Date   
Looking for Ruth Waschpress #galicia

Gabe Kingsley <gabek1@...>
 

Greetings fellow Galitzianers!

I have been unable to reach Ruth Waschpress lately.

We had quite an active exchange a while back and it was she who is
responsible for my joining Gesher Galicia, but I have not been able
to contact her recently. She once told me her internet mail was "iffy,"
but I never had a problem with that address before.
Thanks,

Gabe Kingsley
Hayward, CA

KUBERT/KOBERT/CUBERT Ozeryany/New York
SEIDMAN/SEIDMANN Gusyatin/New York
SPERLING Ozeryany/Chortkiv/New York
JAGENDORF Skala
ROZENAUCH/ROSENHAUCH Probuzna

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Previous e-mail address for Ruth Waschpress removed.
Contact Gabe privately.

Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Looking for Ruth Waschpress #galicia

Gabe Kingsley <gabek1@...>
 

Greetings fellow Galitzianers!

I have been unable to reach Ruth Waschpress lately.

We had quite an active exchange a while back and it was she who is
responsible for my joining Gesher Galicia, but I have not been able
to contact her recently. She once told me her internet mail was "iffy,"
but I never had a problem with that address before.
Thanks,

Gabe Kingsley
Hayward, CA

KUBERT/KOBERT/CUBERT Ozeryany/New York
SEIDMAN/SEIDMANN Gusyatin/New York
SPERLING Ozeryany/Chortkiv/New York
JAGENDORF Skala
ROZENAUCH/ROSENHAUCH Probuzna

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Previous e-mail address for Ruth Waschpress removed.
Contact Gabe privately.

Re: Addresses in Poland #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Sun, 28 May 2006 14:49:44 UTC, susserl@... (lili susser) opined:

Is there a way or institution one can find a persons pre-war address in
Poland?

Any help or suggestion will be appreciated.

Lili Susser
Susserl@...
If the person lived in Warsaw and was a telephone subscriber, his address
can be found in the 1938/9 Warsaw telephone directory. The Library of
Congress has this volume, and it is accessible on the Internet at:
http://lcweb2.loc.gov/cgi-bin/ampage?collId=gdc3&fileName=scd0001_200206110
01wapage.db

Perhaps there are similar volumes for other towns, but I don't know. Even in
Warsaw, the small size of the telephone directory is witness to the fact
that owning a telephone line was far >from universal at the time.

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form there.

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Addresses in Poland #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Sun, 28 May 2006 14:49:44 UTC, susserl@... (lili susser) opined:

Is there a way or institution one can find a persons pre-war address in
Poland?

Any help or suggestion will be appreciated.

Lili Susser
Susserl@...
If the person lived in Warsaw and was a telephone subscriber, his address
can be found in the 1938/9 Warsaw telephone directory. The Library of
Congress has this volume, and it is accessible on the Internet at:
http://lcweb2.loc.gov/cgi-bin/ampage?collId=gdc3&fileName=scd0001_200206110
01wapage.db

Perhaps there are similar volumes for other towns, but I don't know. Even in
Warsaw, the small size of the telephone directory is witness to the fact
that owning a telephone line was far >from universal at the time.

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form there.

Re: names #belarus

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 5/27/2006 1:09:40 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
trovato@... writes:
"...my g-g-g-grandfather Salomon LUSTIG) and/or his son's name was Scholim"

==I don't think they're necessarily the same name.
Salomon = Shlomo in Hebrew Scholim = Shalom in Hebrew
==The two names in their various forms were sometimes used interchangeably,
the one as the Shem Hakodesh, the other as secular name. Scholim was more
commonly Scholem in the Germanic world.
==We have many such confusing name pairs; the most confusing is probably
Eli'ezer and Elazar

Michael Bernet, New York

German SIG #Germany Re: names #germany

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 5/27/2006 1:09:40 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
trovato@... writes:
"...my g-g-g-grandfather Salomon LUSTIG) and/or his son's name was Scholim"

==I don't think they're necessarily the same name.
Salomon = Shlomo in Hebrew Scholim = Shalom in Hebrew
==The two names in their various forms were sometimes used interchangeably,
the one as the Shem Hakodesh, the other as secular name. Scholim was more
commonly Scholem in the Germanic world.
==We have many such confusing name pairs; the most confusing is probably
Eli'ezer and Elazar

Michael Bernet, New York

Cemetery Matzevot Photographs #general

Steven Lasky <steve725@...>
 

Greetings,
It has been brought to my attention that Mt. Hebron Cemetery is no longer
taking photographs of gravestones (matzevot) for free and mailing them to
those who request them.

This is what I have learned >from my conversation with the Mt. Hebron
Cemetery office. Perhaps what I am about to say is also true, to one degree
or another, for other cemeteries, whether you pay them to take photographs
or not. Mt. Hebron told me today that in the past they have taken photos for
free, for the elderly who live far away and cannot visit the gravesite of a
loved one. This is their stated policy now, and is not how I had understood
it (correctly or incorrectly) in the past. They also state that this is high
season and they need all of their people for planting, etc.

It seems that since it has become known that they take matzevot photos for
free that they have become inundated by requests for matzevot photos, some
requests >from "genealogists for ten, twelve photos at a time." This, of
course, is the danger in requesting multiple photos (especially when there
is no cost involved.) Part of the problem is announcing to them when they
ask you why you want all of these photos, that you are requesting them for
genealogical purposes.

So, if you feel you fit into a category of someone who can easily justify a
request for a matzeva photo or two, e.g. being elderly and living far away
and cannot get to the cemetery, etc., do make your request, preferably in
writing. You might also like to wait until mid-August, during your time in
NYC for the conference (if you plan to attend) and visit the cemetery
yourself. You might also think of making your request for matzevot photos
during a time that isn't peak planting season, when activities slow down at
most cemeteries. You can also post your request to one of the
JewishGen-associated discussion groups and ask if anyone who will be
visiting a particular cemetery could take a digital photo for you.

I certainly can't say if the Mt. Hebron policy of taking photos on request,
for payment or for free, is true at all cemeteries or not. The only way to
know is by contacting them with your request. We should be thankful, of
course, that Mt. Hebron and several other cemeteries have put online
searchable databases that allow us to search for burials that are of
interest to us.


Regards,
Steve Lasky
New York
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Cemetery Matzevot Photographs #general

Steven Lasky <steve725@...>
 

Greetings,
It has been brought to my attention that Mt. Hebron Cemetery is no longer
taking photographs of gravestones (matzevot) for free and mailing them to
those who request them.

This is what I have learned >from my conversation with the Mt. Hebron
Cemetery office. Perhaps what I am about to say is also true, to one degree
or another, for other cemeteries, whether you pay them to take photographs
or not. Mt. Hebron told me today that in the past they have taken photos for
free, for the elderly who live far away and cannot visit the gravesite of a
loved one. This is their stated policy now, and is not how I had understood
it (correctly or incorrectly) in the past. They also state that this is high
season and they need all of their people for planting, etc.

It seems that since it has become known that they take matzevot photos for
free that they have become inundated by requests for matzevot photos, some
requests >from "genealogists for ten, twelve photos at a time." This, of
course, is the danger in requesting multiple photos (especially when there
is no cost involved.) Part of the problem is announcing to them when they
ask you why you want all of these photos, that you are requesting them for
genealogical purposes.

So, if you feel you fit into a category of someone who can easily justify a
request for a matzeva photo or two, e.g. being elderly and living far away
and cannot get to the cemetery, etc., do make your request, preferably in
writing. You might also like to wait until mid-August, during your time in
NYC for the conference (if you plan to attend) and visit the cemetery
yourself. You might also think of making your request for matzevot photos
during a time that isn't peak planting season, when activities slow down at
most cemeteries. You can also post your request to one of the
JewishGen-associated discussion groups and ask if anyone who will be
visiting a particular cemetery could take a digital photo for you.

I certainly can't say if the Mt. Hebron policy of taking photos on request,
for payment or for free, is true at all cemeteries or not. The only way to
know is by contacting them with your request. We should be thankful, of
course, that Mt. Hebron and several other cemeteries have put online
searchable databases that allow us to search for burials that are of
interest to us.


Regards,
Steve Lasky
New York
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com

Re: Another [basic] Question on naming #germany

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 5/27/2006 1:29:54 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
djkester@... writes:

"In the pre-family name days (i.e. before ~1800)
when names still had the "Isaac ben Abraham" form, how did it work
with Levites and Kohanim? Were "Levi" and "Kohen" part of the name?"

==The gentile authorities couldn't have cared less about Cohanim or Leviim.
==However, Within the Jewish community, Cohanim and Levi'im often used that
designation as if it were a surname: Kohn, Kahn, haKohen, Katz, Aaronson,
etc of Levi, haLevi, Levy, Levitas etc.

==Those names were often used as part of the full secular name, in the way
that a trade (Schneider etc.) or location (Frankfurter, etc) was used as a
"common-law" surname.

==For Jewish ritual purposes, haKohen or haLevi was always part of the
designee's full name.

==Gentiles often attributed ecclesiastical titles to Jews, rabbis, parnassim
(community presidents), shtadlanim (negotiators on behalf of the
community)--titles such as priest, bishop, preacher, monk. Kohanim were also
sometimes accorded an ecclesiastical title

== Coincidentally, or simply by natural selection, the Russian word for
priest is Kagan (correct me if I'm wrong) which is also a Russian spelling for
the Hebrew Kahan (Cohen). I'm totally ignorant about any Slavic language,
Russian especially, but I would assume that the church in Russia (Orthodox, of
course) may have gotten the Kahan root >from some Semitic language translation of
the Torah; the H-to-G change was necessitated because Russian lacks a sound
or letter for H.

==In short: In Jewish ritual use, the haLevi or haKohen label (or their
equivalents, e.g. SEGAL for LEVI) was always used

==within the Jewish community, these designations were nearly always part of
the name
==for the civilauthorities, these labels were used

1. when the specific Jew used it as part of his secular name
2. occasionally, for Kohanim, usually with some non-Jewish label signifying
friar, monk, priest, deacon or bishop--but probably not for Levites.

Michael Bernet, New York MBernet@...

Kalisz (Poland) Jewish Cemetery Website #general

Debbie Raff
 

A Polish American cyber-friend of mine just sent me the site address for
photos of gravestones at the Kalisz Jewish Cemetery.

The site itself is in Polish and the stones are not transcribed. I did try
to connect a few of the stones with researchers on the JewishGen Family
Finder, but my Hebrew skills are very, very rudimentary.

If your family is associated with the town of Kalisz, you may find some
information of value by looking at these photos.

Go to: http://www.depechemode.9o.pl/kalisz/cmentarzzydowski.html I am not
associated with this town, nor do I have any further details.

Good luck,

Debbie Raff
California

German SIG #Germany Re: Another [basic] Question on naming #germany

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 5/27/2006 1:29:54 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
djkester@... writes:

"In the pre-family name days (i.e. before ~1800)
when names still had the "Isaac ben Abraham" form, how did it work
with Levites and Kohanim? Were "Levi" and "Kohen" part of the name?"

==The gentile authorities couldn't have cared less about Cohanim or Leviim.
==However, Within the Jewish community, Cohanim and Levi'im often used that
designation as if it were a surname: Kohn, Kahn, haKohen, Katz, Aaronson,
etc of Levi, haLevi, Levy, Levitas etc.

==Those names were often used as part of the full secular name, in the way
that a trade (Schneider etc.) or location (Frankfurter, etc) was used as a
"common-law" surname.

==For Jewish ritual purposes, haKohen or haLevi was always part of the
designee's full name.

==Gentiles often attributed ecclesiastical titles to Jews, rabbis, parnassim
(community presidents), shtadlanim (negotiators on behalf of the
community)--titles such as priest, bishop, preacher, monk. Kohanim were also
sometimes accorded an ecclesiastical title

== Coincidentally, or simply by natural selection, the Russian word for
priest is Kagan (correct me if I'm wrong) which is also a Russian spelling for
the Hebrew Kahan (Cohen). I'm totally ignorant about any Slavic language,
Russian especially, but I would assume that the church in Russia (Orthodox, of
course) may have gotten the Kahan root >from some Semitic language translation of
the Torah; the H-to-G change was necessitated because Russian lacks a sound
or letter for H.

==In short: In Jewish ritual use, the haLevi or haKohen label (or their
equivalents, e.g. SEGAL for LEVI) was always used

==within the Jewish community, these designations were nearly always part of
the name
==for the civilauthorities, these labels were used

1. when the specific Jew used it as part of his secular name
2. occasionally, for Kohanim, usually with some non-Jewish label signifying
friar, monk, priest, deacon or bishop--but probably not for Levites.

Michael Bernet, New York MBernet@...

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Kalisz (Poland) Jewish Cemetery Website #general

Debbie Raff
 

A Polish American cyber-friend of mine just sent me the site address for
photos of gravestones at the Kalisz Jewish Cemetery.

The site itself is in Polish and the stones are not transcribed. I did try
to connect a few of the stones with researchers on the JewishGen Family
Finder, but my Hebrew skills are very, very rudimentary.

If your family is associated with the town of Kalisz, you may find some
information of value by looking at these photos.

Go to: http://www.depechemode.9o.pl/kalisz/cmentarzzydowski.html I am not
associated with this town, nor do I have any further details.

Good luck,

Debbie Raff
California

families Goldschmid(Goldschmiedt) & Seliman(Seligmann) #germany

duccio leoni <duccio.leoni@...>
 

Hello I am a new subscriber and I wonder if you can help.
I have recently found out after a lot of research that my ancestors (above)
originally came >from Ebelsbach in Bavaria and moved to Verona, Italy in
1814 and settled in the local Ghetto. At the time the Veneto regent
including Venice, Padua Trento etc were part of the Austrian Hungarian
empire and the families took up Austrian Nationality. After that I am quite
aware of what happened but I have nothing to go on in Bavaria.

I have tried to send an Email to the Mayor of Ebelsbach in broken German and
English without success and also to the Bavarian tourist board to direct me
to Ebelsbach or elsewhere archives also without luck.

Does anyone know how to go about to find:
1) How long the families have been in Ebelsbach. 2) what was their business.
3) is there any archives available to search as more than likely the
registration of births,deaths and marriages would not be recorded yet
centrally. 4) Was there a synagogue and is it still there.

Am I asking too much? any help suggestion will be greatly appreciated

Duccio Leoni England member 217885 <duccio.leoni@...>

German SIG #Germany families Goldschmid(Goldschmiedt) & Seliman(Seligmann) #germany

duccio leoni <duccio.leoni@...>
 

Hello I am a new subscriber and I wonder if you can help.
I have recently found out after a lot of research that my ancestors (above)
originally came >from Ebelsbach in Bavaria and moved to Verona, Italy in
1814 and settled in the local Ghetto. At the time the Veneto regent
including Venice, Padua Trento etc were part of the Austrian Hungarian
empire and the families took up Austrian Nationality. After that I am quite
aware of what happened but I have nothing to go on in Bavaria.

I have tried to send an Email to the Mayor of Ebelsbach in broken German and
English without success and also to the Bavarian tourist board to direct me
to Ebelsbach or elsewhere archives also without luck.

Does anyone know how to go about to find:
1) How long the families have been in Ebelsbach. 2) what was their business.
3) is there any archives available to search as more than likely the
registration of births,deaths and marriages would not be recorded yet
centrally. 4) Was there a synagogue and is it still there.

Am I asking too much? any help suggestion will be greatly appreciated

Duccio Leoni England member 217885 <duccio.leoni@...>

BOOK CITE - Data about the newly published German Memorial Book #germany

Fritz Neubauer
 

Dear Genners,
I am now in the possession of the newly published second edition of the
Gedenkbuch.
"Opfer der Verfolgung der Juden unter der nationalsozialistischen Gewaltherrschaft
in Deutschland 1933-1945"
Published by the German Federal Archive, Koblenz.

While the original first edition of 1986 only covered the territory of
West Germany and Berlin, now additional data for all the regions that
were part of the Germany on December 31, 1937 are included, such as
Dresden, Leipzig or Breslau (i.e. not Austria).

Material that had been under the administration of the East German archives
is now included, among them 80 % of the "Supplementary cards for data about
race and education" of the May 17, 1939 census, so that another 21.600 names
could be added to the 128.000 which makes it now 149.600 in the new
edition.

In addition, names were added for the Jews who were deported
across the Polish border in 1939 and across the French border in 1940.
Arolsen also provided help with some of the data. There are still gaps
in the data, since e.g. some of the census data has not been conserved
in Thuringia, the Rhineland, Erfurt and Minden.

At the end of the fourth volume is a list of all deportations trains
from Germany and also >from Austria, Bohemia and Moravia, the
Sudetenland, the Netherlands and Belgium (only date of deportation,
number of persons, arrival date, deportation place, no names there).

If available, the entries consist of

name, first name
maiden name
birth date, birth place
place of residence
deportation data
deportation place, deportation date
camp(s) data
death date, death place
data about suicide or euthanasia.
(in contrast to other memorial books no street addresses are provided here).

The four volumes amount to 3820 pages of names, all of them contained on
one CD that is part of volume 1. This CD allows various searches apart
from names and maiden names: birth dates, birth places, place of
residence etc. I will have the CD with me in New York.

The Federal Archive charges 149.39 Euro for the fours volumes including
the CD, the postage for the parcel within Germany was 9,57 Euro. So far
it is not possible just to purchase the CD alone. My order was
successfully fulfilled through the email address

m.conen@...

Further information about the project is available in the press release
under the address

http://www.bundesarchiv.de/aktuelles/pressemitteilungen/00147/index.html#

Let me know if you have any further questions on that matter, with kind regards

Fritz Neubauer, North Germany <fritz.neubauer@...>

German SIG #Germany BOOK CITE - Data about the newly published German Memorial Book #germany

Fritz Neubauer
 

Dear Genners,
I am now in the possession of the newly published second edition of the
Gedenkbuch.
"Opfer der Verfolgung der Juden unter der nationalsozialistischen Gewaltherrschaft
in Deutschland 1933-1945"
Published by the German Federal Archive, Koblenz.

While the original first edition of 1986 only covered the territory of
West Germany and Berlin, now additional data for all the regions that
were part of the Germany on December 31, 1937 are included, such as
Dresden, Leipzig or Breslau (i.e. not Austria).

Material that had been under the administration of the East German archives
is now included, among them 80 % of the "Supplementary cards for data about
race and education" of the May 17, 1939 census, so that another 21.600 names
could be added to the 128.000 which makes it now 149.600 in the new
edition.

In addition, names were added for the Jews who were deported
across the Polish border in 1939 and across the French border in 1940.
Arolsen also provided help with some of the data. There are still gaps
in the data, since e.g. some of the census data has not been conserved
in Thuringia, the Rhineland, Erfurt and Minden.

At the end of the fourth volume is a list of all deportations trains
from Germany and also >from Austria, Bohemia and Moravia, the
Sudetenland, the Netherlands and Belgium (only date of deportation,
number of persons, arrival date, deportation place, no names there).

If available, the entries consist of

name, first name
maiden name
birth date, birth place
place of residence
deportation data
deportation place, deportation date
camp(s) data
death date, death place
data about suicide or euthanasia.
(in contrast to other memorial books no street addresses are provided here).

The four volumes amount to 3820 pages of names, all of them contained on
one CD that is part of volume 1. This CD allows various searches apart
from names and maiden names: birth dates, birth places, place of
residence etc. I will have the CD with me in New York.

The Federal Archive charges 149.39 Euro for the fours volumes including
the CD, the postage for the parcel within Germany was 9,57 Euro. So far
it is not possible just to purchase the CD alone. My order was
successfully fulfilled through the email address

m.conen@...

Further information about the project is available in the press release
under the address

http://www.bundesarchiv.de/aktuelles/pressemitteilungen/00147/index.html#

Let me know if you have any further questions on that matter, with kind regards

Fritz Neubauer, North Germany <fritz.neubauer@...>

Re: INTRO - Searching family names need help! #germany

Fritz Neubauer
 

Debbie Jurblum wrote:
My family names and towns are; UNGER (Germany, Gurs / Escou France)
Dear Debbie,
the newly published German Memorial book has an entry for:
UNGER, Hermann born 24 Nov 1899 in Berlin who died on 29 Nov 1940 in Gurs.

With kind regards Fritz Neubauer, North Germany <fritz.neubauer@...>

German SIG #Germany Re: INTRO - Searching family names need help! #germany

Fritz Neubauer
 

Debbie Jurblum wrote:
My family names and towns are; UNGER (Germany, Gurs / Escou France)
Dear Debbie,
the newly published German Memorial book has an entry for:
UNGER, Hermann born 24 Nov 1899 in Berlin who died on 29 Nov 1940 in Gurs.

With kind regards Fritz Neubauer, North Germany <fritz.neubauer@...>

Re: Jewish Newspapers in NYC (1903) #general

Judith27
 

Dear Helene,
I would think that most of the Judaica related material at the New York
Public Library at 42nd Street would be in the basement level area where their
Humanities- Jewish Division is located.
Jewish Division
Dorot Jewish Division
Room 84
(212) 930-0601
Have you tried searching NYPL's CATNYP catalog at http://catnyp.nypl.org/ ?
There appears to be a category if you search in "Journal Title: Journal,
Magazine, Newspaper, Periodical" for Jews -- New York (State) -- New York --
Newspapers with 51 entries.
Shalom,
Judi Langer-Surnamer Caplan
Logn Beach, NY


While in NY for the 2006 conference, I would like to look at Jewish newspapers
from Manhattan, published in 1903. I have two questions and would appreciate
help >from Jewishgenners.

snip<
Helene Kenvin

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re:Jewish Newspapers in NYC (1903) #general

Judith27
 

Dear Helene,
I would think that most of the Judaica related material at the New York
Public Library at 42nd Street would be in the basement level area where their
Humanities- Jewish Division is located.
Jewish Division
Dorot Jewish Division
Room 84
(212) 930-0601
Have you tried searching NYPL's CATNYP catalog at http://catnyp.nypl.org/ ?
There appears to be a category if you search in "Journal Title: Journal,
Magazine, Newspaper, Periodical" for Jews -- New York (State) -- New York --
Newspapers with 51 entries.
Shalom,
Judi Langer-Surnamer Caplan
Logn Beach, NY


While in NY for the 2006 conference, I would like to look at Jewish newspapers
from Manhattan, published in 1903. I have two questions and would appreciate
help >from Jewishgenners.

snip<
Helene Kenvin