Date   

Book about Iasi! #romania

Rosanne Leeson <rdleeson@...>
 

In regard to the announcement of the online translation of the book of
I. Kara-Swartz on the Yizkor Book site of JewishGen we would also like
thank Terry Lasky personally, for all of his hard work as a Project
Coordinator on this, as well as many other of the Romanian databases.
Without his guiding hand at the helm all of this would never have happened!

Bravo, Terry! Many thanks!

Rosanne Leeson
Paula Zieselman
Co-Coordinators
Robert Wascou, Research Coordinator


Romania SIG #Romania Book about Iasi! #romania

Rosanne Leeson <rdleeson@...>
 

In regard to the announcement of the online translation of the book of
I. Kara-Swartz on the Yizkor Book site of JewishGen we would also like
thank Terry Lasky personally, for all of his hard work as a Project
Coordinator on this, as well as many other of the Romanian databases.
Without his guiding hand at the helm all of this would never have happened!

Bravo, Terry! Many thanks!

Rosanne Leeson
Paula Zieselman
Co-Coordinators
Robert Wascou, Research Coordinator


Brick Wall, Jeweler in Paris #france

Brian Stern <brians99@...>
 

Hi Group,

Here's my story:

My maternal grandfather, Chaim ADLER, was born in Zolkiew near Lemberg in
1898 (now Ukraine, then Austria). He came to the US in 1923. My mother is
his daughter. In 1955 my mother was in Germany for a year and she took a
vacation to Paris, France. Her father told her that he had a cousin who
lived in Paris. My mother visited this man in Paris for a few hours one
afternoon. My mother has forgotten the name of this man. I believe that
he was a first cousin of my grandfather.

The cousin was a jeweler and owned a jewelry store named after himself in
Paris. He had a son who was a soldier in Algeria at the time. The family
names that are likely are ADLER and FISCH. It is likely that he was born
in Zolkiew, although of course not certain.

Is it possible to learn the name of this man?

Is it possible to search the naturalizations CD based on place of origin?

Thanks for any suggestions on finding the name of this man.

Brian Stern
Lexington, KY


French SIG #France Brick Wall, Jeweler in Paris #france

Brian Stern <brians99@...>
 

Hi Group,

Here's my story:

My maternal grandfather, Chaim ADLER, was born in Zolkiew near Lemberg in
1898 (now Ukraine, then Austria). He came to the US in 1923. My mother is
his daughter. In 1955 my mother was in Germany for a year and she took a
vacation to Paris, France. Her father told her that he had a cousin who
lived in Paris. My mother visited this man in Paris for a few hours one
afternoon. My mother has forgotten the name of this man. I believe that
he was a first cousin of my grandfather.

The cousin was a jeweler and owned a jewelry store named after himself in
Paris. He had a son who was a soldier in Algeria at the time. The family
names that are likely are ADLER and FISCH. It is likely that he was born
in Zolkiew, although of course not certain.

Is it possible to learn the name of this man?

Is it possible to search the naturalizations CD based on place of origin?

Thanks for any suggestions on finding the name of this man.

Brian Stern
Lexington, KY


Re: LEVY #courland #latvia

T and B Hall <tahall43@...>
 

Looking for marriages or census or deaths of
Marx Meyer LEVY born ca 1800 died 1875 Wissembourg France

Marx (Meyer) LEVY born 1800 died 1875 Wissembourg France
married twice Was told they had 9 children.
second wife: Julia WEILLER

children:

Moses LEVY
born ca 1827 France
married Rosalie BUMPET in New Orleans LA 6 months
died ca 1898 Wissembourg France

Samuel LEVY
born 8 Apr 1835 Niederseebach, France
married Louisa STEIGLEMAN SCHOBER in Shreveport LA
died 4 Mar 1883 Shreveport Caddo Parish LA

Simon LEVY
born 15 Mar 1839 Niederseebach, France
married Harriett Bodenheimer in Shreveport LA
died 27 Mar 1898 Shreveport Caddo Parish LA

Solomon LEVY
born ca 1839 Niederseebach, France never married
died 24 Nov 1905 Shreveport Caddo Parish LA
Note: obit states that Solomon was the last of the 7 brothers

Benjamin LEVY
born ca 1843 Niederseebach, never married
died 15 Oct 1893 Shrevport, Caddo Parish, LA

Emanuel LEVY
born France ca 1847 Niederseebach, France never married
died 2 Mar 1884 Jackson state hospital LA

Mary Dinah LEVY
born 25 June 1849 Niederseebach, France
married Marx MOCH in Shreveport LA
died 10 Dec 1943 Nashville TN

Julie LEVY born 26 June 1854 Niederseebach, Alsace, France
married Solomon DREYFUS in Wissembourg, France
died 16 Dec 1930 Youngstown, OH

Moderator: Wissembourg is in the Bas-Rhin about 60KM north
of Strasbourg on the German border. (www.mapquest.fr)

Brenda J. Hall
Pine Bluff AR


French SIG #France re: LEVY #france

T and B Hall <tahall43@...>
 

Looking for marriages or census or deaths of
Marx Meyer LEVY born ca 1800 died 1875 Wissembourg France

Marx (Meyer) LEVY born 1800 died 1875 Wissembourg France
married twice Was told they had 9 children.
second wife: Julia WEILLER

children:

Moses LEVY
born ca 1827 France
married Rosalie BUMPET in New Orleans LA 6 months
died ca 1898 Wissembourg France

Samuel LEVY
born 8 Apr 1835 Niederseebach, France
married Louisa STEIGLEMAN SCHOBER in Shreveport LA
died 4 Mar 1883 Shreveport Caddo Parish LA

Simon LEVY
born 15 Mar 1839 Niederseebach, France
married Harriett Bodenheimer in Shreveport LA
died 27 Mar 1898 Shreveport Caddo Parish LA

Solomon LEVY
born ca 1839 Niederseebach, France never married
died 24 Nov 1905 Shreveport Caddo Parish LA
Note: obit states that Solomon was the last of the 7 brothers

Benjamin LEVY
born ca 1843 Niederseebach, never married
died 15 Oct 1893 Shrevport, Caddo Parish, LA

Emanuel LEVY
born France ca 1847 Niederseebach, France never married
died 2 Mar 1884 Jackson state hospital LA

Mary Dinah LEVY
born 25 June 1849 Niederseebach, France
married Marx MOCH in Shreveport LA
died 10 Dec 1943 Nashville TN

Julie LEVY born 26 June 1854 Niederseebach, Alsace, France
married Solomon DREYFUS in Wissembourg, France
died 16 Dec 1930 Youngstown, OH

Moderator: Wissembourg is in the Bas-Rhin about 60KM north
of Strasbourg on the German border. (www.mapquest.fr)

Brenda J. Hall
Pine Bluff AR


same name for grandmother and daughter #general

Paul & Irene Berman <ikpjb@...>
 

It is a custom in the Sephardic community to name a child after a living
grandparent. People who have done it have said that it helped create a
special bond between the two.
Irene Berman
Shoham, Israel


single sex NYC high schools #general

Paul & Irene Berman <ikpjb@...>
 

Only a relatively few NYC high schools were single sex even in the 1930's
and 1940's. There was Walton in the Bronx and Hunter - an all-city,
all-girls' school that belonged to a group of five special all-city schools
that required an entrance
exam.
Religious schools were usually single sex.
Irene Berman
Shoham, Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen same name for grandmother and daughter #general

Paul & Irene Berman <ikpjb@...>
 

It is a custom in the Sephardic community to name a child after a living
grandparent. People who have done it have said that it helped create a
special bond between the two.
Irene Berman
Shoham, Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen single sex NYC high schools #general

Paul & Irene Berman <ikpjb@...>
 

Only a relatively few NYC high schools were single sex even in the 1930's
and 1940's. There was Walton in the Bronx and Hunter - an all-city,
all-girls' school that belonged to a group of five special all-city schools
that required an entrance
exam.
Religious schools were usually single sex.
Irene Berman
Shoham, Israel


My Jewish Grandfather #latvia

Marion Werle <werle@...>
 

At the recent IAJGS conference in New York City, the excellent film "My
Jewish Grandfather" was screened (we also showed this at the previous New
York conference). In this work, Casper Hoyberg, a young Danish filmmaker,
travels to Latvia and Israel, the place he was born, where he delicately
unlocks the secrets of a once-silent history and in the process, forges
deeper relationships with his grandmother and father. In interviews with
at-first reluctant relatives, he gently coaxes out the story of his
ancestors in Riga and his grandfather's fate in the Russian army, learning
even more about his own identity. This film includes current and historic
footage of Riga in the years prior to, and during, WWII.

Although many Latvian researchers were able to purchase this film at the
conference, there have been many inquiries since that time, so for anyone
interested in purchasing a DVD, IAJGS Conference Film Coordinator, Pamela
Weisberger, had some for sale. The price is $22 which includes shipping
and handling.

If you are interested, contact her privately to work out arrangements.
(For a slight additional fee, this film can be screened for your genealogical
society.)

Her e-mail is: pweisberger@hotmail.com


Marion Werle
<werle@linkline.com>


Latvia SIG #Latvia My Jewish Grandfather #latvia

Marion Werle <werle@...>
 

At the recent IAJGS conference in New York City, the excellent film "My
Jewish Grandfather" was screened (we also showed this at the previous New
York conference). In this work, Casper Hoyberg, a young Danish filmmaker,
travels to Latvia and Israel, the place he was born, where he delicately
unlocks the secrets of a once-silent history and in the process, forges
deeper relationships with his grandmother and father. In interviews with
at-first reluctant relatives, he gently coaxes out the story of his
ancestors in Riga and his grandfather's fate in the Russian army, learning
even more about his own identity. This film includes current and historic
footage of Riga in the years prior to, and during, WWII.

Although many Latvian researchers were able to purchase this film at the
conference, there have been many inquiries since that time, so for anyone
interested in purchasing a DVD, IAJGS Conference Film Coordinator, Pamela
Weisberger, had some for sale. The price is $22 which includes shipping
and handling.

If you are interested, contact her privately to work out arrangements.
(For a slight additional fee, this film can be screened for your genealogical
society.)

Her e-mail is: pweisberger@hotmail.com


Marion Werle
<werle@linkline.com>


More about the Mt. Ararat Cemetery searchable database #scandinavia

Steven Lasky <steve725@...>
 

Greetings,

This is just a follow-up on my previous posting about the new searchable
database available on the new Mt. Ararat Cemetery
website(www.mountararatcemetery.com.) I just returned >from a short visit to
the cemetery in search of some answers, and I wanted to share them with you,
anticipating that questions regarding these matters will probably come up at
some point. Here we go:

1. Some of you will undoubtedly discover that there are dates of death
listed on this database >from as early as 1910. The office manager at Mt.
Ararat checked a few of these burial records for me, and he found that they
were, for the most part, reinterments >from other cemeteries. There is no
mention of this when you look at any of these burial listings, but now you
know. Also, even though the web site states that the first interment at the
Mt. Ararat was 1933, it was really 1931.

2. If you do a search just using the year of death of 1909, you will find
481 entries with the same date of death, 1/1/1910. You will also get the
same list of names if you do a search just using the year 1910. This
1/1/1910 date is the default setting and is not meant to indicate that the
person's date of death was 1/1/1910. Either the cemetery had no date of
death for these individuals in their computer before the data was uploaded
to the new website, and it defaulted to this same date, or there was some
other reason for it. Either way, if you happen to find a name of interest in
this database with a date of death of 1/1/1910, contact the cemetery for the
correct date. Again, you will find dates of death for a small number of
entries before 1931, but as I've said, these are most likely all
disinterments/reinterments.

3. Regarding planting, care, etc., there are no plants or vegetation (just
grass) on any of the graves in this cemetery, just shrubs, etc. in between
family headstones, on one or both sides of the stone. Also, there are no
individual matzevot (gravestones), i.e. the cemetery permits only family
headstones, one per family. So typically you will have one headstone with
the family surname(s) inscribed on it and, in the minority of cases, symbols
that indicate whether the deceased were Cohains, Levites or Israelites. You
will generally find footstones made of granite for each individual burial.
Because of the small size of these footstones, the information on them is
limited. You will find the deceased's first name, surname, dates of birth
(when available) and death, perhaps in only fifty-percent of the burials the
Hebrew name of the deceased and their father, and a few words, e.g. beloved
wife-devoted mother and grandmother. No other significant inscriptions per
se. Lastly, there are sections in this cemetery that don't even allow for a
family headstone, and you there you will find individual footstones only.

4. The cemetery says that they are not really "set up" for taking gravestone
photos. They will consider taking photos on an individual basis (no charge),
especially for those who already own plots.

5. So remember that you will find errors in this database, just like all the
others. Please give them plenty of time to work out the kinks.

I hope these notes will help those of you who have an interest in those who
are buried at Mt. Ararat Cemetery.


Best,
Steve Lasky
New York
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com


Scandinavia SIG #Scandinavia More about the Mt. Ararat Cemetery searchable database #scandinavia

Steven Lasky <steve725@...>
 

Greetings,

This is just a follow-up on my previous posting about the new searchable
database available on the new Mt. Ararat Cemetery
website(www.mountararatcemetery.com.) I just returned >from a short visit to
the cemetery in search of some answers, and I wanted to share them with you,
anticipating that questions regarding these matters will probably come up at
some point. Here we go:

1. Some of you will undoubtedly discover that there are dates of death
listed on this database >from as early as 1910. The office manager at Mt.
Ararat checked a few of these burial records for me, and he found that they
were, for the most part, reinterments >from other cemeteries. There is no
mention of this when you look at any of these burial listings, but now you
know. Also, even though the web site states that the first interment at the
Mt. Ararat was 1933, it was really 1931.

2. If you do a search just using the year of death of 1909, you will find
481 entries with the same date of death, 1/1/1910. You will also get the
same list of names if you do a search just using the year 1910. This
1/1/1910 date is the default setting and is not meant to indicate that the
person's date of death was 1/1/1910. Either the cemetery had no date of
death for these individuals in their computer before the data was uploaded
to the new website, and it defaulted to this same date, or there was some
other reason for it. Either way, if you happen to find a name of interest in
this database with a date of death of 1/1/1910, contact the cemetery for the
correct date. Again, you will find dates of death for a small number of
entries before 1931, but as I've said, these are most likely all
disinterments/reinterments.

3. Regarding planting, care, etc., there are no plants or vegetation (just
grass) on any of the graves in this cemetery, just shrubs, etc. in between
family headstones, on one or both sides of the stone. Also, there are no
individual matzevot (gravestones), i.e. the cemetery permits only family
headstones, one per family. So typically you will have one headstone with
the family surname(s) inscribed on it and, in the minority of cases, symbols
that indicate whether the deceased were Cohains, Levites or Israelites. You
will generally find footstones made of granite for each individual burial.
Because of the small size of these footstones, the information on them is
limited. You will find the deceased's first name, surname, dates of birth
(when available) and death, perhaps in only fifty-percent of the burials the
Hebrew name of the deceased and their father, and a few words, e.g. beloved
wife-devoted mother and grandmother. No other significant inscriptions per
se. Lastly, there are sections in this cemetery that don't even allow for a
family headstone, and you there you will find individual footstones only.

4. The cemetery says that they are not really "set up" for taking gravestone
photos. They will consider taking photos on an individual basis (no charge),
especially for those who already own plots.

5. So remember that you will find errors in this database, just like all the
others. Please give them plenty of time to work out the kinks.

I hope these notes will help those of you who have an interest in those who
are buried at Mt. Ararat Cemetery.


Best,
Steve Lasky
New York
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com


More about the Mt. Ararat Cemetery searchable database #danzig #gdansk #germany #poland

Steven Lasky <steve725@...>
 

Greetings,

This is just a follow-up on my previous posting about the new searchable
database available on the new Mt. Ararat Cemetery website
(www.mountararatcemetery.com.) I just returned >from a short visit to
the cemetery in search of some answers, and I wanted to share them with you,
anticipating that questions regarding these matters will probably come up at
some point. Here we go:

1. Some of you will undoubtedly discover that there are dates of death
listed on this database >from as early as 1910. The office manager at Mt.
Ararat checked a few of these burial records for me, and he found that they
were, for the most part, reinterments >from other cemeteries. There is no
mention of this when you look at any of these burial listings, but now you
know. Also, even though the web site states that the first interment at the
Mt. Ararat was 1933, it was really 1931.

2. If you do a search just using the year of death of 1909, you will find
481 entries with the same date of death, 1/1/1910. You will also get the
same list of names if you do a search just using the year 1910. This
1/1/1910 date is the default setting and is not meant to indicate that the
person's date of death was 1/1/1910. Either the cemetery had no date of
death for these individuals in their computer before the data was uploaded
to the new website, and it defaulted to this same date, or there was some
other reason for it. Either way, if you happen to find a name of interest in
this database with a date of death of 1/1/1910, contact the cemetery for the
correct date. Again, you will find dates of death for a small number of
entries before 1931, but as I've said, these are most likely all
disinterments/reinterments.

3. Regarding planting, care, etc., there are no plants or vegetation (just
grass) on any of the graves in this cemetery, just shrubs, etc. in between
family headstones, on one or both sides of the stone. Also, there are no
individual matzevot (gravestones), i.e. the cemetery permits only family
headstones, one per family. So typically you will have one headstone with
the family surname(s) inscribed on it and, in the minority of cases, symbols
that indicate whether the deceased were Cohains, Levites or Israelites. You
will generally find footstones made of granite for each individual burial.
Because of the small size of these footstones, the information on them is
limited. You will find the deceased's first name, surname, dates of birth
(when available) and death, perhaps in only fifty-percent of the burials the
Hebrew name of the deceased and their father, and a few words, e.g. beloved
wife-devoted mother and grandmother. No other significant inscriptions per
se. Lastly, there are sections in this cemetery that don't even allow for a
family headstone, and you there you will find individual footstones only.

4. The cemetery says that they are not really "set up" for taking gravestone
photos. They will consider taking photos on an individual basis (no charge),
especially for those who already own plots.

5. So remember that you will find errors in this database, just like all the
others. Please give them plenty of time to work out the kinks.

I hope these notes will help those of you who have an interest in those who
are buried at Mt. Ararat Cemetery.


Best,
Steve Lasky
New York
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com


Danzig/Gedansk SIG #Danzig #Gdansk #Germany #Poland More about the Mt. Ararat Cemetery searchable database #danzig #gdansk #germany #poland

Steven Lasky <steve725@...>
 

Greetings,

This is just a follow-up on my previous posting about the new searchable
database available on the new Mt. Ararat Cemetery website
(www.mountararatcemetery.com.) I just returned >from a short visit to
the cemetery in search of some answers, and I wanted to share them with you,
anticipating that questions regarding these matters will probably come up at
some point. Here we go:

1. Some of you will undoubtedly discover that there are dates of death
listed on this database >from as early as 1910. The office manager at Mt.
Ararat checked a few of these burial records for me, and he found that they
were, for the most part, reinterments >from other cemeteries. There is no
mention of this when you look at any of these burial listings, but now you
know. Also, even though the web site states that the first interment at the
Mt. Ararat was 1933, it was really 1931.

2. If you do a search just using the year of death of 1909, you will find
481 entries with the same date of death, 1/1/1910. You will also get the
same list of names if you do a search just using the year 1910. This
1/1/1910 date is the default setting and is not meant to indicate that the
person's date of death was 1/1/1910. Either the cemetery had no date of
death for these individuals in their computer before the data was uploaded
to the new website, and it defaulted to this same date, or there was some
other reason for it. Either way, if you happen to find a name of interest in
this database with a date of death of 1/1/1910, contact the cemetery for the
correct date. Again, you will find dates of death for a small number of
entries before 1931, but as I've said, these are most likely all
disinterments/reinterments.

3. Regarding planting, care, etc., there are no plants or vegetation (just
grass) on any of the graves in this cemetery, just shrubs, etc. in between
family headstones, on one or both sides of the stone. Also, there are no
individual matzevot (gravestones), i.e. the cemetery permits only family
headstones, one per family. So typically you will have one headstone with
the family surname(s) inscribed on it and, in the minority of cases, symbols
that indicate whether the deceased were Cohains, Levites or Israelites. You
will generally find footstones made of granite for each individual burial.
Because of the small size of these footstones, the information on them is
limited. You will find the deceased's first name, surname, dates of birth
(when available) and death, perhaps in only fifty-percent of the burials the
Hebrew name of the deceased and their father, and a few words, e.g. beloved
wife-devoted mother and grandmother. No other significant inscriptions per
se. Lastly, there are sections in this cemetery that don't even allow for a
family headstone, and you there you will find individual footstones only.

4. The cemetery says that they are not really "set up" for taking gravestone
photos. They will consider taking photos on an individual basis (no charge),
especially for those who already own plots.

5. So remember that you will find errors in this database, just like all the
others. Please give them plenty of time to work out the kinks.

I hope these notes will help those of you who have an interest in those who
are buried at Mt. Ararat Cemetery.


Best,
Steve Lasky
New York
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com


Iasi, Romania Book now online #romania

Terry Lasky <talasky@...>
 

I am happy to announce that the book "Contribution to the History of
Jews in Iasi" by Itic Svart-Kara (1997) has now been translated and is
available on the Jewishgen Yizkor book site. It can be viewed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/iasi/iasi.html

This book was translated through the volunteer efforts of Rony Shaham,
Susanna Vendel, Alma Barozzi, Marcel Bratu and Avi Klammer. They
deserve all the credit for making this all possible. I would also like
to thank Lance Ackerfeld who did a lot of work getting this book up on
the JewishGen site.

Terry Lasky
Project Coordinator
Colorado, USA


Romania SIG #Romania Iasi, Romania Book now online #romania

Terry Lasky <talasky@...>
 

I am happy to announce that the book "Contribution to the History of
Jews in Iasi" by Itic Svart-Kara (1997) has now been translated and is
available on the Jewishgen Yizkor book site. It can be viewed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/iasi/iasi.html

This book was translated through the volunteer efforts of Rony Shaham,
Susanna Vendel, Alma Barozzi, Marcel Bratu and Avi Klammer. They
deserve all the credit for making this all possible. I would also like
to thank Lance Ackerfeld who did a lot of work getting this book up on
the JewishGen site.

Terry Lasky
Project Coordinator
Colorado, USA


More about the Mt. Ararat Cemetery searchable database #romania

Steven Lasky <steve725@...>
 

Greetings,

This is just a follow-up on my previous posting about the new searchable
database available on the new Mt. Ararat Cemetery
website(www.mountararatcemetery.com.) I just returned >from a short visit to
the cemetery in search of some answers, and I wanted to share them with you,
anticipating that questions regarding these matters will probably come up at
some point. Here we go:

1. Some of you will undoubtedly discover that there are dates of death
listed on this database >from as early as 1910. The office manager at Mt.
Ararat checked a few of these burial records for me, and he found that they
were, for the most part, reinterments >from other cemeteries. There is no
mention of this when you look at any of these burial listings, but now you
know. Also, even though the web site states that the first interment at the
Mt. Ararat was 1933, it was really 1931.

2. If you do a search just using the year of death of 1909, you will find
481 entries with the same date of death, 1/1/1910. You will also get the
same list of names if you do a search just using the year 1910. This
1/1/1910 date is the default setting and is not meant to indicate that the
person's date of death was 1/1/1910. Either the cemetery had no date of
death for these individuals in their computer before the data was uploaded
to the new website, and it defaulted to this same date, or there was some
other reason for it. Either way, if you happen to find a name of interest in
this database with a date of death of 1/1/1910, contact the cemetery for the
correct date. Again, you will find dates of death for a small number of
entries before 1931, but as I've said, these are most likely all
disinterments/reinterments.

3. Regarding planting, care, etc., there are no plants or vegetation (just
grass) on any of the graves in this cemetery, just shrubs, etc. in between
family headstones, on one or both sides of the stone. Also, there are no
individual matzevot (gravestones), i.e. the cemetery permits only family
headstones, one per family. So typically you will have one headstone with
the family surname(s) inscribed on it and, in the minority of cases, symbols
that indicate whether the deceased were Cohains, Levites or Israelites. You
will generally find footstones made of granite for each individual burial.
Because of the small size of these footstones, the information on them is
limited. You will find the deceased's first name, surname, dates of birth
(when available) and death, perhaps in only fifty-percent of the burials the
Hebrew name of the deceased and their father, and a few words, e.g. beloved
wife-devoted mother and grandmother. No other significant inscriptions per
se. Lastly, there are sections in this cemetery that don't even allow for a
family headstone, and you there you will find individual footstones only.

4. The cemetery says that they are not really "set up" for taking gravestone
photos. They will consider taking photos on an individual basis (no charge),
especially for those who already own plots.

5. So remember that you will find errors in this database, just like all the
others. Please give them plenty of time to work out the kinks.

I hope these notes will help those of you who have an interest in those who
are buried at Mt. Ararat Cemetery.


Best,
Steve Lasky
New York
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com


Romania SIG #Romania More about the Mt. Ararat Cemetery searchable database #romania

Steven Lasky <steve725@...>
 

Greetings,

This is just a follow-up on my previous posting about the new searchable
database available on the new Mt. Ararat Cemetery
website(www.mountararatcemetery.com.) I just returned >from a short visit to
the cemetery in search of some answers, and I wanted to share them with you,
anticipating that questions regarding these matters will probably come up at
some point. Here we go:

1. Some of you will undoubtedly discover that there are dates of death
listed on this database >from as early as 1910. The office manager at Mt.
Ararat checked a few of these burial records for me, and he found that they
were, for the most part, reinterments >from other cemeteries. There is no
mention of this when you look at any of these burial listings, but now you
know. Also, even though the web site states that the first interment at the
Mt. Ararat was 1933, it was really 1931.

2. If you do a search just using the year of death of 1909, you will find
481 entries with the same date of death, 1/1/1910. You will also get the
same list of names if you do a search just using the year 1910. This
1/1/1910 date is the default setting and is not meant to indicate that the
person's date of death was 1/1/1910. Either the cemetery had no date of
death for these individuals in their computer before the data was uploaded
to the new website, and it defaulted to this same date, or there was some
other reason for it. Either way, if you happen to find a name of interest in
this database with a date of death of 1/1/1910, contact the cemetery for the
correct date. Again, you will find dates of death for a small number of
entries before 1931, but as I've said, these are most likely all
disinterments/reinterments.

3. Regarding planting, care, etc., there are no plants or vegetation (just
grass) on any of the graves in this cemetery, just shrubs, etc. in between
family headstones, on one or both sides of the stone. Also, there are no
individual matzevot (gravestones), i.e. the cemetery permits only family
headstones, one per family. So typically you will have one headstone with
the family surname(s) inscribed on it and, in the minority of cases, symbols
that indicate whether the deceased were Cohains, Levites or Israelites. You
will generally find footstones made of granite for each individual burial.
Because of the small size of these footstones, the information on them is
limited. You will find the deceased's first name, surname, dates of birth
(when available) and death, perhaps in only fifty-percent of the burials the
Hebrew name of the deceased and their father, and a few words, e.g. beloved
wife-devoted mother and grandmother. No other significant inscriptions per
se. Lastly, there are sections in this cemetery that don't even allow for a
family headstone, and you there you will find individual footstones only.

4. The cemetery says that they are not really "set up" for taking gravestone
photos. They will consider taking photos on an individual basis (no charge),
especially for those who already own plots.

5. So remember that you will find errors in this database, just like all the
others. Please give them plenty of time to work out the kinks.

I hope these notes will help those of you who have an interest in those who
are buried at Mt. Ararat Cemetery.


Best,
Steve Lasky
New York
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com