Date   

Re: Summer and cucumber salad #hungary

Judy and Gary Floam <gfloam@...>
 

Moderator: Please contact Mr. Zezmer directly with requests for recipes.

I appreciate the request for people to reply off-list but for those of us
who would like to learn to make a good Hungarian cucumber salad, and see
what the variations are, could Mr. Zezmer post some of the most
representative ones for the whole list?

Thanks,
Judy Floam
Baltimore, Md.


FRIEDMAN, >from Kosice

----- Original Message -----
From: Amos Israel Zezmer <amos.zezmer@wanadoo.fr>
To: H-SIG <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Friday, July 28, 2006 7:55 AM
Subject: [h-sig] Summer and cucumber salad



Moderator: To avoid a deluge of recipes for uborka salata, please respond
off-list.


Re: Marriage records #hungary

Tomas Lang <tlang@...>
 

Dear Danielle:
now I have found among the postings of H-SIG your request dated January, 24,
2006.

I don´t know if you have got >from somebody a satisfactory explanation, may
be I am too late.
To keep you informed I have the pleasure to let you know as follows:

the records of late Cadca Jewis Community are kept in BYTCA State Archive:

births 1840 - 1932
marriages 1852 - 1897, 1920 - 1942
deaths 1851 - 1897, 1920 - 1947
----------------------------------------------------
With best regards
Tomi LANG, NOVE ZAMKY - Slovakia
=============================

----- Original Message -----
From: "Danielle James" <daniandw@chariot.net.au>
To: "H-SIG" <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Tuesday, January 24, 2006 12:23 PM
Subject: [h-sig] Marriage records


My grandparents Oskar Prager and Melanie (nee Brooner) were married in
Cadca, Slovakia, on 21 September,1913 - does anyone know where I could
obtain their marriage records.


Also, my gt-grandmother Malvine Prager (nee ?) was born 5 December, 1854
in Jaska, Croatia. What would your advice be to
trace this record. And would it be possible to find out if she had any
other children other than Oskar Prager.

Thank you for any assistance or advice your can give.

Danielle (James)

Moderator: It's difficult to recommend resources to check if you don't
tell us where you are located or what sources you have already consulted.


Yizkor Book Project July 2006 Report #hungary

Joyce Field
 

The Yizkor Book Project added one new book, one new entry, and 14
updates for July 2006. All new material has been flagged for easy
recognition at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html.

New book:

-Jonava, Lithuania

New entry:

-Jalowka, Poland: Pinkas HaKehillot, Vol. VIII

Updates:

-Chelm, Poland
-Dabrowa, Poland
-Dusetos, Lithuania
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Kamen Kashirskiy, Ukraine
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Lita
-Molchadz, Belarus
-Novogrudok, Belarus: this book has now been completely translated
-Orgeyev (Orhei), Moldova: this book has now been completely translated
-Sochaczew, Poland
-Sosnowiec, Poland
-The Terrible Choice: new essays on Vasily Grossman, Mosze Meryn, and
Emanuel Ringelblum
-Zloczew, Poland

We want to thank all the coordinators of yizkor book translation
projects for their perseverance and dedication. Without their
talents and work, these projects would not be done. We are grateful
to them for making the Yizkor Book Project such a valuable
genealogical tool.

Please remember that we have 29 projects listed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
that need your financial contributions to continue. There are books
from Poland, Belarus, Lithuania, for instance that need assistance.
We can now accept donations to translate individual chapters >from the
Pinkas HaKehillot volumes. You should contact me directly first to
get an estimate of the cost of the chapter you want to have
translated. Provide details of the volume and page numbers when you
write me. The translated tables of contents of the individual
volumes are at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html,
under the heading of Regions.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisitions
jfield@jewishgen.org


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Summer and cucumber salad #hungary

Judy and Gary Floam <gfloam@...>
 

Moderator: Please contact Mr. Zezmer directly with requests for recipes.

I appreciate the request for people to reply off-list but for those of us
who would like to learn to make a good Hungarian cucumber salad, and see
what the variations are, could Mr. Zezmer post some of the most
representative ones for the whole list?

Thanks,
Judy Floam
Baltimore, Md.


FRIEDMAN, >from Kosice

----- Original Message -----
From: Amos Israel Zezmer <amos.zezmer@wanadoo.fr>
To: H-SIG <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Friday, July 28, 2006 7:55 AM
Subject: [h-sig] Summer and cucumber salad



Moderator: To avoid a deluge of recipes for uborka salata, please respond
off-list.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Marriage records #hungary

Tomas Lang <tlang@...>
 

Dear Danielle:
now I have found among the postings of H-SIG your request dated January, 24,
2006.

I don´t know if you have got >from somebody a satisfactory explanation, may
be I am too late.
To keep you informed I have the pleasure to let you know as follows:

the records of late Cadca Jewis Community are kept in BYTCA State Archive:

births 1840 - 1932
marriages 1852 - 1897, 1920 - 1942
deaths 1851 - 1897, 1920 - 1947
----------------------------------------------------
With best regards
Tomi LANG, NOVE ZAMKY - Slovakia
=============================

----- Original Message -----
From: "Danielle James" <daniandw@chariot.net.au>
To: "H-SIG" <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Tuesday, January 24, 2006 12:23 PM
Subject: [h-sig] Marriage records


My grandparents Oskar Prager and Melanie (nee Brooner) were married in
Cadca, Slovakia, on 21 September,1913 - does anyone know where I could
obtain their marriage records.


Also, my gt-grandmother Malvine Prager (nee ?) was born 5 December, 1854
in Jaska, Croatia. What would your advice be to
trace this record. And would it be possible to find out if she had any
other children other than Oskar Prager.

Thank you for any assistance or advice your can give.

Danielle (James)

Moderator: It's difficult to recommend resources to check if you don't
tell us where you are located or what sources you have already consulted.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Yizkor Book Project July 2006 Report #hungary

Joyce Field
 

The Yizkor Book Project added one new book, one new entry, and 14
updates for July 2006. All new material has been flagged for easy
recognition at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html.

New book:

-Jonava, Lithuania

New entry:

-Jalowka, Poland: Pinkas HaKehillot, Vol. VIII

Updates:

-Chelm, Poland
-Dabrowa, Poland
-Dusetos, Lithuania
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Kamen Kashirskiy, Ukraine
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Lita
-Molchadz, Belarus
-Novogrudok, Belarus: this book has now been completely translated
-Orgeyev (Orhei), Moldova: this book has now been completely translated
-Sochaczew, Poland
-Sosnowiec, Poland
-The Terrible Choice: new essays on Vasily Grossman, Mosze Meryn, and
Emanuel Ringelblum
-Zloczew, Poland

We want to thank all the coordinators of yizkor book translation
projects for their perseverance and dedication. Without their
talents and work, these projects would not be done. We are grateful
to them for making the Yizkor Book Project such a valuable
genealogical tool.

Please remember that we have 29 projects listed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
that need your financial contributions to continue. There are books
from Poland, Belarus, Lithuania, for instance that need assistance.
We can now accept donations to translate individual chapters >from the
Pinkas HaKehillot volumes. You should contact me directly first to
get an estimate of the cost of the chapter you want to have
translated. Provide details of the volume and page numbers when you
write me. The translated tables of contents of the individual
volumes are at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html,
under the heading of Regions.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisitions
jfield@jewishgen.org


Re: Cemeteries in Hungary #hungary

Larry Kohn <larry@...>
 

For Internet Explorer there is an easy workaround which will make the
text
of the oroklet.hu website much more readable. Go into Internet Options
on
the Tools menu. On the General tab, click Accessibility. Check the box
for
"Ignore colors specified on webpages". Click OK. When you have finished
viewing this website you will need to reset this option so that you will
see
other webpages in their normal colors.
Larry Kohn
Reston, Virginia

|-----Original Message-----
|From: tom klein [mailto:h-sig@ecologicaltech.com]=20
|Sent: Friday, July 28, 2006 8:51 AM
|To: H-SIG
|Subject: Re:[h-sig] Cemeteries in Hungary
|
|
|That's an amazing site, and thanks for pointing it out! (really.)
|
|However, being a curmudgeon, I would also like to add some=20
|warnings (and tips):=20
|
|be prepared to battle one of the worst web site designs I've=20
|ever seen. First, be ready to turn off your speakers, because=20
|the full voice, cantorial rendition of kol nidre never stops.
|
|and after the assault on your ears, be prepared for severe=20
|eyestrain, since the type used to display the data has almost=20
|no contrast (medium gray on a deep red and black background),=20
|which no combination of colour/resolution settings could make=20
|it more than barely readable on my high-quality monitor. tip:=20
|selecting the contents of the page will highlight it in a=20
|different colour, and often make it easier to read. (using an=20
|alternate web browser, i managed to override text and link=20
|colour - setting both to bright blue at least makes it=20
|readable, albeit not pretty.)=20
|
|just for an additional challenge, the site's "belepes (teljes=20
|kepernyo)" option >from the main page gives you the chance to=20
|disable your window scroll bars, making navigation=20
|"interesting" - tip: it's better to select "belepes (ablak)".=20
|
|and last but not least, be warned that selection by name and=20
|date simultaneously results in server error messages.
|
|it's just very frustrating to see such a rich resource buried=20
|behind such a misdesigned interface.
|
|
|
|....... tom klein, toronto
|
|
|>Stephen Schmideg <stephen@sicore.com.au> wrote:
|>
|>I don't believe the following website has been brought to the group's
|>attention:
|>
|>http://www.oroklet.hu/
|>
|>Not all cemeteries are available, but it contains a very thorough=20
|>listing of Jewish burials in Hungary. You can search by name and=20
|>cemetery. It gives such information as birth and death dates, maiden=20
|>and married names and plot numbers.
|>The site is in Hungarian, but it is easy to work out for=20
|those who don't
|>speak the language, or use the dictionary at
|>http://szotar.sztaki.hu/index.hu.jhtml


Hungary SIG #Hungary RE: Cemeteries in Hungary #hungary

Larry Kohn <larry@...>
 

For Internet Explorer there is an easy workaround which will make the
text
of the oroklet.hu website much more readable. Go into Internet Options
on
the Tools menu. On the General tab, click Accessibility. Check the box
for
"Ignore colors specified on webpages". Click OK. When you have finished
viewing this website you will need to reset this option so that you will
see
other webpages in their normal colors.
Larry Kohn
Reston, Virginia

|-----Original Message-----
|From: tom klein [mailto:h-sig@ecologicaltech.com]=20
|Sent: Friday, July 28, 2006 8:51 AM
|To: H-SIG
|Subject: Re:[h-sig] Cemeteries in Hungary
|
|
|That's an amazing site, and thanks for pointing it out! (really.)
|
|However, being a curmudgeon, I would also like to add some=20
|warnings (and tips):=20
|
|be prepared to battle one of the worst web site designs I've=20
|ever seen. First, be ready to turn off your speakers, because=20
|the full voice, cantorial rendition of kol nidre never stops.
|
|and after the assault on your ears, be prepared for severe=20
|eyestrain, since the type used to display the data has almost=20
|no contrast (medium gray on a deep red and black background),=20
|which no combination of colour/resolution settings could make=20
|it more than barely readable on my high-quality monitor. tip:=20
|selecting the contents of the page will highlight it in a=20
|different colour, and often make it easier to read. (using an=20
|alternate web browser, i managed to override text and link=20
|colour - setting both to bright blue at least makes it=20
|readable, albeit not pretty.)=20
|
|just for an additional challenge, the site's "belepes (teljes=20
|kepernyo)" option >from the main page gives you the chance to=20
|disable your window scroll bars, making navigation=20
|"interesting" - tip: it's better to select "belepes (ablak)".=20
|
|and last but not least, be warned that selection by name and=20
|date simultaneously results in server error messages.
|
|it's just very frustrating to see such a rich resource buried=20
|behind such a misdesigned interface.
|
|
|
|....... tom klein, toronto
|
|
|>Stephen Schmideg <stephen@sicore.com.au> wrote:
|>
|>I don't believe the following website has been brought to the group's
|>attention:
|>
|>http://www.oroklet.hu/
|>
|>Not all cemeteries are available, but it contains a very thorough=20
|>listing of Jewish burials in Hungary. You can search by name and=20
|>cemetery. It gives such information as birth and death dates, maiden=20
|>and married names and plot numbers.
|>The site is in Hungarian, but it is easy to work out for=20
|those who don't
|>speak the language, or use the dictionary at
|>http://szotar.sztaki.hu/index.hu.jhtml


Re: Cemeteries in Hungary #hungary

Carolyn Roth
 

Thanks for your critique. I had a short go at this and experienced all the
frustrations described, but since the scroll control was by that time
disabled, I could do nothing about it. I will have another go.

Carolyn Roth (researching Reich, Neumann, Nabel)

From: tom klein <h-sig@ecologicaltech.com>
Reply-To: "H-SIG" <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
To: "H-SIG" <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Subject: Re:[h-sig] Cemeteries in Hungary
Date: Fri, 28 Jul 2006 08:51:11 -0400

That's an amazing site, and thanks for pointing it out! (really.)

However, being a curmudgeon, I would also like to add some warnings (and
tips):

be prepared to battle one of the worst web site designs I've ever seen.
First, be ready to turn off your speakers, because the full voice,
cantorial rendition of kol nidre never stops.

and after the assault on your ears, be prepared for severe eyestrain, since
the type used to display the data has almost no contrast (medium gray on a
deep red and black background), which no combination of colour/resolution
settings could make it more than barely readable on my high-quality
monitor. tip: selecting the contents of the page will highlight it in a
different colour, and often make it easier to read. (using an alternate
web browser, i managed to override text and link colour - setting both to
bright blue at least makes it readable, albeit not pretty.)

just for an additional challenge, the site's "belepes (teljes kepernyo)"
option >from the main page gives you the chance to disable your window
scroll bars, making navigation "interesting" - tip: it's better to select
"belepes (ablak)".

and last but not least, be warned that selection by name and date
simultaneously results in server error messages.

it's just very frustrating to see such a rich resource buried behind such a
misdesigned interface.



....... tom klein, toronto


Stephen Schmideg <stephen@sicore.com.au> wrote:

I don't believe the following website has been brought to the group's
attention:

http://www.oroklet.hu/

Not all cemeteries are available, but it contains a very thorough
listing of Jewish burials in Hungary.
You can search by name and cemetery.
It gives such information as birth and death dates, maiden and married
names and plot numbers.
The site is in Hungarian, but it is easy to work out for those who don't
speak the language, or use the dictionary at
http://szotar.sztaki.hu/index.hu.jhtml


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re:Cemeteries in Hungary #hungary

Carolyn Roth
 

Thanks for your critique. I had a short go at this and experienced all the
frustrations described, but since the scroll control was by that time
disabled, I could do nothing about it. I will have another go.

Carolyn Roth (researching Reich, Neumann, Nabel)

From: tom klein <h-sig@ecologicaltech.com>
Reply-To: "H-SIG" <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
To: "H-SIG" <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Subject: Re:[h-sig] Cemeteries in Hungary
Date: Fri, 28 Jul 2006 08:51:11 -0400

That's an amazing site, and thanks for pointing it out! (really.)

However, being a curmudgeon, I would also like to add some warnings (and
tips):

be prepared to battle one of the worst web site designs I've ever seen.
First, be ready to turn off your speakers, because the full voice,
cantorial rendition of kol nidre never stops.

and after the assault on your ears, be prepared for severe eyestrain, since
the type used to display the data has almost no contrast (medium gray on a
deep red and black background), which no combination of colour/resolution
settings could make it more than barely readable on my high-quality
monitor. tip: selecting the contents of the page will highlight it in a
different colour, and often make it easier to read. (using an alternate
web browser, i managed to override text and link colour - setting both to
bright blue at least makes it readable, albeit not pretty.)

just for an additional challenge, the site's "belepes (teljes kepernyo)"
option >from the main page gives you the chance to disable your window
scroll bars, making navigation "interesting" - tip: it's better to select
"belepes (ablak)".

and last but not least, be warned that selection by name and date
simultaneously results in server error messages.

it's just very frustrating to see such a rich resource buried behind such a
misdesigned interface.



....... tom klein, toronto


Stephen Schmideg <stephen@sicore.com.au> wrote:

I don't believe the following website has been brought to the group's
attention:

http://www.oroklet.hu/

Not all cemeteries are available, but it contains a very thorough
listing of Jewish burials in Hungary.
You can search by name and cemetery.
It gives such information as birth and death dates, maiden and married
names and plot numbers.
The site is in Hungarian, but it is easy to work out for those who don't
speak the language, or use the dictionary at
http://szotar.sztaki.hu/index.hu.jhtml


Cemeteries in Hungary (How to use the website) #hungary

Stephen Schmideg <stephen@...>
 

Since posting the address of the cemetery site http://www.oroklet.hu/ I
have had a number of people who are language challenged asking for help.
Those who have been able to access the site told me they have found
relatives who they have not been able to locate previously, so I
encourage you all to explore this resource.

To help you here are my interpretations and simple instructions.

Temetok felsorolasa telepulesek szerint = Listing of cemeteries
according to town

The first alphabet gives you a list of town starting with each letter of
the alphabet. Some towns come up that don’t have graves and there are a
number of towns with large Jewish cemeteries that are missing, e.g Gyor,
etc.

Elhunytak felsorolasa nevük szerint = Listing of deceased according to name

The second alphabet gives you all the surnames starting with each letter
of the alphabet.

The information given is:

Name, including maiden name for married women
Year of birth
Year of death
Location of cemetery
Plot
Row
Grave
For children less than 1 year old the number of months (ho) is given.

Kereses a nevek kozott = Search among the names

Can’t see the advantage of this search function, as the response seems
to be limited to 100 cases.

Kereses az osszes adatban nev reszlet = Advanced search of the whole file

You can search by:
Full name (Surname first, followed by first/given name - Hungarian style)
Surname only
First/given name only
Part name, e.g. sch

Note that to search some names that have accented letters you will need
a Hungarian keyboard, otherwise they will not come up. (In Microsoft
Windows you can install multiple keyboards, e.g. English and Hungarian
and easily switch between them.)

You are also supposed to be able to search by birth (Szuletes) and death
(Elhalalozas) dates, but the time period is restricted to 1880 to 2005.
It completes the search, but fails to display the names.

The cemetery location (Temeto helye) search function works, but this is
the same as using the alphabetical listing at the top.

It doesn’t seem to like combination of factors, so you can’t put in both
name and birth year.

There is also no place on this site where you can ask questions or
submit information. Hopefully one of our H-SIG members in Hungary can
locate Lajos Boros, so we can thank him for this wonderful site and
allow us to ask some questions.

Regards
Stephen


Re: Cemeteries in Hungary #hungary

Jerry Zeisler <jzeisler@...>
 

It would also be nice to know the source of some of his (Boros Lajos)
material. For example, I researched and documented the cemetery in Eger in
2001 and completely transcribed the interment books. The grave numbering
system that the interment books describe and the numbering system on the
http://www.oroklet.hu/ web site differ. I was not able to locate the grave
of my ggg-grandfather or his entry in the interment book, however he is
listed in the oroklet.hu database with a specific grave number.

Can someone try contacting Mr. Boros to get a better understanding of his
information? His contact information is not on his web site >from what I can
see.

Thanks!


Jerry Zeisler
Leesburg, Virginia
USA

----- Original Message -----
From: Stephen R. Low
To: H-SIG
Sent: 07/27/2006 12:37 PM
Subject: Re: [h-sig] Cemeteries in Hungary


What a great site! Worth a visit just to hear Kol Nidre--although the
pronunciation differs considerably >from that which is famliar to me.

The greatest tragedy for so many of us is that the site does not appear to
include towns that were ceded to Romania post WW I.


Regards,
Steve Low
Lincoln MA


Hungary SIG #Hungary Cemeteries in Hungary (How to use the website) #hungary

Stephen Schmideg <stephen@...>
 

Since posting the address of the cemetery site http://www.oroklet.hu/ I
have had a number of people who are language challenged asking for help.
Those who have been able to access the site told me they have found
relatives who they have not been able to locate previously, so I
encourage you all to explore this resource.

To help you here are my interpretations and simple instructions.

Temetok felsorolasa telepulesek szerint = Listing of cemeteries
according to town

The first alphabet gives you a list of town starting with each letter of
the alphabet. Some towns come up that don’t have graves and there are a
number of towns with large Jewish cemeteries that are missing, e.g Gyor,
etc.

Elhunytak felsorolasa nevük szerint = Listing of deceased according to name

The second alphabet gives you all the surnames starting with each letter
of the alphabet.

The information given is:

Name, including maiden name for married women
Year of birth
Year of death
Location of cemetery
Plot
Row
Grave
For children less than 1 year old the number of months (ho) is given.

Kereses a nevek kozott = Search among the names

Can’t see the advantage of this search function, as the response seems
to be limited to 100 cases.

Kereses az osszes adatban nev reszlet = Advanced search of the whole file

You can search by:
Full name (Surname first, followed by first/given name - Hungarian style)
Surname only
First/given name only
Part name, e.g. sch

Note that to search some names that have accented letters you will need
a Hungarian keyboard, otherwise they will not come up. (In Microsoft
Windows you can install multiple keyboards, e.g. English and Hungarian
and easily switch between them.)

You are also supposed to be able to search by birth (Szuletes) and death
(Elhalalozas) dates, but the time period is restricted to 1880 to 2005.
It completes the search, but fails to display the names.

The cemetery location (Temeto helye) search function works, but this is
the same as using the alphabetical listing at the top.

It doesn’t seem to like combination of factors, so you can’t put in both
name and birth year.

There is also no place on this site where you can ask questions or
submit information. Hopefully one of our H-SIG members in Hungary can
locate Lajos Boros, so we can thank him for this wonderful site and
allow us to ask some questions.

Regards
Stephen


Hungary SIG #Hungary RE: Cemeteries in Hungary #hungary

Jerry Zeisler <jzeisler@...>
 

It would also be nice to know the source of some of his (Boros Lajos)
material. For example, I researched and documented the cemetery in Eger in
2001 and completely transcribed the interment books. The grave numbering
system that the interment books describe and the numbering system on the
http://www.oroklet.hu/ web site differ. I was not able to locate the grave
of my ggg-grandfather or his entry in the interment book, however he is
listed in the oroklet.hu database with a specific grave number.

Can someone try contacting Mr. Boros to get a better understanding of his
information? His contact information is not on his web site >from what I can
see.

Thanks!


Jerry Zeisler
Leesburg, Virginia
USA

----- Original Message -----
From: Stephen R. Low
To: H-SIG
Sent: 07/27/2006 12:37 PM
Subject: Re: [h-sig] Cemeteries in Hungary


What a great site! Worth a visit just to hear Kol Nidre--although the
pronunciation differs considerably >from that which is famliar to me.

The greatest tragedy for so many of us is that the site does not appear to
include towns that were ceded to Romania post WW I.


Regards,
Steve Low
Lincoln MA


Re: Jewish Cemetery Berlin Weissensee #germany

Ilan Ganot <iganot@...>
 

In reply to Peter Lowe's posting at the GerSIG, asking for information about
the Berlin Weissensee Cemetery:
Hello Peter,
Although I can't answer all your questions, I can express my satisfaction
from the excellent service that I have obtained >from the Office at the
Berlin Weissensee Cemetery.

Long time before my visit I have written to them a letter, with all the
information I had about my great-grandmother who died in 1934 and was buried
in this cemetery.

Some weeks later I have received by post copies of all the relevant
certificates: Death Certificate, Burial Certificate and Burial Record,
including exact location of the grave.

Since the father's name of my great-grandmother was not mentioned in the
documents, I have applied again to the cemetery office, asking for the
possibility to get the inscription on the gravestone, preferably by a
photograph. A few days later I have received a phone call >from Mr. Ronni
Kohls >from the Cemetery Office, describing politely that this service is not
possible.

To make things short, a relative of mine has visited the cemetery last
summer and got >from the cemetery office a very detailed map of the burial
plots and graves. He took photographs of the grave, so I have obtained all
necessary information that was inscribed on the gravestone.

Last May I have visited the Weissensee cemetery by myself. I was very
impressed to see its dimensions, the hugh mausoleums and family burial
plots, which are not characteristic to Jewish cemeteries, and the fact that
the cemetery was just slightly damaged during the years.
Thanks to the cemetery map and after a very short explanation by a patient
office clerk, I could make my way directly by myself, without getting lost,
directly to my great-grandmother's grave. I said the Kaddish and put a stone
from Eretz-Israel on her grave. I was much moved sentimentally.
Unfortunately I can't provide you with any additional details that you have
asked for. You may write to them, call or send a FAX, and I am convinced
that you will receive the best service possible.

Contact details:
Cemetery Weissensee
Herbert-Baum-Str. 45
13088 Berlin

Phone 0049 30 - 925 33 30
Fax 0049 30 - 923 76 296.
(I don't know their email address).

Kind regards, Ilan Ganot, Co-Webmaster, Mazheik Memorial Website
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Mazeikiai/introduction.html

Email: iganot@alumni.technion.ac.il


German SIG #Germany Re: Jewish Cemetery Berlin Weissensee #germany

Ilan Ganot <iganot@...>
 

In reply to Peter Lowe's posting at the GerSIG, asking for information about
the Berlin Weissensee Cemetery:
Hello Peter,
Although I can't answer all your questions, I can express my satisfaction
from the excellent service that I have obtained >from the Office at the
Berlin Weissensee Cemetery.

Long time before my visit I have written to them a letter, with all the
information I had about my great-grandmother who died in 1934 and was buried
in this cemetery.

Some weeks later I have received by post copies of all the relevant
certificates: Death Certificate, Burial Certificate and Burial Record,
including exact location of the grave.

Since the father's name of my great-grandmother was not mentioned in the
documents, I have applied again to the cemetery office, asking for the
possibility to get the inscription on the gravestone, preferably by a
photograph. A few days later I have received a phone call >from Mr. Ronni
Kohls >from the Cemetery Office, describing politely that this service is not
possible.

To make things short, a relative of mine has visited the cemetery last
summer and got >from the cemetery office a very detailed map of the burial
plots and graves. He took photographs of the grave, so I have obtained all
necessary information that was inscribed on the gravestone.

Last May I have visited the Weissensee cemetery by myself. I was very
impressed to see its dimensions, the hugh mausoleums and family burial
plots, which are not characteristic to Jewish cemeteries, and the fact that
the cemetery was just slightly damaged during the years.
Thanks to the cemetery map and after a very short explanation by a patient
office clerk, I could make my way directly by myself, without getting lost,
directly to my great-grandmother's grave. I said the Kaddish and put a stone
from Eretz-Israel on her grave. I was much moved sentimentally.
Unfortunately I can't provide you with any additional details that you have
asked for. You may write to them, call or send a FAX, and I am convinced
that you will receive the best service possible.

Contact details:
Cemetery Weissensee
Herbert-Baum-Str. 45
13088 Berlin

Phone 0049 30 - 925 33 30
Fax 0049 30 - 923 76 296.
(I don't know their email address).

Kind regards, Ilan Ganot, Co-Webmaster, Mazheik Memorial Website
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Mazeikiai/introduction.html

Email: iganot@alumni.technion.ac.il


OESTERREICHER / ZIMMERMANN, Berlin #germany

nicky carklin <nixxyc@...>
 

I am trying to locate the whereabouts of my grandmother's niece and her
family.

My grandmother, Lieselotte NACHMANN (nee OESTERREICHER), left Berlin
for South Africa in 1936. Her mother (Frieda) and younger sister
(Lucie) stayed behind in Berlin and perished in the Holocaust, however
her older sister, Edith OESTERREICHER (born ca 1909), survived.

Edith was hidden during the war and later married a non-Jew with the
surname ZIMMERMANN (first name 'Seph' - possibly short for Joseph?).
They had a daughter called Brigitte, who went on to marry someone
named Gunther (surname unknown) and they had a son (born ca 1968).

Unfortunately I do not know Brigitte's married name or her son's name.
As far as I know they all stayed in Berlin (possibly Charlottenburg).

I would like to get in contact with Brigitte, but I am not sure how to
go about finding her as I do not know what her married name is. Can
anyone offer any advice or help as to how I might be able to go about
this? It would be much appreciated. Many thanks,

Nicky Carklin London, UK (www.jgene.org - jgene wiki)


German SIG #Germany OESTERREICHER / ZIMMERMANN, Berlin #germany

nicky carklin <nixxyc@...>
 

I am trying to locate the whereabouts of my grandmother's niece and her
family.

My grandmother, Lieselotte NACHMANN (nee OESTERREICHER), left Berlin
for South Africa in 1936. Her mother (Frieda) and younger sister
(Lucie) stayed behind in Berlin and perished in the Holocaust, however
her older sister, Edith OESTERREICHER (born ca 1909), survived.

Edith was hidden during the war and later married a non-Jew with the
surname ZIMMERMANN (first name 'Seph' - possibly short for Joseph?).
They had a daughter called Brigitte, who went on to marry someone
named Gunther (surname unknown) and they had a son (born ca 1968).

Unfortunately I do not know Brigitte's married name or her son's name.
As far as I know they all stayed in Berlin (possibly Charlottenburg).

I would like to get in contact with Brigitte, but I am not sure how to
go about finding her as I do not know what her married name is. Can
anyone offer any advice or help as to how I might be able to go about
this? It would be much appreciated. Many thanks,

Nicky Carklin London, UK (www.jgene.org - jgene wiki)


Re: naming practices #germany

Roger Lustig <trovato@...>
 

The problem here is that civil marriage for Prussian Jews was a fairly
murky area of the law until shortly before the separate keeping of vital
records for Jews was ended in 1874. The Standesamt system began then;
before that, Christian vital events were recorded in churches, Jewish
ones (including civil marriage) at the county court. Before 1847, the
city or county government had this authority. In the 1850s, there are
many cases where the birth records list the parents as married for some
children, unmarried for others--and in no particular order.

This happens to be one of those cases. I'm familiar with the records in
question. The first three children of Abraham MELLER and Handel PERL
were entered as the children of a married couple. So were the 5th and
6th. The 4th [the one Henry mentioned] and 7th children, however, were
listed as the children of Handel PERL, with Abraham MELLER acknowledging
paternity.

The same year that the 4th child was born, the 2nd one died. She was
entered in the death register as the daughter of Abraham MELLER--i.e.,
he was considered the head of household.

The civil marriage of the couple was recorded in 1864, i.e., between the
births of the 7th and 8th children. The marriage record makes no
mention of their children, as some do when legitimation is an issue.

I believe there was some reform of the marriage laws around 1860. No
source to hand; just an impression I've gained >from work with the records.

As for Andreas' claim that "Jews of the time [...] did not care about
surnames": by 1855, the time of this record, Silesian Jews had been
required to use fixed surnames for 64 years; those of neighboring
Prussian provinces, for 43 years. All the synagogue records that I've
seen >from that time, and well before, use surnames as a matter of course.

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ

(researching UCKO, GLASER, TROPLOWITZ, LUSTIG, WITTNER, HAENDLER, BRIE,
SOHRAUER, MUEHSAM, NEUMANN, SILBERMANN, RITTER, PREIS, RUND, KRAKAUER
and other relatives in the Beuthen birth records)


German SIG #Germany Re: naming practices #germany

Roger Lustig <trovato@...>
 

The problem here is that civil marriage for Prussian Jews was a fairly
murky area of the law until shortly before the separate keeping of vital
records for Jews was ended in 1874. The Standesamt system began then;
before that, Christian vital events were recorded in churches, Jewish
ones (including civil marriage) at the county court. Before 1847, the
city or county government had this authority. In the 1850s, there are
many cases where the birth records list the parents as married for some
children, unmarried for others--and in no particular order.

This happens to be one of those cases. I'm familiar with the records in
question. The first three children of Abraham MELLER and Handel PERL
were entered as the children of a married couple. So were the 5th and
6th. The 4th [the one Henry mentioned] and 7th children, however, were
listed as the children of Handel PERL, with Abraham MELLER acknowledging
paternity.

The same year that the 4th child was born, the 2nd one died. She was
entered in the death register as the daughter of Abraham MELLER--i.e.,
he was considered the head of household.

The civil marriage of the couple was recorded in 1864, i.e., between the
births of the 7th and 8th children. The marriage record makes no
mention of their children, as some do when legitimation is an issue.

I believe there was some reform of the marriage laws around 1860. No
source to hand; just an impression I've gained >from work with the records.

As for Andreas' claim that "Jews of the time [...] did not care about
surnames": by 1855, the time of this record, Silesian Jews had been
required to use fixed surnames for 64 years; those of neighboring
Prussian provinces, for 43 years. All the synagogue records that I've
seen >from that time, and well before, use surnames as a matter of course.

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ

(researching UCKO, GLASER, TROPLOWITZ, LUSTIG, WITTNER, HAENDLER, BRIE,
SOHRAUER, MUEHSAM, NEUMANN, SILBERMANN, RITTER, PREIS, RUND, KRAKAUER
and other relatives in the Beuthen birth records)