Date   
Locating evidence of a divorce in late 19th Century Poland #general

Stein Lewis
 

from JRI-Poland, I learned that my gf, Mendel SZTEJNSAPIR married
Sora Feige ROZENBLUM on 13 May 1885 in Rajgrod, Lomza. (Sora Feige
was his first cousin) I also know that he had two children in
Rajgrod, one in 1889 and one in 1891, but not >from Sora. Their mother
was my gm, Elke BRAUN of Wizajny, Suwalki, who had five more children
in the USA. I also learned >from JRI-Poland that Sora Feige Rozenblum
married Simcho KUSPERFICKI in Rajgrod in 1888. Thus I know that she
had not died. Obviously, there had to have been a divorce and a get.
It may be asking too much, but is there some way to locate evidence
of a divorce and/or a get >from that period? Were civil divorces
registered?

Lewis Stein
Boynton Beach, FL

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Locating evidence of a divorce in late 19th Century Poland #general

Stein Lewis
 

from JRI-Poland, I learned that my gf, Mendel SZTEJNSAPIR married
Sora Feige ROZENBLUM on 13 May 1885 in Rajgrod, Lomza. (Sora Feige
was his first cousin) I also know that he had two children in
Rajgrod, one in 1889 and one in 1891, but not >from Sora. Their mother
was my gm, Elke BRAUN of Wizajny, Suwalki, who had five more children
in the USA. I also learned >from JRI-Poland that Sora Feige Rozenblum
married Simcho KUSPERFICKI in Rajgrod in 1888. Thus I know that she
had not died. Obviously, there had to have been a divorce and a get.
It may be asking too much, but is there some way to locate evidence
of a divorce and/or a get >from that period? Were civil divorces
registered?

Lewis Stein
Boynton Beach, FL

Looking for Amsterdam #general

Dick Jaeger <richard@...>
 

On behalf of one of my oldest friends I am looking for records of their
mother's family surname, AMSTERDAM originally >from Poland but lived in
Frankfurt till 1940 . Her mother's name was Eva Amsterdam. Eva's father's
name was Joseph, mother Selma, Eva was born in 1917 had two older brothers
Henry and Gustave and a younger brother Arthur. Eva went to London in 1940
and then to the US during the Blitz, sponsored by a cousin named RICHTER,
possibly >from the Detroit or Cleveland area. Eva and her husband and
children lived in New York (married name Singer and children named Carey and
Margo Singer). Her brother Henry was in the British Army during the war and
her parents and younger brother went to Italy Alberpbello or Bari The
family was split up and only Eva's father is known, unfortunately because of
a picture of a grave. Carrey and Margo both of whom live in New York and I
have known each other for over fifty years and Carey was married to my first
cousin. Eva died in the 1970's.
Margo and Carey are trying to develop additional information for me but that
is basically what I have at the moment.
Richard Jaeger
Richard@...

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Looking for Amsterdam #general

Dick Jaeger <richard@...>
 

On behalf of one of my oldest friends I am looking for records of their
mother's family surname, AMSTERDAM originally >from Poland but lived in
Frankfurt till 1940 . Her mother's name was Eva Amsterdam. Eva's father's
name was Joseph, mother Selma, Eva was born in 1917 had two older brothers
Henry and Gustave and a younger brother Arthur. Eva went to London in 1940
and then to the US during the Blitz, sponsored by a cousin named RICHTER,
possibly >from the Detroit or Cleveland area. Eva and her husband and
children lived in New York (married name Singer and children named Carey and
Margo Singer). Her brother Henry was in the British Army during the war and
her parents and younger brother went to Italy Alberpbello or Bari The
family was split up and only Eva's father is known, unfortunately because of
a picture of a grave. Carrey and Margo both of whom live in New York and I
have known each other for over fifty years and Carey was married to my first
cousin. Eva died in the 1970's.
Margo and Carey are trying to develop additional information for me but that
is basically what I have at the moment.
Richard Jaeger
Richard@...

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately

Further query regarding QUACHIK spelling, does the letter Q exist in Russia? #general

Michelle C <michelle30c@...>
 

Hello

Firstly, I would just like to thank everyone who responded to my original
query, it has helped greatly and is much appreciated.

In my original posting I asked if anyone knew if the surnames CHAVATSIK &
QUACHIK were typical Jewish/Russian names. With regards CHAVATSIK the
consensus of opinion seems to be that it most probably began, originally,
with the letter K instead of CH. This indeed seems very feasible. I noted
however that nobody commented on QUACHIK. In all the records I have found
relating to my great grandmother this surname crops up the most, but through
my own research and taking note of the fact that nobody had any info on this
version of the name, am I right in thinking this means that there arn't any
Jewish/Russian surnames beginning with this particular letter? To help me
clarify the situation in my own mind, could any genners confirm for me
whether the letter Q is part of the Russian language? I have tried looking
this up myself but have to admit to getting a little confused with it all!
If not this will confirm that that particular surname was completely changed
from the original. Incidentally, my own grandmother thought her mothers
maiden name was QUANTIKA but this seems very unlikely now. I think the
broken English must have been the culprit, of course Q does sound very
similar to K which brings us back to CHAVATSIK I suppose! The only constant
between the two names is the ending of IK!

Thanking you all in advance for any further help.

Michelle Chaffey U.K

Searching: CHAVATSIK/KHVATSIK/KABATCHIK/QUACHIK - Vinnitsa, Russia/Ukraine
DRUBITCH/DOLBITCH - Kiev, Russia/Ukraine

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Further query regarding QUACHIK spelling, does the letter Q exist in Russia? #general

Michelle C <michelle30c@...>
 

Hello

Firstly, I would just like to thank everyone who responded to my original
query, it has helped greatly and is much appreciated.

In my original posting I asked if anyone knew if the surnames CHAVATSIK &
QUACHIK were typical Jewish/Russian names. With regards CHAVATSIK the
consensus of opinion seems to be that it most probably began, originally,
with the letter K instead of CH. This indeed seems very feasible. I noted
however that nobody commented on QUACHIK. In all the records I have found
relating to my great grandmother this surname crops up the most, but through
my own research and taking note of the fact that nobody had any info on this
version of the name, am I right in thinking this means that there arn't any
Jewish/Russian surnames beginning with this particular letter? To help me
clarify the situation in my own mind, could any genners confirm for me
whether the letter Q is part of the Russian language? I have tried looking
this up myself but have to admit to getting a little confused with it all!
If not this will confirm that that particular surname was completely changed
from the original. Incidentally, my own grandmother thought her mothers
maiden name was QUANTIKA but this seems very unlikely now. I think the
broken English must have been the culprit, of course Q does sound very
similar to K which brings us back to CHAVATSIK I suppose! The only constant
between the two names is the ending of IK!

Thanking you all in advance for any further help.

Michelle Chaffey U.K

Searching: CHAVATSIK/KHVATSIK/KABATCHIK/QUACHIK - Vinnitsa, Russia/Ukraine
DRUBITCH/DOLBITCH - Kiev, Russia/Ukraine

Looking for my grandparents entry record (KUROPATWA)at Ellis Island 1903-1904 from Zambrow #general

engshapes@...
 

I have been Looking for 6 years now for My Grandparents entry records to
Ellis Island 1904-1904 >from Zambrow Poland with no success. Can anyone *help*

The family remembers being told they arrived at Castle Gardens. Perhaps
that is where they disembarked after the ferry took them >from Ellis Island
processing. I think they came second class. In Poland their names were
Jusk Gersk KUROPATWA and Rochel KUROPATWA, married in Zambrow in 1901. Their
name was changed to Joseph and Rachel GOLDSTEIN. Why or where it was changed
we do not know. Anyone please help.
Burt Goldstein

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Looking for my grandparents entry record (KUROPATWA)at Ellis Island 1903-1904 from Zambrow #general

engshapes@...
 

I have been Looking for 6 years now for My Grandparents entry records to
Ellis Island 1904-1904 >from Zambrow Poland with no success. Can anyone *help*

The family remembers being told they arrived at Castle Gardens. Perhaps
that is where they disembarked after the ferry took them >from Ellis Island
processing. I think they came second class. In Poland their names were
Jusk Gersk KUROPATWA and Rochel KUROPATWA, married in Zambrow in 1901. Their
name was changed to Joseph and Rachel GOLDSTEIN. Why or where it was changed
we do not know. Anyone please help.
Burt Goldstein

images of yizkor books online #general

Leah Aharoni
 

I have found digital images of several dozen Yizkor books on the NY
Public Library website. Most books are either in Hebrew or in Yiddish.

http://yizkor.nypl.org/

Happy searching,

Leah Aharoni

Canadian Census Day is May 16 #general

jan meisels allen <janmallen@...>
 

Dear Jewish Genners:

If you are a Canadian resident or have Canadian residents in your society
this is a reminder that May 16 is Census Day!

For the first time in Canada's census history there is an "informed consent"
requirement for information in the census that will be released in 92 years.
Question "53" requires a response as whether or not to have each person's
information released for public consumption in 92 years- the year 2098. An
affirmative answer assures future generations the access to the information.
This question must be answered for each family member, including infants. If
the question is left blank or answered "no" means the information will
never be released for that individual.

Having all Canadian residents' information available when the census is
released is of vital genealogical interest. An affirmative reply will
provide information about ancestors you may or may not have previously known
existed. Gordon Watts, a Canadian journalist and co-chairperson of the
Canadian Census Committee has enumerated reasons for responding
affirmatively to question 53. Among those of most interest to genealogists
are:" to find the make-up of their families and how they evolved through
successive Censuses; To learn where they lived, their occupations, when and
where they were born, ethnic origins, education and religion, etc.; to
provide clues to genetically inherited diseases or disabilities; to verify
age, or date and place of birth where other sources are unavailable, in
order to establish eligibility for pensions, etc; to prove identity to
obtain legal documents, i.e. passports, birth certificates; for
sociological, demographic, economic and historic research: historical
information on the social structure of Canada - sizes of families, age
groupings of children, grandparents and siblings at home, servants and other
household attendants, education, religious affiliation, race, ethnic
origins, housing, business and agriculture production, immigration, patterns
of migration, etc. Historical Census data, especially long-term Census data
series, allow research patterns of economic and social inequality, and to
examine the roots of important family patterns such as living alone,
single-parent families and blended families. "

Statistics Canada will offer internet filing for this year's census, marking
the first time Canadians have ever been able to fill out the forms online.
The census will gather information about every man, woman and child living
in Canada on May 16, 2006, as well as Canadians posted abroad on military or
diplomatic missions and those working on Canadian-registered merchant ships.
Traditionally, paper census forms are sent to people's homes every five
years. However, for this survey, an online census form will be available on
the Statistics Canada website as of May 2, and individuals can use an access
code included in their mailed-out census package to submit the information
electronically.

We hope that you will share this information with anyone you know who is a
Canadian resident so that they know to sign the informed consent provision .
question 53 YES for each individual listed in the family.

Jan Meisels Allen
Director, IAJGS and Chairperson,
Public Records Access and Monitoring Committee

Re: Announcing Chicago 2008 #general

Catherine Youngren
 

Congratulations to everyone involved in the awarding of the 2008 Conference
to Chicago. It's such a great city and I'm sure the conference will be at
the same high standard of all our conferences to date!

Catherine Youngren
President
Jewish Genealogical Institute of British Columbia
Vancouver, B.C. Canada

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen images of yizkor books online #general

Leah Aharoni
 

I have found digital images of several dozen Yizkor books on the NY
Public Library website. Most books are either in Hebrew or in Yiddish.

http://yizkor.nypl.org/

Happy searching,

Leah Aharoni

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Canadian Census Day is May 16 #general

jan meisels allen <janmallen@...>
 

Dear Jewish Genners:

If you are a Canadian resident or have Canadian residents in your society
this is a reminder that May 16 is Census Day!

For the first time in Canada's census history there is an "informed consent"
requirement for information in the census that will be released in 92 years.
Question "53" requires a response as whether or not to have each person's
information released for public consumption in 92 years- the year 2098. An
affirmative answer assures future generations the access to the information.
This question must be answered for each family member, including infants. If
the question is left blank or answered "no" means the information will
never be released for that individual.

Having all Canadian residents' information available when the census is
released is of vital genealogical interest. An affirmative reply will
provide information about ancestors you may or may not have previously known
existed. Gordon Watts, a Canadian journalist and co-chairperson of the
Canadian Census Committee has enumerated reasons for responding
affirmatively to question 53. Among those of most interest to genealogists
are:" to find the make-up of their families and how they evolved through
successive Censuses; To learn where they lived, their occupations, when and
where they were born, ethnic origins, education and religion, etc.; to
provide clues to genetically inherited diseases or disabilities; to verify
age, or date and place of birth where other sources are unavailable, in
order to establish eligibility for pensions, etc; to prove identity to
obtain legal documents, i.e. passports, birth certificates; for
sociological, demographic, economic and historic research: historical
information on the social structure of Canada - sizes of families, age
groupings of children, grandparents and siblings at home, servants and other
household attendants, education, religious affiliation, race, ethnic
origins, housing, business and agriculture production, immigration, patterns
of migration, etc. Historical Census data, especially long-term Census data
series, allow research patterns of economic and social inequality, and to
examine the roots of important family patterns such as living alone,
single-parent families and blended families. "

Statistics Canada will offer internet filing for this year's census, marking
the first time Canadians have ever been able to fill out the forms online.
The census will gather information about every man, woman and child living
in Canada on May 16, 2006, as well as Canadians posted abroad on military or
diplomatic missions and those working on Canadian-registered merchant ships.
Traditionally, paper census forms are sent to people's homes every five
years. However, for this survey, an online census form will be available on
the Statistics Canada website as of May 2, and individuals can use an access
code included in their mailed-out census package to submit the information
electronically.

We hope that you will share this information with anyone you know who is a
Canadian resident so that they know to sign the informed consent provision .
question 53 YES for each individual listed in the family.

Jan Meisels Allen
Director, IAJGS and Chairperson,
Public Records Access and Monitoring Committee

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Announcing Chicago 2008 #general

Catherine Youngren
 

Congratulations to everyone involved in the awarding of the 2008 Conference
to Chicago. It's such a great city and I'm sure the conference will be at
the same high standard of all our conferences to date!

Catherine Youngren
President
Jewish Genealogical Institute of British Columbia
Vancouver, B.C. Canada

Re: The Search for Sepharad - BBC Radio 3 #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Rosemary Wenzerul, in discussing the new BBC series on "Sepharad", wrote:

Dennis Marks, broadcaster and film maker, traces the path of the
Jews of the Iberian peninsual, who, having been expelled >from their
homeland, spread out all over the world, along the way providing a
wealth of culture which was adopted by their host communities.
The word 'Sepharad' is the ancient Hebrew word for Spain.
Well, not quite. An ancient Hebrew place-name "Sefarad" does appear
once in the bible (Obadiah 1:20); but scholars have pointed out that
in the biblical context, Sefarad did not mean Spain. It meant a
place in Asia Minor -- probably the place later known as Sardis.
Apparently Asia Minor is called " Saparda" (obviously the same word
as Sefarad in ancient Persian cuneiform manuscripts.

In Jewish culture, Sefarad came to mean Spain only in rabbinic times
--in fact, probably not before the early middle ages. (Before then,
Spain is referred to in rabbinic literature as Espania or Espamia.)

Judith Romney Wegner

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: The Search for Sepharad - BBC Radio 3 #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Rosemary Wenzerul, in discussing the new BBC series on "Sepharad", wrote:

Dennis Marks, broadcaster and film maker, traces the path of the
Jews of the Iberian peninsual, who, having been expelled >from their
homeland, spread out all over the world, along the way providing a
wealth of culture which was adopted by their host communities.
The word 'Sepharad' is the ancient Hebrew word for Spain.
Well, not quite. An ancient Hebrew place-name "Sefarad" does appear
once in the bible (Obadiah 1:20); but scholars have pointed out that
in the biblical context, Sefarad did not mean Spain. It meant a
place in Asia Minor -- probably the place later known as Sardis.
Apparently Asia Minor is called " Saparda" (obviously the same word
as Sefarad in ancient Persian cuneiform manuscripts.

In Jewish culture, Sefarad came to mean Spain only in rabbinic times
--in fact, probably not before the early middle ages. (Before then,
Spain is referred to in rabbinic literature as Espania or Espamia.)

Judith Romney Wegner

Are CHAVATSIK/QUACHIK typically Jewish/Russian names & how woud they be spelled? #ukraine

Michelle C <michelle30c@...>
 

Hello

I have recently posted a message on the JewishSig discussion board but
somebody suggested I should also place it on here as it is connected to the
Ukraine. So my apologies if genners have already seen this message before.

I am researching my greatgrandmothers surname, it appears on her marriage
cert as CHAVATSIK, with her fathers name as MARK CHAVALICK, his profession
was put as musician. Her surname on her childrens birth records then
appears as QUACHIK. My query was what the original spelling may have been
as I cannot find any names matching the above. Also as she came >from
Vinnitza, Russia (Ukraine), is it unlikely that her surname began with the
letter Q? People have advised me that the most likely spelling of the
surname was that it begun with the letter K as in KHVATSIK/KABATCHIK. My own
grandmother thought her mothers maiden name was QUANTIKA but this seems very
unlikely now and is probably down to the broken English that she spoke.

I also know that my great grandmother had numerous sisters and brothers ( I
was told the brothers were adopted) but most died in Vinnitsa through
starvation (this would have been the late 1800s/early1900s). Apart >from my
greatgrandmother, a couple of her sisters managed to get away and I believe
emigrated to the US. Contact was kept with them up until WWII but was then
lost.

Also this may seem like a silly question, but out of interest, does anyone
have any idea what sort of instrument a musician would have played in the
Ukraine in the late 1800s/early 1900s and was it a poor living?

If anyone has any ideas on this subject it would be greatly appreciated.

M. Chaffey U.K

Searching: CHAVATSIK/CHAVALICK/KHVATSIK/KABATCHIK/QUACHIK - Vinnitsa,
Ukraine
DRUBITCH/DOLBITCH - Kiev, Ukraine

Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Are CHAVATSIK/QUACHIK typically Jewish/Russian names & how woud they be spelled? #ukraine

Michelle C <michelle30c@...>
 

Hello

I have recently posted a message on the JewishSig discussion board but
somebody suggested I should also place it on here as it is connected to the
Ukraine. So my apologies if genners have already seen this message before.

I am researching my greatgrandmothers surname, it appears on her marriage
cert as CHAVATSIK, with her fathers name as MARK CHAVALICK, his profession
was put as musician. Her surname on her childrens birth records then
appears as QUACHIK. My query was what the original spelling may have been
as I cannot find any names matching the above. Also as she came >from
Vinnitza, Russia (Ukraine), is it unlikely that her surname began with the
letter Q? People have advised me that the most likely spelling of the
surname was that it begun with the letter K as in KHVATSIK/KABATCHIK. My own
grandmother thought her mothers maiden name was QUANTIKA but this seems very
unlikely now and is probably down to the broken English that she spoke.

I also know that my great grandmother had numerous sisters and brothers ( I
was told the brothers were adopted) but most died in Vinnitsa through
starvation (this would have been the late 1800s/early1900s). Apart >from my
greatgrandmother, a couple of her sisters managed to get away and I believe
emigrated to the US. Contact was kept with them up until WWII but was then
lost.

Also this may seem like a silly question, but out of interest, does anyone
have any idea what sort of instrument a musician would have played in the
Ukraine in the late 1800s/early 1900s and was it a poor living?

If anyone has any ideas on this subject it would be greatly appreciated.

M. Chaffey U.K

Searching: CHAVATSIK/CHAVALICK/KHVATSIK/KABATCHIK/QUACHIK - Vinnitsa,
Ukraine
DRUBITCH/DOLBITCH - Kiev, Ukraine

books and maps #general

Gayle Schlissel Riley <key2pst@...>
 

I do not know if I am allowed to mention a Polish auction site by name.
*but* I am at awed at the things I am finding. Just now I say a book on
Lwow >from 1928, in Polish which has the most wonderful picture and
graphics. A List of tombstone names. It was not cheap. I can tell you, my
opinion even if a book is not in English the pictures makes buying it
worth whiled.
Also today I spied a map of the Tarnowski's towns Jewish cemteries. I am
buying that.
Online auctions contain many wonder things that we can not buy in the
stores now. Some or many not in English.
Gayle Schlissel Riley >from San Gabriel
Speaking in NYC on Augment your Genealogy using online auction sites

MODERATOR NOTE: Please contact Gayle privately for more details.

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen books and maps #general

Gayle Schlissel Riley <key2pst@...>
 

I do not know if I am allowed to mention a Polish auction site by name.
*but* I am at awed at the things I am finding. Just now I say a book on
Lwow >from 1928, in Polish which has the most wonderful picture and
graphics. A List of tombstone names. It was not cheap. I can tell you, my
opinion even if a book is not in English the pictures makes buying it
worth whiled.
Also today I spied a map of the Tarnowski's towns Jewish cemteries. I am
buying that.
Online auctions contain many wonder things that we can not buy in the
stores now. Some or many not in English.
Gayle Schlissel Riley >from San Gabriel
Speaking in NYC on Augment your Genealogy using online auction sites

MODERATOR NOTE: Please contact Gayle privately for more details.