Date   
Sharsheret Hadorot - May 2006 #rabbinic

Klausner
 

Shalom,

The May 2006 issue of Sharsheret Hadorot, the journal of the Israel
Genealogical Society just appeared.

Here is the Table of Contents of the Journal:

Sharsheret Hadorot, May 2006 Vol. 20, No. 2
Contents -
* The Family of Rabbi Yehuda Ashkenazi, by Jona Schellekens, Ben
Noach and Moshe Mossel
* On the Rapaport Family Name, by Chanan Rapaport.
* A Good Name is Like Good Oil - Origins of the Name Kam,
by Michael Kam
* Shemesh Tzedakah, by Shalom Bronstein
* A Family Quest in Istanbul, by Daniel Kazez.
* The Wimple that came home 60 years later, by Carl Alpert
* The Fulfilled Blessing of a Tzadik, by Yehuda Klausner

Thank you and best wishes, Yocheved

Yocheved Klausner, Editor
Sharsheret Hadorot (bilingual: Hebrew and English)
Israel Genealogical Society (IGS)

Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Sharsheret Hadorot - May 2006 #rabbinic

Klausner
 

Shalom,

The May 2006 issue of Sharsheret Hadorot, the journal of the Israel
Genealogical Society just appeared.

Here is the Table of Contents of the Journal:

Sharsheret Hadorot, May 2006 Vol. 20, No. 2
Contents -
* The Family of Rabbi Yehuda Ashkenazi, by Jona Schellekens, Ben
Noach and Moshe Mossel
* On the Rapaport Family Name, by Chanan Rapaport.
* A Good Name is Like Good Oil - Origins of the Name Kam,
by Michael Kam
* Shemesh Tzedakah, by Shalom Bronstein
* A Family Quest in Istanbul, by Daniel Kazez.
* The Wimple that came home 60 years later, by Carl Alpert
* The Fulfilled Blessing of a Tzadik, by Yehuda Klausner

Thank you and best wishes, Yocheved

Yocheved Klausner, Editor
Sharsheret Hadorot (bilingual: Hebrew and English)
Israel Genealogical Society (IGS)

Re: Male first name of Itzig versus Nitzig #general

Ira Leviton
 

Dear Cousins,

Steve Heimovitz asked, "My Great Uncle Izzie, emigrated from
Podvolochisk, Russia around 1913-1915. I located a steamship manifest
record for an individual that the indexer interpreted his first name as
Nitzig. US public records show his "Americanized" first name as Israel,
Isidore, and Isadore ... My knowledge of Yiddish is nil... I can sort of
make out the horrible cursive manifest entry as "Itzig". Can someone
elaborate on the correctness of Nitzig versus Itzig for male naming from
that area of Russia?"

I reply... Even if your knowledge of Yiddish is nil, there's no reason
that somebody indexing manifests has any greater knowledge of that
language, or Jewish names. I concede that maybe they were able to
interpret handwriting better because of experience, but I also want to
point out that on the other hand maybe they spent 1/50th the time that you
did analyzing the handwriting on your great uncle's manifest entry.

Seeing a name on an index, especially if it's on the Ellis Island site,
gives it an "official status," but indexing errors are too numerous to
count. That's also true for names on death certificates (although perhaps
less often), other indices, census forms, and other paperwork. Moreover,
the name on an index is once-removed >from its source document.

Nitzig doesn't seem to exist as a name >from Russia, and not anywhere as
a Yiddish or Hebrew first name. (Try Googling" it.) It was most likely
Itzig (or even a variation of that.

Ira
Ira Leviton
New York, N.Y.

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Male first name of Itzig versus Nitzig #general

Ira Leviton
 

Dear Cousins,

Steve Heimovitz asked, "My Great Uncle Izzie, emigrated from
Podvolochisk, Russia around 1913-1915. I located a steamship manifest
record for an individual that the indexer interpreted his first name as
Nitzig. US public records show his "Americanized" first name as Israel,
Isidore, and Isadore ... My knowledge of Yiddish is nil... I can sort of
make out the horrible cursive manifest entry as "Itzig". Can someone
elaborate on the correctness of Nitzig versus Itzig for male naming from
that area of Russia?"

I reply... Even if your knowledge of Yiddish is nil, there's no reason
that somebody indexing manifests has any greater knowledge of that
language, or Jewish names. I concede that maybe they were able to
interpret handwriting better because of experience, but I also want to
point out that on the other hand maybe they spent 1/50th the time that you
did analyzing the handwriting on your great uncle's manifest entry.

Seeing a name on an index, especially if it's on the Ellis Island site,
gives it an "official status," but indexing errors are too numerous to
count. That's also true for names on death certificates (although perhaps
less often), other indices, census forms, and other paperwork. Moreover,
the name on an index is once-removed >from its source document.

Nitzig doesn't seem to exist as a name >from Russia, and not anywhere as
a Yiddish or Hebrew first name. (Try Googling" it.) It was most likely
Itzig (or even a variation of that.

Ira
Ira Leviton
New York, N.Y.

Smolyani #general

mathias brandt <rmbrandt@...>
 

Has anybody infirmation about LOHAK (LOGAK) family in Smolyani, Orsha uyezd,
Mohilev (Mogilev) gubernia in Belarus in 1850 - 1900?

Mathew Brandt
Haifa, Israel

R.M.Brandt
rmbrandt@...

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Smolyani #general

mathias brandt <rmbrandt@...>
 

Has anybody infirmation about LOHAK (LOGAK) family in Smolyani, Orsha uyezd,
Mohilev (Mogilev) gubernia in Belarus in 1850 - 1900?

Mathew Brandt
Haifa, Israel

R.M.Brandt
rmbrandt@...

Re: Translation Help -- Yiddish or Hebrew #general

Robert Israel <israel@...>
 

Judith Romney Wegner <jrw@...> wrote:

At 8:40 PM -0700 6/5/06, Stewart Bernstein wrote:

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/toview.html

# VM 7930-Tombstone inscription, probably in Yiddishor Hebrew.
Inscription may have the name Niestempoweras part of the text.
The date is a bit of a mystery; it says 15th of something or other
1930, but he month is blurred in this photograph and hard to read.
It looks like mem aleph bet, which could stand for the Hebrew month
Menahem-Av (which is the full name of the month of Av). If so, this
corresponded with August 9th in 1930. But the next line seems to
contradict that date, it appears to say 8th Heshvan (which
corresponded with 30th October in 1930). I can't explain this
discrepancy, does anyone have any ideas?
It looks to me like "gestorben 15 tog in ch[odesh] Heshvan", i.e.
"died on the 15th day of the month of Heshvan".

Robert Israel
israel@...
Vancouver, BC, Canada

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Translation Help -- Yiddish or Hebrew #general

Robert Israel <israel@...>
 

Judith Romney Wegner <jrw@...> wrote:

At 8:40 PM -0700 6/5/06, Stewart Bernstein wrote:

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/toview.html

# VM 7930-Tombstone inscription, probably in Yiddishor Hebrew.
Inscription may have the name Niestempoweras part of the text.
The date is a bit of a mystery; it says 15th of something or other
1930, but he month is blurred in this photograph and hard to read.
It looks like mem aleph bet, which could stand for the Hebrew month
Menahem-Av (which is the full name of the month of Av). If so, this
corresponded with August 9th in 1930. But the next line seems to
contradict that date, it appears to say 8th Heshvan (which
corresponded with 30th October in 1930). I can't explain this
discrepancy, does anyone have any ideas?
It looks to me like "gestorben 15 tog in ch[odesh] Heshvan", i.e.
"died on the 15th day of the month of Heshvan".

Robert Israel
israel@...
Vancouver, BC, Canada

Translation requested -- Russian or Polish #general

Sandra B Landers
 

Dear Fellow Genners,
I have two documents that I received >from the Lomza, Poland archives that
have just been posted on JewishGen ViewMate. I believe that they are written
in either Cyrillic Russian or Polish. I am hoping that some kind, fellow
member will be able to translate them for me.

One is a 1846 Birth Record for Abram FURMANOWICZ which can be viewed at:
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=7933

The other is a 1891 Death Record for Gerszk FURMANOWICZ that can be viewed at:
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=7934

I believe that these records may be those of my g-great grandfathers.

I would be so grateful to know all the names, dates and places that are on
these two documents. I would like to thank you in advance for any help you
can give.

Please, contact me privately at:
SBLdezynr@...

Thank you so very much.
Sandy Landers
Tamarac, Florida

Searching for:
FURMANOWICZ/Lomza,England FOREMAN/Glasgow, Scotland
KHAIT/HAIT/TAYLOR/Lithuania/Latvia/England,Scotland
SHECHTMAN/SCHECHTMAN/SHEKTMAN/Minsk, Russia,Israel
BOGUSLAVSKI/ Israel MOSKOWITZ/or various spellings Belarus
LANZMAN/LANSMAN/LANDERMAN/LANDERS/Minsk,Russia
MAGID/MAGED/Russia

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Translation requested -- Russian or Polish #general

Sandra B Landers
 

Dear Fellow Genners,
I have two documents that I received >from the Lomza, Poland archives that
have just been posted on JewishGen ViewMate. I believe that they are written
in either Cyrillic Russian or Polish. I am hoping that some kind, fellow
member will be able to translate them for me.

One is a 1846 Birth Record for Abram FURMANOWICZ which can be viewed at:
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=7933

The other is a 1891 Death Record for Gerszk FURMANOWICZ that can be viewed at:
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=7934

I believe that these records may be those of my g-great grandfathers.

I would be so grateful to know all the names, dates and places that are on
these two documents. I would like to thank you in advance for any help you
can give.

Please, contact me privately at:
SBLdezynr@...

Thank you so very much.
Sandy Landers
Tamarac, Florida

Searching for:
FURMANOWICZ/Lomza,England FOREMAN/Glasgow, Scotland
KHAIT/HAIT/TAYLOR/Lithuania/Latvia/England,Scotland
SHECHTMAN/SCHECHTMAN/SHEKTMAN/Minsk, Russia,Israel
BOGUSLAVSKI/ Israel MOSKOWITZ/or various spellings Belarus
LANZMAN/LANSMAN/LANDERMAN/LANDERS/Minsk,Russia
MAGID/MAGED/Russia

Re: Translation Help -- Yiddish or Hebrew #general

Klausner
 

There is no mystery at all:

a. It is not uncommon to have the surname of the person on the tombstone,
especially in the German speaking countries, but also in Poland.

b. The two lines below the surname are indeed Yiddish, with the name of the
Hebrew month in Hebrew, naturally:

1. Gestorben 15 tog = Died on the 15th day
2. In 'het' [abbreviation of hodesh] Heshvan 1930 = In the month of
Heshvan 1930

The date is 15 Heshvan 5691 = 6 November 1930

Best wishes to all, Yocheved

Yocheved Klausner, Editor
Sharsheret Hadorot (bilingual: Hebrew and English)
Israel Genealogical Society (IGS)

----- Original Message -----
From: Judith Romney Wegner
To: JewishGen Discussion Group
Sent: Tuesday, June 06, 2006 5:22 PM
Subject: Re: Translation Help -- Yiddish or Hebrew

...
Second, the stone has an interesting (and in one respect rather
puzzling) inscription. It is of course in Hebrew -- they normally are
-- except that this one happens to gives the man's surname, obviously
in Yiddish; it also gives the Yiddish word "gestorben" (meaning
"died") right before the date.
...
The date is a bit of a mystery; it says 15th of something or other
1930, but he month is blurred in this photograph and hard to read.
It looks like mem aleph bet, which could stand for the Hebrew month
Menahem-Av (which is the full name of the month of Av). If so, this
corresponded with August 9th in 1930. But the next line seems to
contradict that date, it appears to say 8th Heshvan (which
corresponded with 30th October in 1930). I can't explain this
discrepancy, does anyone have any ideas?

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Translation Help -- Yiddish or Hebrew #general

Klausner
 

There is no mystery at all:

a. It is not uncommon to have the surname of the person on the tombstone,
especially in the German speaking countries, but also in Poland.

b. The two lines below the surname are indeed Yiddish, with the name of the
Hebrew month in Hebrew, naturally:

1. Gestorben 15 tog = Died on the 15th day
2. In 'het' [abbreviation of hodesh] Heshvan 1930 = In the month of
Heshvan 1930

The date is 15 Heshvan 5691 = 6 November 1930

Best wishes to all, Yocheved

Yocheved Klausner, Editor
Sharsheret Hadorot (bilingual: Hebrew and English)
Israel Genealogical Society (IGS)

----- Original Message -----
From: Judith Romney Wegner
To: JewishGen Discussion Group
Sent: Tuesday, June 06, 2006 5:22 PM
Subject: Re: Translation Help -- Yiddish or Hebrew

...
Second, the stone has an interesting (and in one respect rather
puzzling) inscription. It is of course in Hebrew -- they normally are
-- except that this one happens to gives the man's surname, obviously
in Yiddish; it also gives the Yiddish word "gestorben" (meaning
"died") right before the date.
...
The date is a bit of a mystery; it says 15th of something or other
1930, but he month is blurred in this photograph and hard to read.
It looks like mem aleph bet, which could stand for the Hebrew month
Menahem-Av (which is the full name of the month of Av). If so, this
corresponded with August 9th in 1930. But the next line seems to
contradict that date, it appears to say 8th Heshvan (which
corresponded with 30th October in 1930). I can't explain this
discrepancy, does anyone have any ideas?

Danzig prenumerantn #danzig #gdansk #germany #poland

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

As explained at http://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/prenumerantn.htm, Jewish
religious books published in the 19th and early 20th century often list the
names of people who advanced money towards their publication, so-called
"pre-subscribers," or, in Yiddish, "prenumerantn." Sometimes, these lists
contain additional (potentially, genealogically useful) details about the
pre-subscribers. I have a list, in Hebrew, of the titles of books
(sometimes, their dates of publication, too) that contain pre-subscribers
identified as being >from Danzig, taken >from Berl Kagan's "Sefer
HaPrenumerantn," described at the above link. In order to see the names of
these pre-subscribers, these books need to be located.

If you would like to help find these books, please contact me privately, and
I will send you a copy of the list of titles. Hopefully, we can place their
pre-subscriber lists online.

Thanks very much and best regards,

Logan Kleinwaks
Coordinator, JewishGen Danzig/Gdansk SIG
kleinwaks@...
near Washington, D.C.

Danzig/Gedansk SIG #Danzig #Gdansk #Germany #Poland Danzig prenumerantn #danzig #gdansk #germany #poland

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

As explained at http://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/prenumerantn.htm, Jewish
religious books published in the 19th and early 20th century often list the
names of people who advanced money towards their publication, so-called
"pre-subscribers," or, in Yiddish, "prenumerantn." Sometimes, these lists
contain additional (potentially, genealogically useful) details about the
pre-subscribers. I have a list, in Hebrew, of the titles of books
(sometimes, their dates of publication, too) that contain pre-subscribers
identified as being >from Danzig, taken >from Berl Kagan's "Sefer
HaPrenumerantn," described at the above link. In order to see the names of
these pre-subscribers, these books need to be located.

If you would like to help find these books, please contact me privately, and
I will send you a copy of the list of titles. Hopefully, we can place their
pre-subscriber lists online.

Thanks very much and best regards,

Logan Kleinwaks
Coordinator, JewishGen Danzig/Gdansk SIG
kleinwaks@...
near Washington, D.C.

Pronunciation of woman's given name, "Gisella" #general

HeyJudy123@...
 

The branch of my mother's family that hailed >from the part of the world that
presently is the modern country of Slovakia, but which had been Hungary when
they left for the USA, c. 1885, had several women named "Gisella" as members.

It has been well-settled on the "Hungarian Special Interest Group" ("H-Sig")
that "Gisella" was a fairly popular name for Hungarian-Jewish woman, and
that its nickname often was "Katie."

My mother, now in her 80's, clearly remembers one of her mother's cousins
with the name.

This woman had stopped in New York after leaving Hungary, staying with my
mother's family for a period during the 1920's. Then, she moved on to
Cleveland and my mother never saw her again. (Again, the participants of
the H-Sig have made it clear that there was a disproportionately large
settlement of immigrant Hungarian Jews in the Cleveland area.)

Here is my question. It seems to me that this name should be pronounced
GIZZ-el-ah or GIZ-zel-lah (or GHIZZ-el-ah or GHIZ-zel-lah) but my mother
pronounces it "GIH-hel-la." No "Z" or "S" sound at all.

Is this a known pronunciation of the name or is it that, 80 years later, my
mother still is parroting her own baby talk?

And, if anyone knows of a "Gihhella" or her descendants in the Cleveland
area, please contact me privately!

thanks,
Judy SEGAL
New York City USA

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Pronunciation of woman's given name, "Gisella" #general

HeyJudy123@...
 

The branch of my mother's family that hailed >from the part of the world that
presently is the modern country of Slovakia, but which had been Hungary when
they left for the USA, c. 1885, had several women named "Gisella" as members.

It has been well-settled on the "Hungarian Special Interest Group" ("H-Sig")
that "Gisella" was a fairly popular name for Hungarian-Jewish woman, and
that its nickname often was "Katie."

My mother, now in her 80's, clearly remembers one of her mother's cousins
with the name.

This woman had stopped in New York after leaving Hungary, staying with my
mother's family for a period during the 1920's. Then, she moved on to
Cleveland and my mother never saw her again. (Again, the participants of
the H-Sig have made it clear that there was a disproportionately large
settlement of immigrant Hungarian Jews in the Cleveland area.)

Here is my question. It seems to me that this name should be pronounced
GIZZ-el-ah or GIZ-zel-lah (or GHIZZ-el-ah or GHIZ-zel-lah) but my mother
pronounces it "GIH-hel-la." No "Z" or "S" sound at all.

Is this a known pronunciation of the name or is it that, 80 years later, my
mother still is parroting her own baby talk?

And, if anyone knows of a "Gihhella" or her descendants in the Cleveland
area, please contact me privately!

thanks,
Judy SEGAL
New York City USA

Nishgeshevet - is this a Galizien town? #galicia

Charlotte Steinzig <adazig@...>
 

When I asked where my husband's grandmother was from
(in Galicia/Austria, to US in about 1895), my
mother-in-law said what sounded like "nishgeshevet."
This was the first time my MOL indicated any knowledge
of this information. I could not find any town
similarly named. One day it occurred to me my MOL
might simply have been saying something like "no such
place" or basically giving me the run-around, as she
does not like any aspect of discussing genealogy. Any
thing here sound like a place or the latter. Thanks.
Charlotte Steinzig
STEINZEIG, NUSSBAUM (Jenny, parents Hirsch and Chaya
Pische Seidman ?? Nussbaum).

Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Nishgeshevet - is this a Galizien town? #galicia

Charlotte Steinzig <adazig@...>
 

When I asked where my husband's grandmother was from
(in Galicia/Austria, to US in about 1895), my
mother-in-law said what sounded like "nishgeshevet."
This was the first time my MOL indicated any knowledge
of this information. I could not find any town
similarly named. One day it occurred to me my MOL
might simply have been saying something like "no such
place" or basically giving me the run-around, as she
does not like any aspect of discussing genealogy. Any
thing here sound like a place or the latter. Thanks.
Charlotte Steinzig
STEINZEIG, NUSSBAUM (Jenny, parents Hirsch and Chaya
Pische Seidman ?? Nussbaum).

Ancient and Modern Genealogies: Genealogy As an Academic Discipline #general

V. Chris and Tom Tinney, Sr. <vctinney@...>
 

Ancient and Modern Genealogies:
Genealogy As an Academic Discipline

Daniel Wagner, Professor of Materials Science at
the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel,
considers Genealogy As an Academic Discipline, at:
http://www.avotaynu.com/wagner.htm
Professor Wagner notes that "The Book of Genesis
may be viewed as the first archival source of
(Jewish) genealogical records."

Alphabetic History of Civilization:
Ancient and Modern Genealogies
http://academic-genealogy.com/ancientandmoderngenealogies.htm

This site evaluates historical knowledge
as it relates to ancient and modern genealogies.
Information gleaned >from social contexts,
both secular and religious, are reviewed,
using modern genealogical research specialist
standards: to properly reconstruct and correctly
portray real historical lives and family pedigrees.
Cultural, religious and family tradition, (their
stated facts and viewpoints), are surveyed within
given ancient contexts of primary and secondary
record sources, as handed down for the benefit
of our modern generation. Modern claims of
genealogical attachment to biblical records
are noted, with remarks.

An additional continued evaluation of ancient records
concerns The Book [Stick] of Judah, at:
http://academic-genealogy.com/ancientgenealogyjudah.htm
All "future significant academic contributions from
areas new to traditional genealogy", must be based
upon and generated by established primary records.

Respectfully yours,

Tom Tinney, Sr.
Who's Who in America,
Millennium Edition [54th] through 2004
Who's Who In Genealogy and Heraldry,
{both editions]
Genealogy and Family History Internet Web Directory
http://www.academic-genealogy.com/

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Ancient and Modern Genealogies: Genealogy As an Academic Discipline #general

V. Chris and Tom Tinney, Sr. <vctinney@...>
 

Ancient and Modern Genealogies:
Genealogy As an Academic Discipline

Daniel Wagner, Professor of Materials Science at
the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel,
considers Genealogy As an Academic Discipline, at:
http://www.avotaynu.com/wagner.htm
Professor Wagner notes that "The Book of Genesis
may be viewed as the first archival source of
(Jewish) genealogical records."

Alphabetic History of Civilization:
Ancient and Modern Genealogies
http://academic-genealogy.com/ancientandmoderngenealogies.htm

This site evaluates historical knowledge
as it relates to ancient and modern genealogies.
Information gleaned >from social contexts,
both secular and religious, are reviewed,
using modern genealogical research specialist
standards: to properly reconstruct and correctly
portray real historical lives and family pedigrees.
Cultural, religious and family tradition, (their
stated facts and viewpoints), are surveyed within
given ancient contexts of primary and secondary
record sources, as handed down for the benefit
of our modern generation. Modern claims of
genealogical attachment to biblical records
are noted, with remarks.

An additional continued evaluation of ancient records
concerns The Book [Stick] of Judah, at:
http://academic-genealogy.com/ancientgenealogyjudah.htm
All "future significant academic contributions from
areas new to traditional genealogy", must be based
upon and generated by established primary records.

Respectfully yours,

Tom Tinney, Sr.
Who's Who in America,
Millennium Edition [54th] through 2004
Who's Who In Genealogy and Heraldry,
{both editions]
Genealogy and Family History Internet Web Directory
http://www.academic-genealogy.com/