist who published for our Society two important databases. He
was the husband of Rosanne Leeson, the present co-moderator of the
French-Sig of Jewishgen.

This issue begins by the memoirs of Antoine MAY, a glove maker
(1810-1899). Born in Hamburg in 1810, Antoine made and sold gloves there
before going to Amsterdam, Cologne, Aachen, Luneville (Lorraine), Paris,
Grenoble, and New York. The author provides a living account of his
tribulations and encounters until 1840 even though he still lived some
sixty years afterwards (Introduction by Bernard Lyon-Caen, translation
from German by Françoise Lyon-Caen).
Complementing these memoirs, Pierre-Andre Meyer explains in a separate
paper who are all the people quoted therein and who are their ancestors.
For instance, he draws the complete family tree of the TREFOUSSE family
(Trefousse is an unusual variant of DREYFUS) >from 1670 to the present
time. The Trefousse glove factory was seized by the Vichy government in
1940, restituted to its owners in 1944 and eventually closed its doors
in 1973.

Michel Gaspard is very proud of his maternal grandfather Paul LEVY
(1887-1962), a famous linguist. Paul Levy is born in Seebach, in Alsace,
which was then a part of the German Empire. In 1910 he settled in Paris
and was a student of Durkheim, Levy-Bruhl, Bergson and especially of
Charles Andler, the founder of the academic studies of German languages.
Paul Levy undertook the first complete study of the languages and
dialects of Alsace and of Lorraine. In 1914, Paul and his cousin Leo
deserted >from the German army and fought in the French Army. The author
gives Paul Levy’s ancestry, poor peddlers, butchers and bakers all
living in northern Alsace and also the ancestry of his wife Elise Weil
(1893-1962). The synagogue of Wissembourg, frequented by Paul in his
childhood, was destroyed by the Nazis in 1941. A new one, built in 1950,
is now transformed into an archive building. The street along this
building has been named "Paul Levy street" in November 2018.

Marianne Wolff tell us about her great-grandparents. Charles Philippe
Cahen (1849-1920), Alsatian polytechnician and engineer, his wife Lucie
Cohen (1858-1920) and their offspring. Charles Cahen, an officer in the
regular army ten years older than Alfred Dreyfus, was stationed in
Besancon, Fort de France, Saigon, Arras ... until his transfer to
Montpellier - far >from the Eastern borders - at the time of the Dreyfus
Affair. Charles is of Alsatian descent, his parents emigrated to Elbeuf
(Normandy) in 1872. The Parisian Lucie Cohen has her origins in Lorraine
and Germany. Charles and Lucie's two sons, Emile and Marcel Eugene,
were engineers >from the Ecole Centrale. Among his many activities Marcel
Eugene founded the publication " La Architecture d’aujourdhui" but died a
few days before its first issue.

Jean-Richard BLOCH (1884-1947) and Max JACOB (1876-1944) are both well
known French characters. Bloch was an historian, writer and a prominent
communist journalist. After World War II, he even became senator. Jacob
was a famous surrealist poet and writer. He became a Roman catholic in
1915 but was nevertheless arrested by the Nazis in 1944 and died in the
camp of Drancy just before his transfer to Auschwitz. Bernard Lyon-Caen
was surprised to find that, in spite of their very different way of life
and interests, they frequently corresponded. They actually were remote
cousins. The author traces their common ancestry in Lorraine and
previously in Germany.

Georges Graner georges.graner@wanadoo.fr


German SIG #Germany Issue 136 of Genealo-J has just been published #germany

Georges Graner
 

/Genealo-J, /publication of the Jewish Genealogical Society of France,
Issue 136, Winter 2018 has just been published.

The present issue contains a eulogy of Daniel Leeson, recently
deceased. He was not only a musician and musicologist but also an active
genealogist who published for our Society two important databases. He
was the husband of Rosanne Leeson, the present co-moderator of the
French-Sig of Jewishgen.

This issue begins by the memoirs of Antoine MAY, a glove maker
(1810-1899). Born in Hamburg in 1810, Antoine made and sold gloves there
before going to Amsterdam, Cologne, Aachen, Luneville (Lorraine), Paris,
Grenoble, and New York. The author provides a living account of his
tribulations and encounters until 1840 even though he still lived some
sixty years afterwards (Introduction by Bernard Lyon-Caen, translation
from German by Françoise Lyon-Caen).
Complementing these memoirs, Pierre-Andre Meyer explains in a separate
paper who are all the people quoted therein and who are their ancestors.
For instance, he draws the complete family tree of the TREFOUSSE family
(Trefousse is an unusual variant of DREYFUS) >from 1670 to the present
time. The Trefousse glove factory was seized by the Vichy government in
1940, restituted to its owners in 1944 and eventually closed its doors
in 1973.

Michel Gaspard is very proud of his maternal grandfather Paul LEVY
(1887-1962), a famous linguist. Paul Levy is born in Seebach, in Alsace,
which was then a part of the German Empire. In 1910 he settled in Paris
and was a student of Durkheim, Levy-Bruhl, Bergson and especially of
Charles Andler, the founder of the academic studies of German languages.
Paul Levy undertook the first complete study of the languages and
dialects of Alsace and of Lorraine. In 1914, Paul and his cousin Leo
deserted >from the German army and fought in the French Army. The author
gives Paul Levy’s ancestry, poor peddlers, butchers and bakers all
living in northern Alsace and also the ancestry of his wife Elise Weil
(1893-1962). The synagogue of Wissembourg, frequented by Paul in his
childhood, was destroyed by the Nazis in 1941. A new one, built in 1950,
is now transformed into an archive building. The street along this
building has been named "Paul Levy street" in November 2018.

Marianne Wolff tell us about her great-grandparents. Charles Philippe
Cahen (1849-1920), Alsatian polytechnician and engineer, his wife Lucie
Cohen (1858-1920) and their offspring. Charles Cahen, an officer in the
regular army ten years older than Alfred Dreyfus, was stationed in
Besancon, Fort de France, Saigon, Arras ... until his transfer to
Montpellier - far >from the Eastern borders - at the time of the Dreyfus
Affair. Charles is of Alsatian descent, his parents emigrated to Elbeuf
(Normandy) in 1872. The Parisian Lucie Cohen has her origins in Lorraine
and Germany. Charles and Lucie's two sons, Emile and Marcel Eugene,
were engineers >from the Ecole Centrale. Among his many activities Marcel
Eugene founded the publication " La Architecture d’aujourdhui" but died a
few days before its first issue.

Jean-Richard BLOCH (1884-1947) and Max JACOB (1876-1944) are both well
known French characters. Bloch was an historian, writer and a prominent
communist journalist. After World War II, he even became senator. Jacob
was a famous surrealist poet and writer. He became a Roman catholic in
1915 but was nevertheless arrested by the Nazis in 1944 and died in the
camp of Drancy just before his transfer to Auschwitz. Bernard Lyon-Caen
was surprised to find that, in spite of their very different way of life
and interests, they frequently corresponded. They actually were remote
cousins. The author traces their common ancestry in Lorraine and
previously in Germany.

Georges Graner georges.graner@wanadoo.fr


Announcing the publication of the Yekaterinoslav-Dnepropetrovsk Memorial Book (Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine) #ukraine

Joel Alpert
 

The Yizkor-Books-In-Print Project of JewishGen is proud to announce
the publication of its 76th title,Yekaterinoslav-Dnepropetrovsk
Memorial Book (Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine)

This is a hard cover book, 11 inches by 8.5 inches with 284 pages.

Project Coordinator and Translator: Gloria Berkenstat Freund
Layout: Joel Alpert
Cover Design: Rachel Kolokoff Hopper

This book is a translation of Sefer Yekaterinoslav-Dnepropetrovsk
Original written in Hebrew
Edited by Zvi Harkavi and Yaakov Goldburt
Published by Yekaterinoslav-Dnepropetrovsk Society
Jerusalem-Tel Aviv 1973
Primary Translator: Yocheved Klausner
Cover Design:Rachel Kolokoff Hopper
Translation Project Coordinator: Marilyn Levinson
List price:$43.95 Available on Amazon for around $32 may have lower
prices elsewhere

For more information go to:
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Dnipropetrovsk.html

Detail: Jews first settled in Dnipropetrovsk (Ukraine) after its
foundation in 1778, and in 1804 the town was included in the Pale of
Settlement. The community numbered 376 in 1805 and 1,699 in 1847. With
the growth of the city in the second half of the 19th century Jews
began to move there >from other parts of Russia and played an important
role in its commerce and industry.

Pogroms occurred in Dnepropetrovsk and the vicinity on July 20-21,
1883, in which 350 homes and many Jewish shops were looted and
destroyed.

By 1897 the Jewish population had increased to 41,240. Most of the
shops and houses in the city center were owned by Jews. There were
three Talmud Torah schools with 500 pupils, 885 studied in the
hadarim, and a yeshivah and 16 private schools were in operation. In
1860 a hospital was founded with 14 beds, growing to 29 in 1886. In
1880 an old age home was opened for the poor.

Pogroms again broke out on October 21-23, 1905, and 74 Jews were
killed, hundreds injured, and much property was looted and destroyed.
Local self-defense was organized in 1904, comprising 600 members. It
did much to protect the community.

In World War I and the civil war in Russia, thousands of Jews took
refuge in Dnepropetrovsk, which numbered 72,928 Jews in 1920. In the
Civil War (1917-20) the city changed hands a number of times,
suffering >from tributes, looting, rape, and murder. In June 1919 the
Denikin army raped about 1,000 women and in May 1919 the Grigoryev
band killed 150 Jews. After the establishment of Soviet rule, Jewish
community life ceased there as elsewhere in the Soviet Union. Zionist
activity was forbidden, and on September 18-22, 1922 about 1,000 were
arrested. The Jewish population numbered 62,073 in 1926

Dnepropetrovsk was occupied by the Germans on August 25, 1941. Thanks
to evacuation and flight, only about 17,000 Jews remained. In
September 179 were killed. On October 13-14, 13,000-15,000 Jews were
assembled and led to the botanical gardens, where they were murdered.
The remaining 2,000 Jews were executed at the end of 1941 and the
beginning of 1942. At the end of summer 1943 a unit of Operation Group
1005 opened the mass graves, burned the bodies, and dispersed the
ashes.

The city was liberated on October 25, 1943, and many Jews returned.
According to the 1959 census there were 53,400 Jews living in
Dnepropetrovsk. In 1970 there was one synagogue still functioning in
the city. Subsequent census figures put the Jewish population at
45,622 in 1979 and 17,869 in 1989. Immigration to Israel diminished
the number significantly during the 1990s.

Alternate names: Dnipro [Ukr, since 2016], Dnipropetrovsk [Ukraine,
until 2016], Dnepropetrovsk [Russia, since 1926], Ekaterinoslav
[Russia, before 1926], Yekaterinoslav [Yiddish], Jekaterynoslaw,
Iekaterinoslav, Dniepropietrowsk [Polish], Dnjepropetrowsk,
Dniepropetrovsk, Dniepropetrovsk, Ekaterinoslav, Jekaterynoslaw,
Keterinoslav, Sicheslav [Russia, 1917-18], Secheslav, Siczeslaw

Dnipro, Ukraine is located at 48°27' N, 34°59'E - 240 miles ESE of
Kiev, on the Dnieper. Ukraine's fourth-largest city.

Nearby Jewish Communities:
Nizhnedneprovsk 5 miles NE
Ihren 10 miles E
Novomoskovsk 15 miles NE
Dniprodzerzhynsk 17 miles W
Synelnykove 26 miles ESE

Researchers and descendants of the town will want to have this book.

For more information go to:
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Dnipropetrovsk.html

The Yizkor-Books-In-Print Project now has 76 titles available. To see
all the books, go to:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/ybip.html

We hope you find this of interest for you and your family in
discovering the history of your ancestors. This would make a birthday
gift for a loved one.

For orders 4 or more books to one address in the US, UK, Canada or
Australia, we can offer you a significantly reduced price of $23 per
book including shipping (Amazon discount price is about $32 plus
shipping). Email to ybip@jewishgen.org

Email to ybip@jewishgen.org to get prices for other locations outside of the US.

Joel Alpert, Coordinator of the Yizkor-Books-In-Print Project


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Announcing the publication of the Yekaterinoslav-Dnepropetrovsk Memorial Book (Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine) #ukraine

Joel Alpert
 

The Yizkor-Books-In-Print Project of JewishGen is proud to announce
the publication of its 76th title,Yekaterinoslav-Dnepropetrovsk
Memorial Book (Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine)

This is a hard cover book, 11 inches by 8.5 inches with 284 pages.

Project Coordinator and Translator: Gloria Berkenstat Freund
Layout: Joel Alpert
Cover Design: Rachel Kolokoff Hopper

This book is a translation of Sefer Yekaterinoslav-Dnepropetrovsk
Original written in Hebrew
Edited by Zvi Harkavi and Yaakov Goldburt
Published by Yekaterinoslav-Dnepropetrovsk Society
Jerusalem-Tel Aviv 1973
Primary Translator: Yocheved Klausner
Cover Design:Rachel Kolokoff Hopper
Translation Project Coordinator: Marilyn Levinson
List price:$43.95 Available on Amazon for around $32 may have lower
prices elsewhere

For more information go to:
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Dnipropetrovsk.html

Detail: Jews first settled in Dnipropetrovsk (Ukraine) after its
foundation in 1778, and in 1804 the town was included in the Pale of
Settlement. The community numbered 376 in 1805 and 1,699 in 1847. With
the growth of the city in the second half of the 19th century Jews
began to move there >from other parts of Russia and played an important
role in its commerce and industry.

Pogroms occurred in Dnepropetrovsk and the vicinity on July 20-21,
1883, in which 350 homes and many Jewish shops were looted and
destroyed.

By 1897 the Jewish population had increased to 41,240. Most of the
shops and houses in the city center were owned by Jews. There were
three Talmud Torah schools with 500 pupils, 885 studied in the
hadarim, and a yeshivah and 16 private schools were in operation. In
1860 a hospital was founded with 14 beds, growing to 29 in 1886. In
1880 an old age home was opened for the poor.

Pogroms again broke out on October 21-23, 1905, and 74 Jews were
killed, hundreds injured, and much property was looted and destroyed.
Local self-defense was organized in 1904, comprising 600 members. It
did much to protect the community.

In World War I and the civil war in Russia, thousands of Jews took
refuge in Dnepropetrovsk, which numbered 72,928 Jews in 1920. In the
Civil War (1917-20) the city changed hands a number of times,
suffering >from tributes, looting, rape, and murder. In June 1919 the
Denikin army raped about 1,000 women and in May 1919 the Grigoryev
band killed 150 Jews. After the establishment of Soviet rule, Jewish
community life ceased there as elsewhere in the Soviet Union. Zionist
activity was forbidden, and on September 18-22, 1922 about 1,000 were
arrested. The Jewish population numbered 62,073 in 1926

Dnepropetrovsk was occupied by the Germans on August 25, 1941. Thanks
to evacuation and flight, only about 17,000 Jews remained. In
September 179 were killed. On October 13-14, 13,000-15,000 Jews were
assembled and led to the botanical gardens, where they were murdered.
The remaining 2,000 Jews were executed at the end of 1941 and the
beginning of 1942. At the end of summer 1943 a unit of Operation Group
1005 opened the mass graves, burned the bodies, and dispersed the
ashes.

The city was liberated on October 25, 1943, and many Jews returned.
According to the 1959 census there were 53,400 Jews living in
Dnepropetrovsk. In 1970 there was one synagogue still functioning in
the city. Subsequent census figures put the Jewish population at
45,622 in 1979 and 17,869 in 1989. Immigration to Israel diminished
the number significantly during the 1990s.

Alternate names: Dnipro [Ukr, since 2016], Dnipropetrovsk [Ukraine,
until 2016], Dnepropetrovsk [Russia, since 1926], Ekaterinoslav
[Russia, before 1926], Yekaterinoslav [Yiddish], Jekaterynoslaw,
Iekaterinoslav, Dniepropietrowsk [Polish], Dnjepropetrowsk,
Dniepropetrovsk, Dniepropetrovsk, Ekaterinoslav, Jekaterynoslaw,
Keterinoslav, Sicheslav [Russia, 1917-18], Secheslav, Siczeslaw

Dnipro, Ukraine is located at 48°27' N, 34°59'E - 240 miles ESE of
Kiev, on the Dnieper. Ukraine's fourth-largest city.

Nearby Jewish Communities:
Nizhnedneprovsk 5 miles NE
Ihren 10 miles E
Novomoskovsk 15 miles NE
Dniprodzerzhynsk 17 miles W
Synelnykove 26 miles ESE

Researchers and descendants of the town will want to have this book.

For more information go to:
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Dnipropetrovsk.html

The Yizkor-Books-In-Print Project now has 76 titles available. To see
all the books, go to:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/ybip.html

We hope you find this of interest for you and your family in
discovering the history of your ancestors. This would make a birthday
gift for a loved one.

For orders 4 or more books to one address in the US, UK, Canada or
Australia, we can offer you a significantly reduced price of $23 per
book including shipping (Amazon discount price is about $32 plus
shipping). Email to ybip@jewishgen.org

Email to ybip@jewishgen.org to get prices for other locations outside of the US.

Joel Alpert, Coordinator of the Yizkor-Books-In-Print Project


Vital Records for Sholem Langsam (1849 - 1937) of Lancut #galicia

Moishe Miller
 

Dear Group,

Has anyone had success obtaining more recent death records >from Lancut,
and if so, did the record contain detail on parents and/or birthplace?

I am interested in finding records related to Sholem Langsam (1849 -1937)
who lived in Lancut, Poland. He was married and had 8 known children.
R' Sholem was a mohel and in the metal business. The Lancut yizkor book
says that he awoke at 2 or 3 every morning to daven in the synagogue. His
children were

Zvi Elimelech
Abraham
Naomi Gottlieb
Feivish
Jacob
Isaac
Golda
Sara Greenberg

Moishe Miller
Brooklyn, NY
moishe.miller@totalben.com


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Vital Records for Sholem Langsam (1849 - 1937) of Lancut #galicia

Moishe Miller
 

Dear Group,

Has anyone had success obtaining more recent death records >from Lancut,
and if so, did the record contain detail on parents and/or birthplace?

I am interested in finding records related to Sholem Langsam (1849 -1937)
who lived in Lancut, Poland. He was married and had 8 known children.
R' Sholem was a mohel and in the metal business. The Lancut yizkor book
says that he awoke at 2 or 3 every morning to daven in the synagogue. His
children were

Zvi Elimelech
Abraham
Naomi Gottlieb
Feivish
Jacob
Isaac
Golda
Sara Greenberg

Moishe Miller
Brooklyn, NY
moishe.miller@totalben.com


Site Cite: German Jewish WWI casualties #germany

Irene Newhouse
 

MOD NOTE: Eric Feinstein posted a message about German WW 1 casualties
to the GerSIG list on November 11, 2018. The message was reposted to
the JGDG (JewishGen list) on Dec. 28, 2018. Links to the SIG Archives
and to the separate JGDG Archives can be found at the lower left corner
of JewishGen's "List Manager" page:
https://www.jewishgen.org/ListManager/members_list.asp =======>


In addition to the sources Eric Feinstein has mentioned, there is a project
to create a searchable database of all German WWI casualties- those injured
as well as killed or missing. The search page is at:

http://des.genealogy.net/eingabe-verlustlisten/search?lang=en

Moderator Note: Read the search tips (Hier findet man Tipps für die Suche)
for help spelling names with umlaut vowels and esszet characters in the
search box. Other helpful information is also included.

Irene Newhouse, Kihei HI USA einew137@yahoo.com


German SIG #Germany Site Cite: German Jewish WWI casualties #germany

Irene Newhouse
 

MOD NOTE: Eric Feinstein posted a message about German WW 1 casualties
to the GerSIG list on November 11, 2018. The message was reposted to
the JGDG (JewishGen list) on Dec. 28, 2018. Links to the SIG Archives
and to the separate JGDG Archives can be found at the lower left corner
of JewishGen's "List Manager" page:
https://www.jewishgen.org/ListManager/members_list.asp =======>


In addition to the sources Eric Feinstein has mentioned, there is a project
to create a searchable database of all German WWI casualties- those injured
as well as killed or missing. The search page is at:

http://des.genealogy.net/eingabe-verlustlisten/search?lang=en

Moderator Note: Read the search tips (Hier findet man Tipps für die Suche)
for help spelling names with umlaut vowels and esszet characters in the
search box. Other helpful information is also included.

Irene Newhouse, Kihei HI USA einew137@yahoo.com


Thank you from the Board of JRI-Poland #poland

Stanley Diamond
 

Dear friends of JRI-Poland:

On December 6st, we asked you - our users and supporters - to remember
JRI-Poland in your year-end giving plans.

You have responded generously and we thank you for your continued
support to enable us to expand our database with additional record
entries for your town(s). Many of you have given us the option of
earmarking your donation to "where it is needed most" and we appreciate
the flexibility that provides.

At the same time, many of you have written privately to let us know how
important JRI-Poland has been to your research and for some of you,
how the JRI-Poland database has resulted in life-changing discoveries.
No matter how often we receive such notes of appreciation, I know I
speak for the entire JRI-Poland leadership when I say we are always
touched to know that we have made a difference.

To all of you who have generously supported our activity this month
and in the past, we thank you again. To researchers who have not yet
made a donation to JRI-Poland, please take a moment to consider doing
so before the year end. No donation is too small.

The JRI-Poland online donations page can be found at:
www.jri-poland.org/support.htm

Note: Jewish Records Indexing - Poland is an independent non-profit
organization with its own administration, volunteers and fundraising.
Because JRI-Poland's database, discussion group and website are hosted
by JewishGen, as a courtesy to researchers, JRI-Poland enables its data
search results to be displayed on JewishGen's All Poland Database.

Best wishes for 2019 to all our friends. May it be a year or health
and continued success.

Stanley Diamond, M.S.M.
Executive Director
On behalf of the Board of JRI-Poland


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Thank you from the Board of JRI-Poland #poland

Stanley Diamond
 

Dear friends of JRI-Poland:

On December 6st, we asked you - our users and supporters - to remember
JRI-Poland in your year-end giving plans.

You have responded generously and we thank you for your continued
support to enable us to expand our database with additional record
entries for your town(s). Many of you have given us the option of
earmarking your donation to "where it is needed most" and we appreciate
the flexibility that provides.

At the same time, many of you have written privately to let us know how
important JRI-Poland has been to your research and for some of you,
how the JRI-Poland database has resulted in life-changing discoveries.
No matter how often we receive such notes of appreciation, I know I
speak for the entire JRI-Poland leadership when I say we are always
touched to know that we have made a difference.

To all of you who have generously supported our activity this month
and in the past, we thank you again. To researchers who have not yet
made a donation to JRI-Poland, please take a moment to consider doing
so before the year end. No donation is too small.

The JRI-Poland online donations page can be found at:
www.jri-poland.org/support.htm

Note: Jewish Records Indexing - Poland is an independent non-profit
organization with its own administration, volunteers and fundraising.
Because JRI-Poland's database, discussion group and website are hosted
by JewishGen, as a courtesy to researchers, JRI-Poland enables its data
search results to be displayed on JewishGen's All Poland Database.

Best wishes for 2019 to all our friends. May it be a year or health
and continued success.

Stanley Diamond, M.S.M.
Executive Director
On behalf of the Board of JRI-Poland


Thank you from the Board of JRI-Poland #lodz #poland

Stanley Diamond
 

Dear friends of JRI-Poland:

On December 6st, we asked you - our users and supporters - to remember
JRI-Poland in your year-end giving plans.

You have responded generously and we thank you for your continued
support to enable us to expand our database with additional record
entries for your town(s). Many of you have given us the option of
earmarking your donation to "where it is needed most" and we appreciate
the flexibility that provides.

At the same time, many of you have written privately to let us know how
important JRI-Poland has been to your research and for some of you,
how the JRI-Poland database has resulted in life-changing discoveries.
No matter how often we receive such notes of appreciation, I know I
speak for the entire JRI-Poland leadership when I say we are always
touched to know that we have made a difference.

To all of you who have generously supported our activity this month
and in the past, we thank you again. To researchers who have not yet
made a donation to JRI-Poland, please take a moment to consider doing
so before the year end. No donation is too small.

The JRI-Poland online donations page can be found at:
www.jri-poland.org/support.htm

Note: Jewish Records Indexing - Poland is an independent non-profit
organization with its own administration, volunteers and fundraising.
Because JRI-Poland's database, discussion group and website are hosted
by JewishGen, as a courtesy to researchers, JRI-Poland enables its data
search results to be displayed on JewishGen's All Poland Database.

Best wishes for 2019 to all our friends. May it be a year or health
and continued success.

Stanley Diamond, M.S.M.
Executive Director
On behalf of the Board of JRI-Poland


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland Thank you from the Board of JRI-Poland #lodz #poland

Stanley Diamond
 

Dear friends of JRI-Poland:

On December 6st, we asked you - our users and supporters - to remember
JRI-Poland in your year-end giving plans.

You have responded generously and we thank you for your continued
support to enable us to expand our database with additional record
entries for your town(s). Many of you have given us the option of
earmarking your donation to "where it is needed most" and we appreciate
the flexibility that provides.

At the same time, many of you have written privately to let us know how
important JRI-Poland has been to your research and for some of you,
how the JRI-Poland database has resulted in life-changing discoveries.
No matter how often we receive such notes of appreciation, I know I
speak for the entire JRI-Poland leadership when I say we are always
touched to know that we have made a difference.

To all of you who have generously supported our activity this month
and in the past, we thank you again. To researchers who have not yet
made a donation to JRI-Poland, please take a moment to consider doing
so before the year end. No donation is too small.

The JRI-Poland online donations page can be found at:
www.jri-poland.org/support.htm

Note: Jewish Records Indexing - Poland is an independent non-profit
organization with its own administration, volunteers and fundraising.
Because JRI-Poland's database, discussion group and website are hosted
by JewishGen, as a courtesy to researchers, JRI-Poland enables its data
search results to be displayed on JewishGen's All Poland Database.

Best wishes for 2019 to all our friends. May it be a year or health
and continued success.

Stanley Diamond, M.S.M.
Executive Director
On behalf of the Board of JRI-Poland


Thank you from the Board of JRI-Poland #poland

Stanley Diamond
 

Dear friends of JRI-Poland:

On December 6st, we asked you - our users and supporters - to remember
JRI-Poland in your year-end giving plans.

You have responded generously and we thank you for your continued
support to enable us to expand our database with additional record
entries for your town(s). Many of you have given us the option of
earmarking your donation to "where it is needed most" and we appreciate
the flexibility that provides.

At the same time, many of you have written privately to let us know how
important JRI-Poland has been to your research and for some of you,
how the JRI-Poland database has resulted in life-changing discoveries.
No matter how often we receive such notes of appreciation, I know I
speak for the entire JRI-Poland leadership when I say we are always
touched to know that we have made a difference.

To all of you who have generously supported our activity this month
and in the past, we thank you again. To researchers who have not yet
made a donation to JRI-Poland, please take a moment to consider doing
so before the year end. No donation is too small.

The JRI-Poland online donations page can be found at:
www.jri-poland.org/support.htm

Note: Jewish Records Indexing - Poland is an independent non-profit
organization with its own administration, volunteers and fundraising.
Because JRI-Poland's database, discussion group and website are hosted
by JewishGen, as a courtesy to researchers, JRI-Poland enables its data
search results to be displayed on JewishGen's All Poland Database.

Best wishes for 2019 to all our friends. May it be a year or health
and continued success.

Stanley Diamond, M.S.M.
Executive Director
On behalf of the Board of JRI-Poland


JRI Poland #Poland Thank you from the Board of JRI-Poland #poland

Stanley Diamond
 

Dear friends of JRI-Poland:

On December 6st, we asked you - our users and supporters - to remember
JRI-Poland in your year-end giving plans.

You have responded generously and we thank you for your continued
support to enable us to expand our database with additional record
entries for your town(s). Many of you have given us the option of
earmarking your donation to "where it is needed most" and we appreciate
the flexibility that provides.

At the same time, many of you have written privately to let us know how
important JRI-Poland has been to your research and for some of you,
how the JRI-Poland database has resulted in life-changing discoveries.
No matter how often we receive such notes of appreciation, I know I
speak for the entire JRI-Poland leadership when I say we are always
touched to know that we have made a difference.

To all of you who have generously supported our activity this month
and in the past, we thank you again. To researchers who have not yet
made a donation to JRI-Poland, please take a moment to consider doing
so before the year end. No donation is too small.

The JRI-Poland online donations page can be found at:
www.jri-poland.org/support.htm

Note: Jewish Records Indexing - Poland is an independent non-profit
organization with its own administration, volunteers and fundraising.
Because JRI-Poland's database, discussion group and website are hosted
by JewishGen, as a courtesy to researchers, JRI-Poland enables its data
search results to be displayed on JewishGen's All Poland Database.

Best wishes for 2019 to all our friends. May it be a year or health
and continued success.

Stanley Diamond, M.S.M.
Executive Director
On behalf of the Board of JRI-Poland


German Jewish Soldier Project #general

E Feinstein
 

This is partly in response to the person >from Australia who wrote about "for paid"
ancestry list of Fallen Jewish soldiers. The same book is online for free at the
website http://www.denkmalprojekt.org

My name is Eric Feinstein and I am a volunteer for the JOWBR of JewishGen.I have
had the privilege of assisting JewishGen to increase the German holdings in our
collection >from some 25,000 records five or six years ago to some 280,000 records
now (including Germany and the German records found under Poland-Prussia.)

Part of this project has been an effort to record German Jewish military burials
from WWI. This effort started some three years ago. We started with the RJF
(Reichsbund Juedischer Frontsoldaten--which is the same list as discussed above)
list and have used some 200-300 sources to record the burial sites and fates of the
German Jewish servicemen. The RJF list was corrected for errors--as it included
soldiers >from the French and K.u.K. armies and missing entries were added.

We have used cemetery records, archival research (many archives across Germany
have produced research projects documenting the fates of the local Jewish soldiers
on the 100th anniversary of WWI), memorial books, regimental histories, and
obituaries >from period newspapers >from Compact Memory and other sources.

The result is 5300+ burial places for the 12,000 German Jewish soldiers. The intent
is to eventually upload everything in the Gersig Database of Jewishgen and the
burial places in their respective places in the JOWBR. [JewishGen Online Worldwide
Burial Registry]

Note I also have a K.u.K. Jewish project for WWI soldiers but I have spend much
less time on it and there is no master list to work with. For that I have a list of
some 7800+ Jewish soldiers with about 4000 burial locations recorded.

Another note is that the http://www.germanjewishsoldiers.com website has been
broken for a long time and I tried to reach the owner of the site without any
success.

Anyone interested in this project can contact me directly.
Shabbat Shalom / Gut Shabbos
All the best, Eric FEINSTEIN
New Jersey
ericfeinstein@yahoo.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen German Jewish Soldier Project #general

E Feinstein
 

This is partly in response to the person >from Australia who wrote about "for paid"
ancestry list of Fallen Jewish soldiers. The same book is online for free at the
website http://www.denkmalprojekt.org

My name is Eric Feinstein and I am a volunteer for the JOWBR of JewishGen.I have
had the privilege of assisting JewishGen to increase the German holdings in our
collection >from some 25,000 records five or six years ago to some 280,000 records
now (including Germany and the German records found under Poland-Prussia.)

Part of this project has been an effort to record German Jewish military burials
from WWI. This effort started some three years ago. We started with the RJF
(Reichsbund Juedischer Frontsoldaten--which is the same list as discussed above)
list and have used some 200-300 sources to record the burial sites and fates of the
German Jewish servicemen. The RJF list was corrected for errors--as it included
soldiers >from the French and K.u.K. armies and missing entries were added.

We have used cemetery records, archival research (many archives across Germany
have produced research projects documenting the fates of the local Jewish soldiers
on the 100th anniversary of WWI), memorial books, regimental histories, and
obituaries >from period newspapers >from Compact Memory and other sources.

The result is 5300+ burial places for the 12,000 German Jewish soldiers. The intent
is to eventually upload everything in the Gersig Database of Jewishgen and the
burial places in their respective places in the JOWBR. [JewishGen Online Worldwide
Burial Registry]

Note I also have a K.u.K. Jewish project for WWI soldiers but I have spend much
less time on it and there is no master list to work with. For that I have a list of
some 7800+ Jewish soldiers with about 4000 burial locations recorded.

Another note is that the http://www.germanjewishsoldiers.com website has been
broken for a long time and I tried to reach the owner of the site without any
success.

Anyone interested in this project can contact me directly.
Shabbat Shalom / Gut Shabbos
All the best, Eric FEINSTEIN
New Jersey
ericfeinstein@yahoo.com

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