Date   
words indicating relationships #hungary

Suzanne Kemeny <suzucchini@...>
 

Could anyone tell me what the following Hungarian
words mean? (they are in family documents, and I
believe have to do with the relationships between the
individuals) I may have misspelled them, since the
handwriting is not always easy to read and I had to
leave out the accent marks. I hope you can make sense
of this and appreciate any help you can give.

****************
batyja
occse
nagybatyja
neje
unohatestoere
lanyak anyosa
lanyak feljouk? (can't read it)
also feleseje
lanyuk sogor
unok
unokaoccse
sogornoje

********************
Thanks so much for all of your help. I really
appreciate it.

Sincerely,

Suzanne Kemeny Riddle
United States

Moderator: Check the H-SIG archives for info about on-line translation aids such as http://consulting.medios.fi/dictionary/










__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
http://mail.yahoo.com

*Re: Looking for a book #hungary

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

Dear Lynn and all,

Many thanks for your information. As much as the so called "Pittsburgh Agreement" (which was signed by President Masaryk in Pittsburgh and was a fundamental document for the forming of the First Czechoslovak State) is a keystone in CZ history, believe it or not, that document is *very difficult* to find. I tried the Czech and Slovak Archives and of course did a thorough search on the Internet. No success! Seemingly the original document was never stored in those two countries, and is hidden somewhere in the US. The book that I mentioned previously seemingly has a facsimile. I will try now the Pittsburgh University's library.

Regards
Tom

At 00:05 -0500 30.05.2006, H-SIG digest wrote:
Subject: Re: Looking for a book
From: "Lynn Saul" <lynnsaul@...>
Date: Sun, 28 May 2006 08:03:32 -0700
X-Message-Number: 1

I did not reply to Tom's message because I don't have the specific
information he requested, BUT
I am >from Pittsburgh originally, and the formation of Czechoslovakia in
Pittsburgh is a big historic deal there. Much of it has been memorialized
at the Cathedral of Learning at the University of Pittsburgh. The
University of Pittsburgh has much of its catalog, especially historic
documents, digitalized online--do a search on their library. (I don't have
the URL but it's easy to search for the University of Pittsburgh library.)
Also, the Heinz History Center in Pittsburgh has an excellent archive and
library. (Off-topic, they have an outstanding collection of Jewish archival
materials in the Rauh Jewish archives.)
Lynn Saul
former Pittsburgher
Tucson AZ
--
...........................................
Tom Venetianer <mailto:tom.vene@...>
Sao Paulo - Brazil

Hungary SIG #Hungary words indicating relationships #hungary

Suzanne Kemeny <suzucchini@...>
 

Could anyone tell me what the following Hungarian
words mean? (they are in family documents, and I
believe have to do with the relationships between the
individuals) I may have misspelled them, since the
handwriting is not always easy to read and I had to
leave out the accent marks. I hope you can make sense
of this and appreciate any help you can give.

****************
batyja
occse
nagybatyja
neje
unohatestoere
lanyak anyosa
lanyak feljouk? (can't read it)
also feleseje
lanyuk sogor
unok
unokaoccse
sogornoje

********************
Thanks so much for all of your help. I really
appreciate it.

Sincerely,

Suzanne Kemeny Riddle
United States

Moderator: Check the H-SIG archives for info about on-line translation aids such as http://consulting.medios.fi/dictionary/










__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
http://mail.yahoo.com

Hungary SIG #Hungary *Re: Looking for a book #hungary

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

Dear Lynn and all,

Many thanks for your information. As much as the so called "Pittsburgh Agreement" (which was signed by President Masaryk in Pittsburgh and was a fundamental document for the forming of the First Czechoslovak State) is a keystone in CZ history, believe it or not, that document is *very difficult* to find. I tried the Czech and Slovak Archives and of course did a thorough search on the Internet. No success! Seemingly the original document was never stored in those two countries, and is hidden somewhere in the US. The book that I mentioned previously seemingly has a facsimile. I will try now the Pittsburgh University's library.

Regards
Tom

At 00:05 -0500 30.05.2006, H-SIG digest wrote:
Subject: Re: Looking for a book
From: "Lynn Saul" <lynnsaul@...>
Date: Sun, 28 May 2006 08:03:32 -0700
X-Message-Number: 1

I did not reply to Tom's message because I don't have the specific
information he requested, BUT
I am >from Pittsburgh originally, and the formation of Czechoslovakia in
Pittsburgh is a big historic deal there. Much of it has been memorialized
at the Cathedral of Learning at the University of Pittsburgh. The
University of Pittsburgh has much of its catalog, especially historic
documents, digitalized online--do a search on their library. (I don't have
the URL but it's easy to search for the University of Pittsburgh library.)
Also, the Heinz History Center in Pittsburgh has an excellent archive and
library. (Off-topic, they have an outstanding collection of Jewish archival
materials in the Rauh Jewish archives.)
Lynn Saul
former Pittsburgher
Tucson AZ
--
...........................................
Tom Venetianer <mailto:tom.vene@...>
Sao Paulo - Brazil

Questions about headstones #unitedkingdom

Richard Gilbert
 

The date 8th April 1940 corresponds with 29th Adar II 5600 unless the death
occurred after sunset in which case the date is 1st Nisan 5600.

5600 was a Jewish leap year which occurs 7 times in every 19 year cycle. In
a leap year an extra month is added. This is to ensure that Pesach
(Passover) always falls in the spring. As the Jewish calendar is lunar is
shorter than the Gregorian solar calendar an extra month needs to be added
to keep the two calendars synchronised. This is done by adding an extra
month Adar. In a leap year such as 5600 the calendar would include Adar I &
Adar II. In 5600 Adar I had 30 days and Adar II 29 days. It does look as
though a mistake has been made on the headstone.

A useful website is www.hebcal.com.

Richard Gilbert
Bushey Heath, Hertfordshire

JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Questions about headstones #unitedkingdom

Richard Gilbert
 

The date 8th April 1940 corresponds with 29th Adar II 5600 unless the death
occurred after sunset in which case the date is 1st Nisan 5600.

5600 was a Jewish leap year which occurs 7 times in every 19 year cycle. In
a leap year an extra month is added. This is to ensure that Pesach
(Passover) always falls in the spring. As the Jewish calendar is lunar is
shorter than the Gregorian solar calendar an extra month needs to be added
to keep the two calendars synchronised. This is done by adding an extra
month Adar. In a leap year such as 5600 the calendar would include Adar I &
Adar II. In 5600 Adar I had 30 days and Adar II 29 days. It does look as
though a mistake has been made on the headstone.

A useful website is www.hebcal.com.

Richard Gilbert
Bushey Heath, Hertfordshire

Yizkor Book Monthly Report for May 2006 #hungary

Joyce Field
 

May 2006 has been a very busy one for the Yizkor Book Project. We
have one new online "book" (really, a collection of original essays),
four new books started, seven new entries, and 12 updates. All
yizkor book material is available at the Index page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. If you are not
familiar with this site, notice at the top of the page, just under
the JewishGen logo, is a list of sites you can access directly by
clicking on the name--for example, Database, Necrology Index, or
Infofiles. There is a wealth of information directly accessible >from
this one page with just a click. Also note that the yizkor material
is listed under four different categories. New material is flagged
for easy identification.

This month we have begun a new online collection, called "The
Terrible Choice: Some Contemporary Jewish Responses to the
Holocaust," at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/terrible_choice/terrible_choice.html
. Melvyn Conroy, the author, writes: "This collection of brief
essays is an attempt to portray the character and personality of a
number of the prominent Jews of occupied Europe, and the manner in
which they responded to the unique circumstances of the Shoah."
Thus far, we have eight essays online.

New books:

-Biecz, Poland
-Indura, Belarus
-Klobuck, Poland
-Transylvania, Hungary:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Transylvania/Transylvania.html.
Listed under Regions

New entries: Pinkas HaKehillot

-Druskininkai, Lith: Poland, vol. VIII
-Gdansk, Poland: Poland, vol. VI
-Krosno, Poland: Poland, vol. III
-Novogrudok, Belarus: Poland, vol. VIII
-Nowy Zmigrod, Poland: Poland, vol. III
-Ostrog, Ukraine: Poland, vol. V
-Polanka, Poland: Poland, vol. VIII

Updates:

-Braslaw, Belarus
-Dabrowa, Poland
-Dembitz, Poland (Polish translation)
-Gabin, Poland
-Kalusz, Ukraine
-Kolbuszowa, Poland
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Nowy Targ, Poland
-Shumskoye, Ukraine
-Stepan, Ukraine
-Zloczew, Poland

Frequently I remind our readers that a number of yizkor books are
being translated by professional translators. The list is at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23.
You can make a needed donation to these books and to JewishGen at
this site. Remember that JewishGen provides all the infrastructure
to make the Yizkor Book Project available to everyone at no cost, but
there is a cost to providing this material online and we hope that
our readers will generously support JewishGen, making their
appreciation known in this way.

At this time i want to thank once again our wonderful "international"
Yizkor Book Project volunteers who so efficiently get the
translations online: Lance Ackerfeld (Israel), Max Heffler (U.S.),
and Osnat Ramaty (Germany). They are a remarkable team. And to all
the people who donate their translations week after week, month after
month, we send our appreciation for their generosity and talent.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition

Hungary SIG #Hungary Yizkor Book Monthly Report for May 2006 #hungary

Joyce Field
 

May 2006 has been a very busy one for the Yizkor Book Project. We
have one new online "book" (really, a collection of original essays),
four new books started, seven new entries, and 12 updates. All
yizkor book material is available at the Index page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. If you are not
familiar with this site, notice at the top of the page, just under
the JewishGen logo, is a list of sites you can access directly by
clicking on the name--for example, Database, Necrology Index, or
Infofiles. There is a wealth of information directly accessible >from
this one page with just a click. Also note that the yizkor material
is listed under four different categories. New material is flagged
for easy identification.

This month we have begun a new online collection, called "The
Terrible Choice: Some Contemporary Jewish Responses to the
Holocaust," at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/terrible_choice/terrible_choice.html
. Melvyn Conroy, the author, writes: "This collection of brief
essays is an attempt to portray the character and personality of a
number of the prominent Jews of occupied Europe, and the manner in
which they responded to the unique circumstances of the Shoah."
Thus far, we have eight essays online.

New books:

-Biecz, Poland
-Indura, Belarus
-Klobuck, Poland
-Transylvania, Hungary:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Transylvania/Transylvania.html.
Listed under Regions

New entries: Pinkas HaKehillot

-Druskininkai, Lith: Poland, vol. VIII
-Gdansk, Poland: Poland, vol. VI
-Krosno, Poland: Poland, vol. III
-Novogrudok, Belarus: Poland, vol. VIII
-Nowy Zmigrod, Poland: Poland, vol. III
-Ostrog, Ukraine: Poland, vol. V
-Polanka, Poland: Poland, vol. VIII

Updates:

-Braslaw, Belarus
-Dabrowa, Poland
-Dembitz, Poland (Polish translation)
-Gabin, Poland
-Kalusz, Ukraine
-Kolbuszowa, Poland
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Nowy Targ, Poland
-Shumskoye, Ukraine
-Stepan, Ukraine
-Zloczew, Poland

Frequently I remind our readers that a number of yizkor books are
being translated by professional translators. The list is at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23.
You can make a needed donation to these books and to JewishGen at
this site. Remember that JewishGen provides all the infrastructure
to make the Yizkor Book Project available to everyone at no cost, but
there is a cost to providing this material online and we hope that
our readers will generously support JewishGen, making their
appreciation known in this way.

At this time i want to thank once again our wonderful "international"
Yizkor Book Project volunteers who so efficiently get the
translations online: Lance Ackerfeld (Israel), Max Heffler (U.S.),
and Osnat Ramaty (Germany). They are a remarkable team. And to all
the people who donate their translations week after week, month after
month, we send our appreciation for their generosity and talent.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition

Frischman #hungary

jps
 

Yehuda,

The IGG Death index ( http://www.italiangen.org ) has a Samuel listed:

Frischman, Samuel; 64y; Jan 23, 1912; Cert # 2441, Manhattan

John Segedy

PS - About a page and a half of other Frischman's you may want to look
at also.

Hungary SIG #Hungary Frischman #hungary

jps
 

Yehuda,

The IGG Death index ( http://www.italiangen.org ) has a Samuel listed:

Frischman, Samuel; 64y; Jan 23, 1912; Cert # 2441, Manhattan

John Segedy

PS - About a page and a half of other Frischman's you may want to look
at also.

Re: Hungarian help on Viewmate #hungary

GilaMiriam Chait <gilamiriamchait@...>
 

This is not Hungarian - maybe Slovakian?

Gila Miriam Chait,
Manchester, England


--- Sheree Roth <ssroth@...> wrote:

Hi all,

I was wondering if any of you out there are able to
read this Hungarian
address and names(?), which I've posted on Viewmate
VM7887. You can get
there directly at:
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=7887


Please respond privately to me if you are able to
translate this. Thanks so
much in advance for any help you can give me.

Sincerely,
Sheree Roth
Palo Alto, CA
ssroth@...
Moderator: Although Sheree requested private responses I'm sending this response to the list to familiarize subscribers with differences between Hungarian and Slovak text.

Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Hungarian help on Viewmate #hungary

GilaMiriam Chait <gilamiriamchait@...>
 

This is not Hungarian - maybe Slovakian?

Gila Miriam Chait,
Manchester, England


--- Sheree Roth <ssroth@...> wrote:

Hi all,

I was wondering if any of you out there are able to
read this Hungarian
address and names(?), which I've posted on Viewmate
VM7887. You can get
there directly at:
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=7887


Please respond privately to me if you are able to
translate this. Thanks so
much in advance for any help you can give me.

Sincerely,
Sheree Roth
Palo Alto, CA
ssroth@...
Moderator: Although Sheree requested private responses I'm sending this response to the list to familiarize subscribers with differences between Hungarian and Slovak text.

tips on deciphering foreign texts #hungary

Milton Hubsher <milton@...>
 

Folks,

Tips on gleaning information >from text written by your ancestors on post
cards, in letters, etc.

Regardless of whether or not you can read Hungarian (I myself can only
barely read Hungarian) or how large your Hungarian vocabulary is (mine
is very limited), it is possible to get lots of information >from text
written by our ancestors.

First, a major clue that can be used to prove whether or not a given
word is Hungarian are the letters used. (This may be the case for other
languages as well, but I am not familiar enough with other languages to
comment. I do know, however, that "sch" is unique to German.)

If the word contains certain letters of the Hungarian
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hungarian_alphabet>alphabet
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hungarian_alphabet>, that are unique to
Hungarian, it is a good bet that the word is Hungarian.

1. Consonants: The letters unique to Hungarian are most of the
digraphs <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digraph_%28orthography%29>
(cs dz gy ly ny sz ty and zs), the tri
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trigraph_%28orthography%29>graph
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trigraph_%28orthography%29> (dzs).
The thing that make these letters unique to Hungarian actually
letters of the Hungarian alphabet, not simply two (2) letters that
happen to come together.
2. Vowels: These letters seem to be vowels with a diacritical marks
(commonly referred to as accents). They are á é í ó ú ő (/ő/) and
ű. Granted some of these symbols can be found in other languages.
More often then not, however, the symbol is not a letter of the
alphabet, as in Hungarian, but a vowel with a diacritical mark. In
any case the ő (/ő/) and ű are definitely unique to Hungarian.

Another big help is, once you have transcribed the text, the transcribed
word(s) can then be used as key search words with any one of the
Internet search engines. This can reveal many clues about the text. In
fact a transcribed word may seem like nonsense to you but turn out to be
the name of a place in Europe.

Hoping this will help.

--
Milton

Moderator: Please contact Milton off-list if you have questions.

Re: Hungarian help on Viewmate #hungary

tom klein <h-sig@...>
 

the address is in slovak, not hungarian, and the addressee is "fany szrulovics".



....... tom klein, toronto

"Sheree Roth" <ssroth@...> wrote:

I was wondering if any of you out there are able to read this Hungarian
address and names(?), which I've posted on Viewmate VM7887. You can get
there directly at:
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=7887

Hungary SIG #Hungary tips on deciphering foreign texts #hungary

Milton Hubsher <milton@...>
 

Folks,

Tips on gleaning information >from text written by your ancestors on post
cards, in letters, etc.

Regardless of whether or not you can read Hungarian (I myself can only
barely read Hungarian) or how large your Hungarian vocabulary is (mine
is very limited), it is possible to get lots of information >from text
written by our ancestors.

First, a major clue that can be used to prove whether or not a given
word is Hungarian are the letters used. (This may be the case for other
languages as well, but I am not familiar enough with other languages to
comment. I do know, however, that "sch" is unique to German.)

If the word contains certain letters of the Hungarian
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hungarian_alphabet>alphabet
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hungarian_alphabet>, that are unique to
Hungarian, it is a good bet that the word is Hungarian.

1. Consonants: The letters unique to Hungarian are most of the
digraphs <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digraph_%28orthography%29>
(cs dz gy ly ny sz ty and zs), the tri
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trigraph_%28orthography%29>graph
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trigraph_%28orthography%29> (dzs).
The thing that make these letters unique to Hungarian actually
letters of the Hungarian alphabet, not simply two (2) letters that
happen to come together.
2. Vowels: These letters seem to be vowels with a diacritical marks
(commonly referred to as accents). They are á é í ó ú ő (/ő/) and
ű. Granted some of these symbols can be found in other languages.
More often then not, however, the symbol is not a letter of the
alphabet, as in Hungarian, but a vowel with a diacritical mark. In
any case the ő (/ő/) and ű are definitely unique to Hungarian.

Another big help is, once you have transcribed the text, the transcribed
word(s) can then be used as key search words with any one of the
Internet search engines. This can reveal many clues about the text. In
fact a transcribed word may seem like nonsense to you but turn out to be
the name of a place in Europe.

Hoping this will help.

--
Milton

Moderator: Please contact Milton off-list if you have questions.

Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Hungarian help on Viewmate #hungary

tom klein <h-sig@...>
 

the address is in slovak, not hungarian, and the addressee is "fany szrulovics".



....... tom klein, toronto

"Sheree Roth" <ssroth@...> wrote:

I was wondering if any of you out there are able to read this Hungarian
address and names(?), which I've posted on Viewmate VM7887. You can get
there directly at:
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=7887

Yizkor Book Monthly Report for May 2006 #courland #latvia

Joyce Field
 

May 2006 has been a very busy one for the Yizkor Book Project. We
have one new online "book" (really, a collection of original essays),
four new books started, seven new entries, and 12 updates. All
yizkor book material is available at the Index page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. If you are not
familiar with this site, notice at the top of the page, just under
the JewishGen logo, is a list of sites you can access directly by
clicking on the name--for example, Database, Necrology Index, or
Infofiles. There is a wealth of information directly accessible >from
this one page with just a click. Also note that the yizkor material
is listed under four different categories. New material is flagged
for easy identification.

This month we have begun a new online collection, called "The
Terrible Choice: Some Contemporary Jewish Responses to the
Holocaust," at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/terrible_choice/terrible_choice.html
. Melvyn Conroy, the author, writes: "This collection of brief
essays is an attempt to portray the character and personality of a
number of the prominent Jews of occupied Europe, and the manner in
which they responded to the unique circumstances of the Shoah."
Thus far, we have eight essays online.

New books:

-Biecz, Poland
-Indura, Belarus
-Klobuck, Poland
-Transylvania, Hungary:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Transylvania/Transylvania.html.
Listed under Regions

New entries: Pinkas HaKehillot

-Druskininkai, Lith: Poland, vol. VIII
-Gdansk, Poland: Poland, vol. VI
-Krosno, Poland: Poland, vol. III
-Novogrudok, Belarus: Poland, vol. VIII
-Nowy Zmigrod, Poland: Poland, vol. III
-Ostrog, Ukraine: Poland, vol. V
-Polanka, Poland: Poland, vol. VIII

Updates:

-Braslaw, Belarus
-Dabrowa, Poland
-Dembitz, Poland (Polish translation)
-Gabin, Poland
-Kalusz, Ukraine
-Kolbuszowa, Poland
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Nowy Targ, Poland
-Shumskoye, Ukraine
-Stepan, Ukraine
-Zloczew, Poland

Frequently I remind our readers that a number of yizkor books are
being translated by professional translators. The list is at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23.
You can make a needed donation to these books and to JewishGen at
this site. Remember that JewishGen provides all the infrastructure
to make the Yizkor Book Project available to everyone at no cost, but
there is a cost to providing this material online and we hope that
our readers will generously support JewishGen, making their
appreciation known in this way.

At this time i want to thank once again our wonderful "international"
Yizkor Book Project volunteers who so efficiently get the
translations online: Lance Ackerfeld (Israel), Max Heffler (U.S.),
and Osnat Ramaty (Germany). They are a remarkable team. And to all
the people who donate their translations week after week, month after
month, we send our appreciation for their generosity and talent.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition

Courland SIG #Courland #Latvia Yizkor Book Monthly Report for May 2006 #courland #latvia

Joyce Field
 

May 2006 has been a very busy one for the Yizkor Book Project. We
have one new online "book" (really, a collection of original essays),
four new books started, seven new entries, and 12 updates. All
yizkor book material is available at the Index page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. If you are not
familiar with this site, notice at the top of the page, just under
the JewishGen logo, is a list of sites you can access directly by
clicking on the name--for example, Database, Necrology Index, or
Infofiles. There is a wealth of information directly accessible >from
this one page with just a click. Also note that the yizkor material
is listed under four different categories. New material is flagged
for easy identification.

This month we have begun a new online collection, called "The
Terrible Choice: Some Contemporary Jewish Responses to the
Holocaust," at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/terrible_choice/terrible_choice.html
. Melvyn Conroy, the author, writes: "This collection of brief
essays is an attempt to portray the character and personality of a
number of the prominent Jews of occupied Europe, and the manner in
which they responded to the unique circumstances of the Shoah."
Thus far, we have eight essays online.

New books:

-Biecz, Poland
-Indura, Belarus
-Klobuck, Poland
-Transylvania, Hungary:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Transylvania/Transylvania.html.
Listed under Regions

New entries: Pinkas HaKehillot

-Druskininkai, Lith: Poland, vol. VIII
-Gdansk, Poland: Poland, vol. VI
-Krosno, Poland: Poland, vol. III
-Novogrudok, Belarus: Poland, vol. VIII
-Nowy Zmigrod, Poland: Poland, vol. III
-Ostrog, Ukraine: Poland, vol. V
-Polanka, Poland: Poland, vol. VIII

Updates:

-Braslaw, Belarus
-Dabrowa, Poland
-Dembitz, Poland (Polish translation)
-Gabin, Poland
-Kalusz, Ukraine
-Kolbuszowa, Poland
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Nowy Targ, Poland
-Shumskoye, Ukraine
-Stepan, Ukraine
-Zloczew, Poland

Frequently I remind our readers that a number of yizkor books are
being translated by professional translators. The list is at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23.
You can make a needed donation to these books and to JewishGen at
this site. Remember that JewishGen provides all the infrastructure
to make the Yizkor Book Project available to everyone at no cost, but
there is a cost to providing this material online and we hope that
our readers will generously support JewishGen, making their
appreciation known in this way.

At this time i want to thank once again our wonderful "international"
Yizkor Book Project volunteers who so efficiently get the
translations online: Lance Ackerfeld (Israel), Max Heffler (U.S.),
and Osnat Ramaty (Germany). They are a remarkable team. And to all
the people who donate their translations week after week, month after
month, we send our appreciation for their generosity and talent.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition

Ashkenazi or Sephardi? DNA unites Jewish families,,but raises questions #southafrica

Saul Issroff <saul@...>
 

Ashkenazi or Sephardi? DNA unites Jewish families,
but raises questions

Schelly Talalay Dardashti has written an article on today's JTA (Jewish
Telegraphic Agency) web site
http://www.jta.org/page_view_story.asp?intarticleid=16659&intcategoryid=5

titled "Ashkenazi or Sephardi? DNA unites Jewish families, but raises
questions" .

This is based on the paper Herb Huebscher and I are presenting at the
26th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy. The official
Conference website is <http://www.jgsny2006.org/>
on Wednesday, August 16 1:45 PM - 3:00 PM
and describes the twenty-five disparate families, 22 of them now
Jewish, that have been identified via DNA testing as descendants of a
common paternal ancestor who lived several hundred years ago. These
families were connected through Family Tree DNA www.familytreedna.com.
A summary of the paper is on Session Summary
http://www.jgsny2006.org/e_pop_profiles.cfm?session=1&session_id=54498&class
_id=51063

The Genetics and genealgoy programme is : Wednesday, August 16
8:00 AM - 9:15 AM
423 Genes for Genealogists: Genetics, Inheritance, and DNA Made Simple
Sitron

9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
425 Genetic Genealogy: Using DNA to Connect -- What DNA Testing Can, and
Can't, Tell a Modern Genealogist Greenspan

11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
430 Our Foremothers: Researching the Common Ancestry of Ashkenazi Jews
Behar

1:45 PM - 3:00 PM
130 A Genealogical Puzzle: Twenty-one Disparate Families with a Common
Ancestor Huebscher Issroff

3:15 PM - 4:30 PM
248 Sephardic DNA Study: Les Fleurs de l'Orient. Farhi

4:45 PM - 6:00 PM
247 How Do Jewish People Use Genetic Information? Ostrer, Harmon ,
Zajac Kleinhandler


Thursday, August 17
8:00 AM - 9:15 AM
445 Medical and Genetic Family History: The Role of the Jewish
Genealogist Diamond

9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
447 Genetics Panel: Using DNA to Enrich Our Research and Our Health
Sitron
Diamond, Behar, Feinberg , Huebscher and Issroff

Saul Issroff (London)

Yizkor Book Monthly Report for May 2006 #southafrica

Joyce Field
 

May 2006 has been a very busy one for the Yizkor Book Project. We
have one new online "book" (really, a collection of original essays),
four new books started, seven new entries, and 12 updates. All
yizkor book material is available at the Index page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. If you are not
familiar with this site, notice at the top of the page, just under
the JewishGen logo, is a list of sites you can access directly by
clicking on the name--for example, Database, Necrology Index, or
Infofiles. There is a wealth of information directly accessible >from
this one page with just a click. Also note that the yizkor material
is listed under four different categories. New material is flagged
for easy identification.

This month we have begun a new online collection, called "The
Terrible Choice: Some Contemporary Jewish Responses to the
Holocaust," at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/terrible_choice/terrible_choice.html
. Melvyn Conroy, the author, writes: "This collection of brief
essays is an attempt to portray the character and personality of a
number of the prominent Jews of occupied Europe, and the manner in
which they responded to the unique circumstances of the Shoah."
Thus far, we have eight essays online.

New books:

-Biecz, Poland
-Indura, Belarus
-Klobuck, Poland
-Transylvania, Hungary:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Transylvania/Transylvania.html.
Listed under Regions

New entries: Pinkas HaKehillot

-Druskininkai, Lith: Poland, vol. VIII
-Gdansk, Poland: Poland, vol. VI
-Krosno, Poland: Poland, vol. III
-Novogrudok, Belarus: Poland, vol. VIII
-Nowy Zmigrod, Poland: Poland, vol. III
-Ostrog, Ukraine: Poland, vol. V
-Polanka, Poland: Poland, vol. VIII

Updates:

-Braslaw, Belarus
-Dabrowa, Poland
-Dembitz, Poland (Polish translation)
-Gabin, Poland
-Kalusz, Ukraine
-Kolbuszowa, Poland
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Nowy Targ, Poland
-Shumskoye, Ukraine
-Stepan, Ukraine
-Zloczew, Poland

Frequently I remind our readers that a number of yizkor books are
being translated by professional translators. The list is at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23.
You can make a needed donation to these books and to JewishGen at
this site. Remember that JewishGen provides all the infrastructure
to make the Yizkor Book Project available to everyone at no cost, but
there is a cost to providing this material online and we hope that
our readers will generously support JewishGen, making their
appreciation known in this way.

At this time i want to thank once again our wonderful "international"
Yizkor Book Project volunteers who so efficiently get the
translations online: Lance Ackerfeld (Israel), Max Heffler (U.S.),
and Osnat Ramaty (Germany). They are a remarkable team. And to all
the people who donate their translations week after week, month after
month, we send our appreciation for their generosity and talent.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition