Date   

Re: STERN from Posen #general

Roger Lustig <julierog@...>
 

Dear Nancy:

I don't know of any list of Jewish soldiers, though I do know that some
Jews, including a relative of mine, fought on one side or the other in
the Napoleonic wars.

On what do you base your suspicions? The name STERN alone wouldn't
indicate Jewish origins, though there are indeed many Jewish STERNs.
Check the German or Swedish on-line telephone directories if you're not
convinced.

The name "Johann August" also doesn't point toward Jewish origin.
Although many Jews had a Hebrew name and also a "street" name that was
more familiar to Gentiles, "Johann" was extremely rare among German Jews
until much later. The 1836 list of naturalized Jewish heads of
household in Posen has over 5,000 names--only two of which are Johann, I
believe. The 1812-era surname-adoption lists >from the neighboring
provinces of Pomerania, Neumark Brandenburg, and West Prussia have no
Johanns at all among their almost 4,000 entries.

("Johanna", on the other hand, was quite common. In general, the
feminine forms, e.g., Henriette, Wilhelmine, Emilie, Pauline were
accepted long before Heinrich, Wilhelm, Emil, Paul.)

Now, if J.A. STERN took that name later on in life, one would have to
find an earlier name--and that becomes especially difficult with Jews,
since they generally didn't *have* fixed surnames before the 19thC.
Even those converts who already had surnames often chose new ones.

When you say "Posen", do you mean the city or the province? There are
many Posen-province Lutheran parish registers in Berlin and Luebeck, but
if you don't know the parish, you'll be searching for a long time. (The
list of registers makes up an LDS microfilm.)

There *is* a list of deaths for the 2nd Posen Infantry Regiment, 1813-5,
also on LDS film. Maybe one of J.A.'s uncles appears there!

Good luck,

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ

Nancy Gonzalez wrote:

Although my STERN family in Wisconsin is a mix of
Catholics and Lutherans, I am suspecting that we were
originally Jewish. I am looking for information on
Johann August STERN (1819 - 1898), whose father and 6
uncles fought in the Napoleanic Wars. Only his father
survived the war to return home to Posen. Johann
later immigrated to the US, ending up in Wisconsin.
Any information you can find out about Johann or his
ancestors would be greatly appreciated. I would
especially like to be able to find out if Johann or
his ancestors belonged to a synogogue in Posen. Is
there any information (list of names)on Prussian
soldiers or Jewish-Prussian soldiers in the Napoleanic
Wars?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: STERN from Posen #general

Roger Lustig <julierog@...>
 

Dear Nancy:

I don't know of any list of Jewish soldiers, though I do know that some
Jews, including a relative of mine, fought on one side or the other in
the Napoleonic wars.

On what do you base your suspicions? The name STERN alone wouldn't
indicate Jewish origins, though there are indeed many Jewish STERNs.
Check the German or Swedish on-line telephone directories if you're not
convinced.

The name "Johann August" also doesn't point toward Jewish origin.
Although many Jews had a Hebrew name and also a "street" name that was
more familiar to Gentiles, "Johann" was extremely rare among German Jews
until much later. The 1836 list of naturalized Jewish heads of
household in Posen has over 5,000 names--only two of which are Johann, I
believe. The 1812-era surname-adoption lists >from the neighboring
provinces of Pomerania, Neumark Brandenburg, and West Prussia have no
Johanns at all among their almost 4,000 entries.

("Johanna", on the other hand, was quite common. In general, the
feminine forms, e.g., Henriette, Wilhelmine, Emilie, Pauline were
accepted long before Heinrich, Wilhelm, Emil, Paul.)

Now, if J.A. STERN took that name later on in life, one would have to
find an earlier name--and that becomes especially difficult with Jews,
since they generally didn't *have* fixed surnames before the 19thC.
Even those converts who already had surnames often chose new ones.

When you say "Posen", do you mean the city or the province? There are
many Posen-province Lutheran parish registers in Berlin and Luebeck, but
if you don't know the parish, you'll be searching for a long time. (The
list of registers makes up an LDS microfilm.)

There *is* a list of deaths for the 2nd Posen Infantry Regiment, 1813-5,
also on LDS film. Maybe one of J.A.'s uncles appears there!

Good luck,

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ

Nancy Gonzalez wrote:

Although my STERN family in Wisconsin is a mix of
Catholics and Lutherans, I am suspecting that we were
originally Jewish. I am looking for information on
Johann August STERN (1819 - 1898), whose father and 6
uncles fought in the Napoleanic Wars. Only his father
survived the war to return home to Posen. Johann
later immigrated to the US, ending up in Wisconsin.
Any information you can find out about Johann or his
ancestors would be greatly appreciated. I would
especially like to be able to find out if Johann or
his ancestors belonged to a synogogue in Posen. Is
there any information (list of names)on Prussian
soldiers or Jewish-Prussian soldiers in the Napoleanic
Wars?


Re: Jewish midwives #general

Paul M Lieberman <paulmlieberman@...>
 

Joan Adler wrote:
I am writing to ask if any records exist, or if anyone
has knowledge, of how a woman became a midwife in the
1880's in Hungary.

My great grandmother Rosa Gutman NEWMAN was a midwife
in Kosice, in present day Slovakia, formerly Hungary,
after her husband died. Family lore states that she
was trained in Budapest. Lore even suggests that she
went to some kind of medical school. But since she
started delivering babies within a month of her
husband's death, this seems unlikely.

The mother and children moved to the US, to
Philadelphia PA where she was a midwife, accoucheuse,
and delivered her own grandchildren in the late 1880's
and 1890's. Was there any kind of certification there
or could a woman just say she is a midwife and begin
delivering babies?

I've checked the digest archives and on Goggle but
found nothing helpful.

Joan ADLER
Smithtown, NY
My great-great grandmother is listed as the midwife for a number of
births in her village of Oros, Hungary (now a suburb of Nyiregyhaza).
Her husband was the kosher butcher. This is purely conjecture, but I
would think that the butcher's wife would be the obvious choice for a
village's midwife. She would have been comfortable with the sight of
blood, have access to sharp knives, and know about the importance of
cleanliness. Also, I understand that kosher butchers were more than just
butchers, in that they had to understand the Jewish laws that applied to
making meat kosher.

- Paul M Lieberman


Re: Translation from Hebrew - two tombstones #general

Klausner
 

----- Original Message -----
From: "Judith Romney Wegner" <jrw@brown.edu>
To: "JewishGen Discussion Group" <jewishgen@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Friday, August 25, 2006 5:15 PM
Subject: Re: Translation >from Hebrew - two tombstones

Can anyone shed light on why a family might> actually describe a deceased
member as ishah
kesherah? Is it a technical term of some kind?
** Please have a look at JOWBR inscriptions and translations: tens of
matzevot read Isha Kshera, along with other attributes, as Isha Hashuva,
Isha Kvuda etc. We usually translate Isha Kshera = a decent woman, just as
Isha Hashuva is translated: an esteemed woman (not an important woman).

"wife of the late Fishel Neuberger." (No doubt
the family took the unusual step of including the
men's surnames in order to avoid confusion. This,
by the way, is the first time I have seen the
term ha-manoaH ("the late...") on a stone. Is
this as rare as it strikes me -- or whether it
was customary in particular communities?
** Also found at JOWBR: the term "hamanoah" as well as the surname of the
deceased are used often.

Best wishes and shavua tov, Yocheved

Yocheved Klausner, Editor
Sharsheret Hadorot (bilingual: Hebrew and English)
Israel Genealogical Society (IGS)
yklaus@netvision.net.il

Visit our Website: www.isragen.org.il


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Jewish midwives #general

Paul M Lieberman <paulmlieberman@...>
 

Joan Adler wrote:
I am writing to ask if any records exist, or if anyone
has knowledge, of how a woman became a midwife in the
1880's in Hungary.

My great grandmother Rosa Gutman NEWMAN was a midwife
in Kosice, in present day Slovakia, formerly Hungary,
after her husband died. Family lore states that she
was trained in Budapest. Lore even suggests that she
went to some kind of medical school. But since she
started delivering babies within a month of her
husband's death, this seems unlikely.

The mother and children moved to the US, to
Philadelphia PA where she was a midwife, accoucheuse,
and delivered her own grandchildren in the late 1880's
and 1890's. Was there any kind of certification there
or could a woman just say she is a midwife and begin
delivering babies?

I've checked the digest archives and on Goggle but
found nothing helpful.

Joan ADLER
Smithtown, NY
My great-great grandmother is listed as the midwife for a number of
births in her village of Oros, Hungary (now a suburb of Nyiregyhaza).
Her husband was the kosher butcher. This is purely conjecture, but I
would think that the butcher's wife would be the obvious choice for a
village's midwife. She would have been comfortable with the sight of
blood, have access to sharp knives, and know about the importance of
cleanliness. Also, I understand that kosher butchers were more than just
butchers, in that they had to understand the Jewish laws that applied to
making meat kosher.

- Paul M Lieberman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Translation from Hebrew - two tombstones #general

Klausner
 

----- Original Message -----
From: "Judith Romney Wegner" <jrw@brown.edu>
To: "JewishGen Discussion Group" <jewishgen@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Friday, August 25, 2006 5:15 PM
Subject: Re: Translation >from Hebrew - two tombstones

Can anyone shed light on why a family might> actually describe a deceased
member as ishah
kesherah? Is it a technical term of some kind?
** Please have a look at JOWBR inscriptions and translations: tens of
matzevot read Isha Kshera, along with other attributes, as Isha Hashuva,
Isha Kvuda etc. We usually translate Isha Kshera = a decent woman, just as
Isha Hashuva is translated: an esteemed woman (not an important woman).

"wife of the late Fishel Neuberger." (No doubt
the family took the unusual step of including the
men's surnames in order to avoid confusion. This,
by the way, is the first time I have seen the
term ha-manoaH ("the late...") on a stone. Is
this as rare as it strikes me -- or whether it
was customary in particular communities?
** Also found at JOWBR: the term "hamanoah" as well as the surname of the
deceased are used often.

Best wishes and shavua tov, Yocheved

Yocheved Klausner, Editor
Sharsheret Hadorot (bilingual: Hebrew and English)
Israel Genealogical Society (IGS)
yklaus@netvision.net.il

Visit our Website: www.isragen.org.il


STREIBANT #general

Suzan & Ron Wynne <srwynne@...>
 

I recently discovered that a maternal great grandmother was Lisel STREIBANT.
I registered the surname with the JGFF and found that mine was the only
Streibant (or Streiband) registered. I searched the JewishGen and JRI
databases and found nothing. My great grandfather lived in Radomysl Wielki
in Galicia so I am assuming that she came >from somewhere nearby.

Neither Lisel nor her husband, Getzel GEIGER, came to the US, but their son
Jekel (Jake) did and became my grandfather. It is possible that no one >from
the Streibant family emigrated.

If anyone has a connection to Streibant/d please contact me privately.

Suzan Wynne
srwynne@erols.com
Kensington, MD


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen STREIBANT #general

Suzan & Ron Wynne <srwynne@...>
 

I recently discovered that a maternal great grandmother was Lisel STREIBANT.
I registered the surname with the JGFF and found that mine was the only
Streibant (or Streiband) registered. I searched the JewishGen and JRI
databases and found nothing. My great grandfather lived in Radomysl Wielki
in Galicia so I am assuming that she came >from somewhere nearby.

Neither Lisel nor her husband, Getzel GEIGER, came to the US, but their son
Jekel (Jake) did and became my grandfather. It is possible that no one >from
the Streibant family emigrated.

If anyone has a connection to Streibant/d please contact me privately.

Suzan Wynne
srwynne@erols.com
Kensington, MD


Re: Replacing a military grave marker #usa

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Sat, 26 Aug 2006 00:32:36 UTC, YLCA87@aol.com wrote:

Dear All,

During the conference I visited my ggp's and great uncle's graves at Mt
Carmel Cemetery. My uncle died at 19 in 1919 in WWI France and has a military
marker. After 87 years in the elements the marker is very worn and cannot be
read.

Has anyone ever had a military marker replaced through the Department of
Veterans Affairs? Or ever tried to have the marker replaced? What were the
costs involved?
If you have any information or hints you can share, that would be great.

Best Regards,
Connie Fisher Newhan (#1272)
Corona, California
Why not enquire of the Department of Veterans' Affairs, the addresses of
which are sure to be on the VA website, and which is certain to have more
up-tp-date, more complete, more reliable, and more authoritative information
than you can get here.

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form
there.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Replacing a military grave marker #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Sat, 26 Aug 2006 00:32:36 UTC, YLCA87@aol.com wrote:

Dear All,

During the conference I visited my ggp's and great uncle's graves at Mt
Carmel Cemetery. My uncle died at 19 in 1919 in WWI France and has a military
marker. After 87 years in the elements the marker is very worn and cannot be
read.

Has anyone ever had a military marker replaced through the Department of
Veterans Affairs? Or ever tried to have the marker replaced? What were the
costs involved?
If you have any information or hints you can share, that would be great.

Best Regards,
Connie Fisher Newhan (#1272)
Corona, California
Why not enquire of the Department of Veterans' Affairs, the addresses of
which are sure to be on the VA website, and which is certain to have more
up-tp-date, more complete, more reliable, and more authoritative information
than you can get here.

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form
there.


Pripet Marshes #general

Marilyn Feingold <mrl516@...>
 

Thanks to all of my friends who sent me information about Pripet
Marshes.What a group!! Now back to the Malamud's, I've give up! Does anyone
know a Warsaw researcher?? Please reply privately. Marilyn Feingold
USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Pripet Marshes #general

Marilyn Feingold <mrl516@...>
 

Thanks to all of my friends who sent me information about Pripet
Marshes.What a group!! Now back to the Malamud's, I've give up! Does anyone
know a Warsaw researcher?? Please reply privately. Marilyn Feingold
USA


Re: What is Kipret Marsh #general

Alexander Sharon
 

"Marilyn Feingold" <mrl516@bellsouth.net> wrote

I just spoke with the widow of a possible relative. She said her father
in law was born in Kipret which is on the Russian/Polish border. Her
husband also mentioned lots of marshes there. Does this register with
anyone? I've looked in '"Where once we Walked " and couldn't find it.
Marilyn,

It should read "Pripet" Marshes. This is the largest swamp of the European
continent situated in the forested basin of Pripet (Russian: Pripyat')
River, the major contributory of the Dnieper River.
from the geographically point of view, Marshes occupy southern Belarus and
Northern Ukraine (Wolyn-Podolsk-Dnieper uplands).
from the Jewish genealogical point of view, this region is known as Polesie
(Woodland in Polish). During the interwar period there was Polesie
wojewodztwo.

List of the Polesie (Pripyat Marshes) major towns reads as the Who is Who in
the Jewish Genealogy: Antopol, Brzesc nad Bugiem (Briest), Drohiczyn, Kamien
Kaszyrski, Kobryn, Kossow, Luniniec, Sarny, Pruzany, and of course, Pinsk.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary Ab


Re: Could Anschnirtz be Auschwitz ? #general

Alexander Sharon
 

"Eve Line Blum" wrote

Still working on the memory book concerning the Convoy#73 that took 878
men >from France to the Baltic States on 15 May 1944, I found a Benjamin
SOLNIK who is said born in "Anschnirtz" in 1900. I couldn't find any
"Anschnirtz" anywhere. On the other hand, I thought that Auschwitz was
Oswiecim before WWII ?
Yes, indeed, town was known as Oswiecim, but only after the year 1918.
Prior to the end of WWI, it was known as Austrian Auschwitz.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Ab.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: What is Kipret Marsh #general

Alexander Sharon
 

"Marilyn Feingold" <mrl516@bellsouth.net> wrote

I just spoke with the widow of a possible relative. She said her father
in law was born in Kipret which is on the Russian/Polish border. Her
husband also mentioned lots of marshes there. Does this register with
anyone? I've looked in '"Where once we Walked " and couldn't find it.
Marilyn,

It should read "Pripet" Marshes. This is the largest swamp of the European
continent situated in the forested basin of Pripet (Russian: Pripyat')
River, the major contributory of the Dnieper River.
from the geographically point of view, Marshes occupy southern Belarus and
Northern Ukraine (Wolyn-Podolsk-Dnieper uplands).
from the Jewish genealogical point of view, this region is known as Polesie
(Woodland in Polish). During the interwar period there was Polesie
wojewodztwo.

List of the Polesie (Pripyat Marshes) major towns reads as the Who is Who in
the Jewish Genealogy: Antopol, Brzesc nad Bugiem (Briest), Drohiczyn, Kamien
Kaszyrski, Kobryn, Kossow, Luniniec, Sarny, Pruzany, and of course, Pinsk.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary Ab


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Could Anschnirtz be Auschwitz ? #general

Alexander Sharon
 

"Eve Line Blum" wrote

Still working on the memory book concerning the Convoy#73 that took 878
men >from France to the Baltic States on 15 May 1944, I found a Benjamin
SOLNIK who is said born in "Anschnirtz" in 1900. I couldn't find any
"Anschnirtz" anywhere. On the other hand, I thought that Auschwitz was
Oswiecim before WWII ?
Yes, indeed, town was known as Oswiecim, but only after the year 1918.
Prior to the end of WWI, it was known as Austrian Auschwitz.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Ab.


"What is Kipret Marsh" (Pripet Marsh) #general

Naomi Fatouros
 

On Aug. 25, 2006, Marilyn Feingold asked " What is
Kipret Marsh"

<<I just spoke with the widow of a possible relative. She said her
father in law was born in Kipret which is on the Russian/Polish
border. Her husband also mentioned lots of marshes there. Does this
register with anyone?
I've looked in '"Where once we Walked " and couldn't find it."

I think Marilyn either misheard what the widow said,
or the widow mis pronounced the name: "Pripet"

The famous Pripet marshes refers to a vast
waterlogged area in southern Belarus and northern
Ukraine.

Ms. Feingold should do a google search for "Pripet
Marsh" or "Pripet Marshes. The online Encyclopedia
Brittanic offers an extensive description of the area.

Naomi Fatouros (nee FELDMAN)
Bloomington, Indiana
NFatouros@sbcglobal.net
BELKOWSKY,BIELKOWSKY, BILKOWSKI, Odessa,St. Petersburg,Berdichev,
Kiev;ROTHSTEIN, Kremenchug;FRASCH,Kiev;LIBERMAN,Moscow;FELDMAN, Pinsk;
SCHUTZ, RETTIG, WAHL, Shcherets;LEVY, WEIL, Mulhouse; SAS/
SASS,Podwolochisk;
RAPOPORT, Tarnopol, Podwolochisk, Radomysl?; BEHAM, Salok, Kharkov;
WOLPIANSKY, Ostryna.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen "What is Kipret Marsh" (Pripet Marsh) #general

Naomi Fatouros
 

On Aug. 25, 2006, Marilyn Feingold asked " What is
Kipret Marsh"

<<I just spoke with the widow of a possible relative. She said her
father in law was born in Kipret which is on the Russian/Polish
border. Her husband also mentioned lots of marshes there. Does this
register with anyone?
I've looked in '"Where once we Walked " and couldn't find it."

I think Marilyn either misheard what the widow said,
or the widow mis pronounced the name: "Pripet"

The famous Pripet marshes refers to a vast
waterlogged area in southern Belarus and northern
Ukraine.

Ms. Feingold should do a google search for "Pripet
Marsh" or "Pripet Marshes. The online Encyclopedia
Brittanic offers an extensive description of the area.

Naomi Fatouros (nee FELDMAN)
Bloomington, Indiana
NFatouros@sbcglobal.net
BELKOWSKY,BIELKOWSKY, BILKOWSKI, Odessa,St. Petersburg,Berdichev,
Kiev;ROTHSTEIN, Kremenchug;FRASCH,Kiev;LIBERMAN,Moscow;FELDMAN, Pinsk;
SCHUTZ, RETTIG, WAHL, Shcherets;LEVY, WEIL, Mulhouse; SAS/
SASS,Podwolochisk;
RAPOPORT, Tarnopol, Podwolochisk, Radomysl?; BEHAM, Salok, Kharkov;
WOLPIANSKY, Ostryna.


Old Photos available - PRATT, BUCHBINDER, MILLNER #germany

Elizabeth Levy <levyliz@...>
 

Dear Friends,

Having been left about 6 kilos of family photos, one year later I am still
trying to make my way through the pile and to match photos with people. It
is an endless and very frustrating task as most photos do not have any
markings on them.

Among the photos are many who are probably friends of the family. I would
like to return them to the families.

If any of the following are people >from your family, please let me know.

Mirjam MILLNER (photo taken 1934)

Selma (maybe Seline) BUCHBINDER - address on back - Schuetzenstr. 9, Frankfurt

Evelyn PRATT - signed December 1, 1928

Elizabeth Levy Israel <levyliz@smile.net.il>


German SIG #Germany Old Photos available - PRATT, BUCHBINDER, MILLNER #germany

Elizabeth Levy <levyliz@...>
 

Dear Friends,

Having been left about 6 kilos of family photos, one year later I am still
trying to make my way through the pile and to match photos with people. It
is an endless and very frustrating task as most photos do not have any
markings on them.

Among the photos are many who are probably friends of the family. I would
like to return them to the families.

If any of the following are people >from your family, please let me know.

Mirjam MILLNER (photo taken 1934)

Selma (maybe Seline) BUCHBINDER - address on back - Schuetzenstr. 9, Frankfurt

Evelyn PRATT - signed December 1, 1928

Elizabeth Levy Israel <levyliz@smile.net.il>