Date   

LitvakSIG Membership Dues #lithuania

Davida Noyek Handler <dnhiowa@...>
 

Dear LitvakSIG membership:

I am posting this at the request of Richard Hoffman, LitvakSIG
Membership/Treasurer - who is in transit to the IAJGS conference in New
York as I write.

You may of course pay your membership dues at the LitvakSIG meeting. We
anticipate a large attendance at this meeting, and the agenda is full.
Richard has requested that those wishing to facilitate matters and not
take time >from the business of the meeting may leave their membership
checks at the front desk in an envelope marked to his attention. He
will be checking his messages daily. Members will receive their
receipts at the meeting, or if not in attendance at the meeting, they
will then receive them at the LitvakSIG luncheon.

Thank you for your cooperation.

Davida Noyek Handler
Immediate Past President, LitvakSIG


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania LitvakSIG Membership Dues #lithuania

Davida Noyek Handler <dnhiowa@...>
 

Dear LitvakSIG membership:

I am posting this at the request of Richard Hoffman, LitvakSIG
Membership/Treasurer - who is in transit to the IAJGS conference in New
York as I write.

You may of course pay your membership dues at the LitvakSIG meeting. We
anticipate a large attendance at this meeting, and the agenda is full.
Richard has requested that those wishing to facilitate matters and not
take time >from the business of the meeting may leave their membership
checks at the front desk in an envelope marked to his attention. He
will be checking his messages daily. Members will receive their
receipts at the meeting, or if not in attendance at the meeting, they
will then receive them at the LitvakSIG luncheon.

Thank you for your cooperation.

Davida Noyek Handler
Immediate Past President, LitvakSIG


Eilat Gordin Levitan's home page #lithuania

Berny 'Scouser' Goodheart <berny.goodheart@...>
 

I don't recall seeing anyone post a link to this site before
But this is a brilliant resource.

http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/index.html

Cheers,
Berny Goodhart


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Eilat Gordin Levitan's home page #lithuania

Berny 'Scouser' Goodheart <berny.goodheart@...>
 

I don't recall seeing anyone post a link to this site before
But this is a brilliant resource.

http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/index.html

Cheers,
Berny Goodhart


"Tracing the Tribe" blog #poland

Gloria Berkenstat Freund
 

Schelly Talalay Dardashti is now writing a Jewish genealogy blog called
"Tracing the Tribe."

Its start date was selected to lead up to and cover the 26th IAJGS
International Conference on Jewish Genealogy.

Schelly will interview speakers and conference attendees, and report on
events, innovations and resources.

Find it at http://tracingthetribe.blogspot.com.

Schelly was requested to begin this new venture by JTA (Jewish Telegraphic
Agency), www.jta.org, and it is the first blog to be associated with the
news agency.

For more information on the Conference, visit www.jgsny2006.org.

Gloria Berkenstat Freund
26th IAJGS Conference Program Committee Chair
<glory1@RCN.COM>


JRI Poland #Poland "Tracing the Tribe" blog #poland

Gloria Berkenstat Freund
 

Schelly Talalay Dardashti is now writing a Jewish genealogy blog called
"Tracing the Tribe."

Its start date was selected to lead up to and cover the 26th IAJGS
International Conference on Jewish Genealogy.

Schelly will interview speakers and conference attendees, and report on
events, innovations and resources.

Find it at http://tracingthetribe.blogspot.com.

Schelly was requested to begin this new venture by JTA (Jewish Telegraphic
Agency), www.jta.org, and it is the first blog to be associated with the
news agency.

For more information on the Conference, visit www.jgsny2006.org.

Gloria Berkenstat Freund
26th IAJGS Conference Program Committee Chair
<glory1@RCN.COM>


Nowa Slupia Project at the Kielce Archives #poland

Erez Gotlieb <erezgot@...>
 

Dear Fellow Researchers,

The Jewish Records Indexing - Poland project is happy
to announce that the indices to all the Jewish vital
records of Nowa Slupia - not filmed by the LDS
(Mormons) - have been indexed by the JRI-Poland team
in Warsaw as part of the Kielce Polish State Archives
(PSA) Project.

Nowa Slupia is located in the Konskie powiat, 30.6
kilometers E of Kielce and 153.9 kilometers S of
Warsaw.

SUMMARY OF NOWA SLUPIA RECORDS BEING INDEXED

There are more than 950 records being indexed as part
of this project. The types and years of records are
as follows:

Births: 1890-1901
Marriages: 1894-1901
Deaths: 1890-1901.

SURNAMES FOUND IN THE NEW INDICES

These are the most common surnames found in the Nowa
Slupia indices.

BLUSZTEJN (32), CHAJBLUM (12), CUKER (24), CUKERMAN
(12), DRELICH (11), FELDMAN (20), FROCHTMAN (42),
GERSZENCHORN (11), GOLDGROB (13), GRYNBAUM (13),
GRYNBLAT (15), GRYNFOGEL (12), GRYNGLAS (17), GUTWILEN
(25), KAC (16), KLAJNBERG (16), ROTFOGEL (40),
ROTSZTEJN (21), SANEK (13), WAJNSZTOK (26), WAJSBLAT
(26).

If you would like to know the number of times any
surname appears in the new indices or more about the
Nowa Slupia project or may be interested in becoming
the Nowa Slupia Town Leader, please contact me at:
erezgot@yahoo.com.

A donation of any amount is greatly appreciated. All
researchers who contribute a minimum of $90 will be
eligible to obtain an EXCEL spreadsheet with every
record in the Nowa Slupia project for their own
personal research. Researchers are requested to sign
a Database Sharing Agreement, agreeing to the use for
personal research, prior to distributing the Excel
file.

Donations can now be accepted by check, VISA, or
MasterCard! Please earmark your donation for the
"Nowa Slupia PSA Project." Mail checks to:

Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
c/o Sheila Salo
5607 Greenleaf Road
Cheverly, MD 20785
USA

VISA and Mastercard contributions may be phoned to
Sheila at (301) 341-1261 or print out the form at:
http://www.jri-poland.org/visa.htm by clicking on the
VISA Card and fax or mail it to Sheila. The fax
number is also (301) 341-1261 (8:00 AM to 8:00 PM
Eastern time only, please). For selected countries,
JRI-Poland is able to accept bank drafts in a donor's
local currency. Please check the JRI-Poland
contributions web page for the list of countries. The
web site address is:
http://www.jri-poland.org/contrib-non-us.htm.

If your country is not on the list and you do not wish
to pay by credit card, please contact Sheila Salo for
help.

Many other towns in the Kielce area are part of this
project. If you are interested in any other town in
the Kielce area, please contact me at
erezgot@yahoo.com.

Best wishes,
Erez Gotlieb, Tenafly, New Jersey, erezgot@yahoo.com
Kielce PSA Project


JRI Poland #Poland Nowa Slupia Project at the Kielce Archives #poland

Erez Gotlieb <erezgot@...>
 

Dear Fellow Researchers,

The Jewish Records Indexing - Poland project is happy
to announce that the indices to all the Jewish vital
records of Nowa Slupia - not filmed by the LDS
(Mormons) - have been indexed by the JRI-Poland team
in Warsaw as part of the Kielce Polish State Archives
(PSA) Project.

Nowa Slupia is located in the Konskie powiat, 30.6
kilometers E of Kielce and 153.9 kilometers S of
Warsaw.

SUMMARY OF NOWA SLUPIA RECORDS BEING INDEXED

There are more than 950 records being indexed as part
of this project. The types and years of records are
as follows:

Births: 1890-1901
Marriages: 1894-1901
Deaths: 1890-1901.

SURNAMES FOUND IN THE NEW INDICES

These are the most common surnames found in the Nowa
Slupia indices.

BLUSZTEJN (32), CHAJBLUM (12), CUKER (24), CUKERMAN
(12), DRELICH (11), FELDMAN (20), FROCHTMAN (42),
GERSZENCHORN (11), GOLDGROB (13), GRYNBAUM (13),
GRYNBLAT (15), GRYNFOGEL (12), GRYNGLAS (17), GUTWILEN
(25), KAC (16), KLAJNBERG (16), ROTFOGEL (40),
ROTSZTEJN (21), SANEK (13), WAJNSZTOK (26), WAJSBLAT
(26).

If you would like to know the number of times any
surname appears in the new indices or more about the
Nowa Slupia project or may be interested in becoming
the Nowa Slupia Town Leader, please contact me at:
erezgot@yahoo.com.

A donation of any amount is greatly appreciated. All
researchers who contribute a minimum of $90 will be
eligible to obtain an EXCEL spreadsheet with every
record in the Nowa Slupia project for their own
personal research. Researchers are requested to sign
a Database Sharing Agreement, agreeing to the use for
personal research, prior to distributing the Excel
file.

Donations can now be accepted by check, VISA, or
MasterCard! Please earmark your donation for the
"Nowa Slupia PSA Project." Mail checks to:

Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
c/o Sheila Salo
5607 Greenleaf Road
Cheverly, MD 20785
USA

VISA and Mastercard contributions may be phoned to
Sheila at (301) 341-1261 or print out the form at:
http://www.jri-poland.org/visa.htm by clicking on the
VISA Card and fax or mail it to Sheila. The fax
number is also (301) 341-1261 (8:00 AM to 8:00 PM
Eastern time only, please). For selected countries,
JRI-Poland is able to accept bank drafts in a donor's
local currency. Please check the JRI-Poland
contributions web page for the list of countries. The
web site address is:
http://www.jri-poland.org/contrib-non-us.htm.

If your country is not on the list and you do not wish
to pay by credit card, please contact Sheila Salo for
help.

Many other towns in the Kielce area are part of this
project. If you are interested in any other town in
the Kielce area, please contact me at
erezgot@yahoo.com.

Best wishes,
Erez Gotlieb, Tenafly, New Jersey, erezgot@yahoo.com
Kielce PSA Project


Re: former street name in riga and liepaja (libau0 #latvia

Tony Crook <tonycrook@...>
 

Dear Professor Salkind,

I am no knowledgeable expert, just another Jewish-genner, so you might
already have tried the following: Rita Bogdanova at the National Jewish
Archives in Riga, but also I had a good contact in Liepaja a couple of
years ago who helped me. Rita's mother comes >from Liepaja, but you could
try my contact, Ilana Ivanova, who is at <ilana@metalurgs.lv>

Ilana has done much work on Jewish genealogy in Liepaja, and she might
recall my name if you wish to use me as a referral.

Good luck, Tony Crook, Gloucestershire, UK

-----------------------------------
Prof Salkind wrote:
Does anyone know of a street in Riga or Liepaja named Nicolai Strasse.
It is where my grandfather Moshe SALKIND lived before he and my family
were shot in Riga.
-----------------------------------


Latvia SIG #Latvia Re: former street name in riga and liepaja (libau0 #latvia

Tony Crook <tonycrook@...>
 

Dear Professor Salkind,

I am no knowledgeable expert, just another Jewish-genner, so you might
already have tried the following: Rita Bogdanova at the National Jewish
Archives in Riga, but also I had a good contact in Liepaja a couple of
years ago who helped me. Rita's mother comes >from Liepaja, but you could
try my contact, Ilana Ivanova, who is at <ilana@metalurgs.lv>

Ilana has done much work on Jewish genealogy in Liepaja, and she might
recall my name if you wish to use me as a referral.

Good luck, Tony Crook, Gloucestershire, UK

-----------------------------------
Prof Salkind wrote:
Does anyone know of a street in Riga or Liepaja named Nicolai Strasse.
It is where my grandfather Moshe SALKIND lived before he and my family
were shot in Riga.
-----------------------------------


Re: Lomza naming patterns #general

Alexander Sharon
 

"Stan Goodman" wrote
Shari Kantrow opined:

Hello,
In researching family names for the first time in
Lomza mid 19th century (1830's-1880's), I came across
something I had not seen before and wonder what your
thoughts are on this. I noticed that unlike in other
towns I had researched in Galicia or Ukraine, the
naming patterns in the Lomza region were very
patryonymic, for example, Herszkowicz,Danielowicz,
Abramowicz,etc. Would several generations keep that
name once assigned; or would it change with each
person? For example, Daniel's son Abram would be Abram
Danielowicz, and likewise, would Abram's son Mendel be
Mendel Abramowicz?
If a patronym survives for several generatons, then it is not a patronym but
a surname. Depending on where you live, you may be surrounded by examples
of surnames derived >from patronyms, changed only to accomodate American
orthographical conventions, e.g. "Moskowitz".

Note that not everything that ends in "-wicz" was ever a patronym. An
example is "Rabinowicz" (Rabinowitz), which indicates the son of the
Rabbi.
Your own name is another example, because "Kantrow" is clipped from
"Kantrowicz", the son of the H.azan, the Cantor. The son of the Tsar was
"Tsarewicz", in Polish spelling.
Actually Stan, in Polish, spelling is Carewicz, and is not not a popular
Polish name.
Rather Krolewicz.

On the other hand, Kantrow is another Russian variation of the surname
making that are ending with -ov, e.g. Pietrov (son of Peter). It is not
"clipped" >from Kantrowicz, it has been developed "directly", depending in
what part of the Empire person was a residents. Names ending with -owicz are
typical to Lithuania - Belarus regions, different pattern were in Podolia or
the southern parts of the Empire.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Ab.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Lomza naming patterns #general

Alexander Sharon
 

"Stan Goodman" wrote
Shari Kantrow opined:

Hello,
In researching family names for the first time in
Lomza mid 19th century (1830's-1880's), I came across
something I had not seen before and wonder what your
thoughts are on this. I noticed that unlike in other
towns I had researched in Galicia or Ukraine, the
naming patterns in the Lomza region were very
patryonymic, for example, Herszkowicz,Danielowicz,
Abramowicz,etc. Would several generations keep that
name once assigned; or would it change with each
person? For example, Daniel's son Abram would be Abram
Danielowicz, and likewise, would Abram's son Mendel be
Mendel Abramowicz?
If a patronym survives for several generatons, then it is not a patronym but
a surname. Depending on where you live, you may be surrounded by examples
of surnames derived >from patronyms, changed only to accomodate American
orthographical conventions, e.g. "Moskowitz".

Note that not everything that ends in "-wicz" was ever a patronym. An
example is "Rabinowicz" (Rabinowitz), which indicates the son of the
Rabbi.
Your own name is another example, because "Kantrow" is clipped from
"Kantrowicz", the son of the H.azan, the Cantor. The son of the Tsar was
"Tsarewicz", in Polish spelling.
Actually Stan, in Polish, spelling is Carewicz, and is not not a popular
Polish name.
Rather Krolewicz.

On the other hand, Kantrow is another Russian variation of the surname
making that are ending with -ov, e.g. Pietrov (son of Peter). It is not
"clipped" >from Kantrowicz, it has been developed "directly", depending in
what part of the Empire person was a residents. Names ending with -owicz are
typical to Lithuania - Belarus regions, different pattern were in Podolia or
the southern parts of the Empire.

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Ab.


help with Romanian on old postcards #romania

Bruce Dumes <brucedumes@...>
 

I'm not sure if this is the right forum for this, but if anyone can
help translate these postcards, it would be greatly appreciated!


http://dumes.net/familypics/Phyllis_Abels_Dumes/Zucker_postcard_1.jpg
http://dumes.net/familypics/Phyllis_Abels_Dumes/Zucker_postcard_2.jpg
http://dumes.net/familypics/Phyllis_Abels_Dumes/Zucker_postcard_3.jpg

My grandmother's family came >from Serbesti, Romania. She came to
America with her younger brother in 1907. My mother still has her
Romanian passport. Thankfully it's written in French on one side,
which makes translation much easier! Here's a link for your amusement:

http://dumes.net/familypics/Phyllis_Abels_Dumes/
Ida_Zucker_Romanian_Passport.jpg

Feel free to visit my website, http://dumes.net! There's more there
about my Russian side than my Romanian, but it's still got a lot of
fun stuff.

Regards,
Bruce Dumes


MODERATOR NOTE: Please remember to add your place of residence
(ciy, state or country) to your signature line when sending
messages to any JewishGen site. Thank you!


Romania SIG #Romania help with Romanian on old postcards #romania

Bruce Dumes <brucedumes@...>
 

I'm not sure if this is the right forum for this, but if anyone can
help translate these postcards, it would be greatly appreciated!


http://dumes.net/familypics/Phyllis_Abels_Dumes/Zucker_postcard_1.jpg
http://dumes.net/familypics/Phyllis_Abels_Dumes/Zucker_postcard_2.jpg
http://dumes.net/familypics/Phyllis_Abels_Dumes/Zucker_postcard_3.jpg

My grandmother's family came >from Serbesti, Romania. She came to
America with her younger brother in 1907. My mother still has her
Romanian passport. Thankfully it's written in French on one side,
which makes translation much easier! Here's a link for your amusement:

http://dumes.net/familypics/Phyllis_Abels_Dumes/
Ida_Zucker_Romanian_Passport.jpg

Feel free to visit my website, http://dumes.net! There's more there
about my Russian side than my Romanian, but it's still got a lot of
fun stuff.

Regards,
Bruce Dumes


MODERATOR NOTE: Please remember to add your place of residence
(ciy, state or country) to your signature line when sending
messages to any JewishGen site. Thank you!


Looking for a book & translation #general

Ron Bing <fyrguy6@...>
 

Dear Genners,

I am hoping someone can assist me. I have been trying
to find someone with a copy of the book The History of
Chabad in the United States that would be willing to
read and translate a section for me.
There is a part of the book that discusses my great
great grandfather Abraham Marrinson-possibly Avrohom
HaCohen Marrinson in the book. He was a Hebrew teacher
and helped establish a Chabad Lubavitch group in the
St Paul, MN area in the early 1900's.
I know this is alot to ask but It is written in Hebrew
which is why I would need someone to translate the
section for me.
Please contact me privately if you can help me with
this. Thank you in advance.
Stacey Marrinson Bing
Mundelein, IL
fyrguy6@yahoo.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Looking for a book & translation #general

Ron Bing <fyrguy6@...>
 

Dear Genners,

I am hoping someone can assist me. I have been trying
to find someone with a copy of the book The History of
Chabad in the United States that would be willing to
read and translate a section for me.
There is a part of the book that discusses my great
great grandfather Abraham Marrinson-possibly Avrohom
HaCohen Marrinson in the book. He was a Hebrew teacher
and helped establish a Chabad Lubavitch group in the
St Paul, MN area in the early 1900's.
I know this is alot to ask but It is written in Hebrew
which is why I would need someone to translate the
section for me.
Please contact me privately if you can help me with
this. Thank you in advance.
Stacey Marrinson Bing
Mundelein, IL
fyrguy6@yahoo.com


Re: Lomza naming patterns #general

tom klein <jewishgen@...>
 

In Russian (and I believe Poland was under Russian rule at the time),
it is still quite normal to list a person's patronymic between their
given and family name.

I believe you are interested in a time period that roughly coincides
with the introduction of fixed family names in Poland (c. 1821), so
there may also have been a mixture or crossover of patronymics and
fixed surnames.

....... Tom Klein, Toronto

Shari Kantrow <sjoysk@yahoo.com> wrote:

In researching family names for the first time in
Lomza mid 19th century (1830's-1880's), I came across
something I had not seen before and wonder what your
thoughts are on this. I noticed that unlike in other
towns I had researched in Galicia or Ukraine, the
naming patterns in the Lomza region were very
patryonymic, for example, Herszkowicz,Danielowicz,
Abramowicz,etc. Would several generations keep that
name once assigned; or would it change with each
person? For example, Daniel's son Abram would be Abram
Danielowicz, and likewise, would Abram's son Mendel be
Mendel Abramowicz?
I am very confused. Please share your thoughts.
Shari Kantrow


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Lomza naming patterns #general

tom klein <jewishgen@...>
 

In Russian (and I believe Poland was under Russian rule at the time),
it is still quite normal to list a person's patronymic between their
given and family name.

I believe you are interested in a time period that roughly coincides
with the introduction of fixed family names in Poland (c. 1821), so
there may also have been a mixture or crossover of patronymics and
fixed surnames.

....... Tom Klein, Toronto

Shari Kantrow <sjoysk@yahoo.com> wrote:

In researching family names for the first time in
Lomza mid 19th century (1830's-1880's), I came across
something I had not seen before and wonder what your
thoughts are on this. I noticed that unlike in other
towns I had researched in Galicia or Ukraine, the
naming patterns in the Lomza region were very
patryonymic, for example, Herszkowicz,Danielowicz,
Abramowicz,etc. Would several generations keep that
name once assigned; or would it change with each
person? For example, Daniel's son Abram would be Abram
Danielowicz, and likewise, would Abram's son Mendel be
Mendel Abramowicz?
I am very confused. Please share your thoughts.
Shari Kantrow


Re: Help with a family letter #general

Ken <yellow@...>
 

John

I get the feeling that he was not 'of Royalty' but somehow used the
expression to express disdain for the Russians.

There was problably a rise in anti-semitic activity at the time and he was
saying that, while the Russians might think they are superior to the Jews,
he feels the Jews are far superior to the Russins, as would be implied by
the expression he used.

In the same way as he obviosly could not have literally meant that Peter the
Great was a goatherd, he might not literally mean that his family were of
royalty.

Ken Lipworth

"John L." <darien4blues@yahoo.com> wrote:

Greetings fellow researchers,

An old family letter >from an aunt states that my
Grandfather used to say "his family was of Royalty
when Peter the Great was a goat herder". Assuming
there is some truth here and he was Russian and
Jewish, under what circumstances could he be from
Royalty at the time of Peter the Great?
Thanks for your help.

John LeVinge


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Help with a family letter #general

Ken <yellow@...>
 

John

I get the feeling that he was not 'of Royalty' but somehow used the
expression to express disdain for the Russians.

There was problably a rise in anti-semitic activity at the time and he was
saying that, while the Russians might think they are superior to the Jews,
he feels the Jews are far superior to the Russins, as would be implied by
the expression he used.

In the same way as he obviosly could not have literally meant that Peter the
Great was a goatherd, he might not literally mean that his family were of
royalty.

Ken Lipworth

"John L." <darien4blues@yahoo.com> wrote:

Greetings fellow researchers,

An old family letter >from an aunt states that my
Grandfather used to say "his family was of Royalty
when Peter the Great was a goat herder". Assuming
there is some truth here and he was Russian and
Jewish, under what circumstances could he be from
Royalty at the time of Peter the Great?
Thanks for your help.

John LeVinge