Date   
Ashkenazi or Sephardi? DNA unites Jewish families,,but raises questions #southafrica

Saul Issroff <saul@...>
 

Ashkenazi or Sephardi? DNA unites Jewish families,
but raises questions

Schelly Talalay Dardashti has written an article on today's JTA (Jewish
Telegraphic Agency) web site
http://www.jta.org/page_view_story.asp?intarticleid=16659&intcategoryid=5

titled "Ashkenazi or Sephardi? DNA unites Jewish families, but raises
questions" .

This is based on the paper Herb Huebscher and I are presenting at the
26th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy. The official
Conference website is <http://www.jgsny2006.org/>
on Wednesday, August 16 1:45 PM - 3:00 PM
and describes the twenty-five disparate families, 22 of them now
Jewish, that have been identified via DNA testing as descendants of a
common paternal ancestor who lived several hundred years ago. These
families were connected through Family Tree DNA www.familytreedna.com.
A summary of the paper is on Session Summary
http://www.jgsny2006.org/e_pop_profiles.cfm?session=1&session_id=54498&class
_id=51063

The Genetics and genealgoy programme is : Wednesday, August 16
8:00 AM - 9:15 AM
423 Genes for Genealogists: Genetics, Inheritance, and DNA Made Simple
Sitron

9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
425 Genetic Genealogy: Using DNA to Connect -- What DNA Testing Can, and
Can't, Tell a Modern Genealogist Greenspan

11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
430 Our Foremothers: Researching the Common Ancestry of Ashkenazi Jews
Behar

1:45 PM - 3:00 PM
130 A Genealogical Puzzle: Twenty-one Disparate Families with a Common
Ancestor Huebscher Issroff

3:15 PM - 4:30 PM
248 Sephardic DNA Study: Les Fleurs de l'Orient. Farhi

4:45 PM - 6:00 PM
247 How Do Jewish People Use Genetic Information? Ostrer, Harmon ,
Zajac Kleinhandler


Thursday, August 17
8:00 AM - 9:15 AM
445 Medical and Genetic Family History: The Role of the Jewish
Genealogist Diamond

9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
447 Genetics Panel: Using DNA to Enrich Our Research and Our Health
Sitron
Diamond, Behar, Feinberg , Huebscher and Issroff

Saul Issroff (London)

Yizkor Book Monthly Report for May 2006 #southafrica

Joyce Field
 

May 2006 has been a very busy one for the Yizkor Book Project. We
have one new online "book" (really, a collection of original essays),
four new books started, seven new entries, and 12 updates. All
yizkor book material is available at the Index page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. If you are not
familiar with this site, notice at the top of the page, just under
the JewishGen logo, is a list of sites you can access directly by
clicking on the name--for example, Database, Necrology Index, or
Infofiles. There is a wealth of information directly accessible >from
this one page with just a click. Also note that the yizkor material
is listed under four different categories. New material is flagged
for easy identification.

This month we have begun a new online collection, called "The
Terrible Choice: Some Contemporary Jewish Responses to the
Holocaust," at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/terrible_choice/terrible_choice.html
. Melvyn Conroy, the author, writes: "This collection of brief
essays is an attempt to portray the character and personality of a
number of the prominent Jews of occupied Europe, and the manner in
which they responded to the unique circumstances of the Shoah."
Thus far, we have eight essays online.

New books:

-Biecz, Poland
-Indura, Belarus
-Klobuck, Poland
-Transylvania, Hungary:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Transylvania/Transylvania.html.
Listed under Regions

New entries: Pinkas HaKehillot

-Druskininkai, Lith: Poland, vol. VIII
-Gdansk, Poland: Poland, vol. VI
-Krosno, Poland: Poland, vol. III
-Novogrudok, Belarus: Poland, vol. VIII
-Nowy Zmigrod, Poland: Poland, vol. III
-Ostrog, Ukraine: Poland, vol. V
-Polanka, Poland: Poland, vol. VIII

Updates:

-Braslaw, Belarus
-Dabrowa, Poland
-Dembitz, Poland (Polish translation)
-Gabin, Poland
-Kalusz, Ukraine
-Kolbuszowa, Poland
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Nowy Targ, Poland
-Shumskoye, Ukraine
-Stepan, Ukraine
-Zloczew, Poland

Frequently I remind our readers that a number of yizkor books are
being translated by professional translators. The list is at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23.
You can make a needed donation to these books and to JewishGen at
this site. Remember that JewishGen provides all the infrastructure
to make the Yizkor Book Project available to everyone at no cost, but
there is a cost to providing this material online and we hope that
our readers will generously support JewishGen, making their
appreciation known in this way.

At this time i want to thank once again our wonderful "international"
Yizkor Book Project volunteers who so efficiently get the
translations online: Lance Ackerfeld (Israel), Max Heffler (U.S.),
and Osnat Ramaty (Germany). They are a remarkable team. And to all
the people who donate their translations week after week, month after
month, we send our appreciation for their generosity and talent.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition

South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica Ashkenazi or Sephardi? DNA unites Jewish families,,but raises questions #southafrica

Saul Issroff <saul@...>
 

Ashkenazi or Sephardi? DNA unites Jewish families,
but raises questions

Schelly Talalay Dardashti has written an article on today's JTA (Jewish
Telegraphic Agency) web site
http://www.jta.org/page_view_story.asp?intarticleid=16659&intcategoryid=5

titled "Ashkenazi or Sephardi? DNA unites Jewish families, but raises
questions" .

This is based on the paper Herb Huebscher and I are presenting at the
26th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy. The official
Conference website is <http://www.jgsny2006.org/>
on Wednesday, August 16 1:45 PM - 3:00 PM
and describes the twenty-five disparate families, 22 of them now
Jewish, that have been identified via DNA testing as descendants of a
common paternal ancestor who lived several hundred years ago. These
families were connected through Family Tree DNA www.familytreedna.com.
A summary of the paper is on Session Summary
http://www.jgsny2006.org/e_pop_profiles.cfm?session=1&session_id=54498&class
_id=51063

The Genetics and genealgoy programme is : Wednesday, August 16
8:00 AM - 9:15 AM
423 Genes for Genealogists: Genetics, Inheritance, and DNA Made Simple
Sitron

9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
425 Genetic Genealogy: Using DNA to Connect -- What DNA Testing Can, and
Can't, Tell a Modern Genealogist Greenspan

11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
430 Our Foremothers: Researching the Common Ancestry of Ashkenazi Jews
Behar

1:45 PM - 3:00 PM
130 A Genealogical Puzzle: Twenty-one Disparate Families with a Common
Ancestor Huebscher Issroff

3:15 PM - 4:30 PM
248 Sephardic DNA Study: Les Fleurs de l'Orient. Farhi

4:45 PM - 6:00 PM
247 How Do Jewish People Use Genetic Information? Ostrer, Harmon ,
Zajac Kleinhandler


Thursday, August 17
8:00 AM - 9:15 AM
445 Medical and Genetic Family History: The Role of the Jewish
Genealogist Diamond

9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
447 Genetics Panel: Using DNA to Enrich Our Research and Our Health
Sitron
Diamond, Behar, Feinberg , Huebscher and Issroff

Saul Issroff (London)

South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica Yizkor Book Monthly Report for May 2006 #southafrica

Joyce Field
 

May 2006 has been a very busy one for the Yizkor Book Project. We
have one new online "book" (really, a collection of original essays),
four new books started, seven new entries, and 12 updates. All
yizkor book material is available at the Index page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. If you are not
familiar with this site, notice at the top of the page, just under
the JewishGen logo, is a list of sites you can access directly by
clicking on the name--for example, Database, Necrology Index, or
Infofiles. There is a wealth of information directly accessible >from
this one page with just a click. Also note that the yizkor material
is listed under four different categories. New material is flagged
for easy identification.

This month we have begun a new online collection, called "The
Terrible Choice: Some Contemporary Jewish Responses to the
Holocaust," at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/terrible_choice/terrible_choice.html
. Melvyn Conroy, the author, writes: "This collection of brief
essays is an attempt to portray the character and personality of a
number of the prominent Jews of occupied Europe, and the manner in
which they responded to the unique circumstances of the Shoah."
Thus far, we have eight essays online.

New books:

-Biecz, Poland
-Indura, Belarus
-Klobuck, Poland
-Transylvania, Hungary:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Transylvania/Transylvania.html.
Listed under Regions

New entries: Pinkas HaKehillot

-Druskininkai, Lith: Poland, vol. VIII
-Gdansk, Poland: Poland, vol. VI
-Krosno, Poland: Poland, vol. III
-Novogrudok, Belarus: Poland, vol. VIII
-Nowy Zmigrod, Poland: Poland, vol. III
-Ostrog, Ukraine: Poland, vol. V
-Polanka, Poland: Poland, vol. VIII

Updates:

-Braslaw, Belarus
-Dabrowa, Poland
-Dembitz, Poland (Polish translation)
-Gabin, Poland
-Kalusz, Ukraine
-Kolbuszowa, Poland
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Nowy Targ, Poland
-Shumskoye, Ukraine
-Stepan, Ukraine
-Zloczew, Poland

Frequently I remind our readers that a number of yizkor books are
being translated by professional translators. The list is at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23.
You can make a needed donation to these books and to JewishGen at
this site. Remember that JewishGen provides all the infrastructure
to make the Yizkor Book Project available to everyone at no cost, but
there is a cost to providing this material online and we hope that
our readers will generously support JewishGen, making their
appreciation known in this way.

At this time i want to thank once again our wonderful "international"
Yizkor Book Project volunteers who so efficiently get the
translations online: Lance Ackerfeld (Israel), Max Heffler (U.S.),
and Osnat Ramaty (Germany). They are a remarkable team. And to all
the people who donate their translations week after week, month after
month, we send our appreciation for their generosity and talent.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition

Re: Death Certificates in New York Archives #general

Elise
 

-----Original Message-----
It was suggested that the researcher seeking a NYC death certificate for
Shimshon S. Frischman use the Italian and German American databases. I,
however, have found them to be very incomplete. I have tried with each
database update to find two ancestors whose deaths fit into the time frames
and boroughs covered and found neither of them. I know they're dead. I don't
think anyone can be sure of finding the searched for individuals there.
Irene Berman
Shoham, Israel
The NYC death index on the Italian and German genealogy sites is being
developed directly >from the official NYC death index books in cooperation
with NYC archive officials. There are many volunteers working hundreds of
laborious hours on this project. There are over 2.7 _million_ names in the
death index database alone, not to mention all the other NYC indexes that
these volunteers have made available online to date.

Can anyone guarantee that the database will ever by 100% complete or
accurate? No. There may be names which were missing or misspelled in the
original death indexes. The OCR software used to scan the original death
index books into the computer may read a letter wrong, causing a typo in the
database. Maybe the original record had the name spelled wrong. The
volunteers are proofreading the data the best they can, but some errors are
bound to get through. Still, I think we can fairly safely say that the
error rate will be extremely small compared to the sheer number of records
in the database. Even if 27,000 (27 thousand) entries had errors, that's
only 1% of the 2.7 million entries in the database! That's just an example,
I have no idea what the real error rate is.

What I do know is that this is _the_ biggest and most complete NYC death
index that we have ever had on the internet and I, for one, am very grateful
to have this index at my fingertips and not have to schlep to the Family
History Center to order an index film and wait 3 weeks for it to arrive
anymore.

I have personally found hundreds of NYC records for my family between the
original NYC indexes and the online databases. Yet there are several
records which still elude me.

Here are some reasons why one might not find who they're looking for:

1) The name was missing in the original death indexes and therefore is also
missing in the online index. The only way to get around this would be to
search through the actual certificates for the timeframe you believe the
person died.

2) The name is typo'd in the database. Be sure to try soundex and
wildcards.

3) The name is spelled differently than you would expect, or the entire name
might be different! I have a relative David Mordko Wahrhaftig -- I finally
found his death certificate filed as Morris Warhoftik. Looks like it would
be easy to find now that I know the name he was filed under, but how should
I have known to look under an anglicized version of his middle name, omit
the first h in his surname and change the g to a k -- especially since he
was listed as David in census records? I ended up using soundex with no
first name to find this one. And I'm sure there are much more difficult
examples than this one.

4) The person died outside of the 5 boroughs, even though they lived in the
boroughs. The death certificate would be filed where the person died, not
where they lived. For example, if they died at a hospital in Long Island,
their death certificate would be filed with the New York State Department of
Health instead of the NYC Department of Health.

"One person's junk is another person's treasure"

I think we can apply this to genealogy databases -- one database may be
useless for some people, but a goldmine for others. So please, just because
you can't find your own family in the database doesn't mean it's worthless.

Elise Friedman
Baltimore, Maryland

KMIOTEK/FRIEDMAN/LEWIS, SCHENDEROWITZ, EMBER (Makow Maz./Przasnysz, Poland);
EISNER, TAUB, WAHRHAFTIG, TUNIS, SONNE (Myszkowice/Tarnopol, Ukraine);
MILLER/MEHLER, TAUB (Byblo/Staryy Sambor/Nizankowice/Dobromil, Ukraine);
PALEVSKY, POLLACK, DUBIN, DAITCH, SAPIR (Horodetz/Kobryn, Belarus);
LIFSHITZ, CHARLAS/KHARLAS/KALLISH (Brest-Litovsk/Antopol, Belarus);
CHESIN, EHUDIN (Mstislavl, Belarus); CHERNOCK, EPSTEIN (Novozybkov, Russia)

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Death Certificates in New York Archives #general

Elise
 

-----Original Message-----
It was suggested that the researcher seeking a NYC death certificate for
Shimshon S. Frischman use the Italian and German American databases. I,
however, have found them to be very incomplete. I have tried with each
database update to find two ancestors whose deaths fit into the time frames
and boroughs covered and found neither of them. I know they're dead. I don't
think anyone can be sure of finding the searched for individuals there.
Irene Berman
Shoham, Israel
The NYC death index on the Italian and German genealogy sites is being
developed directly >from the official NYC death index books in cooperation
with NYC archive officials. There are many volunteers working hundreds of
laborious hours on this project. There are over 2.7 _million_ names in the
death index database alone, not to mention all the other NYC indexes that
these volunteers have made available online to date.

Can anyone guarantee that the database will ever by 100% complete or
accurate? No. There may be names which were missing or misspelled in the
original death indexes. The OCR software used to scan the original death
index books into the computer may read a letter wrong, causing a typo in the
database. Maybe the original record had the name spelled wrong. The
volunteers are proofreading the data the best they can, but some errors are
bound to get through. Still, I think we can fairly safely say that the
error rate will be extremely small compared to the sheer number of records
in the database. Even if 27,000 (27 thousand) entries had errors, that's
only 1% of the 2.7 million entries in the database! That's just an example,
I have no idea what the real error rate is.

What I do know is that this is _the_ biggest and most complete NYC death
index that we have ever had on the internet and I, for one, am very grateful
to have this index at my fingertips and not have to schlep to the Family
History Center to order an index film and wait 3 weeks for it to arrive
anymore.

I have personally found hundreds of NYC records for my family between the
original NYC indexes and the online databases. Yet there are several
records which still elude me.

Here are some reasons why one might not find who they're looking for:

1) The name was missing in the original death indexes and therefore is also
missing in the online index. The only way to get around this would be to
search through the actual certificates for the timeframe you believe the
person died.

2) The name is typo'd in the database. Be sure to try soundex and
wildcards.

3) The name is spelled differently than you would expect, or the entire name
might be different! I have a relative David Mordko Wahrhaftig -- I finally
found his death certificate filed as Morris Warhoftik. Looks like it would
be easy to find now that I know the name he was filed under, but how should
I have known to look under an anglicized version of his middle name, omit
the first h in his surname and change the g to a k -- especially since he
was listed as David in census records? I ended up using soundex with no
first name to find this one. And I'm sure there are much more difficult
examples than this one.

4) The person died outside of the 5 boroughs, even though they lived in the
boroughs. The death certificate would be filed where the person died, not
where they lived. For example, if they died at a hospital in Long Island,
their death certificate would be filed with the New York State Department of
Health instead of the NYC Department of Health.

"One person's junk is another person's treasure"

I think we can apply this to genealogy databases -- one database may be
useless for some people, but a goldmine for others. So please, just because
you can't find your own family in the database doesn't mean it's worthless.

Elise Friedman
Baltimore, Maryland

KMIOTEK/FRIEDMAN/LEWIS, SCHENDEROWITZ, EMBER (Makow Maz./Przasnysz, Poland);
EISNER, TAUB, WAHRHAFTIG, TUNIS, SONNE (Myszkowice/Tarnopol, Ukraine);
MILLER/MEHLER, TAUB (Byblo/Staryy Sambor/Nizankowice/Dobromil, Ukraine);
PALEVSKY, POLLACK, DUBIN, DAITCH, SAPIR (Horodetz/Kobryn, Belarus);
LIFSHITZ, CHARLAS/KHARLAS/KALLISH (Brest-Litovsk/Antopol, Belarus);
CHESIN, EHUDIN (Mstislavl, Belarus); CHERNOCK, EPSTEIN (Novozybkov, Russia)

DARTER Family: European origins #general

Christopher Moncrieff <christophermoncrieff@...>
 

Is anyone able to help me trace the Central European origins of the DARTER
family?

My paternal grandmother was a Darter. The family lived in Herftordshire, England
(UK), and in North London. They were assimilated, secular Jews, although >from
their appearance and habits they were clearly originally Central Europeans.
Some of the family are still alive, but as often happens they know little if
anything about their history.

The name Darter appears to be fairly rare. It is not English, and there are few
if any Darters now in Britain. The family most likely came to the UK during the
19th century, in one of the immigrations.

Initial research on Avotaynu and JewishGen confirms my belief that they were
probably Polish. There also seem to be links to Galicia.

Although I am happy to learn about the current whereabouts of Darters around the
world, my main aim is to find out where they came >from originally. A lot of my
work involves Central Europe, and I speak some of the languages.

So if anyone >from this excellent forum can help me in any way I would be very
grateful.

I look forward to hearing >from you.

Christopher Moncrieff

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen DARTER Family: European origins #general

Christopher Moncrieff <christophermoncrieff@...>
 

Is anyone able to help me trace the Central European origins of the DARTER
family?

My paternal grandmother was a Darter. The family lived in Herftordshire, England
(UK), and in North London. They were assimilated, secular Jews, although >from
their appearance and habits they were clearly originally Central Europeans.
Some of the family are still alive, but as often happens they know little if
anything about their history.

The name Darter appears to be fairly rare. It is not English, and there are few
if any Darters now in Britain. The family most likely came to the UK during the
19th century, in one of the immigrations.

Initial research on Avotaynu and JewishGen confirms my belief that they were
probably Polish. There also seem to be links to Galicia.

Although I am happy to learn about the current whereabouts of Darters around the
world, my main aim is to find out where they came >from originally. A lot of my
work involves Central Europe, and I speak some of the languages.

So if anyone >from this excellent forum can help me in any way I would be very
grateful.

I look forward to hearing >from you.

Christopher Moncrieff

Suwalki in Lithuania *and* in Poland #general

Fritz Neubauer
 

Wilkes wrote:
Having found the Draft Registration card for my wife's uncle , it shows he
was born in Suwalski, Russia. We are now assuming her grandfather was born
in the same town in 1889. Can anyone offer suggestion as to how I can obtain
additional information on family members in this town. And also does anyone
know exactly where this town is located.

Harvey wrote:
This was probably Suwalki in Lithuania. There is a lot of information
via JewishGen's Shtetlinks facility. You should then try the Lithuanian
databases .

My comment: There is an even more known Suwalki in Poland
which had 7000 Jewish inhabitants in World War II. With kind regards
Fritz Neubauer, North Germany

Thanks Bride Index #general

RoniKrinsky <Suesmithe1@...>
 

Many thanks to all of you who replied to my question about finding
someone on this index. I really appreciatte it.

Roni Krinsky
Queens, NY

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Suwalki in Lithuania *and* in Poland #general

Fritz Neubauer
 

Wilkes wrote:
Having found the Draft Registration card for my wife's uncle , it shows he
was born in Suwalski, Russia. We are now assuming her grandfather was born
in the same town in 1889. Can anyone offer suggestion as to how I can obtain
additional information on family members in this town. And also does anyone
know exactly where this town is located.

Harvey wrote:
This was probably Suwalki in Lithuania. There is a lot of information
via JewishGen's Shtetlinks facility. You should then try the Lithuanian
databases .

My comment: There is an even more known Suwalki in Poland
which had 7000 Jewish inhabitants in World War II. With kind regards
Fritz Neubauer, North Germany

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Thanks Bride Index #general

RoniKrinsky <Suesmithe1@...>
 

Many thanks to all of you who replied to my question about finding
someone on this index. I really appreciatte it.

Roni Krinsky
Queens, NY

Suwalski-Suwalki #general

Merle Kastner <merlek@...>
 

Dear Albert,

To respond to your question (shown at the end of this message):

The town is Suwalki, the capital of Suwalki gubernia (province)
in N.E. Poland, very close to the Lithuanian border.

Suwalki records are online at JRI-Poland:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/

Good luck with your research.

Merle

Merle Kastner, Montreal, Canada
merlek@...
KASTNER & OSTFELD, Radauti, Bukovina;
NATHANSON & MENDELSSOHN, Piatra Neamt, Negulesti, Falticeni, Romania;
DENENBERG/DYNABURSKI & GARBARSKI/GOLDBERG, Sejny, Suwalki gubernia, Poland,
New York, NY; KUSSNER, Bendery, Bessarabia/Moldova, Philadelphia, PA;
MILLER/SZCZUCZYNSKI, Lida, Vilnius, Lithuania/Belarus, Philadelphia, PA
ALTMAN, Belchatow, Lodz LEVITT/KISZELEWICZ, Mszczonów, Poland
SINGER, Starry Chartoriysk, Ukraine FOX/FUCHS, Dubno, Poland

Having found the Draft Registration card for my wife's uncle , it shows he
was born in Suwalski, Russia. We are now assuming her grandfather was born
in the same town in 1889. Can anyone offer suggestion as to how I can obtain
additional information on family members in this town. And also does anyone
know exactly where this town is located.
Thank you in advance
Al Hewitt alhewitt@...
Wilkes Barre, PA

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Suwalski-Suwalki #general

Merle Kastner <merlek@...>
 

Dear Albert,

To respond to your question (shown at the end of this message):

The town is Suwalki, the capital of Suwalki gubernia (province)
in N.E. Poland, very close to the Lithuanian border.

Suwalki records are online at JRI-Poland:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/

Good luck with your research.

Merle

Merle Kastner, Montreal, Canada
merlek@...
KASTNER & OSTFELD, Radauti, Bukovina;
NATHANSON & MENDELSSOHN, Piatra Neamt, Negulesti, Falticeni, Romania;
DENENBERG/DYNABURSKI & GARBARSKI/GOLDBERG, Sejny, Suwalki gubernia, Poland,
New York, NY; KUSSNER, Bendery, Bessarabia/Moldova, Philadelphia, PA;
MILLER/SZCZUCZYNSKI, Lida, Vilnius, Lithuania/Belarus, Philadelphia, PA
ALTMAN, Belchatow, Lodz LEVITT/KISZELEWICZ, Mszczonów, Poland
SINGER, Starry Chartoriysk, Ukraine FOX/FUCHS, Dubno, Poland

Having found the Draft Registration card for my wife's uncle , it shows he
was born in Suwalski, Russia. We are now assuming her grandfather was born
in the same town in 1889. Can anyone offer suggestion as to how I can obtain
additional information on family members in this town. And also does anyone
know exactly where this town is located.
Thank you in advance
Al Hewitt alhewitt@...
Wilkes Barre, PA

LitvakSIG Varniai Vital Records #general

Susan Cooper <suzecooper@...>
 

Jews of Varniai
Look up Varniai on the internet and you’ll find a wealth of
information about its famous seminary and cathedral. Very
little, if anything, is to be found about the contribution of
the Jewish traders, craftspeople and farmers (tenants probably
as Jews were not allowed to own land).
In the Jewish world, the town was well known for its scholars
many of whom were educated in the town’s own yeshiva which
opened in 1875. Later a “Talmud Torah” school opened and a
charitable institution called “Bikur Holim” was founded by Rabbi
Hanania. The town also had a “klois”, two “schtiblech” and a
famous old synagogue.
The Jewish population in 1897 was 1,226, although emigration to
America, Great Britain and South Africa had begun many years
before. My own grandfather came to Australia in 1880. There is a
rumour he caught the wrong boat because his other 13 siblings
and mother left a little later for New York.
There are 9000 records in the Lithuanian archives relating to
Jewish families in Varniai (Vorne) which are waiting to be
translated.
Do you have family >from this town in north-western Lithuania?
If you would like to be involved in the Vital Records
Translation Project for Varniai, please contact me.

Susan Cooper
suzecooper@...
Shtetl Coordinator, LitvakSIG Varniai Vital Records.

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen LitvakSIG Varniai Vital Records #general

Susan Cooper <suzecooper@...>
 

Jews of Varniai
Look up Varniai on the internet and you’ll find a wealth of
information about its famous seminary and cathedral. Very
little, if anything, is to be found about the contribution of
the Jewish traders, craftspeople and farmers (tenants probably
as Jews were not allowed to own land).
In the Jewish world, the town was well known for its scholars
many of whom were educated in the town’s own yeshiva which
opened in 1875. Later a “Talmud Torah” school opened and a
charitable institution called “Bikur Holim” was founded by Rabbi
Hanania. The town also had a “klois”, two “schtiblech” and a
famous old synagogue.
The Jewish population in 1897 was 1,226, although emigration to
America, Great Britain and South Africa had begun many years
before. My own grandfather came to Australia in 1880. There is a
rumour he caught the wrong boat because his other 13 siblings
and mother left a little later for New York.
There are 9000 records in the Lithuanian archives relating to
Jewish families in Varniai (Vorne) which are waiting to be
translated.
Do you have family >from this town in north-western Lithuania?
If you would like to be involved in the Vital Records
Translation Project for Varniai, please contact me.

Susan Cooper
suzecooper@...
Shtetl Coordinator, LitvakSIG Varniai Vital Records.

Questions about grave headstone information #unitedkingdom

Les Culank <les.culank@...>
 

Dear Nick,

If you use a Mac, there is a neat desktop Jewish (etc) calendar at
http://www.drissman.com/avi/mac/
which thinks (like you) that April 8th was the 29th & last day of Adar
2, 5700.
For PC's the calendar >from http://www.kaluach.org/ says the same.

At Witton, I was advised the book for the old section had long been
kept at Singers Hill, contact the Synagogue Office for advice on how
to see it.

Have you thought of using Viewmate to seek a translation?
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/

Best wishes,
Les Culank (Cambridge).

Jenny & Les Culank GATOFF/GATOVSKY/FISHKIN Minsk, LITT Dvinsk, HOFFMAN
Kiev,

CULANK/-G/FLECHER Warsaw, SCHNEIDER Zagare, MELCHER/LAPIDUS Silale /
Luoke1. Dates -

JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Questions about grave headstone information #unitedkingdom

Les Culank <les.culank@...>
 

Dear Nick,

If you use a Mac, there is a neat desktop Jewish (etc) calendar at
http://www.drissman.com/avi/mac/
which thinks (like you) that April 8th was the 29th & last day of Adar
2, 5700.
For PC's the calendar >from http://www.kaluach.org/ says the same.

At Witton, I was advised the book for the old section had long been
kept at Singers Hill, contact the Synagogue Office for advice on how
to see it.

Have you thought of using Viewmate to seek a translation?
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/

Best wishes,
Les Culank (Cambridge).

Jenny & Les Culank GATOFF/GATOVSKY/FISHKIN Minsk, LITT Dvinsk, HOFFMAN
Kiev,

CULANK/-G/FLECHER Warsaw, SCHNEIDER Zagare, MELCHER/LAPIDUS Silale /
Luoke1. Dates -

Yizkor Book Monthly Report for May 2006 #general

Joyce Field
 

May 2006 has been a very busy one for the Yizkor Book Project. We
have one new online "book" (really, a collection of original essays),
four new books started, seven new entries, and 12 updates. All
yizkor book material is available at the Index page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. If you are not
familiar with this site, notice at the top of the page, just under
the JewishGen logo, is a list of sites you can access directly by
clicking on the name--for example, Database, Necrology Index, or
Infofiles. There is a wealth of information directly accessible >from
this one page with just a click. Also note that the yizkor material
is listed under four different categories. New material is flagged
for easy identification.

This month we have begun a new online collection, called "The
Terrible Choice: Some Contemporary Jewish Responses to the
Holocaust," at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/terrible_choice/terrible_choice.html
Melvyn Conroy, the author, writes: "This collection of brief
essays is an attempt to portray the character and personality of a
number of the prominent Jews of occupied Europe, and the manner in
which they responded to the unique circumstances of the Shoah."
Thus far, we have eight essays online.

New books:

-Biecz, Poland
-Indura, Belarus
-Klobuck, Poland
-Transylvania, Hungary:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Transylvania/Transylvania.html.
Listed under Regions

New entries: Pinkas HaKehillot

-Druskininkai, Lith: Poland, vol. VIII
-Gdansk, Poland: Poland, vol. VI
-Krosno, Poland: Poland, vol. III
-Novogrudok, Belarus: Poland, vol. VIII
-Nowy Zmigrod, Poland: Poland, vol. III
-Ostrog, Ukraine: Poland, vol. V
-Polanka, Poland: Poland, vol. VIII

Updates:

-Braslaw, Belarus
-Dabrowa, Poland
-Dembitz, Poland (Polish translation)
-Gabin, Poland
-Kalusz, Ukraine
-Kolbuszowa, Poland
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Nowy Targ, Poland
-Shumskoye, Ukraine
-Stepan, Ukraine
-Zloczew, Poland

Frequently I remind our readers that a number of yizkor books are
being translated by professional translators. The list is at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23.
You can make a needed donation to these books and to JewishGen at
this site. Remember that JewishGen provides all the infrastructure
to make the Yizkor Book Project available to everyone at no cost, but
there is a cost to providing this material online and we hope that
our readers will generously support JewishGen, making their
appreciation known in this way.

At this time I want to thank once again our wonderful "international"
Yizkor Book Project volunteers who so efficiently get the
translations online: Lance Ackerfeld (Israel), Max Heffler (U.S.),
and Osnat Ramaty (Germany). They are a remarkable team. And to all
the people who donate their translations week after week, month after
month, we send our appreciation for their generosity and talent.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Yizkor Book Monthly Report for May 2006 #general

Joyce Field
 

May 2006 has been a very busy one for the Yizkor Book Project. We
have one new online "book" (really, a collection of original essays),
four new books started, seven new entries, and 12 updates. All
yizkor book material is available at the Index page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. If you are not
familiar with this site, notice at the top of the page, just under
the JewishGen logo, is a list of sites you can access directly by
clicking on the name--for example, Database, Necrology Index, or
Infofiles. There is a wealth of information directly accessible >from
this one page with just a click. Also note that the yizkor material
is listed under four different categories. New material is flagged
for easy identification.

This month we have begun a new online collection, called "The
Terrible Choice: Some Contemporary Jewish Responses to the
Holocaust," at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/terrible_choice/terrible_choice.html
Melvyn Conroy, the author, writes: "This collection of brief
essays is an attempt to portray the character and personality of a
number of the prominent Jews of occupied Europe, and the manner in
which they responded to the unique circumstances of the Shoah."
Thus far, we have eight essays online.

New books:

-Biecz, Poland
-Indura, Belarus
-Klobuck, Poland
-Transylvania, Hungary:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Transylvania/Transylvania.html.
Listed under Regions

New entries: Pinkas HaKehillot

-Druskininkai, Lith: Poland, vol. VIII
-Gdansk, Poland: Poland, vol. VI
-Krosno, Poland: Poland, vol. III
-Novogrudok, Belarus: Poland, vol. VIII
-Nowy Zmigrod, Poland: Poland, vol. III
-Ostrog, Ukraine: Poland, vol. V
-Polanka, Poland: Poland, vol. VIII

Updates:

-Braslaw, Belarus
-Dabrowa, Poland
-Dembitz, Poland (Polish translation)
-Gabin, Poland
-Kalusz, Ukraine
-Kolbuszowa, Poland
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Nowy Targ, Poland
-Shumskoye, Ukraine
-Stepan, Ukraine
-Zloczew, Poland

Frequently I remind our readers that a number of yizkor books are
being translated by professional translators. The list is at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23.
You can make a needed donation to these books and to JewishGen at
this site. Remember that JewishGen provides all the infrastructure
to make the Yizkor Book Project available to everyone at no cost, but
there is a cost to providing this material online and we hope that
our readers will generously support JewishGen, making their
appreciation known in this way.

At this time I want to thank once again our wonderful "international"
Yizkor Book Project volunteers who so efficiently get the
translations online: Lance Ackerfeld (Israel), Max Heffler (U.S.),
and Osnat Ramaty (Germany). They are a remarkable team. And to all
the people who donate their translations week after week, month after
month, we send our appreciation for their generosity and talent.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition