Date   
Permission to marry: Wolf Isaak STEIN, a soldier from Stanislau. #poland

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

What happens when a Jewish soldier >from Galicia
stationed in Vienna in the 1860s wishes to get
married? This question might be impossible to answer
today unless we unearth some "Rules and Regulations"
in a military handbook about just such a situation.

By a stroke of luck, we have circumvented this first
research stage because of a document I have found
being auctioned on the 14th June on the best-known
internet auction site. Because of the importance of
this document I hope many of you will have a look at
it {see url in the footnote}.

It is a document dated 23 April 1867 granting
permission to marry to Wolf Isaak STEIN from
Stanislau, Galicia. Wolf was probably born about 1840.
The person selling the document appeared unable to
read the word Stanislau which is missing >from the
description. Wolf is obviously still "zustandig"
[resident} in Stanislau.

Wolf was stationed in Vienna and was a member of the
K. und K. Wiener Invaliden Commando and was an
Invaliden Zugsfuhrer - in the Austrian Army a
"Zugsfuhrer" [with umlaut on the U ] was a platoon
leader. What exactly was the Wiener K. und K.
Invaliden Commando? I believe it meant that the
fathers of the soldiers in this regiment had been
wounded in action - if you can read German, search for
Invaliden here:

http://tinyurl.com/fbq82

The military authorities had received the permission
to marry >from the Magistrat in Stanislau and the
permit is numbered 1301 and dated 13th of illegible?

They now give the go-ahead. The bride is named as
Magdalena DEUTSCH [described as an adult]. The only
proviso is that the usual formalities [three
prounouncements of marriage and no objections] are
complied with. Also, Magdalena must renounce all
rights to military benefits. The marriage can then
proceed according to Jewish rites.

This raises other questions:

1. Was this renounciation demanded >from all brides or
only Jewish brides? What exactly were the benefits she
renounced - pensions etc?

2. Did Wolf marry in a synagogue in Vienna? If so, his
marriage should be registered at the Israelitische
Kultusgemeinde [IKG] and we should be able to find it.

3. Alternatively Wolf married Magdalena on home-leave.

4. Perhaps there were special facilities for Jewish
members of the K und K forces to marry with rabbis
seconded to the forces?

5. As Wolf Isaak served in a K. und K. Wiener
Invaliden Regiment, one might assume that his family
resided in Vienna.

These are all unanswered questions, but if we
assiduously chip away at these problems we will
hopefully get a clearer idea of the bureacratic
complexities of such a marriage.

The military archives in Vienna now charge quite hefty
fees. This is of course a major disincentive for
anyone wishing to carry out purely academic,
exploratory research. I am not sure if queries
related to the above research would be exempted from
the fees mentioned above.

Celia Male [U.K.]

Footnote: to see the "permission to marry" document go
to: http://tinyurl.com/gbkfw

JRI Poland #Poland Permission to marry: Wolf Isaak STEIN, a soldier from Stanislau. #poland

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

What happens when a Jewish soldier >from Galicia
stationed in Vienna in the 1860s wishes to get
married? This question might be impossible to answer
today unless we unearth some "Rules and Regulations"
in a military handbook about just such a situation.

By a stroke of luck, we have circumvented this first
research stage because of a document I have found
being auctioned on the 14th June on the best-known
internet auction site. Because of the importance of
this document I hope many of you will have a look at
it {see url in the footnote}.

It is a document dated 23 April 1867 granting
permission to marry to Wolf Isaak STEIN from
Stanislau, Galicia. Wolf was probably born about 1840.
The person selling the document appeared unable to
read the word Stanislau which is missing >from the
description. Wolf is obviously still "zustandig"
[resident} in Stanislau.

Wolf was stationed in Vienna and was a member of the
K. und K. Wiener Invaliden Commando and was an
Invaliden Zugsfuhrer - in the Austrian Army a
"Zugsfuhrer" [with umlaut on the U ] was a platoon
leader. What exactly was the Wiener K. und K.
Invaliden Commando? I believe it meant that the
fathers of the soldiers in this regiment had been
wounded in action - if you can read German, search for
Invaliden here:

http://tinyurl.com/fbq82

The military authorities had received the permission
to marry >from the Magistrat in Stanislau and the
permit is numbered 1301 and dated 13th of illegible?

They now give the go-ahead. The bride is named as
Magdalena DEUTSCH [described as an adult]. The only
proviso is that the usual formalities [three
prounouncements of marriage and no objections] are
complied with. Also, Magdalena must renounce all
rights to military benefits. The marriage can then
proceed according to Jewish rites.

This raises other questions:

1. Was this renounciation demanded >from all brides or
only Jewish brides? What exactly were the benefits she
renounced - pensions etc?

2. Did Wolf marry in a synagogue in Vienna? If so, his
marriage should be registered at the Israelitische
Kultusgemeinde [IKG] and we should be able to find it.

3. Alternatively Wolf married Magdalena on home-leave.

4. Perhaps there were special facilities for Jewish
members of the K und K forces to marry with rabbis
seconded to the forces?

5. As Wolf Isaak served in a K. und K. Wiener
Invaliden Regiment, one might assume that his family
resided in Vienna.

These are all unanswered questions, but if we
assiduously chip away at these problems we will
hopefully get a clearer idea of the bureacratic
complexities of such a marriage.

The military archives in Vienna now charge quite hefty
fees. This is of course a major disincentive for
anyone wishing to carry out purely academic,
exploratory research. I am not sure if queries
related to the above research would be exempted from
the fees mentioned above.

Celia Male [U.K.]

Footnote: to see the "permission to marry" document go
to: http://tinyurl.com/gbkfw

British Jewry Turns 350 (Or So Goes the Myth) #unitedkingdom

Shirley Collier <shirley.collier@...>
 

Somebody has just sent me the following article >from The Forward. I am not
sure if it has been previously issued here as I haven't had access to all
my emails recently.

http://forward.com/main/article.php?ref=glaser20060601426

British Jewry Turns 350 (Or So Goes the Myth) By Eliane Glaser

The British Jewish community is celebrating its 350th anniversary this year,
just a year after merica's Jews observed three-and-a-half centuries in the
country. This month a special service will beheld at Britain's oldest
synagogue. In September, London's Trafalgar Square will host a festival
devoed to Jewish history and culture. The calendar is full of
anniversary-related lectures, concerts and oficial dinners.

It seems a remarkable coincidence that the Jewish communities of Britain
and America were founded at almost exactly the same time. American Jews
place the founding of the community in 1654, when 23 Jews, fleeing the
Brazilian city of Recife >from Portuguese conquerors, found refuge in New
Amsterdam - present-day New York. British Jews, for their part, look to
1656, when Oliver Cromwell readmitted the Jews to England, three-and-a-half
centuries after the Jews were expelled during the antisemitic Medieval
period by King Edward I.

A remarkable coincidence, indeed - were it not for the inconvenient fact
that Cromwell did not readmit the Jews to England.

In 1655, a leading rabbi >from the thriving Jewish community of Amsterdam
called Menasseh ben Israel visited England in order to persuade Cromwell to
let the Jews back in. Menasseh cited the familiar mercantile arguments, and
also appealed to an eccentric millenarian prophecy circulating at the time
that claimed that Christ's second coming would be preceded by a return of
the Jews to England

Cromwell called together a conference of merchants, lawyers and clergymen
to discuss Menasseh's proposal. But after many days of heated debate, they
were unable to reach a verdict, and Menasseh went away empty handed.

Jewish historians have long argued that, although Menasseh's mission
failed, a Jewish community was nevertheless established during 1656. In
March of that year, members of the existing Jewish community in London -
there were indeed Jews in England prior to Menasseh's arrival - petitioned
Cromwell to allow them to hold synagogue services and to establish a
cemetery. The petition for these two hallmarks of communal status, however,
was ignored.

The date of 1656, then, is rather arbitrary. Other milestones could have
conceivably been chosen as the founding moment of British Jewry. In 1701,
the community's first synagogue, Bevis Marks, was established. In 1753, the
so-called "Jew Bill," which allowed members of the community to become
naturalized citizens, was passed by Parliament, though it was repealed a
year later. And in 1858 the Jewish emancipation movement resulted in the
right to serve in Parliament.

It was not until the late 19th century, when hordes of Eastern European
Jews flooded into Britain, threatening the status of the established Jewish
community, that Cromwell's alleged re-admittance of the Jews to England
became accepted as the community's founding story. At the time, the
reputation of Cromwell was enjoying a revival, and the first "Resettlement
Day" was held in 1894.

In America the story was much the same. The first time the year 1654 was
celebrated as the founding of the community was in 1905 - during the great,
unsettling waves of mass immigration >from Europe. For the Jewish communities
on both sides of the pond, the foundational events of the 17th century
provided positive precedents for immigration.

It was insecurity >from which the need for celebration emerged. So why, at a
time of unprecedented communal comfort and safety, are the anniversaries now
such a big deal?
Why don't we recognize that the British readmission story is a myth, and
that the founding of the American Jewish community was a small, reluctant
affair? And since there were Jews in England and America prior to 1656 and
1654, why can we not admit that there was no "man on the moon" moment?

Jewish leaders in Britain and the United States are quick to point out that
the anniversaries are as much about celebrating the Jews' achievements as
about commemorating a historic event. This imperative appears particularly
pressing in the light of assimilation-driven fears about continuity.


Whether or not this anxiety is justified, it is driving the movement, on
both sides of the Atlantic, to consolidate and institutionalize the
celebration of Jewish communal life. While there is nothing inherently
damaging about this, it does not exactly advance the vibrant Jewish
tradition of questioning history and encouraging critical debate.

Furthermore, it is worth noting that it is not only the Jewish community
that stands to benefit >from the anniversaries. In Britain, the events this
year provide the wider national establishment with an opportunity to
congratulate itself on a unique tradition of tolerance. In contrast to
other parts of Europe, where antisemitic persecution has been rife, Britain
believes that it has upheld the principle of religious liberty since the
17th century

This tradition of great British tolerance, however, has been overstated.
In America, the separation of church and state enshrined in the Constitution
has given Jews, on the whole, a proper place in the nation's structure. But
in Britain, church and state remain intertwined - meaning that the inclusion
of religious minorities, including Jews, has always been an informal,
intermittent affair.

With immigration once again becoming a fraught issue in Britian, tolerance
is being trumpeted by political leaders as never before. At the first
"citizenship ceremony" for new immigrants, held in 2004, former minister
David Blunkett emphasized that "Britain has a great tradition as a tolerant
and welcoming nation."

The formula is repeated whenever there is an attempt to define
"Britishness," and the anniversary celebrations only add to this patriotic
self-image. In Britain, it seems fair to say, the Jewish community appears
to be continuing the rather old-fashioned tradition of thanking our hosts
for having us.

Eliane Glaser, a producer at the BBC, is author of a forthcoming history of
the Jews in England (Palgrave Macmillan The Forward
Published Weekly in New York Since 1897

SHIRLEY COLLIER
East of London UK
Member of JGSGB Council
Regional Group Co-ordinator

Researching:
BIERMAN/BERMAN- Piesk,Lublin/New York/London
SHEVA EICHEL - London/New York
HARRIS (or derivations)- Sieradz/Hull/London
HOROWITZ - Siedlce
ROZAINSKY/WAPNIARZ - Lomza/Czestochowa/Pultusk/New York/London
TILLES/TRINKENREICH - Tarnow/Krakow/Newcastle/London

JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom British Jewry Turns 350 (Or So Goes the Myth) #unitedkingdom

Shirley Collier <shirley.collier@...>
 

Somebody has just sent me the following article >from The Forward. I am not
sure if it has been previously issued here as I haven't had access to all
my emails recently.

http://forward.com/main/article.php?ref=glaser20060601426

British Jewry Turns 350 (Or So Goes the Myth) By Eliane Glaser

The British Jewish community is celebrating its 350th anniversary this year,
just a year after merica's Jews observed three-and-a-half centuries in the
country. This month a special service will beheld at Britain's oldest
synagogue. In September, London's Trafalgar Square will host a festival
devoed to Jewish history and culture. The calendar is full of
anniversary-related lectures, concerts and oficial dinners.

It seems a remarkable coincidence that the Jewish communities of Britain
and America were founded at almost exactly the same time. American Jews
place the founding of the community in 1654, when 23 Jews, fleeing the
Brazilian city of Recife >from Portuguese conquerors, found refuge in New
Amsterdam - present-day New York. British Jews, for their part, look to
1656, when Oliver Cromwell readmitted the Jews to England, three-and-a-half
centuries after the Jews were expelled during the antisemitic Medieval
period by King Edward I.

A remarkable coincidence, indeed - were it not for the inconvenient fact
that Cromwell did not readmit the Jews to England.

In 1655, a leading rabbi >from the thriving Jewish community of Amsterdam
called Menasseh ben Israel visited England in order to persuade Cromwell to
let the Jews back in. Menasseh cited the familiar mercantile arguments, and
also appealed to an eccentric millenarian prophecy circulating at the time
that claimed that Christ's second coming would be preceded by a return of
the Jews to England

Cromwell called together a conference of merchants, lawyers and clergymen
to discuss Menasseh's proposal. But after many days of heated debate, they
were unable to reach a verdict, and Menasseh went away empty handed.

Jewish historians have long argued that, although Menasseh's mission
failed, a Jewish community was nevertheless established during 1656. In
March of that year, members of the existing Jewish community in London -
there were indeed Jews in England prior to Menasseh's arrival - petitioned
Cromwell to allow them to hold synagogue services and to establish a
cemetery. The petition for these two hallmarks of communal status, however,
was ignored.

The date of 1656, then, is rather arbitrary. Other milestones could have
conceivably been chosen as the founding moment of British Jewry. In 1701,
the community's first synagogue, Bevis Marks, was established. In 1753, the
so-called "Jew Bill," which allowed members of the community to become
naturalized citizens, was passed by Parliament, though it was repealed a
year later. And in 1858 the Jewish emancipation movement resulted in the
right to serve in Parliament.

It was not until the late 19th century, when hordes of Eastern European
Jews flooded into Britain, threatening the status of the established Jewish
community, that Cromwell's alleged re-admittance of the Jews to England
became accepted as the community's founding story. At the time, the
reputation of Cromwell was enjoying a revival, and the first "Resettlement
Day" was held in 1894.

In America the story was much the same. The first time the year 1654 was
celebrated as the founding of the community was in 1905 - during the great,
unsettling waves of mass immigration >from Europe. For the Jewish communities
on both sides of the pond, the foundational events of the 17th century
provided positive precedents for immigration.

It was insecurity >from which the need for celebration emerged. So why, at a
time of unprecedented communal comfort and safety, are the anniversaries now
such a big deal?
Why don't we recognize that the British readmission story is a myth, and
that the founding of the American Jewish community was a small, reluctant
affair? And since there were Jews in England and America prior to 1656 and
1654, why can we not admit that there was no "man on the moon" moment?

Jewish leaders in Britain and the United States are quick to point out that
the anniversaries are as much about celebrating the Jews' achievements as
about commemorating a historic event. This imperative appears particularly
pressing in the light of assimilation-driven fears about continuity.


Whether or not this anxiety is justified, it is driving the movement, on
both sides of the Atlantic, to consolidate and institutionalize the
celebration of Jewish communal life. While there is nothing inherently
damaging about this, it does not exactly advance the vibrant Jewish
tradition of questioning history and encouraging critical debate.

Furthermore, it is worth noting that it is not only the Jewish community
that stands to benefit >from the anniversaries. In Britain, the events this
year provide the wider national establishment with an opportunity to
congratulate itself on a unique tradition of tolerance. In contrast to
other parts of Europe, where antisemitic persecution has been rife, Britain
believes that it has upheld the principle of religious liberty since the
17th century

This tradition of great British tolerance, however, has been overstated.
In America, the separation of church and state enshrined in the Constitution
has given Jews, on the whole, a proper place in the nation's structure. But
in Britain, church and state remain intertwined - meaning that the inclusion
of religious minorities, including Jews, has always been an informal,
intermittent affair.

With immigration once again becoming a fraught issue in Britian, tolerance
is being trumpeted by political leaders as never before. At the first
"citizenship ceremony" for new immigrants, held in 2004, former minister
David Blunkett emphasized that "Britain has a great tradition as a tolerant
and welcoming nation."

The formula is repeated whenever there is an attempt to define
"Britishness," and the anniversary celebrations only add to this patriotic
self-image. In Britain, it seems fair to say, the Jewish community appears
to be continuing the rather old-fashioned tradition of thanking our hosts
for having us.

Eliane Glaser, a producer at the BBC, is author of a forthcoming history of
the Jews in England (Palgrave Macmillan The Forward
Published Weekly in New York Since 1897

SHIRLEY COLLIER
East of London UK
Member of JGSGB Council
Regional Group Co-ordinator

Researching:
BIERMAN/BERMAN- Piesk,Lublin/New York/London
SHEVA EICHEL - London/New York
HARRIS (or derivations)- Sieradz/Hull/London
HOROWITZ - Siedlce
ROZAINSKY/WAPNIARZ - Lomza/Czestochowa/Pultusk/New York/London
TILLES/TRINKENREICH - Tarnow/Krakow/Newcastle/London

Pinkas Kehillot Poland #poland

Avigdor&Laia <lbendov@...>
 

Just for the record, those needing information regarding a particular town
from the PK should know that Yad LeZehava has copies of all the Pinkas books
from Yad VeShem, including vol. 8 , the newest, on Poland.
The entire catalog of our small library of book and video collections are
being processed now for uploading to our website. The negative side is that
the website is still under construction, although we have hopes to be on
line within the coming weeks.

Avigdor Ben-Dov
Yad LeZehava Holocaust Research Institute
Kedumim, Israel

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately to find out the fee schedule
associated with research requests involving the books held by the
Institute, a non-profit organization.

BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Pinkas Kehillot Poland #poland

Avigdor&Laia <lbendov@...>
 

Just for the record, those needing information regarding a particular town
from the PK should know that Yad LeZehava has copies of all the Pinkas books
from Yad VeShem, including vol. 8 , the newest, on Poland.
The entire catalog of our small library of book and video collections are
being processed now for uploading to our website. The negative side is that
the website is still under construction, although we have hopes to be on
line within the coming weeks.

Avigdor Ben-Dov
Yad LeZehava Holocaust Research Institute
Kedumim, Israel

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately to find out the fee schedule
associated with research requests involving the books held by the
Institute, a non-profit organization.

Researching Bialystok families GONIONDZSKI and KOBRYNIEC #poland

Judy Goldrich <Goldrich@...>
 

Dear SIG Members:
I am researching to discover information about the families of my
grandfather and grandmother who immigrated >from the Bialystok, Poland
area around turn of the 20th century. They were drawn >from the
textile and silk mills of Bialystok to "Silk City" of the time,
Paterson, NJ, USA where my grandfather became a silk weaver and manager
of silk mills as did many of their landsmen of the time.

My grandmother, Chaya (Ida) KOBRYNIEC, married Gershon GONIONDZSKI in
1900 in Bialystok area and they immigrated to Paterson, New Jersey
between 1900-1902. Family legend has my grandfather arriving first
and then sending for my grandmother and their 2 oldest sons, Mordechai
(Max) and Aaron (Harry). Max & Harry's birth data in JRI Poland shows
their surname as GONIONDZSKI or GONIANDZSKI. Gershon's surname
GONIANDZSKI was changed to GOLDBERG, presumably upon arrival at Ellis
Island by an immigration officer who couldn't pronounce the name, as
the family lore goes. I have located my grandmother's, Max, and
Harry's Ellis Island immigration record of 1902, which displays
her/their last name as GOLDBERG by that point. I have not yet located
my grandfather's earlier separate immigration records, and am wondering
why. I have 3 questions for anyone who may be able to answer:

1) Did Ellis Island officials really take it upon themselves to change
immigrants' names upon entry to the country? Were the ship manifests
that we access on the Ellis Island website filled out by officials upon
passenger embarkation in Europe or upon ship's arrival in NYC/Ellis
Island? Which name would I be likely to find on my grandfather's
manifest should it ever be found?

2) Although I know some information about my grandmother's siblings who
immigrated before the war to the US, I was never told if my grandfather
Gershon GONIANDZSKI had any siblings. I know that Gershon's father's
name was Aron. I have never discovered any of his relatives and do not
know if he had any brothers, sisters, or cousins, and if so, had they
ever emigrated out of Poland before WWI or WWII and were they spared
the destruction of the Holocaust, or perhaps survived WWII in Europe
and their descendants are still alive? Is anyone is familiar with this
name?

3) I am told that my grandmother Chaya had a brother, Alter KOBRYNIEC,
but I do not know anything about his family and if/where he/they
perished in the Holocaust. My great-grandfather's name was Mordechai
KOBRYNIEC. My father had told me that he corresponded with his uncle
Alter until a certain point during WWII and then the letters ceased.
Does anyone know anything of his fate?

I would greatly appreciate hearing >from anyone who can suggest any
information regarding these questions.

Sincerely,
Judy (GOLDBERG) GOLDRICH
East Brunswick, NJ, USA
goldrich@...

researching KOBRYNIEC or KOBRYNEC or KOBRINETZ (Shereshev or
Shereshevo, Pruzhany Region, Belarus);
researching GONIANDSZKI or GONIONDZSKI or GONIONSKY or GONONSKY >from
Bialystok;

researching SZMUKLER >from Bialystok and Warsaw;
researching MAREJN >from Bialystok and Warsaw

BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Researching Bialystok families GONIONDZSKI and KOBRYNIEC #poland

Judy Goldrich <Goldrich@...>
 

Dear SIG Members:
I am researching to discover information about the families of my
grandfather and grandmother who immigrated >from the Bialystok, Poland
area around turn of the 20th century. They were drawn >from the
textile and silk mills of Bialystok to "Silk City" of the time,
Paterson, NJ, USA where my grandfather became a silk weaver and manager
of silk mills as did many of their landsmen of the time.

My grandmother, Chaya (Ida) KOBRYNIEC, married Gershon GONIONDZSKI in
1900 in Bialystok area and they immigrated to Paterson, New Jersey
between 1900-1902. Family legend has my grandfather arriving first
and then sending for my grandmother and their 2 oldest sons, Mordechai
(Max) and Aaron (Harry). Max & Harry's birth data in JRI Poland shows
their surname as GONIONDZSKI or GONIANDZSKI. Gershon's surname
GONIANDZSKI was changed to GOLDBERG, presumably upon arrival at Ellis
Island by an immigration officer who couldn't pronounce the name, as
the family lore goes. I have located my grandmother's, Max, and
Harry's Ellis Island immigration record of 1902, which displays
her/their last name as GOLDBERG by that point. I have not yet located
my grandfather's earlier separate immigration records, and am wondering
why. I have 3 questions for anyone who may be able to answer:

1) Did Ellis Island officials really take it upon themselves to change
immigrants' names upon entry to the country? Were the ship manifests
that we access on the Ellis Island website filled out by officials upon
passenger embarkation in Europe or upon ship's arrival in NYC/Ellis
Island? Which name would I be likely to find on my grandfather's
manifest should it ever be found?

2) Although I know some information about my grandmother's siblings who
immigrated before the war to the US, I was never told if my grandfather
Gershon GONIANDZSKI had any siblings. I know that Gershon's father's
name was Aron. I have never discovered any of his relatives and do not
know if he had any brothers, sisters, or cousins, and if so, had they
ever emigrated out of Poland before WWI or WWII and were they spared
the destruction of the Holocaust, or perhaps survived WWII in Europe
and their descendants are still alive? Is anyone is familiar with this
name?

3) I am told that my grandmother Chaya had a brother, Alter KOBRYNIEC,
but I do not know anything about his family and if/where he/they
perished in the Holocaust. My great-grandfather's name was Mordechai
KOBRYNIEC. My father had told me that he corresponded with his uncle
Alter until a certain point during WWII and then the letters ceased.
Does anyone know anything of his fate?

I would greatly appreciate hearing >from anyone who can suggest any
information regarding these questions.

Sincerely,
Judy (GOLDBERG) GOLDRICH
East Brunswick, NJ, USA
goldrich@...

researching KOBRYNIEC or KOBRYNEC or KOBRINETZ (Shereshev or
Shereshevo, Pruzhany Region, Belarus);
researching GONIANDSZKI or GONIONDZSKI or GONIONSKY or GONONSKY >from
Bialystok;

researching SZMUKLER >from Bialystok and Warsaw;
researching MAREJN >from Bialystok and Warsaw

Taibel Chaim from Glubokoye. #lithuania

reuven taibel <ruva11@...>
 

Hello!

My ancestors, *Taibel* (Taybel) family are >from Glubokoye, nowadays Belarus.

Has any of the researchers came across this surname?

According to the1907 Passenger Records of Ellis Island, Chaim Taibel, age
16 has arrived to New-York >from Glubokoye (Wilno district/region).

I Assume, that he is the brother or the cousin of my grandfather.

Can someone assist me in finding traces of Taibel Chaim and its
descendants?

I would be grateful to anyone who will help me with my research!

Thanks

The answer to send on e-mail

*ruva11@... ***

Taibel Reuven

Searching:
Taibel/Taybel in Glubokoye and Kaunas
Broide,Tubiash in Vilkomir
Kulman in Kaunas
Naftalovich in Kaunas

Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Taibel Chaim from Glubokoye. #lithuania

reuven taibel <ruva11@...>
 

Hello!

My ancestors, *Taibel* (Taybel) family are >from Glubokoye, nowadays Belarus.

Has any of the researchers came across this surname?

According to the1907 Passenger Records of Ellis Island, Chaim Taibel, age
16 has arrived to New-York >from Glubokoye (Wilno district/region).

I Assume, that he is the brother or the cousin of my grandfather.

Can someone assist me in finding traces of Taibel Chaim and its
descendants?

I would be grateful to anyone who will help me with my research!

Thanks

The answer to send on e-mail

*ruva11@... ***

Taibel Reuven

Searching:
Taibel/Taybel in Glubokoye and Kaunas
Broide,Tubiash in Vilkomir
Kulman in Kaunas
Naftalovich in Kaunas

Raseiniai Distribution #lithuania

Olga Zabludoff <ozabludoff@...>
 

Members of the LitvakSIG Raseiniai Uyezd Group (RUG) yesterday received
9,350 records representing 27 towns in the Raseiniai District. The
translated lists span the years 1846 to 1913.

Types of records include: Men avoiding conscription; Rabbi electors;
Municipal electors; Voters; Taxpayers (Box, Business and Unable to pay);
Postal savings; Real estate owners; Craftsmen; Merchants; Tavern keepers.

Enthusiastic responses have already come in >from researchers who have made
breakthroughs with these records.

Unfortunately 21 qualified contributors of the RUG are unable to
benefit >from the records because their email addresses are no longer
current. Would the following please contact me privatelywith current
addresses, or if any of you know current e-mail addresses for them,
please contact me privately:

Blivice, Marni; Colistra, Miriam S.; Curwin, David; Feinberg, David A.;
Feldman, Norman; Goldstone, Eric J.; Lapin-Haines, Louise E.; Laz, Louis;
LePere, Gene; Lieberman, Carol; Liebson, Laurence; Nathan, Joel (possibly
deceased); Pagowsky, Melvyn; Propp, Henry; Robins, Leon; Schneider,
Michael Bret; Shamroth, Elizabeth; Sumberg, John; Takata, Grace; Weinstein,
Josef; Apex Int. UK.

The LitvakSIG District Research Groups Project will soon celebrate its tenth
anniversary. In less than a decade this project has acquired, translated,
distributed and posted in the ALD about 450,000 Russian-Jewish records.

Olga Zabludoff, Coordinator
District Research Groups Project

Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Raseiniai Distribution #lithuania

Olga Zabludoff <ozabludoff@...>
 

Members of the LitvakSIG Raseiniai Uyezd Group (RUG) yesterday received
9,350 records representing 27 towns in the Raseiniai District. The
translated lists span the years 1846 to 1913.

Types of records include: Men avoiding conscription; Rabbi electors;
Municipal electors; Voters; Taxpayers (Box, Business and Unable to pay);
Postal savings; Real estate owners; Craftsmen; Merchants; Tavern keepers.

Enthusiastic responses have already come in >from researchers who have made
breakthroughs with these records.

Unfortunately 21 qualified contributors of the RUG are unable to
benefit >from the records because their email addresses are no longer
current. Would the following please contact me privatelywith current
addresses, or if any of you know current e-mail addresses for them,
please contact me privately:

Blivice, Marni; Colistra, Miriam S.; Curwin, David; Feinberg, David A.;
Feldman, Norman; Goldstone, Eric J.; Lapin-Haines, Louise E.; Laz, Louis;
LePere, Gene; Lieberman, Carol; Liebson, Laurence; Nathan, Joel (possibly
deceased); Pagowsky, Melvyn; Propp, Henry; Robins, Leon; Schneider,
Michael Bret; Shamroth, Elizabeth; Sumberg, John; Takata, Grace; Weinstein,
Josef; Apex Int. UK.

The LitvakSIG District Research Groups Project will soon celebrate its tenth
anniversary. In less than a decade this project has acquired, translated,
distributed and posted in the ALD about 450,000 Russian-Jewish records.

Olga Zabludoff, Coordinator
District Research Groups Project

Searching for WEILE/WILL/COHN/BEER from Schoenlanke/Lundsberg/Insterburg/Konigsburg/Hammerstein #danzig #gdansk #germany #poland

Mark Lewis <mark@...>
 

Hello - I am trying to find out what I can about the following
people/places.

c. 1800 Samuel Weile - Schoenlanka, East Prussia
1820? Schlochau
c. 1840? Lina Weile &=A0Jakob Beer - Hammerstein, nr Danzig
1871? Hedwig Beer &=A0Louis Will - Schoenlanka &=A0Lundsberg
1887-19?? Erna Will &=A0Erich Cohn - Insterburg
19??-1934 Erna Will &=A0Erich Cohn =A0- Konigsburg

The descendants came to London in 1938, but we now very little about
the lives of the family before then.

Any help, in terms to where I could start to even look for info would
be great.

Many thanks,
Mark Lewis
London
mark@...

Danzig/Gedansk SIG #Danzig #Gdansk #Germany #Poland Searching for WEILE/WILL/COHN/BEER from Schoenlanke/Lundsberg/Insterburg/Konigsburg/Hammerstein #germany #poland #danzig #gdansk

Mark Lewis <mark@...>
 

Hello - I am trying to find out what I can about the following
people/places.

c. 1800 Samuel Weile - Schoenlanka, East Prussia
1820? Schlochau
c. 1840? Lina Weile &=A0Jakob Beer - Hammerstein, nr Danzig
1871? Hedwig Beer &=A0Louis Will - Schoenlanka &=A0Lundsberg
1887-19?? Erna Will &=A0Erich Cohn - Insterburg
19??-1934 Erna Will &=A0Erich Cohn =A0- Konigsburg

The descendants came to London in 1938, but we now very little about
the lives of the family before then.

Any help, in terms to where I could start to even look for info would
be great.

Many thanks,
Mark Lewis
London
mark@...

Street names in Stockholm #scandinavia

Steven Lasky <steve725@...>
 

Greetings,
I am currently constructing a future exhibition for my website about
photographic studios in Europe and will be including some studio photos from
Stockholm, Sweden. I have some studio photos (with the studio/photographer's
imprint at the bottom of the photo mounts) >from the Nilsson studio and have
just received one >from the Atelier Gota on Gotgatan 71. I don't imagine that
the studio is still there of course, but I am wondering whether anyone knows
whether this address is still in existence. Does anyone know whether any
(very) old photographic studios are still doing business in Stockholm? Is
this street Gotgatan in the business center of Stockholm today?

I am also diligently looking for more studio photos taken pre-war in Sweden
or anywhere else in Western or Eastern Europe during this time. The only
condition is that they have the studio/photographer's name imprinted on the
photo, i.e at the bottom on the matte/mount. If there is printing on the
back side of the photo (usually mounted on some sort of cardboard), that
would be welcome too. If you know the names of the people in the photo,
where they were >from and can date the photo, this should be included, but
is not essential.
Thank you.

Regards,
Steve Lasky
New York
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com

Scandinavia SIG #Scandinavia Street names in Stockholm #scandinavia

Steven Lasky <steve725@...>
 

Greetings,
I am currently constructing a future exhibition for my website about
photographic studios in Europe and will be including some studio photos from
Stockholm, Sweden. I have some studio photos (with the studio/photographer's
imprint at the bottom of the photo mounts) >from the Nilsson studio and have
just received one >from the Atelier Gota on Gotgatan 71. I don't imagine that
the studio is still there of course, but I am wondering whether anyone knows
whether this address is still in existence. Does anyone know whether any
(very) old photographic studios are still doing business in Stockholm? Is
this street Gotgatan in the business center of Stockholm today?

I am also diligently looking for more studio photos taken pre-war in Sweden
or anywhere else in Western or Eastern Europe during this time. The only
condition is that they have the studio/photographer's name imprinted on the
photo, i.e at the bottom on the matte/mount. If there is printing on the
back side of the photo (usually mounted on some sort of cardboard), that
would be welcome too. If you know the names of the people in the photo,
where they were >from and can date the photo, this should be included, but
is not essential.
Thank you.

Regards,
Steve Lasky
New York
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

Dear Danzig Researchers,

I am delighted to announce that we are ready to begin fundraising for a
project to make available online genealogical information >from the Archives
of the Jewish Community of Danzig at the Central Archives for the History of
the Jewish People (CAHJP) in Jerusalem. This massive collection of
documents (about 2000 files, some consisting of hundreds of pages) was
shipped >from Danzig to Jerusalem in 1939, and was "the first major community
collection to be deposited in the Archives." The rich variety of
genealogical and historical information potentially contained in these
documents can be glimpsed through the CAHJP's online inventory of the
collection (see the link in the Resources section of our SIG website). This
is a rare legacy that our relatives have left us, and I hope you will help
to make it more accessible.

The fundraising beginning now is to cover the expenses of acquiring a copy
of a small part of the collection, which will be our first foray into this
apparently largely untapped (by genealogists) resource. Our target is only
$438, a small price to pay for re-opening the book closed on the Danzig
community more than 65 years ago. JewishGen, a non-profit organization, is
facilitating the processing of funds for this project, through our SIG's
JewishGen-erosity webpage:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=31

On that page is a line for "CAHJP Project" -- donations made there will
go towards this project. Contributions are tax-deductible for U.S.
citizens, and there is a link on the above page that Canadians can use to
make tax-deductible contributions through the JGS Canada (Toronto).

I hope that you will give generously towards this project, according to your
means and interest in Danzig Jewish genealogy and history. Your
contributions are absolutely needed for the project to proceed, as we will
not go forward unless the target has been met. If, despite being a
subscriber to this mailing list, you determine that you do not want to or
cannot make a donation, please reconsider whether, instead of nothing, you
could at least give the minimum of $10. Please keep in mind that your
generous donations might help those with more limited financial means
benefit >from this material, too.

If you would like to discuss your donation, please contact me for additional
details about the project.

In the future, because of the great size and variety of the collection, in
order to work with other parts of it, we will need volunteers to visit CAHJP
in Jerusalem and do certain preparatory work there for us. If you are
interested, or know someone who might be, please contact me for details.

I hope you are as excited as I am about finally having the chance to examine
this amazing collection, which, for most of us, is very difficult, if not
practically impossible, to access. Let this mark the beginning of a
rediscovery of the Jewish Community of Danzig >from its own words.

Thanks very much for your support and best regards,

Logan Kleinwaks
Coordinator, JewishGen Danzig/Gdansk SIG
kleinwaks@...
near Washington, D.C.

Danzig/Gedansk SIG #Danzig #Gdansk #Germany #Poland CAHJP project #danzig #gdansk #germany #poland

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

Dear Danzig Researchers,

I am delighted to announce that we are ready to begin fundraising for a
project to make available online genealogical information >from the Archives
of the Jewish Community of Danzig at the Central Archives for the History of
the Jewish People (CAHJP) in Jerusalem. This massive collection of
documents (about 2000 files, some consisting of hundreds of pages) was
shipped >from Danzig to Jerusalem in 1939, and was "the first major community
collection to be deposited in the Archives." The rich variety of
genealogical and historical information potentially contained in these
documents can be glimpsed through the CAHJP's online inventory of the
collection (see the link in the Resources section of our SIG website). This
is a rare legacy that our relatives have left us, and I hope you will help
to make it more accessible.

The fundraising beginning now is to cover the expenses of acquiring a copy
of a small part of the collection, which will be our first foray into this
apparently largely untapped (by genealogists) resource. Our target is only
$438, a small price to pay for re-opening the book closed on the Danzig
community more than 65 years ago. JewishGen, a non-profit organization, is
facilitating the processing of funds for this project, through our SIG's
JewishGen-erosity webpage:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=31

On that page is a line for "CAHJP Project" -- donations made there will
go towards this project. Contributions are tax-deductible for U.S.
citizens, and there is a link on the above page that Canadians can use to
make tax-deductible contributions through the JGS Canada (Toronto).

I hope that you will give generously towards this project, according to your
means and interest in Danzig Jewish genealogy and history. Your
contributions are absolutely needed for the project to proceed, as we will
not go forward unless the target has been met. If, despite being a
subscriber to this mailing list, you determine that you do not want to or
cannot make a donation, please reconsider whether, instead of nothing, you
could at least give the minimum of $10. Please keep in mind that your
generous donations might help those with more limited financial means
benefit >from this material, too.

If you would like to discuss your donation, please contact me for additional
details about the project.

In the future, because of the great size and variety of the collection, in
order to work with other parts of it, we will need volunteers to visit CAHJP
in Jerusalem and do certain preparatory work there for us. If you are
interested, or know someone who might be, please contact me for details.

I hope you are as excited as I am about finally having the chance to examine
this amazing collection, which, for most of us, is very difficult, if not
practically impossible, to access. Let this mark the beginning of a
rediscovery of the Jewish Community of Danzig >from its own words.

Thanks very much for your support and best regards,

Logan Kleinwaks
Coordinator, JewishGen Danzig/Gdansk SIG
kleinwaks@...
near Washington, D.C.

Raseiniai Distribution #general

Olga Zabludoff <ozabludoff@...>
 

Members of the LitvakSIG Raseiniai Uyezd Group (RUG) today received
9,350 records representing 27 towns in the Raseiniai District. The
translated lists span the years 1846 to 1913.

Types of records include: Men avoiding conscription; Rabbi electors;
Municipal electors; Voters; Taxpayers (Box, Business and Unable to pay);
Postal savings; Real estate owners; Craftsmen; Merchants; Tavern keepers.

Enthusiastic responses have already come in >from researchers who have made
breakthroughs with these records.

Unfortunately twenty-one qualified contributors of the RUG are unable to
benefit >from the records because their email addresses are no longer
current. Would the following please contact me with current addresses:

Blivice, Marni; Colistra, Miriam S.; Curwin, David; Feinberg, David A.;
Feldman, Norman; Goldstone, Eric J.; Lapin-Haines, Louise E.; Laz, Louis;
LePere, Gene; Lieberman, Carol; Liebson, Laurence; Nathan, Joel (possibly
deceased); Pagowsky, Melvyn; Propp, Henry; Robins, Leon; Schneider,
Michael Bret; Shamroth, Elizabeth; Sumberg, John; Takata, Grace; Weinstein,
Josef; Apex Int. UK.

The LitvakSIG District Research Groups Project will soon celebrate its tenth
anniversary. In less than a decade this project has acquired, translated,
distributed and posted in the ALD about 450,000 Russian-Jewish records. It
was the pioneer; it is The Source for 19th and 20th century English-language
Litvak records.

Olga Zabludoff, Coordinator
District Research Groups Project

Seeking information on the NOVEMBER family #general

Leslie Weinberg <lbw50@...>
 

My great-grandmother's maiden name was Hani NOVEMBER, married to
Abraham REISZ. Although a researcher I hired was able to find about
twelve births listed, he was unable to find Hani's marriage record,
or the record of her birth. She was born in, and lived in, Oradea,
Romania. I have been trying to tie her in with other Novembers, and
it is very difficult without being able to trace her any further,
The researcher feels her father may have been Joachim November,
There is a birth listed to Joachim and his wife, a daughter, Sali,
and he feels that Hani may have been another daughter, I did note on
one birth record, that there was a Karoly Novemmber who was the
godfather. Do any of these names fit in with anyone's November
family tree? Thanks, Leslie

Searching Reisz, November, Eisen- Oradea, Romania
Eisen, Iram, Blumenberg- Tyczyn, Poland
Danskoy (Donskoy, Danskoi) - Nezhin, Ukraine