Date   

Beuthen births - naming practices #germany

buckidstein@...
 

The term Vaterschaft is not restricted to Jewish births, as Fritz Neubauer
already pointed out. At a time when everybody had to apply for a permission to
marry and licences were often denied, illegitimate births were no exceptions.

When copying 19th century civil registers I again and again note that in
the same region such births were a recurring feature in only some localities
among Jews, Catholics an Protestants throughout the century. If there were
none among the members of the religious majority, none can be found among the
minority.

When an unmarried womon gave birth to a child, the person who kept the civil
register tried to find out the father. Only when a man openly confessed to
be the father, his name was entered.

Every child got the mother's family name. When she married, mother and child
adopted her husband's family name. If she married the child's father, its
birth was "legitimiert". The child's birth was no longer illegitimate. If,
however, the child was Jewish and the traditional Jewish patronymic name giving
system still existed, difficulties arose for the Christian state officer. In
many cases the child received the mother's patronymic as a sort of family name
or one of the father's names or the grandfather's patronymic was added to the
given name.

Gerhard Buck, Idstein, Hesse, Germany buckidstein@aol.com


German SIG #Germany Beuthen births - naming practices #germany

buckidstein@...
 

The term Vaterschaft is not restricted to Jewish births, as Fritz Neubauer
already pointed out. At a time when everybody had to apply for a permission to
marry and licences were often denied, illegitimate births were no exceptions.

When copying 19th century civil registers I again and again note that in
the same region such births were a recurring feature in only some localities
among Jews, Catholics an Protestants throughout the century. If there were
none among the members of the religious majority, none can be found among the
minority.

When an unmarried womon gave birth to a child, the person who kept the civil
register tried to find out the father. Only when a man openly confessed to
be the father, his name was entered.

Every child got the mother's family name. When she married, mother and child
adopted her husband's family name. If she married the child's father, its
birth was "legitimiert". The child's birth was no longer illegitimate. If,
however, the child was Jewish and the traditional Jewish patronymic name giving
system still existed, difficulties arose for the Christian state officer. In
many cases the child received the mother's patronymic as a sort of family name
or one of the father's names or the grandfather's patronymic was added to the
given name.

Gerhard Buck, Idstein, Hesse, Germany buckidstein@aol.com


WEIL, ALEXANDER #germany

Elsebeth Paikin
 

I am working on a "Familiy Tree of the Danish Jews" for the Danish Jewish
Museum in Copenhagen.

Many Danish Jews had roots in Germany. One of the persons that I try to find
information about is:

Isaac WEIL died 30 oct 1820 in Copenhagen
(no information about his birth but he came >from Germany)
married to Lea ALEXANDER
and their son
Levin WEIL, born 21 May 1798 in Copenhagen, died 2 Apr 1859.
married to Sara SALOMONSEN
with a long list of descendants in Denmark.

I would therefore be grateful for any information or guesses about
the origin of Isaac WEIL and Lea ALEXANDER or perhaps other
WEIL-families, that might be linked to the Isaac WEIL. Best regards,

Elsebeth Paikin, President Jewish Genealogical Society of Denmark:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgs-denmark/

SIG Coordinator and webmaster:
JewishGen's Scandinavia SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/scandinavia/
mailto:elsebeth@paikin.dk

At 23:23 05-07-2006, Yizhak Dishon wrote:
Recently I found at [a commercial genealogy website] that my G-Grandfather
Isaac WEIL was born in Bad Duerkheim. His exact birth-date, 1.8.1818,

I had known before,but not the names of his parents : Salomon David WEIL and
Barbara MAAS.The source of this information, as cited ,is "International
Gnealogical Index/Germany".
... snip...


German SIG #Germany WEIL, ALEXANDER #germany

Elsebeth Paikin
 

I am working on a "Familiy Tree of the Danish Jews" for the Danish Jewish
Museum in Copenhagen.

Many Danish Jews had roots in Germany. One of the persons that I try to find
information about is:

Isaac WEIL died 30 oct 1820 in Copenhagen
(no information about his birth but he came >from Germany)
married to Lea ALEXANDER
and their son
Levin WEIL, born 21 May 1798 in Copenhagen, died 2 Apr 1859.
married to Sara SALOMONSEN
with a long list of descendants in Denmark.

I would therefore be grateful for any information or guesses about
the origin of Isaac WEIL and Lea ALEXANDER or perhaps other
WEIL-families, that might be linked to the Isaac WEIL. Best regards,

Elsebeth Paikin, President Jewish Genealogical Society of Denmark:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jgs-denmark/

SIG Coordinator and webmaster:
JewishGen's Scandinavia SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/scandinavia/
mailto:elsebeth@paikin.dk

At 23:23 05-07-2006, Yizhak Dishon wrote:
Recently I found at [a commercial genealogy website] that my G-Grandfather
Isaac WEIL was born in Bad Duerkheim. His exact birth-date, 1.8.1818,

I had known before,but not the names of his parents : Salomon David WEIL and
Barbara MAAS.The source of this information, as cited ,is "International
Gnealogical Index/Germany".
... snip...


400 Family trees from 1938 are at Berlin Jewish Museum #germany

GerSig@...
 

I have read on www.genealoj.org <http://www.genealoj.org/>, the
website of the French JGS Cercle de Genealogie Juive, a message that
could be of interest to Gersig subscribers. I have received permission from
the CGJ to post this announcement:

"The Berlin Jewish Museum holds some 400 Ahnentafeln (family trees
covering 4 generations, including up to the great-grandparents). These
were compiled around 1938 by members of the /Gesellschaft fuer juedische
Familienforschung/ (German Jewish genealogy society). Our organization
has the list of the authors who published data about their ancestors on
these charts.

If a personal research interest is documented, their given names, surnames
and often their places of residence can be requested at:

gesjuedfamforsch@free.fr "

The background information obtained shows that a group of volunteers has
agreed to screen requests >from genealogists who know relatives who lived
in Germany around 1938 and were interested in genealogy. Among the names
in the list there are also some Ahnentafeln of individuals having lived in
earlier periods. The final purpose is to give access to the Ahnentafel
without drowning the Berlin Jewish Museum under a flood of unrelated requests.

The "personal interest" can best be proven by the full name
and personal data of the possible author.

Again, please answer only to: gesjuedfamforsch@free.fr
Responses sent to any other address will be ignored. Please allow time
for a response.

John Paul Lowens, GerSIG Coordinator reply only to gesjuedfamforsch@free.fr


German SIG #Germany 400 Family trees from 1938 are at Berlin Jewish Museum #germany

GerSig@...
 

I have read on www.genealoj.org <http://www.genealoj.org/>, the
website of the French JGS Cercle de Genealogie Juive, a message that
could be of interest to Gersig subscribers. I have received permission from
the CGJ to post this announcement:

"The Berlin Jewish Museum holds some 400 Ahnentafeln (family trees
covering 4 generations, including up to the great-grandparents). These
were compiled around 1938 by members of the /Gesellschaft fuer juedische
Familienforschung/ (German Jewish genealogy society). Our organization
has the list of the authors who published data about their ancestors on
these charts.

If a personal research interest is documented, their given names, surnames
and often their places of residence can be requested at:

gesjuedfamforsch@free.fr "

The background information obtained shows that a group of volunteers has
agreed to screen requests >from genealogists who know relatives who lived
in Germany around 1938 and were interested in genealogy. Among the names
in the list there are also some Ahnentafeln of individuals having lived in
earlier periods. The final purpose is to give access to the Ahnentafel
without drowning the Berlin Jewish Museum under a flood of unrelated requests.

The "personal interest" can best be proven by the full name
and personal data of the possible author.

Again, please answer only to: gesjuedfamforsch@free.fr
Responses sent to any other address will be ignored. Please allow time
for a response.

John Paul Lowens, GerSIG Coordinator reply only to gesjuedfamforsch@free.fr


WINKLER family #rabbinic

Chaim freedman
 

I am researching the WINKLER family and want to know if anyone knows
the ancestry of the actor Henry WINKLER.

There was a WINKLER family which was of rabbinic ancestry and my
interest stems >from my research for the genealogy advisory committee
of Davidic Dynasty.

Chaim Freedman
Petah Tikvah, Israel


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic WINKLER family #rabbinic

Chaim freedman
 

I am researching the WINKLER family and want to know if anyone knows
the ancestry of the actor Henry WINKLER.

There was a WINKLER family which was of rabbinic ancestry and my
interest stems >from my research for the genealogy advisory committee
of Davidic Dynasty.

Chaim Freedman
Petah Tikvah, Israel


Re: parachot/parakhod #ukraine

dave_mason@juno.com <dave_mason@...>
 

Sally Altschuler wrote,

"I am trying to find information and pictures of parachots, the
steamboats, that were common on the Dnepr around 1900. I'd be happy for any kind
of information on this mean of transportation."

I think the standard Russian word (and maybe also Ukrainian) would
be "parakhod" which looks like "napaxog" in cyrillic handwriting.

This word seems to apply to any steam-driven vessel, >from steamboats --
similar to those used on american rivers in the 1800s -- up to ocean liners.
For example the Titanic is called a "paraxhod" in Russian.

I have a Russian video "Zhestokiy Romans" (A Cruel Romance) which is
set in the 1800s and features voyages on steamboats and duels. It is
all surprisingly evocative of Mark Twain's writings about the american
south before the Civil War.

Russia apparently continued to rely on river transport for passengers
long after the U.S. switched over to railroads and then automobiles
and buses. There probably still are "paraxhods" in use and you could
probably take a tour on one.

- David Mason


town name "Karistishow" #ukraine

Marc D. Machtinger <marc@...>
 

Dear SIG Members:

I have a naturalization record for a family member who came >from Russia
(present day Ukraine). The town of birth is listed as "Karistishow,"
however, I cannot find any such town. Would someone kindly suggest to what
town this might actually refer?

I also have a reference to the town "Chorkas" which is also spelled
"Charkoss(e)." I am assuming this town must be "Cherkassy" on the Dnieper
River. Would anyone suggest otherwise?

Finally, there is reference to a town "Chicos." Can anyone suggest what
town this could possibly be?

I appreciate any assistance. Thanks.

Very truly yours,
Marc D. Machtinger, Buffalo Grove, Illinois


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: parachot/parakhod #ukraine

dave_mason@juno.com <dave_mason@...>
 

Sally Altschuler wrote,

"I am trying to find information and pictures of parachots, the
steamboats, that were common on the Dnepr around 1900. I'd be happy for any kind
of information on this mean of transportation."

I think the standard Russian word (and maybe also Ukrainian) would
be "parakhod" which looks like "napaxog" in cyrillic handwriting.

This word seems to apply to any steam-driven vessel, >from steamboats --
similar to those used on american rivers in the 1800s -- up to ocean liners.
For example the Titanic is called a "paraxhod" in Russian.

I have a Russian video "Zhestokiy Romans" (A Cruel Romance) which is
set in the 1800s and features voyages on steamboats and duels. It is
all surprisingly evocative of Mark Twain's writings about the american
south before the Civil War.

Russia apparently continued to rely on river transport for passengers
long after the U.S. switched over to railroads and then automobiles
and buses. There probably still are "paraxhods" in use and you could
probably take a tour on one.

- David Mason


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine town name "Karistishow" #ukraine

Marc D. Machtinger <marc@...>
 

Dear SIG Members:

I have a naturalization record for a family member who came >from Russia
(present day Ukraine). The town of birth is listed as "Karistishow,"
however, I cannot find any such town. Would someone kindly suggest to what
town this might actually refer?

I also have a reference to the town "Chorkas" which is also spelled
"Charkoss(e)." I am assuming this town must be "Cherkassy" on the Dnieper
River. Would anyone suggest otherwise?

Finally, there is reference to a town "Chicos." Can anyone suggest what
town this could possibly be?

I appreciate any assistance. Thanks.

Very truly yours,
Marc D. Machtinger, Buffalo Grove, Illinois


Shaya Poberesky Death Record - Do you recognize parents' names? #ukraine

Christy Odom <christyodom@...>
 

To JewishGen,

I just discovered the Canadian death record for Shaya/Shiel/Yeshia
Poberesky/Rasky. I would be greatly appreciative for any opinions as to what
his parents names might be. They are listed on lines 11 and 13.

It is Viewmate - VM8260

http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=3D8260

Please contact me privately with responses.

I am also searching for any information regarding this family. Thank you in
advance for your assistance.

Christy Odom
christyodom@cox.net


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Shaya Poberesky Death Record - Do you recognize parents' names? #ukraine

Christy Odom <christyodom@...>
 

To JewishGen,

I just discovered the Canadian death record for Shaya/Shiel/Yeshia
Poberesky/Rasky. I would be greatly appreciative for any opinions as to what
his parents names might be. They are listed on lines 11 and 13.

It is Viewmate - VM8260

http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=3D8260

Please contact me privately with responses.

I am also searching for any information regarding this family. Thank you in
advance for your assistance.

Christy Odom
christyodom@cox.net


Re: immigration to Montreal, Canada #general

Robert Israel <israel@...>
 

In article <001501c6b56f$998eaea0$686415ac@homen1ocr0umx2>,
Paul & Irene Berman <ikpjb@netvision.net.il> wrote:

Does anyone know to which port immigrants, whose final destination was meant
to be Montreal, would usually sail in the early part of the twentieth
century?
Montreal, Quebec City, Halifax or Saint John. If they came in
the winter, it would be Halifax or Saint John.

Robert Israel israel@math.ubc.ca
Vancouver, BC, Canada


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: immigration to Montreal, Canada #general

Robert Israel <israel@...>
 

In article <001501c6b56f$998eaea0$686415ac@homen1ocr0umx2>,
Paul & Irene Berman <ikpjb@netvision.net.il> wrote:

Does anyone know to which port immigrants, whose final destination was meant
to be Montreal, would usually sail in the early part of the twentieth
century?
Montreal, Quebec City, Halifax or Saint John. If they came in
the winter, it would be Halifax or Saint John.

Robert Israel israel@math.ubc.ca
Vancouver, BC, Canada


Re: immigration to Montreal, Canada #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

Does anyone know to which port immigrants, whose final destination was meant
to be Montreal, would usually sail in the early part of the twentieth
century?
Irene Berman
Seeking STUPP/ STUPPE of Austria or the Austro -Hungarian Empire, Montreal,
Canada
I have no idea what was usual. But I have one instance of a relative who
debarked alone at the Port of New York in 1900 enroute to Montreal (so says
the passenger manifest), and gave an ultimate-destination address that was
then, as it is now, occupied by a large church, and promptly disappeared
from the planet, as far as I have been able to tell. I also don't know what
happened to the wife and large family he left behind in Lomza.

Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form
there


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: immigration to Montreal, Canada #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

Does anyone know to which port immigrants, whose final destination was meant
to be Montreal, would usually sail in the early part of the twentieth
century?
Irene Berman
Seeking STUPP/ STUPPE of Austria or the Austro -Hungarian Empire, Montreal,
Canada
I have no idea what was usual. But I have one instance of a relative who
debarked alone at the Port of New York in 1900 enroute to Montreal (so says
the passenger manifest), and gave an ultimate-destination address that was
then, as it is now, occupied by a large church, and promptly disappeared
from the planet, as far as I have been able to tell. I also don't know what
happened to the wife and large family he left behind in Lomza.

Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form
there


Re: Are these people the same? #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

Help. I am caught up in a bit of a confusion. I have several
records for a woman named Sarah Borak. I am not sure all
of the records refer to the same person. In some records a
Sora Ryfka Burak has a father named Byszko Burak, in others
Sora Ryfkas fathers name is Bysk Berkowicz. In some records
Sora Ryfka Buraks mother is named Basia z Joelow, and in others,
she is listed as Bejla Joskowna.

She died in 1927. Her gravestone, lists Sarah Burak as daughter of
Binyamin Ha Cohen. Her death certificate listed Benjamin Burak and
Fannie Miller as her parents.

Questions:

1. Was marriage allowed between first cousins in the 1800s era in Lomza,
Poland?
Yes. But I don't think that is what we have here.

2. Is Byszko Burak and Bysk Berkowicz possibly the same person?
They are. "Berkowicz" in this case is a patronymic, not a surname. Sarah's
grandfather is Berko.

3. Is Basia z Joelow (or Joelowna) the same person as Bejla Joskowna
To me, it looks like there has been some confusion at some point between
Basia/Bejla and Joel/Josko. My bet is that there is one woman here.

4. Is Bysk a yiddish diminuitive for Binyamin?
Evidently.


Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form
there.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Are these people the same? #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

Help. I am caught up in a bit of a confusion. I have several
records for a woman named Sarah Borak. I am not sure all
of the records refer to the same person. In some records a
Sora Ryfka Burak has a father named Byszko Burak, in others
Sora Ryfkas fathers name is Bysk Berkowicz. In some records
Sora Ryfka Buraks mother is named Basia z Joelow, and in others,
she is listed as Bejla Joskowna.

She died in 1927. Her gravestone, lists Sarah Burak as daughter of
Binyamin Ha Cohen. Her death certificate listed Benjamin Burak and
Fannie Miller as her parents.

Questions:

1. Was marriage allowed between first cousins in the 1800s era in Lomza,
Poland?
Yes. But I don't think that is what we have here.

2. Is Byszko Burak and Bysk Berkowicz possibly the same person?
They are. "Berkowicz" in this case is a patronymic, not a surname. Sarah's
grandfather is Berko.

3. Is Basia z Joelow (or Joelowna) the same person as Bejla Joskowna
To me, it looks like there has been some confusion at some point between
Basia/Bejla and Joel/Josko. My bet is that there is one woman here.

4. Is Bysk a yiddish diminuitive for Binyamin?
Evidently.


Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form
there.