Date   

Selie near Lomza? #poland

elliott <elliottmalkin@...>
 

Dear Bialystok SIG,

I have an apparent contradiction in my genealogical records and was
hoping that you could help me resolve it.

The Ellis Island Ship Manifest (1913) for my great-grandfather Hyman
Victor lists his place of birth as "Lomza." He was born in 1883.

But his Declaration of Intent (1916) for American citizenship lists
"Selie, Russia" as his place of birth.

I'm wondering if anyone might know if Selie was a town outside of
Lomza or if Lomza was considered a region in addition to a city.
Perhaps Selie is the improper spelling.

Any advice (and links to maps) would be greatly appreciated.

Sincerely,
Elliott Malkin


Yizkor Book Project July 2006 Report #poland

Joyce Field
 

The Yizkor Book Project added one new book, one new entry, and 14
updates for July 2006. All new material has been flagged for easy
recognition at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html.

New book:

-Jonava, Lithuania

New entry:

-Jalowka, Poland: Pinkas HaKehillot, Vol. VIII

Updates:

-Chelm, Poland
-Dabrowa, Poland
-Dusetos, Lithuania
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Kamen Kashirskiy, Ukraine
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Lita
-Molchadz, Belarus
-Novogrudok, Belarus: this book has now been completely translated
-Orgeyev (Orhei), Moldova: this book has now been completely translated
-Sochaczew, Poland
-Sosnowiec, Poland
-The Terrible Choice: new essays on Vasily Grossman, Mosze Meryn, and
Emanuel Ringelblum
-Zloczew, Poland

We want to thank all the coordinators of yizkor book translation
projects for their perseverance and dedication. Without their
talents and work, these projects would not be done. We are grateful
to them for making the Yizkor Book Project such a valuable
genealogical tool.

Please remember that we have 29 projects listed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
that need your financial contributions to continue. There are books
from Poland, Belarus, Lithuania, for instance that need assistance.
We can now accept donations to translate individual chapters >from the
Pinkas HaKehillot volumes. You should contact me directly first to
get an estimate of the cost of the chapter you want to have
translated. Provide details of the volume and page numbers when you
write me. The translated tables of contents of the individual
volumes are at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html,
under the heading of Regions.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisitions
jfield@jewishgen.org


Re: Beuthen births - naming practices #germany

Fritz Neubauer
 

[The original question is quoted in full below.]
"Die Vaterschaft anerkennen" is a straight forward common-knowledge term
that says that a man recognizes officially a child as his child. This
does not necessarly mean that he married the mother, nor has it got to
do much with Jewish customs, because it applies to anybody. It may also
mean that the man is willing to (or has to) provide financial support if
he does not marry the mother.

Fritz Neubauer, North Germany <fritz.neubauer@uni-bielefeld.de>

Henry wrote:

I hope someone with a good knowledge of Jewish customs in the mid-1800's can
help me with answers to the following:
Most of the records are straight forward.
However, there are quite a few which give the mother' name but make no
mention of a husband/father. These records usually end with a sentence
reading, for example >from Akt 14, 1855, "Die Vaterschaft zu diesem Kinde hat
den .. Abraham Meller .. anerkannt".
My dictionaries translate the last word as "acknowledged", "recognized",
"accepted", the opposite to disowned.
In the case of this record,
- Is Meller acknowledging he is the biological father? or
- has Meller married the mother (i.e. her second marriage while
already carrying the child), or
- has he adopted the child without marrying the mother, or
- is he just confirming he will accept responsibility for the
child's economic welfare,
- or is there some other significance to this sentence?
Also, in any database summarizing Beuthen births, what surname should be
given to the child, the mother's or that of the man who has "anerkannt" it?


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Selie near Lomza? #poland

elliott <elliottmalkin@...>
 

Dear Bialystok SIG,

I have an apparent contradiction in my genealogical records and was
hoping that you could help me resolve it.

The Ellis Island Ship Manifest (1913) for my great-grandfather Hyman
Victor lists his place of birth as "Lomza." He was born in 1883.

But his Declaration of Intent (1916) for American citizenship lists
"Selie, Russia" as his place of birth.

I'm wondering if anyone might know if Selie was a town outside of
Lomza or if Lomza was considered a region in addition to a city.
Perhaps Selie is the improper spelling.

Any advice (and links to maps) would be greatly appreciated.

Sincerely,
Elliott Malkin


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Yizkor Book Project July 2006 Report #poland

Joyce Field
 

The Yizkor Book Project added one new book, one new entry, and 14
updates for July 2006. All new material has been flagged for easy
recognition at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html.

New book:

-Jonava, Lithuania

New entry:

-Jalowka, Poland: Pinkas HaKehillot, Vol. VIII

Updates:

-Chelm, Poland
-Dabrowa, Poland
-Dusetos, Lithuania
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Kamen Kashirskiy, Ukraine
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Lita
-Molchadz, Belarus
-Novogrudok, Belarus: this book has now been completely translated
-Orgeyev (Orhei), Moldova: this book has now been completely translated
-Sochaczew, Poland
-Sosnowiec, Poland
-The Terrible Choice: new essays on Vasily Grossman, Mosze Meryn, and
Emanuel Ringelblum
-Zloczew, Poland

We want to thank all the coordinators of yizkor book translation
projects for their perseverance and dedication. Without their
talents and work, these projects would not be done. We are grateful
to them for making the Yizkor Book Project such a valuable
genealogical tool.

Please remember that we have 29 projects listed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
that need your financial contributions to continue. There are books
from Poland, Belarus, Lithuania, for instance that need assistance.
We can now accept donations to translate individual chapters >from the
Pinkas HaKehillot volumes. You should contact me directly first to
get an estimate of the cost of the chapter you want to have
translated. Provide details of the volume and page numbers when you
write me. The translated tables of contents of the individual
volumes are at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html,
under the heading of Regions.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisitions
jfield@jewishgen.org


German SIG #Germany Re: Beuthen births - naming practices #germany

Fritz Neubauer
 

[The original question is quoted in full below.]
"Die Vaterschaft anerkennen" is a straight forward common-knowledge term
that says that a man recognizes officially a child as his child. This
does not necessarly mean that he married the mother, nor has it got to
do much with Jewish customs, because it applies to anybody. It may also
mean that the man is willing to (or has to) provide financial support if
he does not marry the mother.

Fritz Neubauer, North Germany <fritz.neubauer@uni-bielefeld.de>

Henry wrote:

I hope someone with a good knowledge of Jewish customs in the mid-1800's can
help me with answers to the following:
Most of the records are straight forward.
However, there are quite a few which give the mother' name but make no
mention of a husband/father. These records usually end with a sentence
reading, for example >from Akt 14, 1855, "Die Vaterschaft zu diesem Kinde hat
den .. Abraham Meller .. anerkannt".
My dictionaries translate the last word as "acknowledged", "recognized",
"accepted", the opposite to disowned.
In the case of this record,
- Is Meller acknowledging he is the biological father? or
- has Meller married the mother (i.e. her second marriage while
already carrying the child), or
- has he adopted the child without marrying the mother, or
- is he just confirming he will accept responsibility for the
child's economic welfare,
- or is there some other significance to this sentence?
Also, in any database summarizing Beuthen births, what surname should be
given to the child, the mother's or that of the man who has "anerkannt" it?


Yizkor Book Project July 2006 Report #poland

Joyce Field
 

The Yizkor Book Project added one new book, one new entry, and 14
updates for July 2006. All new material has been flagged for easy
recognition at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html.

New book:

-Jonava, Lithuania

New entry:

-Jalowka, Poland: Pinkas HaKehillot, Vol. VIII

Updates:

-Chelm, Poland
-Dabrowa, Poland
-Dusetos, Lithuania
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Kamen Kashirskiy, Ukraine
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Lita
-Molchadz, Belarus
-Novogrudok, Belarus: this book has now been completely translated
-Orgeyev (Orhei), Moldova: this book has now been completely translated
-Sochaczew, Poland
-Sosnowiec, Poland
-The Terrible Choice: new essays on Vasily Grossman, Mosze Meryn, and
Emanuel Ringelblum
-Zloczew, Poland

We want to thank all the coordinators of yizkor book translation
projects for their perseverance and dedication. Without their
talents and work, these projects would not be done. We are grateful
to them for making the Yizkor Book Project such a valuable
genealogical tool.

Please remember that we have 29 projects listed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
that need your financial contributions to continue. There are books
from Poland, Belarus, Lithuania, for instance that need assistance.
We can now accept donations to translate individual chapters >from the
Pinkas HaKehillot volumes. You should contact me directly first to
get an estimate of the cost of the chapter you want to have
translated. Provide details of the volume and page numbers when you
write me. The translated tables of contents of the individual
volumes are at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html,
under the heading of Regions.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisitions
jfield@jewishgen.org


JRI Poland #Poland Yizkor Book Project July 2006 Report #poland

Joyce Field
 

The Yizkor Book Project added one new book, one new entry, and 14
updates for July 2006. All new material has been flagged for easy
recognition at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html.

New book:

-Jonava, Lithuania

New entry:

-Jalowka, Poland: Pinkas HaKehillot, Vol. VIII

Updates:

-Chelm, Poland
-Dabrowa, Poland
-Dusetos, Lithuania
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Kamen Kashirskiy, Ukraine
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Lita
-Molchadz, Belarus
-Novogrudok, Belarus: this book has now been completely translated
-Orgeyev (Orhei), Moldova: this book has now been completely translated
-Sochaczew, Poland
-Sosnowiec, Poland
-The Terrible Choice: new essays on Vasily Grossman, Mosze Meryn, and
Emanuel Ringelblum
-Zloczew, Poland

We want to thank all the coordinators of yizkor book translation
projects for their perseverance and dedication. Without their
talents and work, these projects would not be done. We are grateful
to them for making the Yizkor Book Project such a valuable
genealogical tool.

Please remember that we have 29 projects listed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
that need your financial contributions to continue. There are books
from Poland, Belarus, Lithuania, for instance that need assistance.
We can now accept donations to translate individual chapters >from the
Pinkas HaKehillot volumes. You should contact me directly first to
get an estimate of the cost of the chapter you want to have
translated. Provide details of the volume and page numbers when you
write me. The translated tables of contents of the individual
volumes are at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html,
under the heading of Regions.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisitions
jfield@jewishgen.org


VM8256/VM8259 - Need help with translations from Russian #poland

Yaacov Slizak <yslizak@...>
 

Dear Friends,

I would be very grateful to anyone who can help with translations of
the following documents posted to Viewmate:

VM8259: Birth Certificate of Kayla KLAJNER.
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=8259

VM8256: Marriage of FELDMAN-SZTEJN, Miedzyrzec Podlaski, Poland, 1876.
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=8256

Both are very important for me. The first one is my G-Grandmother's
Certificate of Birth, which I have been looking for almost 15 years,
and finally was put online. The second one should be my 2nd
Great Grandfather Certificate of Marriage.

Thanks in advance for any help you can provide me with.

--
Yaacov Slizak
Ennis, Co.Clare, Ireland

SLIZAK, SANDAL, FELDMAN, WOLFSON, ZYLBERKRANTZ, DOMB - Miedzyrzec/Lukow (Pol)
SPOSOB/SPOSEEP - Kurytnycja, Lyuboml (Ukr), Chelm, Dubenka (Pol), USA;
FARBER - Kiyev (Ukr), Argentina; GURFINKEL - Hrubieszow (Pol)
KLEINER/KLEIN - Hrubieszow, Chrzanow, Sieniawa (Pol), UK;
PLOJT, PLOIT - Vladimir Volynskiy, Ozdziutycze, Kovel (Ukr), Argentina;

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately.


JRI Poland #Poland VM8256/VM8259 - Need help with translations from Russian #poland

Yaacov Slizak <yslizak@...>
 

Dear Friends,

I would be very grateful to anyone who can help with translations of
the following documents posted to Viewmate:

VM8259: Birth Certificate of Kayla KLAJNER.
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=8259

VM8256: Marriage of FELDMAN-SZTEJN, Miedzyrzec Podlaski, Poland, 1876.
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=8256

Both are very important for me. The first one is my G-Grandmother's
Certificate of Birth, which I have been looking for almost 15 years,
and finally was put online. The second one should be my 2nd
Great Grandfather Certificate of Marriage.

Thanks in advance for any help you can provide me with.

--
Yaacov Slizak
Ennis, Co.Clare, Ireland

SLIZAK, SANDAL, FELDMAN, WOLFSON, ZYLBERKRANTZ, DOMB - Miedzyrzec/Lukow (Pol)
SPOSOB/SPOSEEP - Kurytnycja, Lyuboml (Ukr), Chelm, Dubenka (Pol), USA;
FARBER - Kiyev (Ukr), Argentina; GURFINKEL - Hrubieszow (Pol)
KLEINER/KLEIN - Hrubieszow, Chrzanow, Sieniawa (Pol), UK;
PLOJT, PLOIT - Vladimir Volynskiy, Ozdziutycze, Kovel (Ukr), Argentina;

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately.


Re: naming practices #germany

Andreas Schwab <andreas.schwab@...>
 

Dear Henry,
you wrote:
(...) there are quite a few which give the mother' name but make no
mention of a husband/father. These records usually end with a sentence
reading, for example >from Akt 14, 1855, "Die Vaterschaft zu diesem
Kinde hat den .. Abraham Meller .. anerkannt".
I have seen many of these notes while translating birth records for
ViewMate. The explanation is quite simple:
In many European countries is mandatory to have a civil marriage
*and* a religious ceremony. Whereas in North America the officiant at
a marriage has the authority >from the State to perform the
registration of a marriage, in Germany this is done at a civil
ceremony at an office called "Standesamt". Even today, it is illegal
in Germany to perform a religious marriage if a civil marriage has
not been performed in advance. This is regarded as an important element
of the separation between State and Church. In Germany, this requirement was
introduced in the course of the 19th Century in the wake of the Napoleonic wars.

Many Jews did not bother to have a civil marriage, so their marriage was not
officially registered. A child born >from such a marriage was officially regarded
as illegitimate by the civil authorities and would also appear as such in the
birth registration records. It also obtained the surname of the mother (this
did not bother the Jews of the time because they did not care about surnames
anyway). As is usually the case with illegitimate children, the father had to
confirm his fatherhood, else the child would officially be deemed fatherless.

For possible reasons, see the GerSig archives of 7 Dec 2004
From: "Carlos Glikson" <cglikson@ciudad.com.ar>
Subject: Re: Using mother's name as a last name?

There are no sources given for this information, and I did not find
any scholarly study about this recurrent question.

Andreas Schwab, Beaconsfield (Suburban Montreal), Quebec, Canada
adreas.schwab@mcgill.ca


German SIG #Germany Re: naming practices #germany

Andreas Schwab <andreas.schwab@...>
 

Dear Henry,
you wrote:
(...) there are quite a few which give the mother' name but make no
mention of a husband/father. These records usually end with a sentence
reading, for example >from Akt 14, 1855, "Die Vaterschaft zu diesem
Kinde hat den .. Abraham Meller .. anerkannt".
I have seen many of these notes while translating birth records for
ViewMate. The explanation is quite simple:
In many European countries is mandatory to have a civil marriage
*and* a religious ceremony. Whereas in North America the officiant at
a marriage has the authority >from the State to perform the
registration of a marriage, in Germany this is done at a civil
ceremony at an office called "Standesamt". Even today, it is illegal
in Germany to perform a religious marriage if a civil marriage has
not been performed in advance. This is regarded as an important element
of the separation between State and Church. In Germany, this requirement was
introduced in the course of the 19th Century in the wake of the Napoleonic wars.

Many Jews did not bother to have a civil marriage, so their marriage was not
officially registered. A child born >from such a marriage was officially regarded
as illegitimate by the civil authorities and would also appear as such in the
birth registration records. It also obtained the surname of the mother (this
did not bother the Jews of the time because they did not care about surnames
anyway). As is usually the case with illegitimate children, the father had to
confirm his fatherhood, else the child would officially be deemed fatherless.

For possible reasons, see the GerSig archives of 7 Dec 2004
From: "Carlos Glikson" <cglikson@ciudad.com.ar>
Subject: Re: Using mother's name as a last name?

There are no sources given for this information, and I did not find
any scholarly study about this recurrent question.

Andreas Schwab, Beaconsfield (Suburban Montreal), Quebec, Canada
adreas.schwab@mcgill.ca


ROSENCHER #france

bik <kooshb9341@...>
 

My relative Henri ROSENCHER died in Paris on Thursday, July 27.
I'd appreciate scanned copies of any obituary or related
articles you may find in the French press.

He was a soldier for France, twice arrested and twice escaped
from prisoner of war camps, a scout and weapons instructor in
the British initiatives in Algeria, Morocco and Tunisia, and, an
explosives expert in the desperate resistance struggle to
liberate the Vercors plateau in France.
Please send directly to:
--
Bernard Kouchel
kooshb9341@bellsouth.net


French SIG #France ROSENCHER #france

bik <kooshb9341@...>
 

My relative Henri ROSENCHER died in Paris on Thursday, July 27.
I'd appreciate scanned copies of any obituary or related
articles you may find in the French press.

He was a soldier for France, twice arrested and twice escaped
from prisoner of war camps, a scout and weapons instructor in
the British initiatives in Algeria, Morocco and Tunisia, and, an
explosives expert in the desperate resistance struggle to
liberate the Vercors plateau in France.
Please send directly to:
--
Bernard Kouchel
kooshb9341@bellsouth.net


Yizkor Book Project July 2006 Report #france

Joyce Field
 

The Yizkor Book Project added one new book, one new entry, and 14
updates for July 2006. All new material has been flagged for easy
recognition at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html .

New book:

-Jonava, Lithuania

New entry:

-Jalowka, Poland: Pinkas HaKehillot, Vol. VIII

Updates:

-Chelm, Poland
-Dabrowa, Poland
-Dusetos, Lithuania
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Kamen Kashirskiy, Ukraine
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Lita
-Molchadz, Belarus
-Novogrudok, Belarus: this book has now been completely translated
-Orgeyev (Orhei), Moldova: this book has now been completely translated
-Sochaczew, Poland
-Sosnowiec, Poland
-The Terrible Choice: new essays on Vasily Grossman, Mosze Meryn, and
Emanuel Ringelblum
-Zloczew, Poland

We want to thank all the coordinators of yizkor book translation
projects for their perseverance and dedication. Without their
talents and work, these projects would not be done. We are grateful
to them for making the Yizkor Book Project such a valuable
genealogical tool.

Please remember that we have 29 projects listed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
that need your financial contributions to continue. There are books
from Poland, Belarus, Lithuania, for instance that need assistance.
We can now accept donations to translate individual chapters >from the
Pinkas HaKehillot volumes. You should contact me directly first to
get an estimate of the cost of the chapter you want to have
translated. Provide details of the volume and page numbers when you
write me. The translated tables of contents of the individual
volumes are at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html ,
under the heading of Regions.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisitions
jfield@jewishgen.org


Yizkor Book Project July 2006 Report #rabbinic

Joyce Field
 

The Yizkor Book Project added one new book, one new entry, and 14
updates for July 2006. All new material has been flagged for easy
recognition at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html

New book:

-Jonava, Lithuania

New entry:

-Jalowka, Poland: Pinkas HaKehillot, Vol. VIII

Updates:

-Chelm, Poland
-Dabrowa, Poland
-Dusetos, Lithuania
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Kamen Kashirskiy, Ukraine
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Lita
-Molchadz, Belarus
-Novogrudok, Belarus: this book has now been completely translated
-Orgeyev (Orhei), Moldova: this book has now been completely translated
-Sochaczew, Poland
-Sosnowiec, Poland
-The Terrible Choice: new essays on Vasily Grossman, Mosze Meryn, and
Emanuel Ringelblum
-Zloczew, Poland

We want to thank all the coordinators of yizkor book translation
projects for their perseverance and dedication. Without their
talents and work, these projects would not be done. We are grateful
to them for making the Yizkor Book Project such a valuable
genealogical tool.

Please remember that we have 29 projects listed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
that need your financial contributions to continue. There are books
from Poland, Belarus, Lithuania, for instance that need assistance.
We can now accept donations to translate individual chapters >from the
Pinkas HaKehillot volumes. You should contact me directly first to
get an estimate of the cost of the chapter you want to have
translated. Provide details of the volume and page numbers when you
write me. The translated tables of contents of the individual
volumes are at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html,
under the heading of Regions.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisitions
jfield@jewishgen.org


French SIG #France Yizkor Book Project July 2006 Report #france

Joyce Field
 

The Yizkor Book Project added one new book, one new entry, and 14
updates for July 2006. All new material has been flagged for easy
recognition at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html .

New book:

-Jonava, Lithuania

New entry:

-Jalowka, Poland: Pinkas HaKehillot, Vol. VIII

Updates:

-Chelm, Poland
-Dabrowa, Poland
-Dusetos, Lithuania
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Kamen Kashirskiy, Ukraine
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Lita
-Molchadz, Belarus
-Novogrudok, Belarus: this book has now been completely translated
-Orgeyev (Orhei), Moldova: this book has now been completely translated
-Sochaczew, Poland
-Sosnowiec, Poland
-The Terrible Choice: new essays on Vasily Grossman, Mosze Meryn, and
Emanuel Ringelblum
-Zloczew, Poland

We want to thank all the coordinators of yizkor book translation
projects for their perseverance and dedication. Without their
talents and work, these projects would not be done. We are grateful
to them for making the Yizkor Book Project such a valuable
genealogical tool.

Please remember that we have 29 projects listed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
that need your financial contributions to continue. There are books
from Poland, Belarus, Lithuania, for instance that need assistance.
We can now accept donations to translate individual chapters >from the
Pinkas HaKehillot volumes. You should contact me directly first to
get an estimate of the cost of the chapter you want to have
translated. Provide details of the volume and page numbers when you
write me. The translated tables of contents of the individual
volumes are at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html ,
under the heading of Regions.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisitions
jfield@jewishgen.org


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Yizkor Book Project July 2006 Report #rabbinic

Joyce Field
 

The Yizkor Book Project added one new book, one new entry, and 14
updates for July 2006. All new material has been flagged for easy
recognition at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html

New book:

-Jonava, Lithuania

New entry:

-Jalowka, Poland: Pinkas HaKehillot, Vol. VIII

Updates:

-Chelm, Poland
-Dabrowa, Poland
-Dusetos, Lithuania
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Kamen Kashirskiy, Ukraine
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Lita
-Molchadz, Belarus
-Novogrudok, Belarus: this book has now been completely translated
-Orgeyev (Orhei), Moldova: this book has now been completely translated
-Sochaczew, Poland
-Sosnowiec, Poland
-The Terrible Choice: new essays on Vasily Grossman, Mosze Meryn, and
Emanuel Ringelblum
-Zloczew, Poland

We want to thank all the coordinators of yizkor book translation
projects for their perseverance and dedication. Without their
talents and work, these projects would not be done. We are grateful
to them for making the Yizkor Book Project such a valuable
genealogical tool.

Please remember that we have 29 projects listed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
that need your financial contributions to continue. There are books
from Poland, Belarus, Lithuania, for instance that need assistance.
We can now accept donations to translate individual chapters >from the
Pinkas HaKehillot volumes. You should contact me directly first to
get an estimate of the cost of the chapter you want to have
translated. Provide details of the volume and page numbers when you
write me. The translated tables of contents of the individual
volumes are at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html,
under the heading of Regions.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisitions
jfield@jewishgen.org


R. Baruch haLevi EPSTEIN (the Torah Tmimah) #rabbinic

Yosaif Dubovick <ymd000@...>
 

On 2006.07.30, Itzhak Epstein <iegen@earthlink.net> wrote:

Does anybody know whether R. Baruch haLevi EPSTEIN had any siblings
or children, and where one can find genealogical information about
them? I did, of course, look at Mekor Baruch.
If I'm not mistaken, the University was named after R' Meir
BAR-ILAN, a brother of R' Chaim. Yeshivas Rabbeinu Chaim BERLIN
(Brooklyn, NY) is named after R' Chaim.

R' Meir was the father of Dr. Yehudit (named after her grandfather,
the NiTZiV) LEIBERMAN, wife of R' Shaul Prof. LEIBERMAN (second
marriage, R' Shaul's first wife was a granddaughter of the Godol of
Minsk R' Yerucham Yehudah Leib PERLMAN, a daughter of R' Eliezer
RABINOWITZ, the author of Mishnas Eliezer (which R' shaul printed
anonymously for Mossad HaRav Kook in 1962), she died in Russia).
They didn't have children.

R' Meir sat on the directorate of The Harry Fischel Institute in
Yerushalayim, and as a maternal grandson of the Aruch HaShulchan,
furthered the publishing of the "Future Aruch HaShulchan", dealing
with those halachos not necessarily in practice today. The first
volume, Zeraim, was published in 1938, with sucessive volumes being
published by Mossad HaRav Kook.

There is a BERLIN family in Yerushalim today, related by marriage to
Rav Elyashiv. I believe one of the family was responsible for
publishing R' Yitzchok Hutner (Rosh Yeshivas R' Chaim Berlin) 's
Toras HaNazir.

Targum publishing put out a book 'My Uncle the Netziv' (I see the
publishing house todate is Artscroll, but it was previously a Tragum
publication), recollections of the Torah Temimah on his uncle,
gleaned >from the most part >from Mekor Baruch. The was another book
printed along the same lines, but for the moment, the title escapes
me.

All the best,

Yosaif M. Dubovick
Betar Illit, Israel


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Fwd: R. Baruch haLevi EPSTEIN (the Torah Tmimah) #rabbinic

Yosaif Dubovick <ymd000@...>
 

On 2006.07.30, Itzhak Epstein <iegen@earthlink.net> wrote:

Does anybody know whether R. Baruch haLevi EPSTEIN had any siblings
or children, and where one can find genealogical information about
them? I did, of course, look at Mekor Baruch.
If I'm not mistaken, the University was named after R' Meir
BAR-ILAN, a brother of R' Chaim. Yeshivas Rabbeinu Chaim BERLIN
(Brooklyn, NY) is named after R' Chaim.

R' Meir was the father of Dr. Yehudit (named after her grandfather,
the NiTZiV) LEIBERMAN, wife of R' Shaul Prof. LEIBERMAN (second
marriage, R' Shaul's first wife was a granddaughter of the Godol of
Minsk R' Yerucham Yehudah Leib PERLMAN, a daughter of R' Eliezer
RABINOWITZ, the author of Mishnas Eliezer (which R' shaul printed
anonymously for Mossad HaRav Kook in 1962), she died in Russia).
They didn't have children.

R' Meir sat on the directorate of The Harry Fischel Institute in
Yerushalayim, and as a maternal grandson of the Aruch HaShulchan,
furthered the publishing of the "Future Aruch HaShulchan", dealing
with those halachos not necessarily in practice today. The first
volume, Zeraim, was published in 1938, with sucessive volumes being
published by Mossad HaRav Kook.

There is a BERLIN family in Yerushalim today, related by marriage to
Rav Elyashiv. I believe one of the family was responsible for
publishing R' Yitzchok Hutner (Rosh Yeshivas R' Chaim Berlin) 's
Toras HaNazir.

Targum publishing put out a book 'My Uncle the Netziv' (I see the
publishing house todate is Artscroll, but it was previously a Tragum
publication), recollections of the Torah Temimah on his uncle,
gleaned >from the most part >from Mekor Baruch. The was another book
printed along the same lines, but for the moment, the title escapes
me.

All the best,

Yosaif M. Dubovick
Betar Illit, Israel