Date   
Re: How to search with very little to start with #general

Roger Lustig <julierog@...>
 

Dear Doug:

The only stupid question is the one you forget to ask. Welcome!

SALING and SALINGER (people sometimes added or dropped the -ER almost at
random) are indeed surnames used by Jews. In Germany, when Jews adopted
surnames at the beginning of the 19th century, several families in the
region around Berlin chose that name. It was also found elsewhere.

To find out where, register what you know (names, towns) with the
JewishGen Family Finder (JGFF) at http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff/
That will let the Jewish-genealogy world know of your interest, and will
also allow you to connect with a dozen or more other researchers who are
working on those names! The one thing better than doing research:
finding someone who's already done it, or something like it.

On your own, trace what you can of your grandmother's family: who,
where, when. Was she an immigrant? How about her mother? Did she tell
stories about hearing (or even speaking) foreign languages? What
stories *did* she tell? What was her address when she was young? Did
she belong to a church? Just gather info for now and see where it
leads. Sooner or later you may well come upon a way to find her
ancestors who came to America.

Good luck, and keep us posted!

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ

Welch Douglas wrote:

I hope this is not a naive-sounding or too general
question. I have never done any Jewish genealogy but I
have done quite a bit of Native American genealogy and I
know how whacky sounding the newbies can be.

Some years ago my grandmother mentioned to my father that
she had some Jewish heritage in her family. This had not
been known to us but my father didn't inquire in detail
about it at the time. She died shortly afterward (she was
in her 90s) and there are no other living family members
to ask that we know. We are wondering how we might go
about researching such a connection for genealogical
purposes.

I'm not prepared with names and dates, unfortunately, at
this very moment but my initial question is pretty
general. In looking at her immediate family tree, nothing
jumps out at me as looking like an obvious Jewish surname
so it's hard to know where to start.

Her mother's maiden surname was Saling and I have seen
this mentioned as a possible Jewish surname on some name
origin lists. I have poked around in the FAQ and found
some references to surnames books but I didn't really see
anything pertaining to my overall question.

Elizabeth Shamroth - researching: Baworow, Tarnopol, Zbaraz #general

Susana Leistner Bloch
 

Will Elizabeth Shamroth or anyone who knows her please contact me.
Messages sent to your e-mail address bounced.

Susana Leistner Bloch
Winnipeg MB Canada

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: How to search with very little to start with #general

Roger Lustig <julierog@...>
 

Dear Doug:

The only stupid question is the one you forget to ask. Welcome!

SALING and SALINGER (people sometimes added or dropped the -ER almost at
random) are indeed surnames used by Jews. In Germany, when Jews adopted
surnames at the beginning of the 19th century, several families in the
region around Berlin chose that name. It was also found elsewhere.

To find out where, register what you know (names, towns) with the
JewishGen Family Finder (JGFF) at http://www.jewishgen.org/jgff/
That will let the Jewish-genealogy world know of your interest, and will
also allow you to connect with a dozen or more other researchers who are
working on those names! The one thing better than doing research:
finding someone who's already done it, or something like it.

On your own, trace what you can of your grandmother's family: who,
where, when. Was she an immigrant? How about her mother? Did she tell
stories about hearing (or even speaking) foreign languages? What
stories *did* she tell? What was her address when she was young? Did
she belong to a church? Just gather info for now and see where it
leads. Sooner or later you may well come upon a way to find her
ancestors who came to America.

Good luck, and keep us posted!

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ

Welch Douglas wrote:

I hope this is not a naive-sounding or too general
question. I have never done any Jewish genealogy but I
have done quite a bit of Native American genealogy and I
know how whacky sounding the newbies can be.

Some years ago my grandmother mentioned to my father that
she had some Jewish heritage in her family. This had not
been known to us but my father didn't inquire in detail
about it at the time. She died shortly afterward (she was
in her 90s) and there are no other living family members
to ask that we know. We are wondering how we might go
about researching such a connection for genealogical
purposes.

I'm not prepared with names and dates, unfortunately, at
this very moment but my initial question is pretty
general. In looking at her immediate family tree, nothing
jumps out at me as looking like an obvious Jewish surname
so it's hard to know where to start.

Her mother's maiden surname was Saling and I have seen
this mentioned as a possible Jewish surname on some name
origin lists. I have poked around in the FAQ and found
some references to surnames books but I didn't really see
anything pertaining to my overall question.

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Elizabeth Shamroth - researching: Baworow, Tarnopol, Zbaraz #general

Susana Leistner Bloch
 

Will Elizabeth Shamroth or anyone who knows her please contact me.
Messages sent to your e-mail address bounced.

Susana Leistner Bloch
Winnipeg MB Canada

Re: Lithuania Internal Passports - UPDATE #general

Eilat Gordin Levitan
 

On 5/23/06, HOMARGOL@... <HOMARGOL@...> wrote:
2,091 additional records have been added to the JewishGen Lithuania
1919-1940 Internal Passport Database, and are available on JewishGen.
Included are records >from the following towns:
- City of Panevezys - 244 records.
I would like to thank Howard Margol. I checked for my great
grandmothers' Kriger family and for the first time I found (100%
sure) records of her brother and his family with information prior to
1900. and now I am able to connect my Krigers (most likely) to all the
other Krigers who originated in Krekenava! (most >from Lithuania
originated there) , I was told by my grandmother and her first cousins
that the family was >from Vashki but our Krigers must have moved there
after 1878. In the records >from 30 June 1921
Panevezys Panevezys KRIGERAS / [KRIEGER], Leib
Head of the household 43 in 1921 ( b; 1878) born in Krekenava,
Panevezys Uyezd
7203/600502 optician ( he was the youngest son so my great
grandmother, who was the oldest, she must have also been born in
Krekenava! )
Internal Passport Application
LCVA/1264/3/8817 KRIGERIENE / [KRIEGER], Sheina
Wife 41 in 1921 Died in Panevezys in 1940
7204/600503 housewife
KRIGERAITE / [KRIEGER], Zisa Beine
Leib Daughter born in 1905
KRIGERAITE / [KRIEGER], Gita
Leib Daughter born in 1910
KRIGERAITE / [KRIEGER], Miriam
Leib Daughter born in 1914
KRIGERAITE / [KRIEGER], Rakhel
Leib Daughter born in 1919 ( in Samara, Russia)

What a great day it is for our family search!
Thank you so much!

Eilat Gordin Levitan
Los Angeles

Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: Lithuania Internal Passports - UPDATE #lithuania

Eilat Gordin Levitan
 

On 5/23/06, HOMARGOL@... <HOMARGOL@...> wrote:
2,091 additional records have been added to the JewishGen Lithuania
1919-1940 Internal Passport Database, and are available on JewishGen.
Included are records >from the following towns:
- City of Panevezys - 244 records.
I would like to thank Howard Margol. I checked for my great
grandmothers' Kriger family and for the first time I found (100%
sure) records of her brother and his family with information prior to
1900. and now I am able to connect my Krigers (most likely) to all the
other Krigers who originated in Krekenava! (most >from Lithuania
originated there) , I was told by my grandmother and her first cousins
that the family was >from Vashki but our Krigers must have moved there
after 1878. In the records >from 30 June 1921
Panevezys Panevezys KRIGERAS / [KRIEGER], Leib
Head of the household 43 in 1921 ( b; 1878) born in Krekenava,
Panevezys Uyezd
7203/600502 optician ( he was the youngest son so my great
grandmother, who was the oldest, she must have also been born in
Krekenava! )
Internal Passport Application
LCVA/1264/3/8817 KRIGERIENE / [KRIEGER], Sheina
Wife 41 in 1921 Died in Panevezys in 1940
7204/600503 housewife
KRIGERAITE / [KRIEGER], Zisa Beine
Leib Daughter born in 1905
KRIGERAITE / [KRIEGER], Gita
Leib Daughter born in 1910
KRIGERAITE / [KRIEGER], Miriam
Leib Daughter born in 1914
KRIGERAITE / [KRIEGER], Rakhel
Leib Daughter born in 1919 ( in Samara, Russia)

What a great day it is for our family search!
Thank you so much!

Eilat Gordin Levitan
Los Angeles

Re: 21st St. Cemetery Manhattan, NY #general

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

Jewishgenners wrote:

Has anyone visited or passed by Congregation Shearith Israel's historic
21st Street Cemetery lately? Is it kept locked? Is it possible to make
arrangements to visit the cemetery?>>

<<I can't visualize anything along 21st Street, East or West that might have
been a cemetery.>>

Yes...this cemetery is still in existence, and you can find photographs of
it and a map by going to the website for the Foundation for the Advancement
of Sephardic Studies and Culture at:

http://www.sephardicstudies.org/csi11.html

The location is at 98-110 West 21st Street, between loft buildings and
across the street >from the School Of Visual Arts on West 21st St just West
of 6th Avenue . This cemetery was adjacent to the congregation's synagogue
on 19th Street--built in 1860 and now long gone.

Known as "Spanish and Portuguese Jewish Synagogue or Beth Haim third
cemetery of Shearith Israel"
these burial grounds were established in 1829 and used for interments until
1851 when the city prohibited them at this location.

A New York Times article >from 1857 entitled "Some Old Grave-Yards," explains
that it could not be seen >from the street due to a very high brick wall
shutting it in. It was found directly behind O'Neill's and several other
large stores on Sixth Avenue and the graves could be viewed >from their back
windows. The description told of "green grass" and "weeping willow" with
white monuments. It was 80 feet wide and 140 feet deep.

from a New York article written in 1928, "Where Time Has Stopped," we learn
that even though it was against the law many families, who were attached to this
location, chose to pay a fine of $250 to continue burying family members at
this 21st Street location. Over the years, the congregation rejected offers
of hundreds of thousands for the land. A department store wanted to arch a
building over the cemetery, leaving it undisturbed, but that plan was also
rejected.

Other photos can be found at:

http://www.nyu.edu/classes/finearts/nyc/ladies/shearith.html and

http://www.forgotten-ny.com/CEMETERIES/Hidden%20cemeteries/hidcem.html
(where you might be able to read the inscription on the gate)

In 2002, another NY Times articles mentions a workshop on historic NYC
cemeteries, conducted by the New York Landmarks Conservancy, and offered a
tour. It's nice to know that some of these historic sites are still in
existence in Manhattan. Best to contact the congregation of the foundation
to find out how you can arrange a visit since, >from the photographs, it
appears to have a locked gate.

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@...

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: 21st St. Cemetery Manhattan, NY #general

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

Jewishgenners wrote:

Has anyone visited or passed by Congregation Shearith Israel's historic
21st Street Cemetery lately? Is it kept locked? Is it possible to make
arrangements to visit the cemetery?>>

<<I can't visualize anything along 21st Street, East or West that might have
been a cemetery.>>

Yes...this cemetery is still in existence, and you can find photographs of
it and a map by going to the website for the Foundation for the Advancement
of Sephardic Studies and Culture at:

http://www.sephardicstudies.org/csi11.html

The location is at 98-110 West 21st Street, between loft buildings and
across the street >from the School Of Visual Arts on West 21st St just West
of 6th Avenue . This cemetery was adjacent to the congregation's synagogue
on 19th Street--built in 1860 and now long gone.

Known as "Spanish and Portuguese Jewish Synagogue or Beth Haim third
cemetery of Shearith Israel"
these burial grounds were established in 1829 and used for interments until
1851 when the city prohibited them at this location.

A New York Times article >from 1857 entitled "Some Old Grave-Yards," explains
that it could not be seen >from the street due to a very high brick wall
shutting it in. It was found directly behind O'Neill's and several other
large stores on Sixth Avenue and the graves could be viewed >from their back
windows. The description told of "green grass" and "weeping willow" with
white monuments. It was 80 feet wide and 140 feet deep.

from a New York article written in 1928, "Where Time Has Stopped," we learn
that even though it was against the law many families, who were attached to this
location, chose to pay a fine of $250 to continue burying family members at
this 21st Street location. Over the years, the congregation rejected offers
of hundreds of thousands for the land. A department store wanted to arch a
building over the cemetery, leaving it undisturbed, but that plan was also
rejected.

Other photos can be found at:

http://www.nyu.edu/classes/finearts/nyc/ladies/shearith.html and

http://www.forgotten-ny.com/CEMETERIES/Hidden%20cemeteries/hidcem.html
(where you might be able to read the inscription on the gate)

In 2002, another NY Times articles mentions a workshop on historic NYC
cemeteries, conducted by the New York Landmarks Conservancy, and offered a
tour. It's nice to know that some of these historic sites are still in
existence in Manhattan. Best to contact the congregation of the foundation
to find out how you can arrange a visit since, >from the photographs, it
appears to have a locked gate.

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@...

Rabanim she Nispu Bashoah #rabbinic

Pnina Meislish <pniname@...>
 

Dear Friends,

About two weeks ago I published in Hebrew my book Rabbanim Shanispu
Bashoha.Biogrephiot shel Rabbanim ve Admorom Mipolin u Mishar Arzot
Mizrach Europa, Shenispu Bashoah. About 2000 biographies. 320 folio
pages. I publushed it by myself, and sell it only >from my home: 90
shekel, 25$ posting included.

Dr. Pnina Meislish, Jerusalem

[Moderator's Note: This message is distributed in accordance with
our policy of allowing a one-time distribution of commercial
advertisements or testimonials of Genealogy related products.
Please direct your replies privately to the poster.]

Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Rabanim she Nispu Bashoah #rabbinic

Pnina Meislish <pniname@...>
 

Dear Friends,

About two weeks ago I published in Hebrew my book Rabbanim Shanispu
Bashoha.Biogrephiot shel Rabbanim ve Admorom Mipolin u Mishar Arzot
Mizrach Europa, Shenispu Bashoah. About 2000 biographies. 320 folio
pages. I publushed it by myself, and sell it only >from my home: 90
shekel, 25$ posting included.

Dr. Pnina Meislish, Jerusalem

[Moderator's Note: This message is distributed in accordance with
our policy of allowing a one-time distribution of commercial
advertisements or testimonials of Genealogy related products.
Please direct your replies privately to the poster.]

Re: The Poor Jews Temporary Shelter Website #general

Gloria Berkenstat Freund
 

Nicholas Evans, Research Associate at the University of Cape Town, will be
giving three lectures at the at the 26th Annual IAJGS Conference in New York
this August. He will be speaking about the following: "Poor Jews' Temporary
Shelters and Their Documentary Legacy," "British Passenger Lists and Medical
Records as a Source for Migrant History, 1793-1914" and the Lucille Gudis
Memorial Lecture, "Jewish Transmigration Through Britain, 1836-1924."

For more information about these presentations and the Conference, visit
www.jgsny2006.org

Gloria Berkenstat Freund
26th Annual IAJGS Conference Program Committee Chair

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: The Poor Jews Temporary Shelter Website #general

Gloria Berkenstat Freund
 

Nicholas Evans, Research Associate at the University of Cape Town, will be
giving three lectures at the at the 26th Annual IAJGS Conference in New York
this August. He will be speaking about the following: "Poor Jews' Temporary
Shelters and Their Documentary Legacy," "British Passenger Lists and Medical
Records as a Source for Migrant History, 1793-1914" and the Lucille Gudis
Memorial Lecture, "Jewish Transmigration Through Britain, 1836-1924."

For more information about these presentations and the Conference, visit
www.jgsny2006.org

Gloria Berkenstat Freund
26th Annual IAJGS Conference Program Committee Chair

BENKOFF, SUPERFINE #belarus

Alice Gutenkauf <gutenkauf@...>
 

Dear Listers

My grandfather's name was Abraham BENKOFF. We think he came >from Odessa
tho'I can't find anything to confirm this. It's my belief that he may have
left Russia >from Odessa but not that he originated there. He met and married
my grandmother, Ida SUPERFINE (in Poland either CUPROFIN or TSUPROFIN here
in Chicago. Is there anyone who might have some ideas about where I should
look. I have tried the census but I am not sure when he arrived here
tho' it has to have been before or about 1890. I know he had relatives named
ISAACOVITZ, whom he helped to emigrate to this country. He died in Chicago
in 1908 and before that he had a shoe store on the North side possibly
on Diversey about 1400 West.
Thanks,
Alice Rifkind Gutenkauf
Morton Grove, Illinois
Researching: RIFKIND (RIVKIN) Rogachev,Belarus and Riga,Russia (Latvia);
BENKOFF somewhere in Russia; SUPERFINE (CUPROFIN, TSUPROFIN)-Tomaszow
Mazowiecki, Poland, HALPERIN - Rogachev, Belarus;
POLLACK(POPLACK-POPLAR)Rokishiki, Lithuania

MODERATOR NOTE: Private replies please.

Belarus SIG #Belarus BENKOFF, SUPERFINE #belarus

Alice Gutenkauf <gutenkauf@...>
 

Dear Listers

My grandfather's name was Abraham BENKOFF. We think he came >from Odessa
tho'I can't find anything to confirm this. It's my belief that he may have
left Russia >from Odessa but not that he originated there. He met and married
my grandmother, Ida SUPERFINE (in Poland either CUPROFIN or TSUPROFIN here
in Chicago. Is there anyone who might have some ideas about where I should
look. I have tried the census but I am not sure when he arrived here
tho' it has to have been before or about 1890. I know he had relatives named
ISAACOVITZ, whom he helped to emigrate to this country. He died in Chicago
in 1908 and before that he had a shoe store on the North side possibly
on Diversey about 1400 West.
Thanks,
Alice Rifkind Gutenkauf
Morton Grove, Illinois
Researching: RIFKIND (RIVKIN) Rogachev,Belarus and Riga,Russia (Latvia);
BENKOFF somewhere in Russia; SUPERFINE (CUPROFIN, TSUPROFIN)-Tomaszow
Mazowiecki, Poland, HALPERIN - Rogachev, Belarus;
POLLACK(POPLACK-POPLAR)Rokishiki, Lithuania

MODERATOR NOTE: Private replies please.

Searching Sam Raphael in Darlington/Liverpool #unitedkingdom

Inbal Livne <ballydoodle@...>
 

Dear all,
Thanks to a kind lady responding to a previous Raphael related message I
think I've discovered that one Sam Raphael, originally of Darlington
(although probably born in Poland) moved to Liverpool (c.1930s I think). He
had three daughters - Queenie, Lilly and another (haven't found the name
yet).

Sam's father David was the older brother of my great-grandfather Max
Raphael. Max left Kowal in Poland in about 1905 for Darlington. I think
David left much earlier. They were 2 of 13 children. I think many of the
others stayed in Poland. I have a photo >from a family wedding in the early
1920s in which Sam Raphael, and possibly his family, make an appearance but
after that the families seems to have gone their own way. If anyone else is
researching these people, I'd love to know if there was a reason the two
parts of the family lost touch and if anyone has any information on the
other Raphael's who didn't leave Kowal / went somewhere other than the North
east of England.

Inbal Livne, Edinburgh
(me@...)

JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Searching Sam Raphael in Darlington/Liverpool #unitedkingdom

Inbal Livne <ballydoodle@...>
 

Dear all,
Thanks to a kind lady responding to a previous Raphael related message I
think I've discovered that one Sam Raphael, originally of Darlington
(although probably born in Poland) moved to Liverpool (c.1930s I think). He
had three daughters - Queenie, Lilly and another (haven't found the name
yet).

Sam's father David was the older brother of my great-grandfather Max
Raphael. Max left Kowal in Poland in about 1905 for Darlington. I think
David left much earlier. They were 2 of 13 children. I think many of the
others stayed in Poland. I have a photo >from a family wedding in the early
1920s in which Sam Raphael, and possibly his family, make an appearance but
after that the families seems to have gone their own way. If anyone else is
researching these people, I'd love to know if there was a reason the two
parts of the family lost touch and if anyone has any information on the
other Raphael's who didn't leave Kowal / went somewhere other than the North
east of England.

Inbal Livne, Edinburgh
(me@...)

Re: Recording of Birth in Belzer Rebbe entourage during WWI #general

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

Karen Roekard wrote regarding birth records:

<<If Hungary, are 20th century Hungarian records accessible? How?>>

Civil Registration in Hungary began in 1895, when the government began a
system of keeping their own copy of births, marriages and deaths, regardless
of religious affiliation. The civil registration books for birth, marriage
and death are held at the town halls of most Hungarian villages, towns and
cities.

When I visited Hungary, in the towns of Nyirkarasz (Szabolcs County) and
Tiszaszalka (Bereg County) I was able to look through these books--very
briefly, since they are not supposed to be viewable by the public--to see if
I could find family records. A lot depends on the disposition of the
mayor...or clerk...or whomever has custody over these metrical books.
Sometimes offering a "donation" to the town helps obtain a longer viewing
session. (No photocopying or photography was allowed.)

Most town officials will do research in these books for you and create
abstracts of the records. The price for this research will vary with
location and the number of records and years you are requesting. If you
know the exact date of birth, and the spelling of the name, this should be
an easy search. Others might take longer, but I found that most Hungarian
town officials were cooperative.

Contact can be made via snail mail or telephone, but in Hungarian, not
English. I had my researcher in Hungary contact one town hall ahead of
time, and when I arrived they presented me with a handwritten list of
surnames extracted >from these civil record books. A Google search on your
town, with the words "mayor" or "polgarmester" should produce town hall
information. There may also be a website for this information...but I don't
know what it is. If another H-Sigger does...please provide the link!

Perhaps someone also has a sample letter (in Hungarian) where one can fill
in the blanks to request this type of record search.

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@...

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Recording of Birth in Belzer Rebbe entourage during WWI #general

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

Karen Roekard wrote regarding birth records:

<<If Hungary, are 20th century Hungarian records accessible? How?>>

Civil Registration in Hungary began in 1895, when the government began a
system of keeping their own copy of births, marriages and deaths, regardless
of religious affiliation. The civil registration books for birth, marriage
and death are held at the town halls of most Hungarian villages, towns and
cities.

When I visited Hungary, in the towns of Nyirkarasz (Szabolcs County) and
Tiszaszalka (Bereg County) I was able to look through these books--very
briefly, since they are not supposed to be viewable by the public--to see if
I could find family records. A lot depends on the disposition of the
mayor...or clerk...or whomever has custody over these metrical books.
Sometimes offering a "donation" to the town helps obtain a longer viewing
session. (No photocopying or photography was allowed.)

Most town officials will do research in these books for you and create
abstracts of the records. The price for this research will vary with
location and the number of records and years you are requesting. If you
know the exact date of birth, and the spelling of the name, this should be
an easy search. Others might take longer, but I found that most Hungarian
town officials were cooperative.

Contact can be made via snail mail or telephone, but in Hungarian, not
English. I had my researcher in Hungary contact one town hall ahead of
time, and when I arrived they presented me with a handwritten list of
surnames extracted >from these civil record books. A Google search on your
town, with the words "mayor" or "polgarmester" should produce town hall
information. There may also be a website for this information...but I don't
know what it is. If another H-Sigger does...please provide the link!

Perhaps someone also has a sample letter (in Hungarian) where one can fill
in the blanks to request this type of record search.

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@...

Correction to previous JCRS , Colorado post #general

Tom and Alison Greengard <agreengard@...>
 

Online tuberculosis patient index records are available
thru 1925 (not 1955) via the www.isaacsolomonsynagogue.org
website. I would like to also acknowledge that these
records are largely due to the work of volunteers of the
Jewish Genealogical Society of Colorado.

Alison Greengard
Lakewood, Colorado

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Correction to previous JCRS , Colorado post #general

Tom and Alison Greengard <agreengard@...>
 

Online tuberculosis patient index records are available
thru 1925 (not 1955) via the www.isaacsolomonsynagogue.org
website. I would like to also acknowledge that these
records are largely due to the work of volunteers of the
Jewish Genealogical Society of Colorado.

Alison Greengard
Lakewood, Colorado