Date   

Researching Surname Change #poland

Michel Heyman <mheyman@...>
 

When my great uncle immigrated to New York in 1913 he changed his last name
from Checinski to Hyman. The question I have been unable to answer after
years of wondering and questioning is why my great uncle chose the last name
Hyman?

Secondly, my grandfather (younger brother of my great uncle) travelled
to South Africa in the 1920's >from Pitorikow, Poland (and where he was
naturalized in 1924) changed his last name to Heyman not Hyman. I have
documentation >from the South African archives showing the name change and
naturalization papers, but to no trace as to why name change to Heyman or
if there was a previous family connection in the US or South Africa? I am
trying to find out why my great uncle chose Hyman 11 years earlier and why
my grand father chose Heyman in 1924. Can anyone recommend some creative
means of researching this objective other than simply posting to South
Africa newsgroup? Thank you.

Michel Heyman


JRI Poland #Poland Researching Surname Change #poland

Michel Heyman <mheyman@...>
 

When my great uncle immigrated to New York in 1913 he changed his last name
from Checinski to Hyman. The question I have been unable to answer after
years of wondering and questioning is why my great uncle chose the last name
Hyman?

Secondly, my grandfather (younger brother of my great uncle) travelled
to South Africa in the 1920's >from Pitorikow, Poland (and where he was
naturalized in 1924) changed his last name to Heyman not Hyman. I have
documentation >from the South African archives showing the name change and
naturalization papers, but to no trace as to why name change to Heyman or
if there was a previous family connection in the US or South Africa? I am
trying to find out why my great uncle chose Hyman 11 years earlier and why
my grand father chose Heyman in 1924. Can anyone recommend some creative
means of researching this objective other than simply posting to South
Africa newsgroup? Thank you.

Michel Heyman


Seeking descendants of Morris MARSHALL from CA #general

H Duboff
 

B"H

Hi, Genners.

I just discovered that an ancestor of mine changed his last name. (His
brothers all kept the original name).

I'm looking for descendants of Morris MARSHALL, whose name was
originally Morris MAILSHANKER.

He lived in the Los Angeles area as of the 1950s and died (death
reported to LA County) in 1960. His wife was named Annie.

They had 2 sons, Leon and Irvin. I don't know if the sons changed
their surnames as well; the sons were born between approximately 1915
and 1920. All were originally >from Philadelphia.
--
Henoch Duboff <hduboff@gmail.com>
Mequon, Wisconsin, USA

Researching: DUBNITZKY (Aliksandriya, Kherson, Ukr.); FAERSTEIN,
TICHNER; (Skala, Austria-Hungary / Ukraine); MAILSHANKER/MELSZENKER
(Grading/Gorodok Podol., Dnipropetrovsk, and B. Aires - Argentina);
MARSHALL (Los Angeles, CA); OBLETZ (Any); RAFKIN/RAVKIN (Dwinsk -
Russia); ZEMBLE (Lushnitz - Russia);


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Seeking descendants of Morris MARSHALL from CA #general

H Duboff
 

B"H

Hi, Genners.

I just discovered that an ancestor of mine changed his last name. (His
brothers all kept the original name).

I'm looking for descendants of Morris MARSHALL, whose name was
originally Morris MAILSHANKER.

He lived in the Los Angeles area as of the 1950s and died (death
reported to LA County) in 1960. His wife was named Annie.

They had 2 sons, Leon and Irvin. I don't know if the sons changed
their surnames as well; the sons were born between approximately 1915
and 1920. All were originally >from Philadelphia.
--
Henoch Duboff <hduboff@gmail.com>
Mequon, Wisconsin, USA

Researching: DUBNITZKY (Aliksandriya, Kherson, Ukr.); FAERSTEIN,
TICHNER; (Skala, Austria-Hungary / Ukraine); MAILSHANKER/MELSZENKER
(Grading/Gorodok Podol., Dnipropetrovsk, and B. Aires - Argentina);
MARSHALL (Los Angeles, CA); OBLETZ (Any); RAFKIN/RAVKIN (Dwinsk -
Russia); ZEMBLE (Lushnitz - Russia);


Encyclopaedia of Jewish Communities in Romania #romania

Mark Lewis <mark@...>
 

I have come across this book on JewishGen
(http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/pinkas_romania1.html)

I am trying to research the Jewish communities in Ploesti, and other places
in Prahova Country near Ploesti.

Can anyone tell me how I can access/order this book in English, or more
relevantly the specific area I am interested in?

Many thanks!

Mark Lewis
London
mark@terrafirma.co.uk


Romania SIG #Romania Encyclopaedia of Jewish Communities in Romania #romania

Mark Lewis <mark@...>
 

I have come across this book on JewishGen
(http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/pinkas_romania1.html)

I am trying to research the Jewish communities in Ploesti, and other places
in Prahova Country near Ploesti.

Can anyone tell me how I can access/order this book in English, or more
relevantly the specific area I am interested in?

Many thanks!

Mark Lewis
London
mark@terrafirma.co.uk


Springs Advertiser #southafrica

Eric Horwitz <horwitzclan@...>
 

Hi
Good Morning
If I want an article that was in the Springs Advertiser in 1938
How can I go about getting it?
Many thanks
Eric Horwitz


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica Springs Advertiser #southafrica

Eric Horwitz <horwitzclan@...>
 

Hi
Good Morning
If I want an article that was in the Springs Advertiser in 1938
How can I go about getting it?
Many thanks
Eric Horwitz


Surname Kantor #southafrica

Miriam Mason <ashrink@...>
 

Dear Group,
My maternal grandmother was Minnie Kantor.
She was born in Vienna or Lemberg, depending on the information on
different papers.
Her father was a baker. Her mother died when she was very young.

Minnie married Sam Jugend (Yugend) and they lived in France for a few
years where the couple had cousins.
In 1888 they came to the US. They lived in New York for about 10 years on
Allen Street......then in New Jersey for a year......and then to Minnesota
where the couple lived until their deaths. They had 10 living children.
Yetta, Dorothy, Lena, Jennie, Rosie, Eva, Frieda, Ida, Sarah and Sidney.
It is said that one of Minnie's brothers......surname Kantor, immigrated
to South Africa. I am assuming this to be in the 1880's or 1890's. I do not
have a town..I do not have a first name......I am just hoping by chance that
some of this may sound familiar to someone.

If there is a Kantor in this Sig could they please contact me?

Miriam Mason
Succasunna, New Jersey USA
ashrink@optonline.net


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica Surname Kantor #southafrica

Miriam Mason <ashrink@...>
 

Dear Group,
My maternal grandmother was Minnie Kantor.
She was born in Vienna or Lemberg, depending on the information on
different papers.
Her father was a baker. Her mother died when she was very young.

Minnie married Sam Jugend (Yugend) and they lived in France for a few
years where the couple had cousins.
In 1888 they came to the US. They lived in New York for about 10 years on
Allen Street......then in New Jersey for a year......and then to Minnesota
where the couple lived until their deaths. They had 10 living children.
Yetta, Dorothy, Lena, Jennie, Rosie, Eva, Frieda, Ida, Sarah and Sidney.
It is said that one of Minnie's brothers......surname Kantor, immigrated
to South Africa. I am assuming this to be in the 1880's or 1890's. I do not
have a town..I do not have a first name......I am just hoping by chance that
some of this may sound familiar to someone.

If there is a Kantor in this Sig could they please contact me?

Miriam Mason
Succasunna, New Jersey USA
ashrink@optonline.net


Re: PERITZ family from Breslau #germany

Roger Lustig <trovato@...>
 

Careful! The film in question is not quite as labeled. It does indeed
contain records of births in Breslau in 1846-1872, but only a fraction
of them, because it is neither a synagogue register nor a local court
civil register.

Instead, it's a midwife's register. It records the 2000+ births that
*one* particular Jewish midwife in Breslau attended. Consider the size
of the Breslau Jewish community in those days, this cannot be more than
20% of the total births.

That said, I have a rough transcription of the register. There would
seem to have been at least two wives associated with Adolph PERITZ--or
perhaps two Adolph PERITZes. The dates do not rule out either
possibility. Adolph P and Dorel (common kinnui for Sara) WIELUNER are
listed twice: Minna (28 Sep 1858) and Max (31 Dec 1861). The other
wife, Dorel KEMPNER, had children by Adolph P. in the preceding years.
No Ismar among them.

[Minna and Max...perhaps he was a mathematician...8-)]

If Ismar was born later and doesn't appear here that could mean any
number of things, e.g., that the family had moved to a different part of
town, or that the midwife who kept the register wasn't available that night.

Those who look at this register may be amused by the cartoons on the
front cover--a father coming to fetch the midwife, and the midwife
traipsing along in the middle of the night.

On a more general note, this film is one of the "Gatermann" films, most
of which were made at the end of WW II >from items in the Breslau Jewish
Community Archive. The originals are lost. The descriptions in the LDS
catalogue generally follow those at the beginning of each film, and are
often inaccurate. Some items are essentially illegible.

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA

Hermann da Fonseca-Wollheim wrote:
The Mormons have a film "Breslau - Birth register 1846-1872" (Film #
1184383) where you should find the parents of Ismar PERITZ. If they were born
in Breslau, you could probably also find the grand-parents in another film.

Rich Robinson, Daly City, California <richrobinson2005@yahoo.com> wrote:
...His parents were Adolph and Sarah PERITZ (her unmarried name is also
given, WIELUNER). I would be grateful for anyone who has information or can
recommend sources to consult ....


German SIG #Germany Re: AW: PERITZ family from Breslau #germany

Roger Lustig <trovato@...>
 

Careful! The film in question is not quite as labeled. It does indeed
contain records of births in Breslau in 1846-1872, but only a fraction
of them, because it is neither a synagogue register nor a local court
civil register.

Instead, it's a midwife's register. It records the 2000+ births that
*one* particular Jewish midwife in Breslau attended. Consider the size
of the Breslau Jewish community in those days, this cannot be more than
20% of the total births.

That said, I have a rough transcription of the register. There would
seem to have been at least two wives associated with Adolph PERITZ--or
perhaps two Adolph PERITZes. The dates do not rule out either
possibility. Adolph P and Dorel (common kinnui for Sara) WIELUNER are
listed twice: Minna (28 Sep 1858) and Max (31 Dec 1861). The other
wife, Dorel KEMPNER, had children by Adolph P. in the preceding years.
No Ismar among them.

[Minna and Max...perhaps he was a mathematician...8-)]

If Ismar was born later and doesn't appear here that could mean any
number of things, e.g., that the family had moved to a different part of
town, or that the midwife who kept the register wasn't available that night.

Those who look at this register may be amused by the cartoons on the
front cover--a father coming to fetch the midwife, and the midwife
traipsing along in the middle of the night.

On a more general note, this film is one of the "Gatermann" films, most
of which were made at the end of WW II >from items in the Breslau Jewish
Community Archive. The originals are lost. The descriptions in the LDS
catalogue generally follow those at the beginning of each film, and are
often inaccurate. Some items are essentially illegible.

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA

Hermann da Fonseca-Wollheim wrote:
The Mormons have a film "Breslau - Birth register 1846-1872" (Film #
1184383) where you should find the parents of Ismar PERITZ. If they were born
in Breslau, you could probably also find the grand-parents in another film.

Rich Robinson, Daly City, California <richrobinson2005@yahoo.com> wrote:
...His parents were Adolph and Sarah PERITZ (her unmarried name is also
given, WIELUNER). I would be grateful for anyone who has information or can
recommend sources to consult ....


Volunteers required #usa

JPLowens@...
 

The enthusiastic support for a proposal to enhance the Early American SIG
website must be matched by offers to do the work required.

This is a volunteer organization.

All the endorsements of well-meaning proposals are meaningless
without volunteers.

Any proposal must be in keeping with JewishGen guidelines.

A project manager would have to work with JewishGen,
coordinate the work of the other volunteers
and find and guide one with the technical expertise required.

Future messages in support of improving the EA SIG
should include descriptions of what the sender is willing to do
to help make those improvements happen.

John Paul Lowens, Suburban NYC


Early American SIG #USA Volunteers required #usa

JPLowens@...
 

The enthusiastic support for a proposal to enhance the Early American SIG
website must be matched by offers to do the work required.

This is a volunteer organization.

All the endorsements of well-meaning proposals are meaningless
without volunteers.

Any proposal must be in keeping with JewishGen guidelines.

A project manager would have to work with JewishGen,
coordinate the work of the other volunteers
and find and guide one with the technical expertise required.

Future messages in support of improving the EA SIG
should include descriptions of what the sender is willing to do
to help make those improvements happen.

John Paul Lowens, Suburban NYC


Re: Helene Kenvin's web proposal #usa

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

I know very little about early American Jewish life, having only identified
a few distant relatives who were here before 1880. So, the ideas below
might be impractical or redundant:

1) How about compiling a list of all towns in the U.S. that had a synagogue
before the year 1880? Perhaps, some major institutions might be willing to
help with such a project, if it has not already been done (perhaps, such a
list has already been published?).

2) How about organizing volunteers on a town-by-town basis to try to record
the names of all Jews who lived in the smaller of these towns (i.e., not New
York) prior to 1880, >from census records, cemetery records, etc?

3) It might also be helpful to contact the towns' historical societies and
public libraries. I have received large amounts of genealogical/historical
material >from the historical society of Ligonier, Indiana and the public
library of LaCrosse, Wisconsin, which I have not found publicly elsewhere
(and which I intend to donate to the Leo Baeck Institute). Best regards,

Logan Kleinwaks kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu near Washington, D.C.


Early American SIG #USA Re: Helene Kenvin's web proposal #usa

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

I know very little about early American Jewish life, having only identified
a few distant relatives who were here before 1880. So, the ideas below
might be impractical or redundant:

1) How about compiling a list of all towns in the U.S. that had a synagogue
before the year 1880? Perhaps, some major institutions might be willing to
help with such a project, if it has not already been done (perhaps, such a
list has already been published?).

2) How about organizing volunteers on a town-by-town basis to try to record
the names of all Jews who lived in the smaller of these towns (i.e., not New
York) prior to 1880, >from census records, cemetery records, etc?

3) It might also be helpful to contact the towns' historical societies and
public libraries. I have received large amounts of genealogical/historical
material >from the historical society of Ligonier, Indiana and the public
library of LaCrosse, Wisconsin, which I have not found publicly elsewhere
(and which I intend to donate to the Leo Baeck Institute). Best regards,

Logan Kleinwaks kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu near Washington, D.C.


American community links #usa

Joyce Field
 

I think it would be a wonderful research project to create "American
Jewish community links." Yes, there could be links to JOWBR. Yes,
more American cemeteries need to be photographed and the inscriptions
translated, if necessary, and the data and photos donated to JOWBR.

Hadassah Lipsius told me at the New York conference that she was
astounded at the ovewhelming response to the cemetery tours organized
by the conference. People are coming to recognize the valuable
genealogical information available on tombstone inscriptions. There
are many abandoned cemeteries in small towns across the U.S. It
would be a major contribution to US Jewish history if the burial records
were in one central database. The Early American SIG can help this happen.

The SIG might want to consider having a research coordinator to work
with JewishGen staff on implementing these important projects.

Kudos to Helene Kenvin for her suggestions.

Joyce Field JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Early American SIG #USA American community links #usa

Joyce Field
 

I think it would be a wonderful research project to create "American
Jewish community links." Yes, there could be links to JOWBR. Yes,
more American cemeteries need to be photographed and the inscriptions
translated, if necessary, and the data and photos donated to JOWBR.

Hadassah Lipsius told me at the New York conference that she was
astounded at the ovewhelming response to the cemetery tours organized
by the conference. People are coming to recognize the valuable
genealogical information available on tombstone inscriptions. There
are many abandoned cemeteries in small towns across the U.S. It
would be a major contribution to US Jewish history if the burial records
were in one central database. The Early American SIG can help this happen.

The SIG might want to consider having a research coordinator to work
with JewishGen staff on implementing these important projects.

Kudos to Helene Kenvin for her suggestions.

Joyce Field JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Replacing a military grave marker #usa

Connie Fisher Newhan
 

Dear All,
During the conference I visited my ggp's and great uncle's graves at Mt
Carmel Cemetery. My uncle died at 19 in 1919 in WWI France and has a military
marker. After 87 years in the elements the marker is very worn and cannot be
read.

Has anyone ever had a military marker replaced through the Department of
Veterans Affairs? Or ever tried to have the marker replaced? What were the
costs involved?
If you have any information or hints you can share [by private Email], that would
be great. Best Regards,

Connie Fisher Newhan (#1272) Corona, California YLCA87@aol.com


Early American SIG #USA Replacing a military grave marker #usa

Connie Fisher Newhan
 

Dear All,
During the conference I visited my ggp's and great uncle's graves at Mt
Carmel Cemetery. My uncle died at 19 in 1919 in WWI France and has a military
marker. After 87 years in the elements the marker is very worn and cannot be
read.

Has anyone ever had a military marker replaced through the Department of
Veterans Affairs? Or ever tried to have the marker replaced? What were the
costs involved?
If you have any information or hints you can share [by private Email], that would
be great. Best Regards,

Connie Fisher Newhan (#1272) Corona, California YLCA87@aol.com