Date   

Question on obtaining NY State death certificate #belarus

DElliot874@...
 

My great grandfather, Jacob Medvedev, is buried at Beth David cemetery, and
died in the 1950s in Brooklyn. I want a copy of his death certificate to see
if his mother's maiden name is listed -- in searching the NY State website, it
seems they charge by 'years since death' which equates to $120+. Can anyone
direct me to a less expensive way to obtain a NY death certificate, and should
his mother's maiden name be on it? Thanks, and email me in private.

David Ekelchik
Teaneck, New Jersey
delliot874@aol.com

searching: MEDVEDEV, ZIKLIK - Lenin; SICKLICK - U.S.; EKELCHIK - Pinsk
(Russia); TREILAZER - Warsaw ; LONSTEIN - Vilna


technikum in vilna #belarus

LJTRS@...
 

Hello,

My grandfather who grew up in Brest Litovsk was sent to get an engineering
degree in the Vilna Technikum. His family left Brest for Zelva because of
conscription issues (they were hiding there because they had family) and he was
shipped off to Vilna. He was only about fifteen at the time but he lied
about his age to allow him entrance. Does anybody in this group know much about
that school?

Thanks.
Rishy Savin
Miami, Florida

Researching PERELMUTER and KREINES and LONDINSKY in Belarus


Belarus SIG #Belarus Question on obtaining NY State death certificate #belarus

DElliot874@...
 

My great grandfather, Jacob Medvedev, is buried at Beth David cemetery, and
died in the 1950s in Brooklyn. I want a copy of his death certificate to see
if his mother's maiden name is listed -- in searching the NY State website, it
seems they charge by 'years since death' which equates to $120+. Can anyone
direct me to a less expensive way to obtain a NY death certificate, and should
his mother's maiden name be on it? Thanks, and email me in private.

David Ekelchik
Teaneck, New Jersey
delliot874@aol.com

searching: MEDVEDEV, ZIKLIK - Lenin; SICKLICK - U.S.; EKELCHIK - Pinsk
(Russia); TREILAZER - Warsaw ; LONSTEIN - Vilna


Belarus SIG #Belarus technikum in vilna #belarus

LJTRS@...
 

Hello,

My grandfather who grew up in Brest Litovsk was sent to get an engineering
degree in the Vilna Technikum. His family left Brest for Zelva because of
conscription issues (they were hiding there because they had family) and he was
shipped off to Vilna. He was only about fifteen at the time but he lied
about his age to allow him entrance. Does anybody in this group know much about
that school?

Thanks.
Rishy Savin
Miami, Florida

Researching PERELMUTER and KREINES and LONDINSKY in Belarus


Re: EIDB manifest notations #general

Carlos Glikson
 

Michael Kaplan wrote that

I once came upon a very nice posting on interpreting those handwritten
notations that occasionally show up on Ellis Island arrivals manifests. I
remember that they come about when someone applies for naturalization, but
there is a lot more.

Will someone please tell me where this information can be found.
Michael probably refers to the following JewishGen InfoFile:

A Guide to Interpreting Passenger List Annotations
by Marian L. Smith, Historian, U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service
with the assistance of Elise Friedman, Flora Gursky, and Eleanor Bien

It can be found in
http://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/Manifests/

There is an article by Marian Smith on a different topic, also very
interesting to genealogists, in the website of the U.S. Citizenship and
Immigration Services (USCIS), in charge of services formerly provided by the
Immigration and Naturalization Service and now under the Department of
Homeland Security (DHS).

The article, "American Names / Declaring Independence" starts with one of
the typical name change stories atributed to "Ellis Island"....
http://www.uscis.gov/graphics/aboutus/history/articles/NameEssay.html
and expands on the reasons not to take the responsibility of the famous
"clerk at Ellis Island" so literally...

Carlos Glikson


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: EIDB manifest notations #general

Carlos Glikson
 

Michael Kaplan wrote that

I once came upon a very nice posting on interpreting those handwritten
notations that occasionally show up on Ellis Island arrivals manifests. I
remember that they come about when someone applies for naturalization, but
there is a lot more.

Will someone please tell me where this information can be found.
Michael probably refers to the following JewishGen InfoFile:

A Guide to Interpreting Passenger List Annotations
by Marian L. Smith, Historian, U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service
with the assistance of Elise Friedman, Flora Gursky, and Eleanor Bien

It can be found in
http://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/Manifests/

There is an article by Marian Smith on a different topic, also very
interesting to genealogists, in the website of the U.S. Citizenship and
Immigration Services (USCIS), in charge of services formerly provided by the
Immigration and Naturalization Service and now under the Department of
Homeland Security (DHS).

The article, "American Names / Declaring Independence" starts with one of
the typical name change stories atributed to "Ellis Island"....
http://www.uscis.gov/graphics/aboutus/history/articles/NameEssay.html
and expands on the reasons not to take the responsibility of the famous
"clerk at Ellis Island" so literally...

Carlos Glikson


Ship company passenger records #general

malkajef <malkajef@...>
 

I heard that the ship companies maintained their own passenger records,
which are different >from those they gave to the US authorities. Does any one
know how to access those company passenger records?

Jeff Malka


Hamburg records #general

malkajef <malkajef@...>
 

I have all the US ship passenger records I needed, but have never sent away
for the Hamburg passenger records which were made at the point where they
set out on their transatlantic voyage. Do the Hamburg passenger records
have different or better information than the US ship passenger records?

Jeff Malka


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Ship company passenger records #general

malkajef <malkajef@...>
 

I heard that the ship companies maintained their own passenger records,
which are different >from those they gave to the US authorities. Does any one
know how to access those company passenger records?

Jeff Malka


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Hamburg records #general

malkajef <malkajef@...>
 

I have all the US ship passenger records I needed, but have never sent away
for the Hamburg passenger records which were made at the point where they
set out on their transatlantic voyage. Do the Hamburg passenger records
have different or better information than the US ship passenger records?

Jeff Malka


DOEW Austria redesigns its website. #general

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

The Documentation Center of Austrian Resistance has redesigned its
website. This site, which has a much wider geographic and historical
scope than the name implies, has a lot of vital and also very
distressing data on it.

If you have looked at it before and found it hard to navigate,
you may find it easier to find your way around now.

http://en.doew.braintrust.at/ [English]

http://www.doew.at/ausstellung/ [German]

Celia Male [U.K.]


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen DOEW Austria redesigns its website. #general

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

The Documentation Center of Austrian Resistance has redesigned its
website. This site, which has a much wider geographic and historical
scope than the name implies, has a lot of vital and also very
distressing data on it.

If you have looked at it before and found it hard to navigate,
you may find it easier to find your way around now.

http://en.doew.braintrust.at/ [English]

http://www.doew.at/ausstellung/ [German]

Celia Male [U.K.]


Louis Katz born 1889 in "Kahenyesd, Hungary" #hungary

mt-b <71431.1612@...>
 

I think this location is misspelled. As a rule, Hungarian does not mix t=
he
vowel 'a' with the vowel 'e'. It does put the vowel 'e' with an 'o' or '=
u'
that has two dots or two slanted lines above it. In the source I used (s=
ee
below), Lelkes does not list a village with an 'h', so that letter might =
be
a 'k'.

Try "Ko:kenye'sd". The 'o' has two dots above it. The 'e' has one slant=
ed
line above it. This locale was in Tiszantuli district (ja'ras) of Ugocsa=

county, with 1405 residents in the civil census of 1910. In Slovak, this=

place was known as 'Kalmi'. It is currently called Porumbesti (with a
curved line under the s), and is in Romania.

Source: Magyar Helyse'gne'v-Azonosi'to' Szo'ta'r, edited by Lelkes Gyo:rgy,
1998, page 339.

Good luck in your search.

Maureen Tighe-Brown


Re: wanting to learn more about little villages near Kisvarda #hungary

Kay Grossman <grossman@...>
 

I completely agree with your note in which you advised those wanting
to understand more about their ancestors to learn the languages they
spoke and read.
Ted Grossman
Eastsound, Washington

On Aug 28, 2006, at 5:56 AM, Ida & Joseph Schwarcz wrote:

Dear Ted,
More power to you. It is my personal opinion that many members of
Jewishgen
would do well to study the languages of their ancestors. Hungarian
is a
particularly difficult one. By learning a bit of Yiddish, Hebrew,
Russian,
Polish, etc., they would be able to read and understand more about
their
ancestors.
Sincerely,
Ida Selavan Schwarcz
Omer, Israel

-----Original Message-----
From: Kay Grossman [mailto:grossman@rockisland.com]
Sent: Saturday, August 26, 2006 1:08 AM
To: H-SIG
Subject: [h-sig] wanting to learn more about little villages near
Kisvarda


I am appealing for help with my research on the Jewish people who
lived in the little villages in the vicinity of Kisvarda >from the
late 19th century to just before World War II. Specifically I would
like to talk to anyone who lived in these villages, or Kisvarda
during this time, or is familiar with them.
During the past year I have been attending a Hungarian language
class, and have been reading English sources recommended by
University of Washington professors. At the recent conference in New
York City, I was inspired to pursue such a project by Elaine Kalman
Naves, who wrote a book and made a movie about one such village, Vaja.
Earlier this summer I spent five weeks in Hungary, where I visited
the villages where my grandparents and great-grandparents grew up and
married -- Petnahaza and Nyirjako. The warm reception I received by
those who maintain the town records was also a great source of
encouragement.
Thanks for giving this your attention.
Ted Grossman
Eastsound, Washington


Hungary SIG #Hungary Louis Katz born 1889 in "Kahenyesd, Hungary" #hungary

mt-b <71431.1612@...>
 

I think this location is misspelled. As a rule, Hungarian does not mix t=
he
vowel 'a' with the vowel 'e'. It does put the vowel 'e' with an 'o' or '=
u'
that has two dots or two slanted lines above it. In the source I used (s=
ee
below), Lelkes does not list a village with an 'h', so that letter might =
be
a 'k'.

Try "Ko:kenye'sd". The 'o' has two dots above it. The 'e' has one slant=
ed
line above it. This locale was in Tiszantuli district (ja'ras) of Ugocsa=

county, with 1405 residents in the civil census of 1910. In Slovak, this=

place was known as 'Kalmi'. It is currently called Porumbesti (with a
curved line under the s), and is in Romania.

Source: Magyar Helyse'gne'v-Azonosi'to' Szo'ta'r, edited by Lelkes Gyo:rgy,
1998, page 339.

Good luck in your search.

Maureen Tighe-Brown


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: wanting to learn more about little villages near Kisvarda #hungary

Kay Grossman <grossman@...>
 

I completely agree with your note in which you advised those wanting
to understand more about their ancestors to learn the languages they
spoke and read.
Ted Grossman
Eastsound, Washington

On Aug 28, 2006, at 5:56 AM, Ida & Joseph Schwarcz wrote:

Dear Ted,
More power to you. It is my personal opinion that many members of
Jewishgen
would do well to study the languages of their ancestors. Hungarian
is a
particularly difficult one. By learning a bit of Yiddish, Hebrew,
Russian,
Polish, etc., they would be able to read and understand more about
their
ancestors.
Sincerely,
Ida Selavan Schwarcz
Omer, Israel

-----Original Message-----
From: Kay Grossman [mailto:grossman@rockisland.com]
Sent: Saturday, August 26, 2006 1:08 AM
To: H-SIG
Subject: [h-sig] wanting to learn more about little villages near
Kisvarda


I am appealing for help with my research on the Jewish people who
lived in the little villages in the vicinity of Kisvarda >from the
late 19th century to just before World War II. Specifically I would
like to talk to anyone who lived in these villages, or Kisvarda
during this time, or is familiar with them.
During the past year I have been attending a Hungarian language
class, and have been reading English sources recommended by
University of Washington professors. At the recent conference in New
York City, I was inspired to pursue such a project by Elaine Kalman
Naves, who wrote a book and made a movie about one such village, Vaja.
Earlier this summer I spent five weeks in Hungary, where I visited
the villages where my grandparents and great-grandparents grew up and
married -- Petnahaza and Nyirjako. The warm reception I received by
those who maintain the town records was also a great source of
encouragement.
Thanks for giving this your attention.
Ted Grossman
Eastsound, Washington


More about the Mt. Ararat Cemetery searchable database #hungary

Steven Lasky <steve725@...>
 

Greetings,

This is just a follow-up on my previous posting about the new searchable
database available on the new Mt. Ararat Cemetery
website(www.mountararatcemetery.com.) I just returned >from a short visit to
the cemetery in search of some answers, and I wanted to share them with you,
anticipating that questions regarding these matters will probably come up at
some point. Here we go:

1. Some of you will undoubtedly discover that there are dates of death
listed on this database >from as early as 1910. The office manager at Mt.
Ararat checked a few of these burial records for me, and he found that they
were, for the most part, reinterments >from other cemeteries. There is no
mention of this when you look at any of these burial listings, but now you
know. Also, even though the web site states that the first interment at the
Mt. Ararat was 1933, it was really 1931.

2. If you do a search just using the year of death of 1909, you will find
481 entries with the same date of death, 1/1/1910. You will also get the
same list of names if you do a search just using the year 1910. This
1/1/1910 date is the default setting and is not meant to indicate that the
person's date of death was 1/1/1910. Either the cemetery had no date of
death for these individuals in their computer before the data was uploaded
to the new website, and it defaulted to this same date, or there was some
other reason for it. Either way, if you happen to find a name of interest in
this database with a date of death of 1/1/1910, contact the cemetery for the
correct date. Again, you will find dates of death for a small number of
entries before 1931, but as I've said, these are most likely all
disinterments/reinterments.

3. Regarding planting, care, etc., there are no plants or vegetation (just
grass) on any of the graves in this cemetery, just shrubs, etc. in between
family headstones, on one or both sides of the stone. Also, there are no
individual matzevot (gravestones), i.e. the cemetery permits only family
headstones, one per family. So typically you will have one headstone with
the family surname(s) inscribed on it and, in the minority of cases, symbols
that indicate whether the deceased were Cohains, Levites or Israelites. You
will generally find footstones made of granite for each individual burial.
Because of the small size of these footstones, the information on them is
limited. You will find the deceased's first name, surname, dates of birth
(when available) and death, perhaps in only fifty-percent of the burials the
Hebrew name of the deceased and their father, and a few words, e.g. beloved
wife-devoted mother and grandmother. No other significant inscriptions per
se. Lastly, there are sections in this cemetery that don't even allow for a
family headstone, and you there you will find individual footstones only.

4. The cemetery says that they are not really "set up" for taking gravestone
photos. They will consider taking photos on an individual basis (no charge),
especially for those who already own plots.

5. So remember that you will find errors in this database, just like all the
others. Please give them plenty of time to work out the kinks.

I hope these notes will help those of you who have an interest in those who
are buried at Mt. Ararat Cemetery.


Best,
Steve Lasky
New York
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com


Hungary SIG #Hungary More about the Mt. Ararat Cemetery searchable database #hungary

Steven Lasky <steve725@...>
 

Greetings,

This is just a follow-up on my previous posting about the new searchable
database available on the new Mt. Ararat Cemetery
website(www.mountararatcemetery.com.) I just returned >from a short visit to
the cemetery in search of some answers, and I wanted to share them with you,
anticipating that questions regarding these matters will probably come up at
some point. Here we go:

1. Some of you will undoubtedly discover that there are dates of death
listed on this database >from as early as 1910. The office manager at Mt.
Ararat checked a few of these burial records for me, and he found that they
were, for the most part, reinterments >from other cemeteries. There is no
mention of this when you look at any of these burial listings, but now you
know. Also, even though the web site states that the first interment at the
Mt. Ararat was 1933, it was really 1931.

2. If you do a search just using the year of death of 1909, you will find
481 entries with the same date of death, 1/1/1910. You will also get the
same list of names if you do a search just using the year 1910. This
1/1/1910 date is the default setting and is not meant to indicate that the
person's date of death was 1/1/1910. Either the cemetery had no date of
death for these individuals in their computer before the data was uploaded
to the new website, and it defaulted to this same date, or there was some
other reason for it. Either way, if you happen to find a name of interest in
this database with a date of death of 1/1/1910, contact the cemetery for the
correct date. Again, you will find dates of death for a small number of
entries before 1931, but as I've said, these are most likely all
disinterments/reinterments.

3. Regarding planting, care, etc., there are no plants or vegetation (just
grass) on any of the graves in this cemetery, just shrubs, etc. in between
family headstones, on one or both sides of the stone. Also, there are no
individual matzevot (gravestones), i.e. the cemetery permits only family
headstones, one per family. So typically you will have one headstone with
the family surname(s) inscribed on it and, in the minority of cases, symbols
that indicate whether the deceased were Cohains, Levites or Israelites. You
will generally find footstones made of granite for each individual burial.
Because of the small size of these footstones, the information on them is
limited. You will find the deceased's first name, surname, dates of birth
(when available) and death, perhaps in only fifty-percent of the burials the
Hebrew name of the deceased and their father, and a few words, e.g. beloved
wife-devoted mother and grandmother. No other significant inscriptions per
se. Lastly, there are sections in this cemetery that don't even allow for a
family headstone, and you there you will find individual footstones only.

4. The cemetery says that they are not really "set up" for taking gravestone
photos. They will consider taking photos on an individual basis (no charge),
especially for those who already own plots.

5. So remember that you will find errors in this database, just like all the
others. Please give them plenty of time to work out the kinks.

I hope these notes will help those of you who have an interest in those who
are buried at Mt. Ararat Cemetery.


Best,
Steve Lasky
New York
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com


Re: Kahenyesd, Hungary #hungary

Peter <thidas@...>
 

-----Original Message-----
From: Sheila Stevens [mailto:baylahh@hotmail.com]
Sent: Monday, August 28, 2006 7:39 AM
To: H-SIG
Subject: [h-sig] Kahenyesd, Hungary
There is no town like Kahenyesd in Hungary. The first four latters
are probably copied incorrectly.

Peter

Peter I. Hidas
Mississauga, Ontario,
Canada.

thidas@sympatico.ca
peterhidas@yahoo.com
www3.sympatico.ca/thidas
http://community.webshots.com/user/peterhidas





I have just joined H-Sig and am beginning my research in Hungary. My
grandparents told me they were >from Budapest but I have my
grandfather's
Petition for Naturalization and it has the following information:

Louis (Yacov Eliezer) Katz, born 1889, Kahenyesd, Hungary.

I have not been able to find any information about that town. Is
anyone
familiar with that name or have any information about it?

Thanks very much,

Shalom, Sheila Stevens,
West Windsor, New Jersey


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Kahenyesd, Hungary #hungary

Peter <thidas@...>
 

-----Original Message-----
From: Sheila Stevens [mailto:baylahh@hotmail.com]
Sent: Monday, August 28, 2006 7:39 AM
To: H-SIG
Subject: [h-sig] Kahenyesd, Hungary
There is no town like Kahenyesd in Hungary. The first four latters
are probably copied incorrectly.

Peter

Peter I. Hidas
Mississauga, Ontario,
Canada.

thidas@sympatico.ca
peterhidas@yahoo.com
www3.sympatico.ca/thidas
http://community.webshots.com/user/peterhidas





I have just joined H-Sig and am beginning my research in Hungary. My
grandparents told me they were >from Budapest but I have my
grandfather's
Petition for Naturalization and it has the following information:

Louis (Yacov Eliezer) Katz, born 1889, Kahenyesd, Hungary.

I have not been able to find any information about that town. Is
anyone
familiar with that name or have any information about it?

Thanks very much,

Shalom, Sheila Stevens,
West Windsor, New Jersey