Date   

Re: Cemetery in NJ #general

Zev Griner <zgriner@...>
 

In general, here is a link to start with when you have questions about
cemeteries:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Cemetery/

Zev Griner

Rochelle P. Gershenow wrote:

I am trying to identify the name of a cemetery I believe to be on Livingston
Avenue in New Brunswick, NJ (USA). It was a Workman's Circle cemetery that
may have been taken over by the city. I understand that it is a locked
cemetery and that one needs to make arrangements to go into it. I also need
contact information so I can inquire about viewing a grave in the cemetery.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Cemetery in NJ #general

Zev Griner <zgriner@...>
 

In general, here is a link to start with when you have questions about
cemeteries:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Cemetery/

Zev Griner

Rochelle P. Gershenow wrote:

I am trying to identify the name of a cemetery I believe to be on Livingston
Avenue in New Brunswick, NJ (USA). It was a Workman's Circle cemetery that
may have been taken over by the city. I understand that it is a locked
cemetery and that one needs to make arrangements to go into it. I also need
contact information so I can inquire about viewing a grave in the cemetery.


Issue 33 of Etsi, Sephardi Genealogical and Historical Review #general

laurphil@...
 

The June issue of Etsi, the Sephardi Genealogical and Historical Review has
just been published. Here are the main articles:
- "The graduates of the Alliance school of boys of Smyrna >from 1873 to
1879"
(with the full list of the 240 pupils who attended the school during this
period).
- "A contested consistorial election in Constantine in 1880" (with the list
of the 53 Jews who contested the election).
- "A description of the Jews of Salonika in 1734" (after a missionary
narrative).
- "The Jewish Community of Gallipoli at the end of the 19th and the
beginning of the 20th century" (with the list of Alliance members in 1884).
- Abstract of the AJOE (Association of Jews Originating >from Egypt)
Conference on the Suez Canal nationalization jubilee, 6 March 2006
- Book review of "Souvenir gourmands d'un Français d'Egypte" (Greedy
memories of a French >from Egypt), by Maurice Bensoussan.

The articles are written in French. As usual, this issue includes summaries
in English and Judeo-Spanish and an index to names and places.

More information: www.geocities.com/Etsi-Sefarad
Philip Abensur (Paris, France)


Benjamin Bilkowitz; may have lived in AL, MS, LA; died before 30 May 1911 #general

Marshaleigh Bahan <mobahan@...>
 

An unexpected turn of events just when I thought that I had some
answers. Esther Jacobs, widow of Benjamin Bilkowiltz, married Saul
Berkoff (Bercoff) 30 May 1911 in New Orleans, Orleans Parish,
Louisiana. The couple and her daughter, Marcia, moved to Houston,
Harris Co., Texas. Saul Bercoff was in 1913-1915 Houston City
Directory; >from 1917-1919 just Esther Bercoff and Marcia Bercoff are
listed. Esther and Marcia Bercoff are on 1920 census for Charleston,
Charleston Co., South Carolina where Esther Bercoff died in 1945. I
have not been able to locate death or divorce of Saul Bercoff.

I am interested in any information about Benjamin Bilkowiltz who may
have been Marcia's father. Marcia was born 8 May 1904 in Biloxi,
Harrison Co., Mississippi. Mississippi did not start keeping birth
records until later. I have found a William Bilkowitz who died 19 June
1910 in Mobile Co., Alabama but have made no connection to Benjamin
Bilkowiltz. Esther Jacobs had a connection to Mobile, Mobile Co.,
Alabama because her nephew, Joseph Meyer Levkoff married Frances
Morningstar in 1901 in Mobile, Al.

There were no Jewish burials in Biloxi, Mississippi with the names of
Bilkowiltz, Bercoff, or Jacobs. Years ago, I couldn't find any Bercoff
reference in Biloxi, Mississippi library and didn't know about
Bilkowiltz until this week. Sadly the library and genealogy section
were severely damaged by Katrina. Any help would be appreciated.

Marshaleigh Bahan


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Issue 33 of Etsi, Sephardi Genealogical and Historical Review #general

laurphil@...
 

The June issue of Etsi, the Sephardi Genealogical and Historical Review has
just been published. Here are the main articles:
- "The graduates of the Alliance school of boys of Smyrna >from 1873 to
1879"
(with the full list of the 240 pupils who attended the school during this
period).
- "A contested consistorial election in Constantine in 1880" (with the list
of the 53 Jews who contested the election).
- "A description of the Jews of Salonika in 1734" (after a missionary
narrative).
- "The Jewish Community of Gallipoli at the end of the 19th and the
beginning of the 20th century" (with the list of Alliance members in 1884).
- Abstract of the AJOE (Association of Jews Originating >from Egypt)
Conference on the Suez Canal nationalization jubilee, 6 March 2006
- Book review of "Souvenir gourmands d'un Français d'Egypte" (Greedy
memories of a French >from Egypt), by Maurice Bensoussan.

The articles are written in French. As usual, this issue includes summaries
in English and Judeo-Spanish and an index to names and places.

More information: www.geocities.com/Etsi-Sefarad
Philip Abensur (Paris, France)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Benjamin Bilkowitz; may have lived in AL, MS, LA; died before 30 May 1911 #general

Marshaleigh Bahan <mobahan@...>
 

An unexpected turn of events just when I thought that I had some
answers. Esther Jacobs, widow of Benjamin Bilkowiltz, married Saul
Berkoff (Bercoff) 30 May 1911 in New Orleans, Orleans Parish,
Louisiana. The couple and her daughter, Marcia, moved to Houston,
Harris Co., Texas. Saul Bercoff was in 1913-1915 Houston City
Directory; >from 1917-1919 just Esther Bercoff and Marcia Bercoff are
listed. Esther and Marcia Bercoff are on 1920 census for Charleston,
Charleston Co., South Carolina where Esther Bercoff died in 1945. I
have not been able to locate death or divorce of Saul Bercoff.

I am interested in any information about Benjamin Bilkowiltz who may
have been Marcia's father. Marcia was born 8 May 1904 in Biloxi,
Harrison Co., Mississippi. Mississippi did not start keeping birth
records until later. I have found a William Bilkowitz who died 19 June
1910 in Mobile Co., Alabama but have made no connection to Benjamin
Bilkowiltz. Esther Jacobs had a connection to Mobile, Mobile Co.,
Alabama because her nephew, Joseph Meyer Levkoff married Frances
Morningstar in 1901 in Mobile, Al.

There were no Jewish burials in Biloxi, Mississippi with the names of
Bilkowiltz, Bercoff, or Jacobs. Years ago, I couldn't find any Bercoff
reference in Biloxi, Mississippi library and didn't know about
Bilkowiltz until this week. Sadly the library and genealogy section
were severely damaged by Katrina. Any help would be appreciated.

Marshaleigh Bahan


MEYERSON - Arrival 1906 - Where? #general

Jan Groshan <jangro@...>
 

I've hit yet another brick wall and you genners have been so helpful in the
past, I'm hoping you can help yet again. My grandfather, Abraham MEYERSON,
came to the US in May 1904 on the SS Rotterdam. I have a copy of the
manifest and it appears he arrived alone. According to census documents, my
grandmother (Rose Bertha) and, most probably two children, Gertrude (aka
Gussie, aka Gittel) and Meyer (aka Mike) arrived two years later, in 1906.
Gertrude would have been about 2 years old and Meyer about 3 years old, Rose
Bertha would have been about 28. Abraham was living in New York at the time,
so I would guess they arrived in New York as well, but the Ellis Island
database has been no help, nor has the major genealogy website. Would any of
you ingenious genners have any idea where I can turn next to find how, when
and where these three individuals came to the U.S.?

Jan Groshan


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen MEYERSON - Arrival 1906 - Where? #general

Jan Groshan <jangro@...>
 

I've hit yet another brick wall and you genners have been so helpful in the
past, I'm hoping you can help yet again. My grandfather, Abraham MEYERSON,
came to the US in May 1904 on the SS Rotterdam. I have a copy of the
manifest and it appears he arrived alone. According to census documents, my
grandmother (Rose Bertha) and, most probably two children, Gertrude (aka
Gussie, aka Gittel) and Meyer (aka Mike) arrived two years later, in 1906.
Gertrude would have been about 2 years old and Meyer about 3 years old, Rose
Bertha would have been about 28. Abraham was living in New York at the time,
so I would guess they arrived in New York as well, but the Ellis Island
database has been no help, nor has the major genealogy website. Would any of
you ingenious genners have any idea where I can turn next to find how, when
and where these three individuals came to the U.S.?

Jan Groshan


Beuthen naming practices at birth #germany

graupner@...
 

Dear Moderator,

As requested, here is a summary of the responses to the question I asked
recently about surnames for children whose record of birth does not show the
name of a husband for the mother.

There have been eight responses, either directly to me or in the GerSIG forum.

Needless to say, there was a wide range of opinions as to what the
"anerkannt" signifies.

However, on the (to me) important part of my original posting, namely, what
surname to give the child in the JRI-PL Bytom database, the score >from the
responses was, one in favour of the mother's name, and two in favour of the
father's name, with a further two appearing to lean towards the father,

As a result, I have decided to apply the father's name to these birth
records.

All respondents are thanked for their input. This SIG is a great sounding board.

Henry Graupner Guelph, Ontario, Canada <graupner@rogers.com>
JRI-PL Bytom Coordinator


German SIG #Germany Beuthen naming practices at birth #germany

graupner@...
 

Dear Moderator,

As requested, here is a summary of the responses to the question I asked
recently about surnames for children whose record of birth does not show the
name of a husband for the mother.

There have been eight responses, either directly to me or in the GerSIG forum.

Needless to say, there was a wide range of opinions as to what the
"anerkannt" signifies.

However, on the (to me) important part of my original posting, namely, what
surname to give the child in the JRI-PL Bytom database, the score >from the
responses was, one in favour of the mother's name, and two in favour of the
father's name, with a further two appearing to lean towards the father,

As a result, I have decided to apply the father's name to these birth
records.

All respondents are thanked for their input. This SIG is a great sounding board.

Henry Graupner Guelph, Ontario, Canada <graupner@rogers.com>
JRI-PL Bytom Coordinator


RIESER from Pflaumloch and Laupheim..? and maybe Noerdlingen ? #germany

Adam Yamey <adamandlopa@...>
 

My mother's matrilineal
great great great grandfather was Hirsch Naftali
RIESER (b: June 3, 1757 in Pflaumloch d: 1818 in
Laupheim - in Laupheim there was a very large RIESER
family). I have read on
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/N%C3%B6rdlingen> that
Jews expelled in about 1400 >from Noerdlingen, in the
Ries Crater, were largely accepted by the town of
Laupheim. On
<http://www.alemannia-judaica.de/tracking_jewish_history.htm>
I read that the jews who settled in Pflaumloch in the
15th century may have arrived there after they were
thrown out of Noerdlingen.

Is it too fanciful an idea to consider that the
possibility that the surname RIESER may reflect the
origins of my mother's family in the Ries crater area
in which Noerdlingen is situated?

Adam Yamey, London, UK <adamandlopa@yahoo.co.uk>

MODERATOR NOTE: Send your theories on origins of the RIESER name to Mr. Yamey
privately. He will send a summary of your responses to the list.


German SIG #Germany RIESER from Pflaumloch and Laupheim..? and maybe Noerdlingen ? #germany

Adam Yamey <adamandlopa@...>
 

My mother's matrilineal
great great great grandfather was Hirsch Naftali
RIESER (b: June 3, 1757 in Pflaumloch d: 1818 in
Laupheim - in Laupheim there was a very large RIESER
family). I have read on
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/N%C3%B6rdlingen> that
Jews expelled in about 1400 >from Noerdlingen, in the
Ries Crater, were largely accepted by the town of
Laupheim. On
<http://www.alemannia-judaica.de/tracking_jewish_history.htm>
I read that the jews who settled in Pflaumloch in the
15th century may have arrived there after they were
thrown out of Noerdlingen.

Is it too fanciful an idea to consider that the
possibility that the surname RIESER may reflect the
origins of my mother's family in the Ries crater area
in which Noerdlingen is situated?

Adam Yamey, London, UK <adamandlopa@yahoo.co.uk>

MODERATOR NOTE: Send your theories on origins of the RIESER name to Mr. Yamey
privately. He will send a summary of your responses to the list.


Re: SCHUSTER- Frankfurt am Main- "Juedische Hocharistokratie" #germany

Andres J Bonet <andresbonet@...>
 

In reply to Adam Yamey:

It was interesting to read you comment. I would say that the "Jüdische
Hocharistokratie" was formed by inheritance, being of the leaders of the
Jewish community, which formed real aristocratic lines in the history of all
Jewish important families and success (money) which was the second form to
pick interest >from the ruling persons in each community.
If you read my article in the Sharsheret Ha Dorot magazine of the IGS
(published in internet) you'll find one of these lines, the
SHEMTOB-KALONYMOS-BONET. They used to inherit the leadership of a community
and in some moments were too head of all comunities.

I personally, was born in Bonn. Bonn is the city in Germany of which many
Jews took their name. But I have been since ever very curious to know the
origin of that name, so I studied that the romans took over an existing
village and romanized its name. But the coincidence that made me have some
doubt was the fact that my familyname BONET, an old Spanish and for Jews an
even older Jewish sephardic name has since very soon used a coat of arms, a
seal or image that represented the rampant lion of Judah that is so much to
see in Jerusalem. The colors of this coat of arms are too quite old and have
the same deep meaning as the stars of David used on top of the lion. What
was my surprise to find the same lion and colors with a little variant on
the stars which is replaced by a cross, at the city of Bonn. A coincidence?
I do not believe in coincidences. The Kalonymus, family of sages and a saga
in itself did go to Germany to establish the first (really the first?, I
have again my doubts) Jewish communities and were very well known in Mainz.
KALONYMUS is a name meaning "the good", the good line that descended of King
David. I wonder if the BONN family used any symbol to represent themselves.

"Andres J Bonet" <andresbonet@hotmail.com> Madrid (Spain)
(collaborating member of the Spanish Royal Academy of Genealogy and Heraldry)


German SIG #Germany Re: SCHUSTER- Frankfurt am Main- "Juedische Hocharistokratie" #germany

Andres J Bonet <andresbonet@...>
 

In reply to Adam Yamey:

It was interesting to read you comment. I would say that the "Jüdische
Hocharistokratie" was formed by inheritance, being of the leaders of the
Jewish community, which formed real aristocratic lines in the history of all
Jewish important families and success (money) which was the second form to
pick interest >from the ruling persons in each community.
If you read my article in the Sharsheret Ha Dorot magazine of the IGS
(published in internet) you'll find one of these lines, the
SHEMTOB-KALONYMOS-BONET. They used to inherit the leadership of a community
and in some moments were too head of all comunities.

I personally, was born in Bonn. Bonn is the city in Germany of which many
Jews took their name. But I have been since ever very curious to know the
origin of that name, so I studied that the romans took over an existing
village and romanized its name. But the coincidence that made me have some
doubt was the fact that my familyname BONET, an old Spanish and for Jews an
even older Jewish sephardic name has since very soon used a coat of arms, a
seal or image that represented the rampant lion of Judah that is so much to
see in Jerusalem. The colors of this coat of arms are too quite old and have
the same deep meaning as the stars of David used on top of the lion. What
was my surprise to find the same lion and colors with a little variant on
the stars which is replaced by a cross, at the city of Bonn. A coincidence?
I do not believe in coincidences. The Kalonymus, family of sages and a saga
in itself did go to Germany to establish the first (really the first?, I
have again my doubts) Jewish communities and were very well known in Mainz.
KALONYMUS is a name meaning "the good", the good line that descended of King
David. I wonder if the BONN family used any symbol to represent themselves.

"Andres J Bonet" <andresbonet@hotmail.com> Madrid (Spain)
(collaborating member of the Spanish Royal Academy of Genealogy and Heraldry)


Re: PAIS - the name #general

Ury Link
 

Dear Genners,
Cecilia wrote:


The Great Synagogue marriage transcriptions show marriages in the
early 19C where the groom's father was named Aryeh PAIS.

I am curious as to the meaning (if any) of Pais.>>>

My answer is: The giving name Pais is a nickname that is derived >from the
name Faybush that also is a nickname to the Hebrew Biblical name Uri. It
is a long story to tell why it came to this name and if you look in the
JewishGen archive you find a lot of letters about the name Faybush ,Pais and
Uri. This nickname was very popular in Holland and it is also used as a
family name.

Best regards
Ury Link
Amsterdam
Holland


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: PAIS - the name #general

Ury Link
 

Dear Genners,
Cecilia wrote:


The Great Synagogue marriage transcriptions show marriages in the
early 19C where the groom's father was named Aryeh PAIS.

I am curious as to the meaning (if any) of Pais.>>>

My answer is: The giving name Pais is a nickname that is derived >from the
name Faybush that also is a nickname to the Hebrew Biblical name Uri. It
is a long story to tell why it came to this name and if you look in the
JewishGen archive you find a lot of letters about the name Faybush ,Pais and
Uri. This nickname was very popular in Holland and it is also used as a
family name.

Best regards
Ury Link
Amsterdam
Holland


PAIS - the name #general

kalman@...
 

PAIS may be a "Hungarized" name: "pajzs" means "shield" in Hungarian, and
a somewhat archaic spelling is "pais". (There is a famous Hungarian
linguist whose name is Dezsõ Pais.)

Gyorgy C. Kalman


Subject: PAIS - the name
From: myths@ic24.net (cecilia)
Date: Fri, 04 Aug 2006 13:58:11 GMT
X-Message-Number: 5

The Great Synagogue marriage transcriptions show marriages in the
early 19C where the groom's father was named Aryeh PAIS.

http://www.breslov.org/bmovement.html mentions Avraham Pais and his
son Chaim Pais in Breslov in the early 19C, and Abraham Pais the
physicist (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abraham_Pais) was a 20C
example.

I am curious as to the meaning (if any) of Pais.

Cecilia Nyleve


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen PAIS - the name #general

kalman@...
 

PAIS may be a "Hungarized" name: "pajzs" means "shield" in Hungarian, and
a somewhat archaic spelling is "pais". (There is a famous Hungarian
linguist whose name is Dezsõ Pais.)

Gyorgy C. Kalman


Subject: PAIS - the name
From: myths@ic24.net (cecilia)
Date: Fri, 04 Aug 2006 13:58:11 GMT
X-Message-Number: 5

The Great Synagogue marriage transcriptions show marriages in the
early 19C where the groom's father was named Aryeh PAIS.

http://www.breslov.org/bmovement.html mentions Avraham Pais and his
son Chaim Pais in Breslov in the early 19C, and Abraham Pais the
physicist (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abraham_Pais) was a 20C
example.

I am curious as to the meaning (if any) of Pais.

Cecilia Nyleve


Emigration From Cuba 1930 #general

Ellen Shindelman Kowitt
 

I would recommend checking passenger lists for Florida ports since that was
a common entry point into the U.S. >from Cuba.

My Russian born grandfather was stuck in Cuba in 1924 after the U.S. shut
down immigration. He remained there until the U.S. opened again in 1930.
He sailed >from Havana to Key West, where he took a train up the coast to New
York City to be with family. An uncle had earlier arrived in the port of
Tampa, Florida in 1923 >from Havana.

Ellen Shindelman Kowitt
Denver, CO


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Emigration From Cuba 1930 #general

Ellen Shindelman Kowitt
 

I would recommend checking passenger lists for Florida ports since that was
a common entry point into the U.S. >from Cuba.

My Russian born grandfather was stuck in Cuba in 1924 after the U.S. shut
down immigration. He remained there until the U.S. opened again in 1930.
He sailed >from Havana to Key West, where he took a train up the coast to New
York City to be with family. An uncle had earlier arrived in the port of
Tampa, Florida in 1923 >from Havana.

Ellen Shindelman Kowitt
Denver, CO