Date   

Tarnow Schools Project Announcement #galicia

Howard Fink <HowGen@...>
 

Jewish Record Indexing (JRI)-Poland has great news for those
researching family >from Tarnow and area. Records >from several schools
have been made available at the Tarnow Polish State Archives.
JRI- Poland has arranged for an archivist to enter the data >from these
school registers into a database. The Jewish students are identified
in these records, and only those entries are included.

In most cases these records are comparable to birth records; records
typically include birth date, town and parents' names. Even when the
exact birth year is not present the birth date can be approximated
>from the school year information. Note that it is common to find the
same student entered year after year. Record photocopies (see the
example at the link below) may include even more information, like
subjects and status that are not present in the spreadsheet.

The records for some schools start as early as the 1870's and in some
cases are available up to World War II. For more information about
specific records and years, please contact me privately.

So far almost 14,000 records have been entered, >from five of the schools:

I Gimnazjum im. K. Brodzinskiego w Tarnowie
III Gimnazjum im. A. Mickiewicza w Tarnowie
Szkola Wydzialowa Meska im. M. Kopernika w Tarnowie
Szkola Wydzialowa im. M. Konopnickiej w Tarnowie
Szkola Podstawowa im. J. Slowackiego w Tarnowie

The other schools available are:

II Gimnazjum im. hetm. J. Tarnowskiego w Tarnowie
Szkola Podstawowa im. T Kosciuszki w Tarnowie
Panstwowe Seminarium Nauczycielskie Meskie im. J. Sniadeckiego w Tarnowie
Prywatne Seminarium Nauczycielski Zenskie z prawami publicznymi w Tarnowie
Szkola Ludowa im. K. Brodzinskiego w Tarnowie
Szkola Podstawowa im. T. Czackiego w Tarnowie
Szkola Podstawowa im. K. Hoffmanowej w Tarnowie
Szkola Powszechna im. H. Sienkiewicza w Tarnowi
Szkola Podstawowa im. St. Sztaszica w Tarnowie
Szkola Podstawowa im. St. Konarskiego w Tarnowie
Szkola Powszechna im. Krolowej Jadwigi w Tarnowie
Szkola Podstawowa Nr. 8 w Tarnowie Moscicach

A surname list >from the first schools entered may be viewed at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/psa/TarnowSchools_surn.htm

Students came >from towns and villages all around Tarnow. There are
four hundred different towns of birth listed already; those most
frequently mentioned are:
Tarnow, Krakow, Dabrowa, Rzeszow, Wieden, Tuchow, Lwow, Nowy Sacz,
Brzesko, Mielec, Zabno, Koszyce Wielkie, Jaroslaw, Przemysl,
Radomysl, Rzedzin, Bochnia, Berlin, Pilzno, Tarnobrzeg, Debica,
Drohobycz, Podgorze, Bircza, Nowy Jork, Bobowa, Sambor, Budapeszt,
Palesnica, Siedliszowice, Lodz, Jaslo, Lublin, Sanok, Warszawa,
Zbylitowska Gora, Brzostek, Frauenkirchen, Klikowa, Baranow, Lancut,
Szdziszow, Radlow, Rozwadow, Staszow and Ujscie Solne. Yes, there are
eighteen students listed >from New York!

A sample record >from I Gimnazjum im. K. Brodzinskiego w Tarnowie can be seen at:
http://www.jri-poland.org/TarnowSchoolSample.jpg

When the entry of all schools’ records is complete you will be able
to order photocopies using the JRI-Poland Order Basket system.

Just think of the thrill you will feel as you finally learn where
that strong gene in Math comes from! (Or maybe that problem with
Chemistry) These records provide a little more than the dry vital
statistics that we get >from most of our historical research.

Howard Fink
HowGen@...
Tarnow Archives Coordinator


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Tarnow Schools Project Announcement #galicia

Howard Fink <HowGen@...>
 

Jewish Record Indexing (JRI)-Poland has great news for those
researching family >from Tarnow and area. Records >from several schools
have been made available at the Tarnow Polish State Archives.
JRI- Poland has arranged for an archivist to enter the data >from these
school registers into a database. The Jewish students are identified
in these records, and only those entries are included.

In most cases these records are comparable to birth records; records
typically include birth date, town and parents' names. Even when the
exact birth year is not present the birth date can be approximated
>from the school year information. Note that it is common to find the
same student entered year after year. Record photocopies (see the
example at the link below) may include even more information, like
subjects and status that are not present in the spreadsheet.

The records for some schools start as early as the 1870's and in some
cases are available up to World War II. For more information about
specific records and years, please contact me privately.

So far almost 14,000 records have been entered, >from five of the schools:

I Gimnazjum im. K. Brodzinskiego w Tarnowie
III Gimnazjum im. A. Mickiewicza w Tarnowie
Szkola Wydzialowa Meska im. M. Kopernika w Tarnowie
Szkola Wydzialowa im. M. Konopnickiej w Tarnowie
Szkola Podstawowa im. J. Slowackiego w Tarnowie

The other schools available are:

II Gimnazjum im. hetm. J. Tarnowskiego w Tarnowie
Szkola Podstawowa im. T Kosciuszki w Tarnowie
Panstwowe Seminarium Nauczycielskie Meskie im. J. Sniadeckiego w Tarnowie
Prywatne Seminarium Nauczycielski Zenskie z prawami publicznymi w Tarnowie
Szkola Ludowa im. K. Brodzinskiego w Tarnowie
Szkola Podstawowa im. T. Czackiego w Tarnowie
Szkola Podstawowa im. K. Hoffmanowej w Tarnowie
Szkola Powszechna im. H. Sienkiewicza w Tarnowi
Szkola Podstawowa im. St. Sztaszica w Tarnowie
Szkola Podstawowa im. St. Konarskiego w Tarnowie
Szkola Powszechna im. Krolowej Jadwigi w Tarnowie
Szkola Podstawowa Nr. 8 w Tarnowie Moscicach

A surname list >from the first schools entered may be viewed at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/psa/TarnowSchools_surn.htm

Students came >from towns and villages all around Tarnow. There are
four hundred different towns of birth listed already; those most
frequently mentioned are:
Tarnow, Krakow, Dabrowa, Rzeszow, Wieden, Tuchow, Lwow, Nowy Sacz,
Brzesko, Mielec, Zabno, Koszyce Wielkie, Jaroslaw, Przemysl,
Radomysl, Rzedzin, Bochnia, Berlin, Pilzno, Tarnobrzeg, Debica,
Drohobycz, Podgorze, Bircza, Nowy Jork, Bobowa, Sambor, Budapeszt,
Palesnica, Siedliszowice, Lodz, Jaslo, Lublin, Sanok, Warszawa,
Zbylitowska Gora, Brzostek, Frauenkirchen, Klikowa, Baranow, Lancut,
Szdziszow, Radlow, Rozwadow, Staszow and Ujscie Solne. Yes, there are
eighteen students listed >from New York!

A sample record >from I Gimnazjum im. K. Brodzinskiego w Tarnowie can be seen at:
http://www.jri-poland.org/TarnowSchoolSample.jpg

When the entry of all schools’ records is complete you will be able
to order photocopies using the JRI-Poland Order Basket system.

Just think of the thrill you will feel as you finally learn where
that strong gene in Math comes from! (Or maybe that problem with
Chemistry) These records provide a little more than the dry vital
statistics that we get >from most of our historical research.

Howard Fink
HowGen@...
Tarnow Archives Coordinator


Danzig microfilm indexing #gdansk #germany #poland #danzig

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

I am very excited to announce that we are ready to begin indexing Danzig
microfilms >from the Family History Library (FHL). Please read below details
about the contents of these microfilms and how you can participate >from home
(or wherever your computer is).

1) Which microfilms will be indexed, and their contents.

We will begin with microfilms 1184407, 1184408, 1184409, 1184410. The
approximate total number of Danzig records/entries on these microfilms is
9232, ranging in date >from at least 1752 until 1940! I have seen on them
many instances of surnames SIG members are researching. The descriptions of
their contents on www.familysearch.org are not completely accurate, and my
impression of their contents is as follows.

1184407: birth records 1905-1936; birth records for Weinberg 1839-1847;
marriage records for Weinberg 1837-1845, often with places of origin; burial
records for Weinberg 1847-1883; burial records >from at least 1765 to 1883

1184408: death and burial records 1889-1940, often with father's name, and,
from 1934, place and date of birth
1184409: burial records for Altschottland and unified Danzig 1848-1920,
cross-referenced to burial plot purchase records for Altschottland
1848-1883, which are also indexed alphabetically; burial records 1883-1929,
cross-referenced to burial plot purchase records 1883-1900, which are also
indexed alphabetically

1184410: typed transcription of the 1814 surname adoption list already
online, with essay about surname adoption >from 1936; handwritten
citizenship? list (missing first two pages, covering surnames beginning with
"A") sharing much in common with the 1814 surname adoption list, but
differing in substantive ways; burial records >from at least 1752 until at
least 1871

Additional details about these contents appear at the end of this message.

2) How the indexing will proceed.

The indexing will be performed by SIG volunteers, meaning no fundraising
will be required. Volunteers will receive >from me by email batches of
images produced by scanning the microfilms, plus data entry Excel
spreadsheets with instructions about what to transcribe and how. Volunteers
will send me completed spreadsheets before receiving additional images to
index. I will prepare the indices for submission to JewishGen for online
presentation.

In order to volunteer, you must be comfortable entering data into an
existing Excel spreadsheet. The ability to read German, Hebrew print, or
Hebrew cursive is required for some (but not all) parts of the microfilms.
You will also need to know how to zoom in and out of jpeg images.

IF YOU WANT TO VOLUNTEER, please send me an email containing the following
information:

Have you ever worked on a project to index Jewish records? If so, which?
How well can you read 19th century German?
How well can you read Hebrew print?
How well can you read Hebrew cursive?
Of the items mentioned in the description of the contents above, which would
you prefer to work on first?
What version of Excel do you have? (You can determine this >from within
Excel by clicking on Help, then About Microsoft Excel, and reading the top
line.)

I will then send you additional information needed by volunteers. There is
no minimum committment, nor any deadline for indexing. You can work at your
own pace.

All volunteers will need to submit a JewishGen Volunteer Agreement
(http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen/agree/volunteer.html) in order to
participate in this project. Please contact me before doing this, though.

3) What will happen to the data produced by indexing.

The indices will be added to the All-Poland and Germany Databases on
JewishGen, freely available to all, and copies will be made available to
JRI-Poland. Burial records will be submitted to the JewishGen Online
Worldwide Burial Registry. So, this information should be accessible to a
very large audience.

4) Further details about the contents of the microfilms.

The ranges of dates I observed are significantly larger, in some cases, than
those indicated in the online FHL catalog. There seem to be two reasons for
this: some entries have dates written only in Hebrew, which the FHL seems to
have ignored, and these are generally the earliest; and some of the records
of burials in family plots list burials over many decades, while the FHL
seems to have used only the earliest burial dates. I did not examine all of
the Hebrew-only dates, so it is possible I missed an earlier or later date.

Many of the records associated with burials (there are several different
formats for burial records) identify the locations of graves according to
section and grave number (and some even by physical dimensions in feet).
There is so much of this information that it might be possible to
reconstruct maps of the two cemeteries, especially if aided by what (little)
survives >from them. In some cases, cross-referencing records by grave
location will also be genealogically useful.

The burial plot purchase records on microfilm 1184409 often include not only
the name of the purchaser and the location of the plot, but also the names
of the people intended to be buried in the plots, and/or their relationships
to the purchaser. This information can be very useful genealogically when
combined with the burial records on this microfilm, which indicate the names
and dates of the people actually buried in these plots (but, often, not
their relationships to the purchaser).

The precise meaning of the burial records on microfilm 1184410 is not clear
to me. Because they are arranged primarily alphabetically by given name and
grouped by section number, and because of the consistency of the handwriting
over many decades of burial dates, perhaps they were not made
contemporaneously with the burials, but are either an inventory of burials,
with the information having been read >from gravestones (which might indicate
why some is only in German, some only in Hebrew, some lacking dates --
perhaps illegible), or an indexing of other burial records.

The citizenship? list on microfilm 1184410 contains many names not on the
surname adoption list (especially people who are not heads of households), a
numbering possibly suggesting location of residency, and some information
that seems to have been accidentally dropped by the compilers of the 1817
printing of the surname adoption list (seemingly, due to the similarity in
appearance of ditto marks " and spacers ..).

Many of the records, especially those >from after the First World War, but
also some of the earliest, indicate places of origin far away >from Danzig.
There are probably many researchers whose relatives are listed in these
records, while they are not aware of any connection to Danzig or even the
surroundings.

5) Relation to other Danzig records.

This material is separate >from and different than what is in the Archives of
the Jewish Community of Danzig at the Central Archives for the History of
the Jewish People (CAHJP), Jerusalem (a link to the CAHJP inventory can be
found in the Resources section of our SIG website). The process involved in
indexing is also different -- for the CAHJP material, fundraising is
necessary to purchase microfilm and xerox copies, and for digitization of
the microfilms. Additional details about the first part of the CAHJP
project, for which we are fundraising, will soon be announced (to proceed
with other parts of the CAHJP's Danzig collection, we need volunteers to
visit CAHJP). Donations can be earmarked for the CAHJP project through our
JewishGen-erosity page
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=31
.

Combining these and other (smaller) sources will provide an expansive and
in-depth genealogical picture of the Danzig Jewish community. Depending on
your particular interests (especially, which of the five "precursor"
communities), you might find information in only some or in all of the
sources. I hope that a high degree of collaboration among SIG members will
enable us to proceed on all fronts.

While there is no requirement that you volunteer in order to make use of the
indices, I hope that you will seriously consider whether you can help with
the indexing even a little, if you expect to benefit >from this project.
Besides, it will give you the opportunities to view original records from
Danzig on your own computer and to help in a major way to preserve the
memory of our destroyed community. If you are unable to participate in the
indexing, please consider instead making a donation to the CAHJP project
above, or contact me to learn about other ways you might be able to help in
this group effort.

Best regards and thank you in advance to all volunteers,

Logan Kleinwaks
Coordinator, JewishGen Danzig/Gdansk SIG
kleinwaks@...
near Washington, D.C.


Danzig/Gedansk SIG #Danzig #Gdansk #Germany #Poland Danzig microfilm indexing #gdansk #germany #poland #danzig

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

I am very excited to announce that we are ready to begin indexing Danzig
microfilms >from the Family History Library (FHL). Please read below details
about the contents of these microfilms and how you can participate >from home
(or wherever your computer is).

1) Which microfilms will be indexed, and their contents.

We will begin with microfilms 1184407, 1184408, 1184409, 1184410. The
approximate total number of Danzig records/entries on these microfilms is
9232, ranging in date >from at least 1752 until 1940! I have seen on them
many instances of surnames SIG members are researching. The descriptions of
their contents on www.familysearch.org are not completely accurate, and my
impression of their contents is as follows.

1184407: birth records 1905-1936; birth records for Weinberg 1839-1847;
marriage records for Weinberg 1837-1845, often with places of origin; burial
records for Weinberg 1847-1883; burial records >from at least 1765 to 1883

1184408: death and burial records 1889-1940, often with father's name, and,
from 1934, place and date of birth
1184409: burial records for Altschottland and unified Danzig 1848-1920,
cross-referenced to burial plot purchase records for Altschottland
1848-1883, which are also indexed alphabetically; burial records 1883-1929,
cross-referenced to burial plot purchase records 1883-1900, which are also
indexed alphabetically

1184410: typed transcription of the 1814 surname adoption list already
online, with essay about surname adoption >from 1936; handwritten
citizenship? list (missing first two pages, covering surnames beginning with
"A") sharing much in common with the 1814 surname adoption list, but
differing in substantive ways; burial records >from at least 1752 until at
least 1871

Additional details about these contents appear at the end of this message.

2) How the indexing will proceed.

The indexing will be performed by SIG volunteers, meaning no fundraising
will be required. Volunteers will receive >from me by email batches of
images produced by scanning the microfilms, plus data entry Excel
spreadsheets with instructions about what to transcribe and how. Volunteers
will send me completed spreadsheets before receiving additional images to
index. I will prepare the indices for submission to JewishGen for online
presentation.

In order to volunteer, you must be comfortable entering data into an
existing Excel spreadsheet. The ability to read German, Hebrew print, or
Hebrew cursive is required for some (but not all) parts of the microfilms.
You will also need to know how to zoom in and out of jpeg images.

IF YOU WANT TO VOLUNTEER, please send me an email containing the following
information:

Have you ever worked on a project to index Jewish records? If so, which?
How well can you read 19th century German?
How well can you read Hebrew print?
How well can you read Hebrew cursive?
Of the items mentioned in the description of the contents above, which would
you prefer to work on first?
What version of Excel do you have? (You can determine this >from within
Excel by clicking on Help, then About Microsoft Excel, and reading the top
line.)

I will then send you additional information needed by volunteers. There is
no minimum committment, nor any deadline for indexing. You can work at your
own pace.

All volunteers will need to submit a JewishGen Volunteer Agreement
(http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen/agree/volunteer.html) in order to
participate in this project. Please contact me before doing this, though.

3) What will happen to the data produced by indexing.

The indices will be added to the All-Poland and Germany Databases on
JewishGen, freely available to all, and copies will be made available to
JRI-Poland. Burial records will be submitted to the JewishGen Online
Worldwide Burial Registry. So, this information should be accessible to a
very large audience.

4) Further details about the contents of the microfilms.

The ranges of dates I observed are significantly larger, in some cases, than
those indicated in the online FHL catalog. There seem to be two reasons for
this: some entries have dates written only in Hebrew, which the FHL seems to
have ignored, and these are generally the earliest; and some of the records
of burials in family plots list burials over many decades, while the FHL
seems to have used only the earliest burial dates. I did not examine all of
the Hebrew-only dates, so it is possible I missed an earlier or later date.

Many of the records associated with burials (there are several different
formats for burial records) identify the locations of graves according to
section and grave number (and some even by physical dimensions in feet).
There is so much of this information that it might be possible to
reconstruct maps of the two cemeteries, especially if aided by what (little)
survives >from them. In some cases, cross-referencing records by grave
location will also be genealogically useful.

The burial plot purchase records on microfilm 1184409 often include not only
the name of the purchaser and the location of the plot, but also the names
of the people intended to be buried in the plots, and/or their relationships
to the purchaser. This information can be very useful genealogically when
combined with the burial records on this microfilm, which indicate the names
and dates of the people actually buried in these plots (but, often, not
their relationships to the purchaser).

The precise meaning of the burial records on microfilm 1184410 is not clear
to me. Because they are arranged primarily alphabetically by given name and
grouped by section number, and because of the consistency of the handwriting
over many decades of burial dates, perhaps they were not made
contemporaneously with the burials, but are either an inventory of burials,
with the information having been read >from gravestones (which might indicate
why some is only in German, some only in Hebrew, some lacking dates --
perhaps illegible), or an indexing of other burial records.

The citizenship? list on microfilm 1184410 contains many names not on the
surname adoption list (especially people who are not heads of households), a
numbering possibly suggesting location of residency, and some information
that seems to have been accidentally dropped by the compilers of the 1817
printing of the surname adoption list (seemingly, due to the similarity in
appearance of ditto marks " and spacers ..).

Many of the records, especially those >from after the First World War, but
also some of the earliest, indicate places of origin far away >from Danzig.
There are probably many researchers whose relatives are listed in these
records, while they are not aware of any connection to Danzig or even the
surroundings.

5) Relation to other Danzig records.

This material is separate >from and different than what is in the Archives of
the Jewish Community of Danzig at the Central Archives for the History of
the Jewish People (CAHJP), Jerusalem (a link to the CAHJP inventory can be
found in the Resources section of our SIG website). The process involved in
indexing is also different -- for the CAHJP material, fundraising is
necessary to purchase microfilm and xerox copies, and for digitization of
the microfilms. Additional details about the first part of the CAHJP
project, for which we are fundraising, will soon be announced (to proceed
with other parts of the CAHJP's Danzig collection, we need volunteers to
visit CAHJP). Donations can be earmarked for the CAHJP project through our
JewishGen-erosity page
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=31
.

Combining these and other (smaller) sources will provide an expansive and
in-depth genealogical picture of the Danzig Jewish community. Depending on
your particular interests (especially, which of the five "precursor"
communities), you might find information in only some or in all of the
sources. I hope that a high degree of collaboration among SIG members will
enable us to proceed on all fronts.

While there is no requirement that you volunteer in order to make use of the
indices, I hope that you will seriously consider whether you can help with
the indexing even a little, if you expect to benefit >from this project.
Besides, it will give you the opportunities to view original records from
Danzig on your own computer and to help in a major way to preserve the
memory of our destroyed community. If you are unable to participate in the
indexing, please consider instead making a donation to the CAHJP project
above, or contact me to learn about other ways you might be able to help in
this group effort.

Best regards and thank you in advance to all volunteers,

Logan Kleinwaks
Coordinator, JewishGen Danzig/Gdansk SIG
kleinwaks@...
near Washington, D.C.


Re: the name "Christof" #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

I too have known Jews called Christopher. Beats me why their parents did it!

Re what you say about names "originating >from the New Testament", the
overwhelming majority of those names are actually Greek versions of
Hebrew names -- most of them stemming originally >from the Hebrew
Bible. Not least (Historically, he was in fact Joshua, son of
Miriam and Joseph of Nazareth -- which is why the New Testament
calls him Jesus of Nazareth and his followers were known in his day
as the Nazarenes)

Other NT names coming >from the Hebrew include Mary (Miriam), Anna
(Hannah), Elias (Elijah), Elizabeth (Elisheva), Matthew
(Matityahu) Elias (Elijah), John (Yohannan), James (Jacob), Simon
(Simeon), Saul (the original name of St. Paul), Lazarus
(Ell'azar), Joanna (Yohanna) Salome (Shulammit) and Thomas (>from
the Hebrew word for "twin." I'm sure there are more that I can't
call to mind at the moment, but that's enough to make the point that
many "Christian" names are actually Jewish names to start with.

Christopher obviously is a different matter. It means
"Christ-bearer." The name is said to come >from a legend about a man
who carried the Christ-child across a river and thereby became St.
Christopher

Judith Romney Wegner


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: the name "Christof" #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

I too have known Jews called Christopher. Beats me why their parents did it!

Re what you say about names "originating >from the New Testament", the
overwhelming majority of those names are actually Greek versions of
Hebrew names -- most of them stemming originally >from the Hebrew
Bible. Not least (Historically, he was in fact Joshua, son of
Miriam and Joseph of Nazareth -- which is why the New Testament
calls him Jesus of Nazareth and his followers were known in his day
as the Nazarenes)

Other NT names coming >from the Hebrew include Mary (Miriam), Anna
(Hannah), Elias (Elijah), Elizabeth (Elisheva), Matthew
(Matityahu) Elias (Elijah), John (Yohannan), James (Jacob), Simon
(Simeon), Saul (the original name of St. Paul), Lazarus
(Ell'azar), Joanna (Yohanna) Salome (Shulammit) and Thomas (>from
the Hebrew word for "twin." I'm sure there are more that I can't
call to mind at the moment, but that's enough to make the point that
many "Christian" names are actually Jewish names to start with.

Christopher obviously is a different matter. It means
"Christ-bearer." The name is said to come >from a legend about a man
who carried the Christ-child across a river and thereby became St.
Christopher

Judith Romney Wegner


Immigration visas #general

Gladys Paulin <paulin@...>
 

Immigration visa files are at the USCIS (formerly the INS) in Washington and
are available through a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request. See
http://www.uscis.gov/graphics/aboutus/foia/index.htm for instructions and
form.

The USCIS has these files beginning >from July 1, 1924.

Gladys Friedman Paulin, CG
Winter Springs, FL
http://genealogybygladys.com

Editor "OnBoard the Newsletter of the Board for Certification of Genealogists"

from Suzan Wynne
The State Department's consular records include visa applications.
Maryland. I would start with writing to the State Department.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Immigration visas #general

Gladys Paulin <paulin@...>
 

Immigration visa files are at the USCIS (formerly the INS) in Washington and
are available through a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request. See
http://www.uscis.gov/graphics/aboutus/foia/index.htm for instructions and
form.

The USCIS has these files beginning >from July 1, 1924.

Gladys Friedman Paulin, CG
Winter Springs, FL
http://genealogybygladys.com

Editor "OnBoard the Newsletter of the Board for Certification of Genealogists"

from Suzan Wynne
The State Department's consular records include visa applications.
Maryland. I would start with writing to the State Department.


Strange marriage certificate #unitedkingdom

HPOLLINS@...
 

I was intending to send to JCR-UK the contents of a marriage certificate I
had received to add to its collection of birth, marriage and death
certificates. But I hesitated because of the oddity of this one. It relates
to Henry
JACKSON whose family is in the 1851 Census for North Shields. I wanted to find
out who his father was and also the maiden name of his wife, Hannah. I sent
for the marriage certificate. It gives his name as Henry JAKSON (sic), paint=
er glazier, but his father is given as Jonas JACOBS. I thought initially that
perhaps JACOBS had become JACKSON. But the strangest feature of the
certificate was that the bride's name was Harry (sic) JACOBS, and her father
was Jacob MAIR. I looked at the Index of marriages and found that it was
listed under Harry JACOBS as well as Henry JACKSON. I think the oddity
arose because the minister who conducted the service was Joseph CARO of
Newcastle who had only recently immigrated and presumably his English was poor.
There is a further problem. I found Jonas JACOBS in the 1841 Census of North
Shields and his daughter was Hannah. All the family were born abroad. Yet
Hannah JACKSON, who appears in subsequent Censuses was reported consistently
as being born in Sunderland.

All rather strange.

Harold Pollins
Oxford


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Strange marriage certificate #unitedkingdom

HPOLLINS@...
 

I was intending to send to JCR-UK the contents of a marriage certificate I
had received to add to its collection of birth, marriage and death
certificates. But I hesitated because of the oddity of this one. It relates
to Henry
JACKSON whose family is in the 1851 Census for North Shields. I wanted to find
out who his father was and also the maiden name of his wife, Hannah. I sent
for the marriage certificate. It gives his name as Henry JAKSON (sic), paint=
er glazier, but his father is given as Jonas JACOBS. I thought initially that
perhaps JACOBS had become JACKSON. But the strangest feature of the
certificate was that the bride's name was Harry (sic) JACOBS, and her father
was Jacob MAIR. I looked at the Index of marriages and found that it was
listed under Harry JACOBS as well as Henry JACKSON. I think the oddity
arose because the minister who conducted the service was Joseph CARO of
Newcastle who had only recently immigrated and presumably his English was poor.
There is a further problem. I found Jonas JACOBS in the 1841 Census of North
Shields and his daughter was Hannah. All the family were born abroad. Yet
Hannah JACKSON, who appears in subsequent Censuses was reported consistently
as being born in Sunderland.

All rather strange.

Harold Pollins
Oxford


the name "Christof" #general

David Kravitz
 

Stan Goodman opined:

"Nothing is impossible, but to me it seems unlikely that someone who gives
his son the name "Christof" is a Jew (or is _still_ a Jew)"

I have two orthodox Jewish friends called Christopher and I was at
university with one Christine Cohen. At her orthodox wedding under the
chupah, the rabbi insisted on calling her by her middle name. There are a
great many, including my own middle name, whose names originate >from the New
Testament.

David Kravitz
Netanya, Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen the name "Christof" #general

David Kravitz
 

Stan Goodman opined:

"Nothing is impossible, but to me it seems unlikely that someone who gives
his son the name "Christof" is a Jew (or is _still_ a Jew)"

I have two orthodox Jewish friends called Christopher and I was at
university with one Christine Cohen. At her orthodox wedding under the
chupah, the rabbi insisted on calling her by her middle name. There are a
great many, including my own middle name, whose names originate >from the New
Testament.

David Kravitz
Netanya, Israel


Lenin, Belarus cemetery - wooden grave markers #belarus

nulevich@...
 

I spent two days in Lenin, Belarus in June. The cemetery there contains both stone
and wooden grave markers. During a brief discussion in Pinsk with someone who has
visited numerous cemeteries the individual mentioned that he had seen wooden grave
markers only in the Lenin cemetery, not in others. Can any auditors of this list
cite other Belarus cemeteries in which wooden grave markers appear? Or is their
use rare?

Neal Ulevich
Denver, Colorado, USA


Re: Info requested on surname of SCHALLOM #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Wed, 12 Jul 2006 03:06:45 UTC, pam@... (Pam) wrote:

I'm looking for information or history on the SCHALLOM/SCHOLLUM/SCHALOM
surname.

The info I have is sketchy - but goes back to Wenzel SCHALOM of Otesice m.
to Elisabetha BEZDEK with son Christoph Schalom (1764);

Christoph Schalom, Merklin #35 m. Marianna BAXA and children were Johan
Schallom (7-30-1813 to 1892) and Anna Schallom (1821);

from Johan SCHALLOM - I then have a place listed as Celakovy, m. to Maria
WEISS (1819) and m. 4-26-1842 in Stankov Town - children were Josephine,
Charles, Wenzel, George.

My line comes thru Chrarles who m. Catharina FRIERDICH (Friedrich) (which is
also my line on my paternal side) they married 4-21-1868 in Monroe County,
IL - they had Charles Jr., Louise, Wenzel, George, Katherine, Mary B. (my
gggrandmother), Peter Joseph, Agnes and Sylvie . They settled in Monroe
County, IL

I have not been able to trace any info on whether the name SCHALLOM is >from
Jewish ancestry or not - but the name is so close to 'shalom' that I can not
help but wonder if my 'catholic' heritage was originally of the Jewish
faith. Other names in the same areas (Moravia) that are connected with this
surname are MICHALEK, REIS (RIESS), GOLD, SCHUBERT, SCHRAMM,
Nothing is impossible, but to me it seems unlikely that someone who gives
his son the name "Christof" is a Jew (or is _still_ a Jew). There are
people here that are far more familiar with German-speaking societies of the
period than me, but my inclination would be to look for an alternate
defivation of the admittedly tempting surname.
--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form there.


Belarus SIG #Belarus Lenin, Belarus cemetery - wooden grave markers #belarus

nulevich@...
 

I spent two days in Lenin, Belarus in June. The cemetery there contains both stone
and wooden grave markers. During a brief discussion in Pinsk with someone who has
visited numerous cemeteries the individual mentioned that he had seen wooden grave
markers only in the Lenin cemetery, not in others. Can any auditors of this list
cite other Belarus cemeteries in which wooden grave markers appear? Or is their
use rare?

Neal Ulevich
Denver, Colorado, USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Info requested on surname of SCHALLOM #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Wed, 12 Jul 2006 03:06:45 UTC, pam@... (Pam) wrote:

I'm looking for information or history on the SCHALLOM/SCHOLLUM/SCHALOM
surname.

The info I have is sketchy - but goes back to Wenzel SCHALOM of Otesice m.
to Elisabetha BEZDEK with son Christoph Schalom (1764);

Christoph Schalom, Merklin #35 m. Marianna BAXA and children were Johan
Schallom (7-30-1813 to 1892) and Anna Schallom (1821);

from Johan SCHALLOM - I then have a place listed as Celakovy, m. to Maria
WEISS (1819) and m. 4-26-1842 in Stankov Town - children were Josephine,
Charles, Wenzel, George.

My line comes thru Chrarles who m. Catharina FRIERDICH (Friedrich) (which is
also my line on my paternal side) they married 4-21-1868 in Monroe County,
IL - they had Charles Jr., Louise, Wenzel, George, Katherine, Mary B. (my
gggrandmother), Peter Joseph, Agnes and Sylvie . They settled in Monroe
County, IL

I have not been able to trace any info on whether the name SCHALLOM is >from
Jewish ancestry or not - but the name is so close to 'shalom' that I can not
help but wonder if my 'catholic' heritage was originally of the Jewish
faith. Other names in the same areas (Moravia) that are connected with this
surname are MICHALEK, REIS (RIESS), GOLD, SCHUBERT, SCHRAMM,
Nothing is impossible, but to me it seems unlikely that someone who gives
his son the name "Christof" is a Jew (or is _still_ a Jew). There are
people here that are far more familiar with German-speaking societies of the
period than me, but my inclination would be to look for an alternate
defivation of the admittedly tempting surname.
--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form there.


Lida District Birds-of-a-Feather Thursday, Aug. 17 at 11 a.m. #belarus

Jrbaston
 

There will be a Lida District Birds of a Feather meeting on Thursday,
August 17 >from 11 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. in the Gramercy Room, on the
7th Floor of the hotel.

We will give researchers >from Lida District towns (see below) an informal
opportunity to network among ourselves, and we will also review the many
research resources available for Lida District towns in the All-Belarus and
All-Lithuania Databases, as well as on the Lida District Researchers page
< http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Lida-District/lida-dist.htm >
and in the Yizkor Book translations:

Towns of registration in the Lida District include Eisiskes/Eishishok
(now in Lithuania);and Belitsy, Lida, Nowy Dwor, Orlya, Ostrynia,
Radun, Rozanka, Scucyn, Vashilishki, Voronova, and Zaludok, (now in
Belarus). Our families also came >from many small villages in the area.

If you're a Lida District researcher attending the IAJGS conference, we
hope to see you at this Birds-of-a-Feather meeting. Please write me
privately and let me know whether you'll be participating.

Judy Baston
JRBaston@...

RESEARCHING: BASTUNSKI and KAGANOVICH >from Eishishok; BASTUNSKI
and Abramovich >from Sokoly and Voronovo.


Belarus SIG #Belarus Lida District Birds-of-a-Feather Thursday, Aug. 17 at 11 a.m. #belarus

Jrbaston
 

There will be a Lida District Birds of a Feather meeting on Thursday,
August 17 >from 11 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. in the Gramercy Room, on the
7th Floor of the hotel.

We will give researchers >from Lida District towns (see below) an informal
opportunity to network among ourselves, and we will also review the many
research resources available for Lida District towns in the All-Belarus and
All-Lithuania Databases, as well as on the Lida District Researchers page
< http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Lida-District/lida-dist.htm >
and in the Yizkor Book translations:

Towns of registration in the Lida District include Eisiskes/Eishishok
(now in Lithuania);and Belitsy, Lida, Nowy Dwor, Orlya, Ostrynia,
Radun, Rozanka, Scucyn, Vashilishki, Voronova, and Zaludok, (now in
Belarus). Our families also came >from many small villages in the area.

If you're a Lida District researcher attending the IAJGS conference, we
hope to see you at this Birds-of-a-Feather meeting. Please write me
privately and let me know whether you'll be participating.

Judy Baston
JRBaston@...

RESEARCHING: BASTUNSKI and KAGANOVICH >from Eishishok; BASTUNSKI
and Abramovich >from Sokoly and Voronovo.


Fw: Trip Report and Thanks #ukraine

Stephen R. Low <steve.low@...>
 

To all:

I'm writing to thank the many subscribers to the Hungarian, Romanian, and
Ukrainian SIGs who offered great suggestions over the past few months that
led to my recent trip to Eastern Europe and more. I have tried to retain the
names and e-mail addresses for many of you and over the next several weeks,
I will try to respond individually. In the meantime, here is a blanket
"thanks," a brief report on what I did, and an offer to help others by
sharing my contacts and experience.

As you will see, this was a very personal journey, filled with symbolism,
and very moving--even with my hard heart.

On June 3, I left >from Boston on a journey that would take me to the
birthplaces of my four grandparents: Kiliya, Ukraine; Iasi, Halmeu, and
Seini, Romania. (Halmeu and Seine were Hungarian when my grandparents left
them.) I also visited Odessa and Ismail in Ukraine, Kishinev; the capital of
Moldova; and Sighet, Satu Mare, and Baia Mare, Romania. In each place, I
spent >from 1 to 4 days. My goal was not to conduct research, but rather to
see these places and to get a feel for what they were like 100-115 years
ago, when these grandparents came to the U.S. In the end, I did conduct a
small amount of research in Halmeu and Seine, and these efforts were
extraordinary.

I traveled between these places by bus, by rented car, and by rabbi (yes, a
rabbi drove me >from Odessa to Ismail!). The car rental permitted me to drive
from Iasi to Satu Mare, crossing the Carpathians, with an overnight stop in
Sighet (the birthplace of Elie Wiesel, whose home has been turned into a
museum).

All along the way, I met wonderful people and had some wonderful guides. I
never was concerned about safety. I found that speaking only English, while
a handicap, did not present great problems. I kept a very detailed diary and
took many photos that are referenced within its pages, and I will spend the
next many weeks integrating the words and photos into a single document.
from Satu Mare, on June 22, I took a bus to Budapest, where my wife joined
me. We spent four days there as tourists, although we did visit the Great
Synagogue and attended Friday night services there. On June 26 we began a
four train/25 hour marathon: >from Budapest to Vienna to Paris (on the Orient
Express) to London (on Eurostar, through the Chunnel) to Southampton,
arriving there just 2 ½ hours before sailing back to the U.S. on the Queen
Mary 2 to New York. Six nights later, on July 3, we got out of bed at 3:45
and were on deck at 4 am in the morning to watch us enter New York harbor,
sail underneath the Verrazano Narrows Bridge, and pass the Statue of
Liberty—fulfilling a dream I’ve had for 30 years.
In New York, we dropped our luggage at the hotel, and went immediately to
(where else?) Ellis Island! That evening and the next, we managed to meet
two NY cousins I had never met before, and on our final day, July 5, we
rented a car for the drive back to the Boston area. But first, we drove to
Mt. Hebron, Mt. Zion, and Riverside (in NJ) cemeteries and visited the
graves of my parents, all four grandparents, and four of my eight
great-grandparents.
A spectacular trip. And I would do it again.
As I indicated, I'd be happy to share my specific experiences with anyone
contemplating similar travel. Also, part of my planning involved technology:
cell phone and a word processor, and I'd be happy to report on how I handled
these important parts of the trip.

Regards,
Steve Low
Lincoln MA

Researching:

LOW >from Satu Mare/Seini, Romania (i.e., Szatmar/Szinervaraljá, Hungary) to
New York

SCHWARTZ >from Halmeu, Romania (I.e., Halmi, Hungary) to New York

WITTNER >from Iasi, Romania to New York; Manchester, England; Australia

LANDO/LANDA/LANDAU >from Kiliya, Ukraine and Kishinev, Moldova to New York
and
Palestine


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Fw: Trip Report and Thanks #ukraine

Stephen R. Low <steve.low@...>
 

To all:

I'm writing to thank the many subscribers to the Hungarian, Romanian, and
Ukrainian SIGs who offered great suggestions over the past few months that
led to my recent trip to Eastern Europe and more. I have tried to retain the
names and e-mail addresses for many of you and over the next several weeks,
I will try to respond individually. In the meantime, here is a blanket
"thanks," a brief report on what I did, and an offer to help others by
sharing my contacts and experience.

As you will see, this was a very personal journey, filled with symbolism,
and very moving--even with my hard heart.

On June 3, I left >from Boston on a journey that would take me to the
birthplaces of my four grandparents: Kiliya, Ukraine; Iasi, Halmeu, and
Seini, Romania. (Halmeu and Seine were Hungarian when my grandparents left
them.) I also visited Odessa and Ismail in Ukraine, Kishinev; the capital of
Moldova; and Sighet, Satu Mare, and Baia Mare, Romania. In each place, I
spent >from 1 to 4 days. My goal was not to conduct research, but rather to
see these places and to get a feel for what they were like 100-115 years
ago, when these grandparents came to the U.S. In the end, I did conduct a
small amount of research in Halmeu and Seine, and these efforts were
extraordinary.

I traveled between these places by bus, by rented car, and by rabbi (yes, a
rabbi drove me >from Odessa to Ismail!). The car rental permitted me to drive
from Iasi to Satu Mare, crossing the Carpathians, with an overnight stop in
Sighet (the birthplace of Elie Wiesel, whose home has been turned into a
museum).

All along the way, I met wonderful people and had some wonderful guides. I
never was concerned about safety. I found that speaking only English, while
a handicap, did not present great problems. I kept a very detailed diary and
took many photos that are referenced within its pages, and I will spend the
next many weeks integrating the words and photos into a single document.
from Satu Mare, on June 22, I took a bus to Budapest, where my wife joined
me. We spent four days there as tourists, although we did visit the Great
Synagogue and attended Friday night services there. On June 26 we began a
four train/25 hour marathon: >from Budapest to Vienna to Paris (on the Orient
Express) to London (on Eurostar, through the Chunnel) to Southampton,
arriving there just 2 ½ hours before sailing back to the U.S. on the Queen
Mary 2 to New York. Six nights later, on July 3, we got out of bed at 3:45
and were on deck at 4 am in the morning to watch us enter New York harbor,
sail underneath the Verrazano Narrows Bridge, and pass the Statue of
Liberty—fulfilling a dream I’ve had for 30 years.
In New York, we dropped our luggage at the hotel, and went immediately to
(where else?) Ellis Island! That evening and the next, we managed to meet
two NY cousins I had never met before, and on our final day, July 5, we
rented a car for the drive back to the Boston area. But first, we drove to
Mt. Hebron, Mt. Zion, and Riverside (in NJ) cemeteries and visited the
graves of my parents, all four grandparents, and four of my eight
great-grandparents.
A spectacular trip. And I would do it again.
As I indicated, I'd be happy to share my specific experiences with anyone
contemplating similar travel. Also, part of my planning involved technology:
cell phone and a word processor, and I'd be happy to report on how I handled
these important parts of the trip.

Regards,
Steve Low
Lincoln MA

Researching:

LOW >from Satu Mare/Seini, Romania (i.e., Szatmar/Szinervaraljá, Hungary) to
New York

SCHWARTZ >from Halmeu, Romania (I.e., Halmi, Hungary) to New York

WITTNER >from Iasi, Romania to New York; Manchester, England; Australia

LANDO/LANDA/LANDAU >from Kiliya, Ukraine and Kishinev, Moldova to New York
and
Palestine