Date   

EPSTEIN Family Y-DNA Study #romania

Itzhak Epstein
 

Several EPSTEINs have joined in a Family Tree DNA JewishGen surname project.
Painless mouth swab genetic testing procedures are being used as a promising
tool for breaking through our genealogical brick walls. It might help you
to greatly expand your family tree, and may also help our surname project.
To the best of our knowledge, the EPPSTEINs emerged in Germany in the early
15th century. By the late 19th century, the surname was prominent in and
near what is now Belarus, and moderately present elsewhere in eastern and central
Europe. It is reasonable to assume that many Epsteins in the Russian Empire,
especially in Byelorussia, adopted the surname in the early 19th century or
changed to it later to avoid the draft. It is also likely that Epsteins in Romania,
for instance, probably held that surname for several centuries. Y-DNA testing
will hopefully shed light on this issue.
We have identified members of one paternal lineage that has borne the
Epstein surname for several centuries. There are hints of another old line.
Most of the project's current members, however, are patrilineally unrelated
to each other. In addition, most of us have discovered patrilineal
relationships to men whose surnames are not EPSTEIN. Most of us trace
our ancestry to eastern Europe, and only two to Germany. We are looking
forward to our first Rumanian member.
We are working on identifying the various branches of our principal cluster,
on exploring additional clusters, and on connecting our unrelated
members to cousins. To accomplish these goals and to create as broad
a search as possible, we need more male Epsteins to contribute a
cheek swab as a DNA sample. If you are female EPSTEIN or an EPSTEIN
through female ancestors, a sample >from an EPSTEIN male relative can
represent your family in the test. If you are not an EPSTEIN, please share
this message with EPSTEINs who may want to participate in this project.
To join, go to http://tinyurl.com/nyh6z
The basic, and most affordable, twelve marker test will indicate to whom
you are probably related. The more advanced tests could help to identify
closer and more certain relationships. You can start with the 12 marker test
and add to it at a later date, using the same sample.

More information about DNA testing and JewishGen's involvement in it
can be found at http://www.jewishgen.org/dna/

If you have any questions, please contact Marsha Epstein, our project's
volunteer administrator at epsteindna_admin@...

Itzhak Epstein New York, NY
iegen@...


Romania SIG #Romania EPSTEIN Family Y-DNA Study #romania

Itzhak Epstein
 

Several EPSTEINs have joined in a Family Tree DNA JewishGen surname project.
Painless mouth swab genetic testing procedures are being used as a promising
tool for breaking through our genealogical brick walls. It might help you
to greatly expand your family tree, and may also help our surname project.
To the best of our knowledge, the EPPSTEINs emerged in Germany in the early
15th century. By the late 19th century, the surname was prominent in and
near what is now Belarus, and moderately present elsewhere in eastern and central
Europe. It is reasonable to assume that many Epsteins in the Russian Empire,
especially in Byelorussia, adopted the surname in the early 19th century or
changed to it later to avoid the draft. It is also likely that Epsteins in Romania,
for instance, probably held that surname for several centuries. Y-DNA testing
will hopefully shed light on this issue.
We have identified members of one paternal lineage that has borne the
Epstein surname for several centuries. There are hints of another old line.
Most of the project's current members, however, are patrilineally unrelated
to each other. In addition, most of us have discovered patrilineal
relationships to men whose surnames are not EPSTEIN. Most of us trace
our ancestry to eastern Europe, and only two to Germany. We are looking
forward to our first Rumanian member.
We are working on identifying the various branches of our principal cluster,
on exploring additional clusters, and on connecting our unrelated
members to cousins. To accomplish these goals and to create as broad
a search as possible, we need more male Epsteins to contribute a
cheek swab as a DNA sample. If you are female EPSTEIN or an EPSTEIN
through female ancestors, a sample >from an EPSTEIN male relative can
represent your family in the test. If you are not an EPSTEIN, please share
this message with EPSTEINs who may want to participate in this project.
To join, go to http://tinyurl.com/nyh6z
The basic, and most affordable, twelve marker test will indicate to whom
you are probably related. The more advanced tests could help to identify
closer and more certain relationships. You can start with the 12 marker test
and add to it at a later date, using the same sample.

More information about DNA testing and JewishGen's involvement in it
can be found at http://www.jewishgen.org/dna/

If you have any questions, please contact Marsha Epstein, our project's
volunteer administrator at epsteindna_admin@...

Itzhak Epstein New York, NY
iegen@...


Searching KOLETZ Lithuania/England #general

elanamig@...
 

Hello,

I'm searching for the KOLETZ family line. My great-grand aunt, Shifra
Gruzinsky, married Abraham Koletz in the early 1900's and immigrated
to England around 1912. Shifra was born around 1880's. She had 3
sisters - Masha, Riva, and Rukhel. Their parents were Malka and
Lev (Leib) Gruzinsky. Leib Gruzinsky had 2 sons >from his previous
marriage. In 1912, Masha and her husband Isaak Veller, accompanied
Shifra and Abraham Koletz to England. Shifra and Abraham Koletz had 4
children (that I know of). Their names were Gershe, Ann, Meishkele
(Moshe/Moses), and someone starting with an R (Raigale? something like
that) I know for sure that in the 1960's Koletz's were still in
England, because another relative was able to locate them.
Unfortunately, since that time, we lost both, the Koletz's, and that
relative.

If any of this sounds familar, please, reply!

Thanks.
Elana Abelev


Searching: MOREINIS from Ukraine/Latvia/Lithuania #general

elanamig@...
 

Hello,

I'm searching for the MOREINIS family line. My grandmother was born
Chaya Dvoyra Moreinis, but was later recorded as Klavdia Moreinis. Her
father is Fishel (Felix) Moreinis. My grandmother was born in Odessa,
Ukraine, on Octoper 18, 1922, and married Isaak Galperin some time in
mid 1940's.

If any of this sounds familar, please, reply!

Thanks.
Elana Abelev


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching KOLETZ Lithuania/England #general

elanamig@...
 

Hello,

I'm searching for the KOLETZ family line. My great-grand aunt, Shifra
Gruzinsky, married Abraham Koletz in the early 1900's and immigrated
to England around 1912. Shifra was born around 1880's. She had 3
sisters - Masha, Riva, and Rukhel. Their parents were Malka and
Lev (Leib) Gruzinsky. Leib Gruzinsky had 2 sons >from his previous
marriage. In 1912, Masha and her husband Isaak Veller, accompanied
Shifra and Abraham Koletz to England. Shifra and Abraham Koletz had 4
children (that I know of). Their names were Gershe, Ann, Meishkele
(Moshe/Moses), and someone starting with an R (Raigale? something like
that) I know for sure that in the 1960's Koletz's were still in
England, because another relative was able to locate them.
Unfortunately, since that time, we lost both, the Koletz's, and that
relative.

If any of this sounds familar, please, reply!

Thanks.
Elana Abelev


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching: MOREINIS from Ukraine/Latvia/Lithuania #general

elanamig@...
 

Hello,

I'm searching for the MOREINIS family line. My grandmother was born
Chaya Dvoyra Moreinis, but was later recorded as Klavdia Moreinis. Her
father is Fishel (Felix) Moreinis. My grandmother was born in Odessa,
Ukraine, on Octoper 18, 1922, and married Isaak Galperin some time in
mid 1940's.

If any of this sounds familar, please, reply!

Thanks.
Elana Abelev


Searching: GRUZINSKY near Rasein/Kelme (Lithuania) #general

elanamig@...
 

Hello,

I'm searching for the GRUZINSKY family line. My great-grandmother is
Masha Gruzinsky. She was born near Rasain, Lithuania, in 1890. She
had 3 sisters - Shifra, Riva, and Rukhel. Their parents were Malka and
Lev (Leib) Gruzinsky. Leib Gruzinsky had 2 sons >from his previous
marriage.

Out of the 4 daughters, Rukhel was the oldest, Masha was the youngest.
In 1912, Masha and her husband Isaak Veller, together with Shifra and
Shifra's husband Abraham Koletz, went to England. In 1917-18, Masha
and
Isaak went back to Ukraine/Romania, and the Koletz's stayed in England.
We do not know what happened to Rukhel and Riva.

If any of this sounds familar, please, reply!

Thanks.
Elana Abelev


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching: GRUZINSKY near Rasein/Kelme (Lithuania) #general

elanamig@...
 

Hello,

I'm searching for the GRUZINSKY family line. My great-grandmother is
Masha Gruzinsky. She was born near Rasain, Lithuania, in 1890. She
had 3 sisters - Shifra, Riva, and Rukhel. Their parents were Malka and
Lev (Leib) Gruzinsky. Leib Gruzinsky had 2 sons >from his previous
marriage.

Out of the 4 daughters, Rukhel was the oldest, Masha was the youngest.
In 1912, Masha and her husband Isaak Veller, together with Shifra and
Shifra's husband Abraham Koletz, went to England. In 1917-18, Masha
and
Isaak went back to Ukraine/Romania, and the Koletz's stayed in England.
We do not know what happened to Rukhel and Riva.

If any of this sounds familar, please, reply!

Thanks.
Elana Abelev


Searching: SHRAER from Ukraine/US #general

elanamig@...
 

Hello,

I'm searching for the SHRAER family line. Shraers are originally from
Chotyn (Kamenets-Podolsk area). I know that Shulem and Ester Shraer had
2 sons, Hayman (b. around 1897) and Abraham (b around 1905). There
were other children who died in childhood. Hyman came to the states
around 1917, and had two daughters Janet (1939 or so) and Ester (1942
or so). At some point he lived in New York.

Abraham stayed in Ukraine and had a son Sergey born around 1935, and a
daughter Edith (my mom) born in 1955.

If you know anything, please, reply!

Thanks.
Elana Abelev


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching: SHRAER from Ukraine/US #general

elanamig@...
 

Hello,

I'm searching for the SHRAER family line. Shraers are originally from
Chotyn (Kamenets-Podolsk area). I know that Shulem and Ester Shraer had
2 sons, Hayman (b. around 1897) and Abraham (b around 1905). There
were other children who died in childhood. Hyman came to the states
around 1917, and had two daughters Janet (1939 or so) and Ester (1942
or so). At some point he lived in New York.

Abraham stayed in Ukraine and had a son Sergey born around 1935, and a
daughter Edith (my mom) born in 1955.

If you know anything, please, reply!

Thanks.
Elana Abelev


Searching: GALPERIN (Ukraine/Lithuania/Latvia) #general

elanamig@...
 

Hello,

I'm searching for the Galperin family line. My maiden name is
Galperin. My Grandfather, Isaac Galperin, has 2 brothers - Gregory
Galperin in Israel now, and David Galperin, in Germany. Isaac Galperin
was born around 1915-1920. Their father, Miron Galperin, died when
Isaac, the oldest, was 11 years old. All were born in Odessa, Ukraine.


If any of this sounds familar, please, reply!

Thanks.
Elana Abelev


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching: GALPERIN (Ukraine/Lithuania/Latvia) #general

elanamig@...
 

Hello,

I'm searching for the Galperin family line. My maiden name is
Galperin. My Grandfather, Isaac Galperin, has 2 brothers - Gregory
Galperin in Israel now, and David Galperin, in Germany. Isaac Galperin
was born around 1915-1920. Their father, Miron Galperin, died when
Isaac, the oldest, was 11 years old. All were born in Odessa, Ukraine.


If any of this sounds familar, please, reply!

Thanks.
Elana Abelev


Yizkor Book Project Report for June 2006 #austria-czech

Joyce Field
 

For the month of June 2006 we posted three new entries and nine
updates. All can be accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. Flags are
appended in the alphabetical listings for new material.

New entries:

-Korczyna, Poland: Pinkas HaKehillot Poland, vol. III
-Joniskelis, Lithuania: Pinkas HaKehillot Lita
-Pusalotas, Lithuania: Pinkas HaKehillot Lita

Updates:

-Borshchev, Ukraine: Sefer Borszczow
-Dembitz, Poland
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Kalusz, Ukraine
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Novy Sacz, Poland
-Ryki, Poland (Polish translation of Pinkas HaKehillot chapter):
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol7_00550p.html
-Sosnowiec, Poland
-Zaglembia, Poland

Please contact me privately if you are interested in coordinating a
yizkor book translation project or in translating a chapter or
chapters >from the Pinkas HaKehillot volumes. Under Regions on the
Yizkor Book Translation Index page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html you will find the
tables of contents for Pinkas HaKehillot volumes on Greece, Hungary,
Latvia and Estonia, Lithuania, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, and
Yugoslavia. All volumes are written in Hebrew. Translated chapters
are highlighted in blue; all remaining chapters in the tables of
contents are available for translation. We do not have the
translated table of contents for the volumes on Germany, Netherlands,
and Tunisia. If you are willing to translate these, please contact
me.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Yizkor Book Project Report for June 2006 #austria-czech

Joyce Field
 

For the month of June 2006 we posted three new entries and nine
updates. All can be accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. Flags are
appended in the alphabetical listings for new material.

New entries:

-Korczyna, Poland: Pinkas HaKehillot Poland, vol. III
-Joniskelis, Lithuania: Pinkas HaKehillot Lita
-Pusalotas, Lithuania: Pinkas HaKehillot Lita

Updates:

-Borshchev, Ukraine: Sefer Borszczow
-Dembitz, Poland
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Kalusz, Ukraine
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Novy Sacz, Poland
-Ryki, Poland (Polish translation of Pinkas HaKehillot chapter):
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol7_00550p.html
-Sosnowiec, Poland
-Zaglembia, Poland

Please contact me privately if you are interested in coordinating a
yizkor book translation project or in translating a chapter or
chapters >from the Pinkas HaKehillot volumes. Under Regions on the
Yizkor Book Translation Index page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html you will find the
tables of contents for Pinkas HaKehillot volumes on Greece, Hungary,
Latvia and Estonia, Lithuania, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, and
Yugoslavia. All volumes are written in Hebrew. Translated chapters
are highlighted in blue; all remaining chapters in the tables of
contents are available for translation. We do not have the
translated table of contents for the volumes on Germany, Netherlands,
and Tunisia. If you are willing to translate these, please contact
me.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Lodz ghetto and Stutthof - drama documentary #austria-czech

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

The horror of the Lodz ghetto deportations is captured in stark statistics:
Only 34 of the 5,000 Jews deported >from Vienna to Lodz were still alive when
the camps were liberated - see:

http://www.doew.at/projekte/holocaust/shoahengl/lodz.html

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Lodz/statistics.htm

For those of us who had relatives who lived/died in the Lodz ghetto, this
Friday's drama documentary, "The Conversation" on BBC Radio 4 should be of
particular interest and poignancy. "The Conversation" is a dramatic
reconstruction of a conversation between Trevor FRIEDMAN whose father was
a Jewish slave labourer in the War and Roman HALTER, who had shared the
same experience.

It is based on tape-recorded interviews in the form of a "question and
answer" dialogue with HALTER, a survivor and Trevor, the son of a survivor,
whose father arrived in Britain in 1945 aged 20 and never told him anything
of his horrendous youthful experiences. It was 24 years after his father's
death that Trevor finally knew the facts.

You can listen to it on "BBC Listen Again" till the coming Friday - it is
informative and horrific. Stutthof conditions are also discussed as are
Mengele's sadistic selection processes - all in a matter-of-fact calm manner.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/progs/listenagain.shtml

Go to "The Afternoon Play" (45 min)
Broadcast on Radio 4 - Fri 30 Jun - 14:15

Celia Male [U.K.]


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Lodz ghetto and Stutthof - drama documentary #austria-czech

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

The horror of the Lodz ghetto deportations is captured in stark statistics:
Only 34 of the 5,000 Jews deported >from Vienna to Lodz were still alive when
the camps were liberated - see:

http://www.doew.at/projekte/holocaust/shoahengl/lodz.html

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Lodz/statistics.htm

For those of us who had relatives who lived/died in the Lodz ghetto, this
Friday's drama documentary, "The Conversation" on BBC Radio 4 should be of
particular interest and poignancy. "The Conversation" is a dramatic
reconstruction of a conversation between Trevor FRIEDMAN whose father was
a Jewish slave labourer in the War and Roman HALTER, who had shared the
same experience.

It is based on tape-recorded interviews in the form of a "question and
answer" dialogue with HALTER, a survivor and Trevor, the son of a survivor,
whose father arrived in Britain in 1945 aged 20 and never told him anything
of his horrendous youthful experiences. It was 24 years after his father's
death that Trevor finally knew the facts.

You can listen to it on "BBC Listen Again" till the coming Friday - it is
informative and horrific. Stutthof conditions are also discussed as are
Mengele's sadistic selection processes - all in a matter-of-fact calm manner.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/progs/listenagain.shtml

Go to "The Afternoon Play" (45 min)
Broadcast on Radio 4 - Fri 30 Jun - 14:15

Celia Male [U.K.]


EPSTEIN Family Y-DNA Study #rabbinic

Itzhak Epstein
 

Several EPSTEINs have joined in a Family Tree DNA's JewishGen
surname project. Painless mouth swab genetic testing procedures are
being used as a promising tool for breaking through our genealogical
brick walls. It might help you to greatly expand your family tree,
and may also help our surname project.

In addition to being borne by a historic rabbinic family, EPSTEIN is
a popular Ashkenazi surname. JewishGen family finder's listings
indicate that its EPSTEIN researchers' interests are concentrated in
Belarus, Lithuania, and the nearby parts of Poland; and, as they get
further away, they are more moderately represented in Eastern and
Central Europe. So far, most of our project's members' recent
direct male ancestors are >from Belarus or nearby areas in Poland,
Lithuania, and the Ukraine.

We have identified members of one paternal lineage that has borne
the EPSTEIN surname for several centuries. There are hints of
another old line. Most of the project's current members, however,
are patrilineally unrelated to each other. In addition, most of us
have discovered patrilineal relationships to men whose surnames are
not EPSTEIN. Most of us trace our ancestry to Eastern Europe, and
only two to Germany.

We are working on identifying the various branches of our principal
cluster, on exploring additional clusters, and on connecting our
unrelated members to cousins. To accomplish these goals and to
create as broad a search as possible, we need more male EPSTEINs to
contribute a cheek swab as a DNA sample. If you are female EPSTEIN
or an EPSTEIN through female ancestors, a sample >from an EPSTEIN
male relative can represent your family in the test. If you are not
an EPSTEIN, please share this message with EPSTEINs who may want to
participate in this project.

To join the EPSTEIN surname project, go to http://tinyurl.com/nyh6z
The basic, and most affordable, twelve marker test will indicate to
whom you are probably related. The more advanced tests could help to
identify closer and more certain relationships. You can start with
the 12 marker test and add to it at a later date, using the same
sample.

Parallel to the EPSTEIN surname project, I have just established a
separate DNA project to explore the relationships among three
historic rabbinic families -- the BENVENISTEs, the HOROWITZs, and
the EPSTEINs. While it already accepts members, I intend to launch
its recruitment drive in a few weeks. Qualified HOROWITZs and
BENVENISTEs are especially welcome. If you are interested in this
project, please contact me.

More information about DNA testing and JewishGen's involvement in it
can be found at http://www.jewishgen.org/dna/

If you have any questions, please contact Marsha Epstein, our
project's volunteer administrator at epsteindna_admin@...

Itzhak Epstein New York, NY


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic EPSTEIN Family Y-DNA Study #rabbinic

Itzhak Epstein
 

Several EPSTEINs have joined in a Family Tree DNA's JewishGen
surname project. Painless mouth swab genetic testing procedures are
being used as a promising tool for breaking through our genealogical
brick walls. It might help you to greatly expand your family tree,
and may also help our surname project.

In addition to being borne by a historic rabbinic family, EPSTEIN is
a popular Ashkenazi surname. JewishGen family finder's listings
indicate that its EPSTEIN researchers' interests are concentrated in
Belarus, Lithuania, and the nearby parts of Poland; and, as they get
further away, they are more moderately represented in Eastern and
Central Europe. So far, most of our project's members' recent
direct male ancestors are >from Belarus or nearby areas in Poland,
Lithuania, and the Ukraine.

We have identified members of one paternal lineage that has borne
the EPSTEIN surname for several centuries. There are hints of
another old line. Most of the project's current members, however,
are patrilineally unrelated to each other. In addition, most of us
have discovered patrilineal relationships to men whose surnames are
not EPSTEIN. Most of us trace our ancestry to Eastern Europe, and
only two to Germany.

We are working on identifying the various branches of our principal
cluster, on exploring additional clusters, and on connecting our
unrelated members to cousins. To accomplish these goals and to
create as broad a search as possible, we need more male EPSTEINs to
contribute a cheek swab as a DNA sample. If you are female EPSTEIN
or an EPSTEIN through female ancestors, a sample >from an EPSTEIN
male relative can represent your family in the test. If you are not
an EPSTEIN, please share this message with EPSTEINs who may want to
participate in this project.

To join the EPSTEIN surname project, go to http://tinyurl.com/nyh6z
The basic, and most affordable, twelve marker test will indicate to
whom you are probably related. The more advanced tests could help to
identify closer and more certain relationships. You can start with
the 12 marker test and add to it at a later date, using the same
sample.

Parallel to the EPSTEIN surname project, I have just established a
separate DNA project to explore the relationships among three
historic rabbinic families -- the BENVENISTEs, the HOROWITZs, and
the EPSTEINs. While it already accepts members, I intend to launch
its recruitment drive in a few weeks. Qualified HOROWITZs and
BENVENISTEs are especially welcome. If you are interested in this
project, please contact me.

More information about DNA testing and JewishGen's involvement in it
can be found at http://www.jewishgen.org/dna/

If you have any questions, please contact Marsha Epstein, our
project's volunteer administrator at epsteindna_admin@...

Itzhak Epstein New York, NY


Yizkor Book Project Report for June 2006 #rabbinic

Joyce Field
 

For the month of June 2006 we posted three new entries and nine
updates. All can be accessed at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html>. Flags are
appended in the alphabetical listings for new material.

New entries:

-Korczyna, Poland: Pinkas HaKehillot Poland, vol. III
-Joniskelis, Lithuania: Pinkas HaKehillot Lita
-Pusalotas, Lithuania: Pinkas HaKehillot Lita

Updates:

-Borshchev, Ukraine: Sefer Borszczow
-Dembitz, Poland
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Kalusz, Ukraine
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Novy Sacz, Poland
-Ryki, Poland (Polish translation of Pinkas HaKehillot chapter):
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol7_00550p.html
-Sosnowiec, Poland
-Zaglembia, Poland

Please contact me privately if you are interested in coordinating a
yizkor book translation project or in translating a chapter or
chapters >from the Pinkas HaKehillot volumes. Under Regions on the
Yizkor Book Translation Index page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html you will find the
tables of contents for Pinkas HaKehillot volumes on Greece, Hungary,
Latvia and Estonia, Lithuania, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, and
Yugoslavia. All volumes are written in Hebrew. Translated chapters
are highlighted in blue; all remaining chapters in the tables of
contents are available for translation. We do not have the translated
table of contents for the volumes on Germany, Netherlands, and
Tunisia. If you are willing to translate these, please contact me.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Yizkor Book Project Report for June 2006 #rabbinic

Joyce Field
 

For the month of June 2006 we posted three new entries and nine
updates. All can be accessed at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html>. Flags are
appended in the alphabetical listings for new material.

New entries:

-Korczyna, Poland: Pinkas HaKehillot Poland, vol. III
-Joniskelis, Lithuania: Pinkas HaKehillot Lita
-Pusalotas, Lithuania: Pinkas HaKehillot Lita

Updates:

-Borshchev, Ukraine: Sefer Borszczow
-Dembitz, Poland
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Kalusz, Ukraine
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Novy Sacz, Poland
-Ryki, Poland (Polish translation of Pinkas HaKehillot chapter):
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol7_00550p.html
-Sosnowiec, Poland
-Zaglembia, Poland

Please contact me privately if you are interested in coordinating a
yizkor book translation project or in translating a chapter or
chapters >from the Pinkas HaKehillot volumes. Under Regions on the
Yizkor Book Translation Index page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html you will find the
tables of contents for Pinkas HaKehillot volumes on Greece, Hungary,
Latvia and Estonia, Lithuania, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, and
Yugoslavia. All volumes are written in Hebrew. Translated chapters
are highlighted in blue; all remaining chapters in the tables of
contents are available for translation. We do not have the translated
table of contents for the volumes on Germany, Netherlands, and
Tunisia. If you are willing to translate these, please contact me.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition