Date   

Wide range of resources to be in IAJGS Conference Resource Room #lithuania

gloria@...
 

The Resource Room at the 26th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish
Genealogy will provide a wide range of electronic, print, microfilm,
and human resources to assist attendees with their research.

Computer services and databases will include....

* access to Ancestry.com, HeritageQuest census records, the New York
Times(1857-2000) and newspaper archives and Godfrey Library's
collection of online databases

* U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum Database - (three million records
normally available only at the Museum) and the Shoah Foundation's
Visual History Archive search tool and testimony catalog

* Manhattan Brides Index (the data entered so far in the Genealogy
Federation of Long Island project to index 1,400,000 marriage licenses
by bride's name)

* Memorial Database of Jewish Soldiers, Partisans and Workers Killed in
Action during Nazism (a searchable database of Jews in the Russian army
killed and missing in action during WWII)

Among the 100-plus books and other print materials on hand will be...

* dozens of reference books on general and Jewish genealogy, Jewish and
New York history, immigration, translation, cemetery research, rabbinic
research, the Holocaust and a large collection of volumes on Jewish
Bialystok

* large scale insurance maps of New York's old Lower East Side and a
variety of historical and modern maps of Europe

* the Center for Jewish History Genealogy Institute Fact Sheets

* individual research projects

We are also delighted to offer...

* a large collection of microfilm of Jewish interest usually housed at
the Woodside (Queens) Family History Center - including the Hamburg
Emigration Lists - and 10 microfilm readers on which to view the them

Plus we welcome the participation in the Resource Room of...

* translators to interpret documents in Russian, Polish, Spanish,
Hebrew, Yiddish, and other languages

* representatives of Ancestry.com in the Resource Room to assist in
using that site and representatives of the Shoah Foundation, available
for consultation

Please check the Resource Room page on the Conference website
(www.jgsny2006.org/resource_room.cfm) for details, additional items,
and updates. If you have material to share, please contact us at
resources@jgsny2006.

Gloria Berkenstat Freund
26th Annual IAJGS Conference Program Committee Chair

gloria@...


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Wide range of resources to be in IAJGS Conference Resource Room #lithuania

gloria@...
 

The Resource Room at the 26th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish
Genealogy will provide a wide range of electronic, print, microfilm,
and human resources to assist attendees with their research.

Computer services and databases will include....

* access to Ancestry.com, HeritageQuest census records, the New York
Times(1857-2000) and newspaper archives and Godfrey Library's
collection of online databases

* U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum Database - (three million records
normally available only at the Museum) and the Shoah Foundation's
Visual History Archive search tool and testimony catalog

* Manhattan Brides Index (the data entered so far in the Genealogy
Federation of Long Island project to index 1,400,000 marriage licenses
by bride's name)

* Memorial Database of Jewish Soldiers, Partisans and Workers Killed in
Action during Nazism (a searchable database of Jews in the Russian army
killed and missing in action during WWII)

Among the 100-plus books and other print materials on hand will be...

* dozens of reference books on general and Jewish genealogy, Jewish and
New York history, immigration, translation, cemetery research, rabbinic
research, the Holocaust and a large collection of volumes on Jewish
Bialystok

* large scale insurance maps of New York's old Lower East Side and a
variety of historical and modern maps of Europe

* the Center for Jewish History Genealogy Institute Fact Sheets

* individual research projects

We are also delighted to offer...

* a large collection of microfilm of Jewish interest usually housed at
the Woodside (Queens) Family History Center - including the Hamburg
Emigration Lists - and 10 microfilm readers on which to view the them

Plus we welcome the participation in the Resource Room of...

* translators to interpret documents in Russian, Polish, Spanish,
Hebrew, Yiddish, and other languages

* representatives of Ancestry.com in the Resource Room to assist in
using that site and representatives of the Shoah Foundation, available
for consultation

Please check the Resource Room page on the Conference website
(www.jgsny2006.org/resource_room.cfm) for details, additional items,
and updates. If you have material to share, please contact us at
resources@jgsny2006.

Gloria Berkenstat Freund
26th Annual IAJGS Conference Program Committee Chair

gloria@...


Wide range of resources to be in IAJGS Conference Resource Room #poland

gloria@...
 

The Resource Room at the 26th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish
Genealogy will provide a wide range of electronic, print, microfilm,
and human resources to assist attendees with their research.

Computer services and databases will include....

* access to Ancestry.com, HeritageQuest census records, the New York
Times(1857-2000) and newspaper archives and Godfrey Library's
collection of online databases

* U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum Database - (three million records
normally available only at the Museum) and the Shoah Foundation's
Visual History Archive search tool and testimony catalog

* Manhattan Brides Index (the data entered so far in the Genealogy
Federation of Long Island project to index 1,400,000 marriage licenses
by bride's name)

* Memorial Database of Jewish Soldiers, Partisans and Workers Killed in
Action during Nazism (a searchable database of Jews in the Russian army
killed and missing in action during WWII)

Among the 100-plus books and other print materials on hand will be...

* dozens of reference books on general and Jewish genealogy, Jewish and
New York history, immigration, translation, cemetery research, rabbinic
research, the Holocaust and a large collection of volumes on Jewish
Bialystok

* large scale insurance maps of New York's old Lower East Side and a
variety of historical and modern maps of Europe

* the Center for Jewish History Genealogy Institute Fact Sheets

* individual research projects

We are also delighted to offer...

* a large collection of microfilm of Jewish interest usually housed at
the Woodside (Queens) Family History Center - including the Hamburg
Emigration Lists - and 10 microfilm readers on which to view the them

Plus we welcome the participation in the Resource Room of...

* translators to interpret documents in Russian, Polish, Spanish,
Hebrew, Yiddish, and other languages

* representatives of Ancestry.com in the Resource Room to assist in
using that site and representatives of the Shoah Foundation, available
for consultation

Please check the Resource Room page on the Conference website
(www.jgsny2006.org/resource_room.cfm) for details, additional items,
and updates. If you have material to share, please contact us at
resources@jgsny2006.

Gloria Berkenstat Freund
26th Annual IAJGS Conference Program Committee Chair

gloria@...;


Lithuania Event London U.K. Tuesday 27th June #lithuania

Saul Issroff <saul@...>
 

ONCE UPON A TIME IN LITHUANIA - THE STORY OF THE JEWS OF LITHUANIA

Tuesday 27th June at the London Jewish Cultural Centre

Exhibition opens at 6.30 p.m. Panel discussion 7.30 p.m.

An evening to explore the world of Jewish Lithuania, past and present
and the opportunity to see the exhibition Once Upon A Time in Lithuania
by artist Naomi Alexander.
Speakers:

Judith Diamond - How to trace family roots in Lithuania
Robin Michaelson - Exploring Jewish Lithuania
Saul Issroff - The Holocaust and Jewish Lithuania today

Judith Diamond is convenor of the Litvak Special Interest Group in the
UK for the Jewish Genealogical Society of Great Britain. She compiled a
family history around her ancestral shtetl of Leckava, "A Leckava
Haggadah," published in 2002.

Robin Michaelson is a highly experienced group leader who has taken
several group tours to the Baltics. He has helped many Litvaks visit
their shtetls.

Saul Issroff edited and compiled with Rose Lerer Cohen The Holocaust in
Lithuania 1939-1945. A Book of Remembrance (Gefen, 2002).

Venue: London Jewish Cultural Centre, Ivy House, 94-96 North End Road,
London NW11 7SX. RSVP: admin@... or. tel 020 8457 5000
Price £10
Naomi Alexander's book, Once Upon A Time in Lithuania will be on sale
during the evening.


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Wide range of resources to be in IAJGS Conference Resource Room #poland

gloria@...
 

The Resource Room at the 26th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish
Genealogy will provide a wide range of electronic, print, microfilm,
and human resources to assist attendees with their research.

Computer services and databases will include....

* access to Ancestry.com, HeritageQuest census records, the New York
Times(1857-2000) and newspaper archives and Godfrey Library's
collection of online databases

* U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum Database - (three million records
normally available only at the Museum) and the Shoah Foundation's
Visual History Archive search tool and testimony catalog

* Manhattan Brides Index (the data entered so far in the Genealogy
Federation of Long Island project to index 1,400,000 marriage licenses
by bride's name)

* Memorial Database of Jewish Soldiers, Partisans and Workers Killed in
Action during Nazism (a searchable database of Jews in the Russian army
killed and missing in action during WWII)

Among the 100-plus books and other print materials on hand will be...

* dozens of reference books on general and Jewish genealogy, Jewish and
New York history, immigration, translation, cemetery research, rabbinic
research, the Holocaust and a large collection of volumes on Jewish
Bialystok

* large scale insurance maps of New York's old Lower East Side and a
variety of historical and modern maps of Europe

* the Center for Jewish History Genealogy Institute Fact Sheets

* individual research projects

We are also delighted to offer...

* a large collection of microfilm of Jewish interest usually housed at
the Woodside (Queens) Family History Center - including the Hamburg
Emigration Lists - and 10 microfilm readers on which to view the them

Plus we welcome the participation in the Resource Room of...

* translators to interpret documents in Russian, Polish, Spanish,
Hebrew, Yiddish, and other languages

* representatives of Ancestry.com in the Resource Room to assist in
using that site and representatives of the Shoah Foundation, available
for consultation

Please check the Resource Room page on the Conference website
(www.jgsny2006.org/resource_room.cfm) for details, additional items,
and updates. If you have material to share, please contact us at
resources@jgsny2006.

Gloria Berkenstat Freund
26th Annual IAJGS Conference Program Committee Chair

gloria@...;


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Lithuania Event London U.K. Tuesday 27th June #lithuania

Saul Issroff <saul@...>
 

ONCE UPON A TIME IN LITHUANIA - THE STORY OF THE JEWS OF LITHUANIA

Tuesday 27th June at the London Jewish Cultural Centre

Exhibition opens at 6.30 p.m. Panel discussion 7.30 p.m.

An evening to explore the world of Jewish Lithuania, past and present
and the opportunity to see the exhibition Once Upon A Time in Lithuania
by artist Naomi Alexander.
Speakers:

Judith Diamond - How to trace family roots in Lithuania
Robin Michaelson - Exploring Jewish Lithuania
Saul Issroff - The Holocaust and Jewish Lithuania today

Judith Diamond is convenor of the Litvak Special Interest Group in the
UK for the Jewish Genealogical Society of Great Britain. She compiled a
family history around her ancestral shtetl of Leckava, "A Leckava
Haggadah," published in 2002.

Robin Michaelson is a highly experienced group leader who has taken
several group tours to the Baltics. He has helped many Litvaks visit
their shtetls.

Saul Issroff edited and compiled with Rose Lerer Cohen The Holocaust in
Lithuania 1939-1945. A Book of Remembrance (Gefen, 2002).

Venue: London Jewish Cultural Centre, Ivy House, 94-96 North End Road,
London NW11 7SX. RSVP: admin@... or. tel 020 8457 5000
Price £10
Naomi Alexander's book, Once Upon A Time in Lithuania will be on sale
during the evening.


Pages of Testimony summary for Opalin, Poland/Ukraine #ukraine

taxtroll@...
 

First, I'd like to thank everyone who contacted me regarding the
problems I was having searching on the Yad Vashem database. It turns
out that it was a compatibility issue with AOL. Once I started using IE
I was able to finish my project. One person who contacted me told me
that YD is working on upgrading their system >from the current DOS based
version so hopefully these problems won't exist in the future.

The project I was working on was a summary of the Pages of Testimony
where Opalin, Poland (now Ukraine) was reported as the place of birth,
residence, or death of the victim. I've entered all of this data into
an Excel spreadsheet that I'd like to share with anyone who would like
a copy. There are 144 records. A search for "Opalin" on the YD website
yields 151 results. There were 7 hits that I concluded were exact
duplicates where both the victim and submitter were the same. If you'd
like a copy of the spreadsheet please e-mail me directly and I'll
forward you a copy along with my theories applied in collecting the
data.

Also, if anyone else has ancestors >from Opalin and would like your
share your information maybe we could create our own little database
with the information we have. According to my g-grandfather Moshe
SHNAYDER's 1908 Brest-Litovsk marriage record he was born in Opalin. So
few records survive for this town. Maybe we can piece together some of
our genealogical puzzles by gathering the bits we know in one place.
I'd be happy to be the point person on this and then share the
summarized data with everyone. Please remember to include the source of
your data so anyone else looking at it will know where it came from.

Please e-mail me directly if you'd like a copy of the Opalin Pages of
Testimony summary and with any information on Opalin ancestors.

Sharon Klein
Acworth, GA


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Pages of Testimony summary for Opalin, Poland/Ukraine #ukraine

taxtroll@...
 

First, I'd like to thank everyone who contacted me regarding the
problems I was having searching on the Yad Vashem database. It turns
out that it was a compatibility issue with AOL. Once I started using IE
I was able to finish my project. One person who contacted me told me
that YD is working on upgrading their system >from the current DOS based
version so hopefully these problems won't exist in the future.

The project I was working on was a summary of the Pages of Testimony
where Opalin, Poland (now Ukraine) was reported as the place of birth,
residence, or death of the victim. I've entered all of this data into
an Excel spreadsheet that I'd like to share with anyone who would like
a copy. There are 144 records. A search for "Opalin" on the YD website
yields 151 results. There were 7 hits that I concluded were exact
duplicates where both the victim and submitter were the same. If you'd
like a copy of the spreadsheet please e-mail me directly and I'll
forward you a copy along with my theories applied in collecting the
data.

Also, if anyone else has ancestors >from Opalin and would like your
share your information maybe we could create our own little database
with the information we have. According to my g-grandfather Moshe
SHNAYDER's 1908 Brest-Litovsk marriage record he was born in Opalin. So
few records survive for this town. Maybe we can piece together some of
our genealogical puzzles by gathering the bits we know in one place.
I'd be happy to be the point person on this and then share the
summarized data with everyone. Please remember to include the source of
your data so anyone else looking at it will know where it came from.

Please e-mail me directly if you'd like a copy of the Opalin Pages of
Testimony summary and with any information on Opalin ancestors.

Sharon Klein
Acworth, GA


Resource Room at the 2006 Conference! #france

Rosanne Leeson <rdleeson@...>
 

The Resource Room at the 26th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish
Genealogy will provide a wide range of electronic, print, microfilm, and
human resources to assist attendees with their research.

Computer services and databases will include....

* access to Ancestry.com, HeritageQuest census records, the New York
Times(1857­2000) and newspaper archives and Godfrey Library’s collection of
online databases

* U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum Database - (three million records normally
available only at the Museum) and the Shoah Foundation’s Visual History
Archive search tool and testimony catalog

* Manhattan Brides Index (the data entered so far in the Genealogy
Federation of Long Island project to index 1,400,000 marriage licenses by
bride's name)

* Memorial Database of Jewish Soldiers, Partisans and Workers Killed in
Action during Nazism (a searchable database of Jews in the Russian army
killed and missing in action during WWII)

Among the 100-plus books and other print materials on hand will be...

* dozens of reference books on general and Jewish genealogy, Jewish and New
York history, immigration, translation, cemetery research, rabbinic
research, the Holocaust and a large collection of volumes on Jewish
Bialystok

* large scale insurance maps of New York's old Lower East Side and a
variety
of historical and modern maps of Europe

* the Center for Jewish History Genealogy Institute Fact Sheets

* individual research projects

We are also delighted to offer...

* a large collection of microfilm of Jewish interest usually housed at the
Woodside (Queens) Family History Center - including the Hamburg Emigration
Lists - and 10 microfilm readers on which to view the them

Plus we welcome the participation in the Resource Room of...

* translators to interpret documents in Russian, Polish, Spanish, Hebrew,
Yiddish, and other languages

* representatives of Ancestry.com in the Resource Room to assist in using
that site and representatives of the Shoah Foundation, available for
consultation

Please check the Resource Room page on the Conference website
(www.jgsny2006.org/resource_room.cfm) for details, additional items, and
updates. If you have material to share, please contact us at
resources@jgsny2006.

Gloria Berkenstat Freund
26th Annual IAJGS Conference Program Committee Chair

glory1@...


Resource Room at the 2006 Conference! #romania

Rosanne Leeson <rdleeson@...>
 

The Resource Room at the 26th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish
Genealogy will provide a wide range of electronic, print, microfilm, and
human resources to assist attendees with their research.

Computer services and databases will include....

* access to Ancestry.com, HeritageQuest census records, the New York
Times(1857­2000) and newspaper archives and Godfrey Library’s collection of
online databases

* U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum Database - (three million records normally
available only at the Museum) and the Shoah Foundation’s Visual History
Archive search tool and testimony catalog

* Manhattan Brides Index (the data entered so far in the Genealogy
Federation of Long Island project to index 1,400,000 marriage licenses by
bride's name)

* Memorial Database of Jewish Soldiers, Partisans and Workers Killed in
Action during Nazism (a searchable database of Jews in the Russian army
killed and missing in action during WWII)

Among the 100-plus books and other print materials on hand will be...

* dozens of reference books on general and Jewish genealogy, Jewish and New
York history, immigration, translation, cemetery research, rabbinic
research, the Holocaust and a large collection of volumes on Jewish
Bialystok

* large scale insurance maps of New York's old Lower East Side and a
variety
of historical and modern maps of Europe

* the Center for Jewish History Genealogy Institute Fact Sheets

* individual research projects

We are also delighted to offer...

* a large collection of microfilm of Jewish interest usually housed at the
Woodside (Queens) Family History Center - including the Hamburg Emigration
Lists - and 10 microfilm readers on which to view the them

Plus we welcome the participation in the Resource Room of...

* translators to interpret documents in Russian, Polish, Spanish, Hebrew,
Yiddish, and other languages

* representatives of Ancestry.com in the Resource Room to assist in using
that site and representatives of the Shoah Foundation, available for
consultation

Please check the Resource Room page on the Conference website
(www.jgsny2006.org/resource_room.cfm) for details, additional items, and
updates. If you have material to share, please contact us at
resources@jgsny2006.

Gloria Berkenstat Freund
26th Annual IAJGS Conference Program Committee Chair

glory1@...


French SIG #France Resource Room at the 2006 Conference! #france

Rosanne Leeson <rdleeson@...>
 

The Resource Room at the 26th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish
Genealogy will provide a wide range of electronic, print, microfilm, and
human resources to assist attendees with their research.

Computer services and databases will include....

* access to Ancestry.com, HeritageQuest census records, the New York
Times(1857­2000) and newspaper archives and Godfrey Library’s collection of
online databases

* U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum Database - (three million records normally
available only at the Museum) and the Shoah Foundation’s Visual History
Archive search tool and testimony catalog

* Manhattan Brides Index (the data entered so far in the Genealogy
Federation of Long Island project to index 1,400,000 marriage licenses by
bride's name)

* Memorial Database of Jewish Soldiers, Partisans and Workers Killed in
Action during Nazism (a searchable database of Jews in the Russian army
killed and missing in action during WWII)

Among the 100-plus books and other print materials on hand will be...

* dozens of reference books on general and Jewish genealogy, Jewish and New
York history, immigration, translation, cemetery research, rabbinic
research, the Holocaust and a large collection of volumes on Jewish
Bialystok

* large scale insurance maps of New York's old Lower East Side and a
variety
of historical and modern maps of Europe

* the Center for Jewish History Genealogy Institute Fact Sheets

* individual research projects

We are also delighted to offer...

* a large collection of microfilm of Jewish interest usually housed at the
Woodside (Queens) Family History Center - including the Hamburg Emigration
Lists - and 10 microfilm readers on which to view the them

Plus we welcome the participation in the Resource Room of...

* translators to interpret documents in Russian, Polish, Spanish, Hebrew,
Yiddish, and other languages

* representatives of Ancestry.com in the Resource Room to assist in using
that site and representatives of the Shoah Foundation, available for
consultation

Please check the Resource Room page on the Conference website
(www.jgsny2006.org/resource_room.cfm) for details, additional items, and
updates. If you have material to share, please contact us at
resources@jgsny2006.

Gloria Berkenstat Freund
26th Annual IAJGS Conference Program Committee Chair

glory1@...


Romania SIG #Romania Resource Room at the 2006 Conference! #romania

Rosanne Leeson <rdleeson@...>
 

The Resource Room at the 26th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish
Genealogy will provide a wide range of electronic, print, microfilm, and
human resources to assist attendees with their research.

Computer services and databases will include....

* access to Ancestry.com, HeritageQuest census records, the New York
Times(1857­2000) and newspaper archives and Godfrey Library’s collection of
online databases

* U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum Database - (three million records normally
available only at the Museum) and the Shoah Foundation’s Visual History
Archive search tool and testimony catalog

* Manhattan Brides Index (the data entered so far in the Genealogy
Federation of Long Island project to index 1,400,000 marriage licenses by
bride's name)

* Memorial Database of Jewish Soldiers, Partisans and Workers Killed in
Action during Nazism (a searchable database of Jews in the Russian army
killed and missing in action during WWII)

Among the 100-plus books and other print materials on hand will be...

* dozens of reference books on general and Jewish genealogy, Jewish and New
York history, immigration, translation, cemetery research, rabbinic
research, the Holocaust and a large collection of volumes on Jewish
Bialystok

* large scale insurance maps of New York's old Lower East Side and a
variety
of historical and modern maps of Europe

* the Center for Jewish History Genealogy Institute Fact Sheets

* individual research projects

We are also delighted to offer...

* a large collection of microfilm of Jewish interest usually housed at the
Woodside (Queens) Family History Center - including the Hamburg Emigration
Lists - and 10 microfilm readers on which to view the them

Plus we welcome the participation in the Resource Room of...

* translators to interpret documents in Russian, Polish, Spanish, Hebrew,
Yiddish, and other languages

* representatives of Ancestry.com in the Resource Room to assist in using
that site and representatives of the Shoah Foundation, available for
consultation

Please check the Resource Room page on the Conference website
(www.jgsny2006.org/resource_room.cfm) for details, additional items, and
updates. If you have material to share, please contact us at
resources@jgsny2006.

Gloria Berkenstat Freund
26th Annual IAJGS Conference Program Committee Chair

glory1@...


Malkiel of Moscow #general

Rich Lowenthal <richlowenthal@...>
 

While doing genealogical research in a database of historic newspapers, I
found a reference in a 1870's Utah paper of the bankruptcy of the financial
firm, "Malkiel of Moscow." MALKIEL is one of the family names I am
researching, and within my family there are anecdotal associations with
Moscow; does anyone know anything about this firm (or the name) or have any
suggestions where I could look for information?

Thanks,

Rich Lowenthal
North Bennington, VT

Researching MALKIEL, DRITZ, REFOWICH, ZUROFSKY, LEVITAN of Seda, GREENFIELD
of Maltz (Grodno)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Malkiel of Moscow #general

Rich Lowenthal <richlowenthal@...>
 

While doing genealogical research in a database of historic newspapers, I
found a reference in a 1870's Utah paper of the bankruptcy of the financial
firm, "Malkiel of Moscow." MALKIEL is one of the family names I am
researching, and within my family there are anecdotal associations with
Moscow; does anyone know anything about this firm (or the name) or have any
suggestions where I could look for information?

Thanks,

Rich Lowenthal
North Bennington, VT

Researching MALKIEL, DRITZ, REFOWICH, ZUROFSKY, LEVITAN of Seda, GREENFIELD
of Maltz (Grodno)


Vienna Jewish Records #hungary

Henry Wellisch <henry.kelwel@...>
 

I know that this is not exactly part of Hungarian research, but I am
sure that there are quite a few people in this group whose relatives
moved to Vienna. Also among the "new" records there are some from
certain Burgenland communities who were at one time part of Hungary.
The BMD records of the Vienna Jewish community which span the period
1826 to 1938 were filmed in 1980 by the Family History Library (FHL)
and have been available >from this source since then. As far as I know
these films were made >from duplicates that were located in the Vienna
municipal archives. The original records are still with the Jewish
community of Vienna.
I understand that the FHL began to film the original records in 2004
and hundreds of new films are now beginning to show up on the FHL
website. As a matter of fact many records have appeared over the last
few weeks and it seems that more are to come. Here is an abbreviated
partial list of the "new" records.
BMD records, Vienna, 1826-1938, with indexes (over 100 films)
BMD records, Vienna, Turkish (Sephardic) community
Proklamationen (whatever that is) 1913-1937
Versoehnungsbuch (Reconciliation book) 1921-1938
Scheidungsbuch (Divorce book) 1905-1942
Uebergetretene (Conversions), some districts, index 1868-1941.
Geburtsanzeigen (Birth notices) 1893-1937 (196 films!!)
Todesanzeigen (Death notices) 1931-May 1938)
Among the "new" films there are also some BMD records >from these
communities outside Vienna:
Baden, Horn, Klosterneuburg, St. Poelten, Ybbs-Amstetten,
Gross Enzersdorf, Lackenbach, Mattersburg, Eisenstadt, Rechnitz,
Stockerau-Korneuburg.
For complete details visit the FHL website at:
http://www.familysearch.org/, go to the catalogue, go to place search
and then to Vienna, Jewish records.
Henry Wellisch
Toronto


Re: The Hebrew equivalent of Vilmos #hungary

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Amos Zezmer posted as follows:

"Would anyone know the Hebrew equivalent(s) of the given name Vilmos? Is
there anywhere on the web where one can look up secular given names and
their Hebrew equivalents?"

to which the Monitor replied as follows:

"Moderator: As countless subscribers have previously indicated, there are
no fixed Hungarian counterparts to Yiddish or Hebrew counterparts for
Hungarian names and, conversely and no fixed Yiddish or Hebrew versions of
secular Hungarian names. Those who wanted to Magyarize their shtetl names
might pick a name that sounded similar or began with the same letter but
might as easily pick a name that bore no resemblance whatsoever. Check the
Hungarian SIG archives for the many discussions that we've had on this
topic and for on-line references. Please respond off-list if you have
specific suggestions."

What the Moderator has written is correct, as far as it goes. However,
there is in fact a *linkage* made by the rabbis in Hungary between the
Hungarian secular name Vilmos and the two Hebrew names: Binyamin and
Ze'eyv. And this is pertinent to the questions of Mr. Zezmer.

The secular name Vilmos was widely used by Jews in Hungary, to the extent
that the rabbis who wrote Jewish legal tracts on the subject of the linkage
between Hungarian (and German) secular names and these two Hebrew names,
set Jewish law as follows: If a Jew could be shown by the Divorce Rabbi to
have used both the name Vilmos and the name Binyamin, then in a Jewish
contract (e.g., a Get, a Jewish divorce contract), he must be identified
(i.e., his name written) as Binyamin haMechune Vilmosh (written in Hebrew
characters, the *Yiddish* version of Vilmos being pronounced exactly like
the secular name). "haMechune" is a Hebrew legal term meaning "known as"
or "alias".

And the same was true of the two names Vilmos and Ze'eyv: Ze'eyv haMechune
Vilmosh.

So, I it is possible to answer the question posed by Amos Zezmer
positively, in the limited sense I have described. The names were not
*equivalent* but they were rather linked to their Hebrew names
statistically through their frequency of use and Jewish Law. That is, a
researcher might reasonably expect to find sometimes one, sometimes the
other, and sometimes both of the linked secular and Hebrew names in
Hungarian documents. Mr. Zezmer should be on the lookout for the given
names Binyamin and Ze'eyv (or something close to these two names, such as
Binye (a Yiddish nickname for Binyamin) or Yomi (another such Yiddish
nickname).

It is also true, as the Moderator has stated, that a Jew with the name
Vilmos could also have been given at birth almost any of the other Hebrew
names which were used by Jews -- without any special linkage to them, just
low-level statistics. The names Binyamin and Ze'eyv were special in the
strong statistical connection of Vilmos to them.

In answer to the second question, the name Vilmos (and other) secular
names) can be found on the JewishGen Given Names Data Bases web site:

< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames/ >

by searching the Hungary GNDB for the name "Vilmos" using Global Plain Text
Search (without the quotation marks). An update to this GNDB is now in
preparation and will contain a full set of the 500 German secular names
used by Hungarian Jews as well as about 50 Hungarian secular names also
used by them.

Shavu'a tov,

Professor G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel


Re: Wealthy in Hildesheim, Germany? #general

HPOLLINS@...
 

In Britain there were Jewish domestic servants, although not enough to
satisfy the demands of middle-class Jewish matrons. Both the Jews' Free School
and the Orphan Asylum gave instruction to girls in the expectation that they
would go into service. The history of the Orphan Asylum ('Norwood') stated
explicitly:”Girls were trained in domestic skills, and at 15 they were usually
placed in domestic service.” In 1894 a Jewish Domestic Home was established in
London for the same purpose. >from the studies of the Census of England &
Wales that I have done while there were Irish domestics in Jewish homes most that
I have come across were local British girls and women.

Harold Pollins
Oxford
England
--

In a message dated 18/06/2006 17:26:54 GMT Standard Time, jrw@...
writes:
I don't know about Germany, but as for 19th-century British Jews, I
have frequently been astonished many times to see a servant (usually
with an Irish name) listed on the census entry for my own ancestral
families -- who seem otherwise to have been as poor as church mice
(if that's not mixing metaphors!). It would seem that as
impoverished as these Anglo-Dutch Jews were, the Irish were even
worse off, leading them to emigrate to London in order to find
employment -- which, for girls, mostly meant becoming a live-in maid
with a family that was not particularly well-heeled. These girls
worked for a pittance, but at least they got room and board and
avoided starvation.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Vienna Jewish Records #hungary

Henry Wellisch <henry.kelwel@...>
 

I know that this is not exactly part of Hungarian research, but I am
sure that there are quite a few people in this group whose relatives
moved to Vienna. Also among the "new" records there are some from
certain Burgenland communities who were at one time part of Hungary.
The BMD records of the Vienna Jewish community which span the period
1826 to 1938 were filmed in 1980 by the Family History Library (FHL)
and have been available >from this source since then. As far as I know
these films were made >from duplicates that were located in the Vienna
municipal archives. The original records are still with the Jewish
community of Vienna.
I understand that the FHL began to film the original records in 2004
and hundreds of new films are now beginning to show up on the FHL
website. As a matter of fact many records have appeared over the last
few weeks and it seems that more are to come. Here is an abbreviated
partial list of the "new" records.
BMD records, Vienna, 1826-1938, with indexes (over 100 films)
BMD records, Vienna, Turkish (Sephardic) community
Proklamationen (whatever that is) 1913-1937
Versoehnungsbuch (Reconciliation book) 1921-1938
Scheidungsbuch (Divorce book) 1905-1942
Uebergetretene (Conversions), some districts, index 1868-1941.
Geburtsanzeigen (Birth notices) 1893-1937 (196 films!!)
Todesanzeigen (Death notices) 1931-May 1938)
Among the "new" films there are also some BMD records >from these
communities outside Vienna:
Baden, Horn, Klosterneuburg, St. Poelten, Ybbs-Amstetten,
Gross Enzersdorf, Lackenbach, Mattersburg, Eisenstadt, Rechnitz,
Stockerau-Korneuburg.
For complete details visit the FHL website at:
http://www.familysearch.org/, go to the catalogue, go to place search
and then to Vienna, Jewish records.
Henry Wellisch
Toronto


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: The Hebrew equivalent of Vilmos #hungary

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Amos Zezmer posted as follows:

"Would anyone know the Hebrew equivalent(s) of the given name Vilmos? Is
there anywhere on the web where one can look up secular given names and
their Hebrew equivalents?"

to which the Monitor replied as follows:

"Moderator: As countless subscribers have previously indicated, there are
no fixed Hungarian counterparts to Yiddish or Hebrew counterparts for
Hungarian names and, conversely and no fixed Yiddish or Hebrew versions of
secular Hungarian names. Those who wanted to Magyarize their shtetl names
might pick a name that sounded similar or began with the same letter but
might as easily pick a name that bore no resemblance whatsoever. Check the
Hungarian SIG archives for the many discussions that we've had on this
topic and for on-line references. Please respond off-list if you have
specific suggestions."

What the Moderator has written is correct, as far as it goes. However,
there is in fact a *linkage* made by the rabbis in Hungary between the
Hungarian secular name Vilmos and the two Hebrew names: Binyamin and
Ze'eyv. And this is pertinent to the questions of Mr. Zezmer.

The secular name Vilmos was widely used by Jews in Hungary, to the extent
that the rabbis who wrote Jewish legal tracts on the subject of the linkage
between Hungarian (and German) secular names and these two Hebrew names,
set Jewish law as follows: If a Jew could be shown by the Divorce Rabbi to
have used both the name Vilmos and the name Binyamin, then in a Jewish
contract (e.g., a Get, a Jewish divorce contract), he must be identified
(i.e., his name written) as Binyamin haMechune Vilmosh (written in Hebrew
characters, the *Yiddish* version of Vilmos being pronounced exactly like
the secular name). "haMechune" is a Hebrew legal term meaning "known as"
or "alias".

And the same was true of the two names Vilmos and Ze'eyv: Ze'eyv haMechune
Vilmosh.

So, I it is possible to answer the question posed by Amos Zezmer
positively, in the limited sense I have described. The names were not
*equivalent* but they were rather linked to their Hebrew names
statistically through their frequency of use and Jewish Law. That is, a
researcher might reasonably expect to find sometimes one, sometimes the
other, and sometimes both of the linked secular and Hebrew names in
Hungarian documents. Mr. Zezmer should be on the lookout for the given
names Binyamin and Ze'eyv (or something close to these two names, such as
Binye (a Yiddish nickname for Binyamin) or Yomi (another such Yiddish
nickname).

It is also true, as the Moderator has stated, that a Jew with the name
Vilmos could also have been given at birth almost any of the other Hebrew
names which were used by Jews -- without any special linkage to them, just
low-level statistics. The names Binyamin and Ze'eyv were special in the
strong statistical connection of Vilmos to them.

In answer to the second question, the name Vilmos (and other) secular
names) can be found on the JewishGen Given Names Data Bases web site:

< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames/ >

by searching the Hungary GNDB for the name "Vilmos" using Global Plain Text
Search (without the quotation marks). An update to this GNDB is now in
preparation and will contain a full set of the 500 German secular names
used by Hungarian Jews as well as about 50 Hungarian secular names also
used by them.

Shavu'a tov,

Professor G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Wealthy in Hildesheim, Germany? #general

HPOLLINS@...
 

In Britain there were Jewish domestic servants, although not enough to
satisfy the demands of middle-class Jewish matrons. Both the Jews' Free School
and the Orphan Asylum gave instruction to girls in the expectation that they
would go into service. The history of the Orphan Asylum ('Norwood') stated
explicitly:”Girls were trained in domestic skills, and at 15 they were usually
placed in domestic service.” In 1894 a Jewish Domestic Home was established in
London for the same purpose. >from the studies of the Census of England &
Wales that I have done while there were Irish domestics in Jewish homes most that
I have come across were local British girls and women.

Harold Pollins
Oxford
England
--

In a message dated 18/06/2006 17:26:54 GMT Standard Time, jrw@...
writes:
I don't know about Germany, but as for 19th-century British Jews, I
have frequently been astonished many times to see a servant (usually
with an Irish name) listed on the census entry for my own ancestral
families -- who seem otherwise to have been as poor as church mice
(if that's not mixing metaphors!). It would seem that as
impoverished as these Anglo-Dutch Jews were, the Irish were even
worse off, leading them to emigrate to London in order to find
employment -- which, for girls, mostly meant becoming a live-in maid
with a family that was not particularly well-heeled. These girls
worked for a pittance, but at least they got room and board and
avoided starvation.