Date   

Searching: KESNER (and variants of the name) #general

Ally Burdett
 

I am looking for any information about this family. It would also be nice to
hear >from anyone who thinks they may have an ancestor in common.

The surname may not actually be KESNER. I have reason to believe that it may
be KIZENER or KISNEY or something else similar.

The names are: Solomon and Dinah Kesner. Census records state they were born
in Russia, but obviously due to border changes, their birth place may not be
known as that today.

Their children were Dora, Caroline, Amelia and Leah. The family left Russia
in the late 1860s. Amelia was born in Hamburg in about 1868, and the family
eventually settled in Whitechapel, London, in about 1870. Leah was born in
London. >from a post I found on another forum, I was able to ascertain that
Leah emigrated to New York in about 1890.

Thank you.

Ally Burdett, London, England


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching: KESNER (and variants of the name) #general

Ally Burdett
 

I am looking for any information about this family. It would also be nice to
hear >from anyone who thinks they may have an ancestor in common.

The surname may not actually be KESNER. I have reason to believe that it may
be KIZENER or KISNEY or something else similar.

The names are: Solomon and Dinah Kesner. Census records state they were born
in Russia, but obviously due to border changes, their birth place may not be
known as that today.

Their children were Dora, Caroline, Amelia and Leah. The family left Russia
in the late 1860s. Amelia was born in Hamburg in about 1868, and the family
eventually settled in Whitechapel, London, in about 1870. Leah was born in
London. >from a post I found on another forum, I was able to ascertain that
Leah emigrated to New York in about 1890.

Thank you.

Ally Burdett, London, England


Re: Surname SANES #general

David Zohar <davidzohar@...>
 

Sa Nes exists in Israel as a Hebrew surname meaning Carry(Sa) the Flag(Nes).

David Zohar
Jerusalem


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Surname SANES #general

David Zohar <davidzohar@...>
 

Sa Nes exists in Israel as a Hebrew surname meaning Carry(Sa) the Flag(Nes).

David Zohar
Jerusalem


Re: How given name Vogel becomes Fanny #general

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Rene van Wijngaarden wrote: <Is there an explanation how
the given name Vogel=bird in Dutch becomes Fanny?>

Steve Bloom wrote: <nearly all of the "Fayga" in my family who moved
to an English speaking country became "Fanny" - ......... it was
simply a popular female name amongst immigrant Jews of the time that
happened to have some similar letters ....... There could be a more
complex answer, but I think that's it.>

Yes, Steve has hit the nail on the head and here is the history of
this transition as I have unravelled it:

The trouble with Judith's explanation is that most babies called
Fayga or Feigele did not arrive in England till the late 1800s and
the use of the name Fanny was already well-established in the
Habsburg Empire since the late 1700s when Emperor Joseph II issued
his Toleranz Patent. Hence the use of Fanny in the German language
pre-dates, by more than 100 years, its widespread use in the English
language [see particularly Fanny von ARNSTEIN below].

The most important part of the Patent {Edict} relating to names was
that Jewish families had to adopt German family names. First names
were also included in the reforms. Thus, in Bohemia and Moravia, a
list of 30 female first names was on offer as well as over 100 male
first names. Franziska was one of the names on this list - as were
Anna, Barbara, Elisabeth, Eva, Karolina, Katharina, Libuscha,
Ludmilla, Libuscha, Maria, Rachel, Rosalia, Sara, Theresia &
Veronica.
Here you see Franziska was the only choice of a name starting with
*F*; Veronica/Verona were possible alternatives for Vogele.

Vogel, Vogele and Feigele were *not permitted* as names. Franziska
was chosen by about 5-6% of all Bohemian women by 1793 [calculated
from the census] and Veronica by about 1.5%. Franziska was
abbreviated to the names Fanni/Fani and Fanny.

There are about 2,000 Fanny/Fani/Fanni buried in the Austrian [mainly
Vienna] Jewish cemeteries since the late 1700s. The earliest
Fanny/Fanni/Fani I have found buried in Vienna {Wahringer Friedhof]
are: ARNSTEIN Fanny born 29.11.1758; GUMPERZ Fanni born 28.08.1781;
SCHLESINGER Fanni born 1782; WERTHEIMSTEIN Fanny born 01.07.1783

If you look for Franziska burials there are about 1,000 and quite a
few have the name Fanny added to them. In most, the name Franziska
did not stick and they became plain *Fanny*!

The most famous was Fanny von ARNSTEIN nee ITZIG [1758 Berlin-1818
Vienna]. Her name was Vogele/Vogelchen. Here we have an even earlier
Vogele> Franzeska> Fanny transition in Germany:
http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/view.jsp?artid=1802&letter=A

She appears like this in Wahring cemetery book entry:
ARNSTEIN Franciska, Fanny, Franziska dob 29.11.1758 aged 60 Jahre
buried 08.06.1818 Group 4 grave 88

re choice of names beginning with *F* in English - there are more
than you think: Fiona, Frieda, Flora, Felicity, Florence, Florentine,
Francesca, Frances, Fenella [I know one!], Faseny [I know one!],
Faith, Fay and last but not least, Fanny. So the explanation that
Fanny was the only possible choice for Feigele is clearly illogical.

This URL shows the decline in the name Fanny in the USA - and tells
us that the name is of Latin origin meaning ">from France" variant of
Frances: http://www.thinkbabynames.com/meaning/0/Fanny

see also http://www.thenamemachine.com/baby-names-girls/Fanny.html
[other name trends can be checked here]

Hence the Habsburg Emperor Joseph II Toleranz Patent appears the most
likely origin of the *widespread* name transition via Franzeska >
Fanni/Fani/Fanny, although we see >from Fanny von ARNSTEIN that this
transition also took place in German-born Jews well before the date
of the Toleranz Patent.

The switch >from Feigele to Fanny by Rene's Dutch cousin, I believe,
was largely influenced by the German/Habsburgian tradition. Once
again, do not forget the Habsburg Empire, the Josephian reforms
{Enlightenment} and their influence on European Jewry.

Celia Male [U.K.]


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen re: How given name Vogel becomes Fanny #general

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Rene van Wijngaarden wrote: <Is there an explanation how
the given name Vogel=bird in Dutch becomes Fanny?>

Steve Bloom wrote: <nearly all of the "Fayga" in my family who moved
to an English speaking country became "Fanny" - ......... it was
simply a popular female name amongst immigrant Jews of the time that
happened to have some similar letters ....... There could be a more
complex answer, but I think that's it.>

Yes, Steve has hit the nail on the head and here is the history of
this transition as I have unravelled it:

The trouble with Judith's explanation is that most babies called
Fayga or Feigele did not arrive in England till the late 1800s and
the use of the name Fanny was already well-established in the
Habsburg Empire since the late 1700s when Emperor Joseph II issued
his Toleranz Patent. Hence the use of Fanny in the German language
pre-dates, by more than 100 years, its widespread use in the English
language [see particularly Fanny von ARNSTEIN below].

The most important part of the Patent {Edict} relating to names was
that Jewish families had to adopt German family names. First names
were also included in the reforms. Thus, in Bohemia and Moravia, a
list of 30 female first names was on offer as well as over 100 male
first names. Franziska was one of the names on this list - as were
Anna, Barbara, Elisabeth, Eva, Karolina, Katharina, Libuscha,
Ludmilla, Libuscha, Maria, Rachel, Rosalia, Sara, Theresia &
Veronica.
Here you see Franziska was the only choice of a name starting with
*F*; Veronica/Verona were possible alternatives for Vogele.

Vogel, Vogele and Feigele were *not permitted* as names. Franziska
was chosen by about 5-6% of all Bohemian women by 1793 [calculated
from the census] and Veronica by about 1.5%. Franziska was
abbreviated to the names Fanni/Fani and Fanny.

There are about 2,000 Fanny/Fani/Fanni buried in the Austrian [mainly
Vienna] Jewish cemeteries since the late 1700s. The earliest
Fanny/Fanni/Fani I have found buried in Vienna {Wahringer Friedhof]
are: ARNSTEIN Fanny born 29.11.1758; GUMPERZ Fanni born 28.08.1781;
SCHLESINGER Fanni born 1782; WERTHEIMSTEIN Fanny born 01.07.1783

If you look for Franziska burials there are about 1,000 and quite a
few have the name Fanny added to them. In most, the name Franziska
did not stick and they became plain *Fanny*!

The most famous was Fanny von ARNSTEIN nee ITZIG [1758 Berlin-1818
Vienna]. Her name was Vogele/Vogelchen. Here we have an even earlier
Vogele> Franzeska> Fanny transition in Germany:
http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/view.jsp?artid=1802&letter=A

She appears like this in Wahring cemetery book entry:
ARNSTEIN Franciska, Fanny, Franziska dob 29.11.1758 aged 60 Jahre
buried 08.06.1818 Group 4 grave 88

re choice of names beginning with *F* in English - there are more
than you think: Fiona, Frieda, Flora, Felicity, Florence, Florentine,
Francesca, Frances, Fenella [I know one!], Faseny [I know one!],
Faith, Fay and last but not least, Fanny. So the explanation that
Fanny was the only possible choice for Feigele is clearly illogical.

This URL shows the decline in the name Fanny in the USA - and tells
us that the name is of Latin origin meaning ">from France" variant of
Frances: http://www.thinkbabynames.com/meaning/0/Fanny

see also http://www.thenamemachine.com/baby-names-girls/Fanny.html
[other name trends can be checked here]

Hence the Habsburg Emperor Joseph II Toleranz Patent appears the most
likely origin of the *widespread* name transition via Franzeska >
Fanni/Fani/Fanny, although we see >from Fanny von ARNSTEIN that this
transition also took place in German-born Jews well before the date
of the Toleranz Patent.

The switch >from Feigele to Fanny by Rene's Dutch cousin, I believe,
was largely influenced by the German/Habsburgian tradition. Once
again, do not forget the Habsburg Empire, the Josephian reforms
{Enlightenment} and their influence on European Jewry.

Celia Male [U.K.]


Unusual naming procedures #general

Nick Rich <nick@...>
 

Dear all,

My Great Great Grand-Father was called Jacob Moses (Jaacov Moshe) RYDZ, and
was born in Slesin and died in Konin, Kalisz Guburnia, Poland. He had sons
Avram (Adolph), Icyk (Isaac), Nussin (Nathan), Schloima (Solomon), Lejser
Szmul (Simon Lisear), who all came to England in the 1880's. One other son,
Dawid, stayed behind and settled in Konin.

Every-one of these sons named their first born son either Jacob Morris,
Jacob Maurice, or Jacob Moses, clearly named after Jaacov Moshe, who died
before any of the Grand-Children were born, which would be usual Ashkenazi
procedure, naming first born after a deceased relative, usually their
Grand-Father. What really puzzles me is that the sons of Avram and Icyk both
died very young, and they then named a second son by the same name later on.
Clearly the Father was very dear to them, as each son was determined to give
the name to his son, but I always thought it unlucky to give a brother the
same name as one who died so young. I then thought that maybe the
Grand-Father Jaacov Moshe, was so important in his community that it was a
foregone conclusion that each son was to name one of his sons the same name,
but I have now discovered that the original man was a carpenter.

Can anyone offer any suggestions as to why they would have chosen to name in
this way. This is just a matter of curiosity for me, but has nagged at me
for some time now. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Kind regards to all,

Nick Rich
Birmingham
UK

Researching family - RICH, RYDZ, EJMAN, JELENKIEWICZ, BLOOMBERG/BLUMBERG,
JACOBS, COHEN.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Unusual naming procedures #general

Nick Rich <nick@...>
 

Dear all,

My Great Great Grand-Father was called Jacob Moses (Jaacov Moshe) RYDZ, and
was born in Slesin and died in Konin, Kalisz Guburnia, Poland. He had sons
Avram (Adolph), Icyk (Isaac), Nussin (Nathan), Schloima (Solomon), Lejser
Szmul (Simon Lisear), who all came to England in the 1880's. One other son,
Dawid, stayed behind and settled in Konin.

Every-one of these sons named their first born son either Jacob Morris,
Jacob Maurice, or Jacob Moses, clearly named after Jaacov Moshe, who died
before any of the Grand-Children were born, which would be usual Ashkenazi
procedure, naming first born after a deceased relative, usually their
Grand-Father. What really puzzles me is that the sons of Avram and Icyk both
died very young, and they then named a second son by the same name later on.
Clearly the Father was very dear to them, as each son was determined to give
the name to his son, but I always thought it unlucky to give a brother the
same name as one who died so young. I then thought that maybe the
Grand-Father Jaacov Moshe, was so important in his community that it was a
foregone conclusion that each son was to name one of his sons the same name,
but I have now discovered that the original man was a carpenter.

Can anyone offer any suggestions as to why they would have chosen to name in
this way. This is just a matter of curiosity for me, but has nagged at me
for some time now. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Kind regards to all,

Nick Rich
Birmingham
UK

Researching family - RICH, RYDZ, EJMAN, JELENKIEWICZ, BLOOMBERG/BLUMBERG,
JACOBS, COHEN.


Re: German WWI cemetery in France #general

cecilia <myths@...>
 

Rosanne Leeson wrote:
W[...] I would assume that these countries also have
records >from their Verdun area cemeteries, just as the US does. [...]
http://www.cwgc.org/ for Commonwealth War Graves Commission on-line
database.

I can't get into it at present, but it has (another site said) a link
to the German War Graves Commission for which the search site appears
to be (found via Google)
http://www.volksbund.de/graebersuche/

The German site seems to require the name and address of the enquirer.

Cecilia Nyleve

MODERATOR NOTE: The http://www.cwgc.org website is not
currently working.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: German WWI cemetery in France #general

cecilia <myths@...>
 

Rosanne Leeson wrote:
W[...] I would assume that these countries also have
records >from their Verdun area cemeteries, just as the US does. [...]
http://www.cwgc.org/ for Commonwealth War Graves Commission on-line
database.

I can't get into it at present, but it has (another site said) a link
to the German War Graves Commission for which the search site appears
to be (found via Google)
http://www.volksbund.de/graebersuche/

The German site seems to require the name and address of the enquirer.

Cecilia Nyleve

MODERATOR NOTE: The http://www.cwgc.org website is not
currently working.


Polish Military records from the second WW #poland

Ofer Cohen <oferco@...>
 

My father in law served in the olish army just before WWII. Are there any
records that can be obtained about his service?

Regards

Ofer Cohen
Israel


JRI Poland #Poland Polish Military records from the second WW #poland

Ofer Cohen <oferco@...>
 

My father in law served in the olish army just before WWII. Are there any
records that can be obtained about his service?

Regards

Ofer Cohen
Israel


Researcher Avrohom Krauss #lithuania

Deena Berton <deenahome@...>
 

If anyone knows how to reach Avrohom Krauss, please ask him to contact me
directly.

Thank you,
Deena Berton
Telsiai Uyezd Coordinator
LitvakSIG
deenahome@camcom.com


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Researcher Avrohom Krauss #lithuania

Deena Berton <deenahome@...>
 

If anyone knows how to reach Avrohom Krauss, please ask him to contact me
directly.

Thank you,
Deena Berton
Telsiai Uyezd Coordinator
LitvakSIG
deenahome@camcom.com


Vital Records Translation Project website update #lithuania

Joel Ratner
 

Vital Records Translation Project

Those researchers interested in the Vital Records Translation Project can
find updates to the blog posted at http://mysite.verizon.net/vzeol99x
It is expected there will be further updates in the weeks to come advising
of changes to the project as they are formulated.

Joel Ratner
Coordinator, LitvakSIG Vital Records Translation Project


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Vital Records Translation Project website update #lithuania

Joel Ratner
 

Vital Records Translation Project

Those researchers interested in the Vital Records Translation Project can
find updates to the blog posted at http://mysite.verizon.net/vzeol99x
It is expected there will be further updates in the weeks to come advising
of changes to the project as they are formulated.

Joel Ratner
Coordinator, LitvakSIG Vital Records Translation Project


Re: German WWI cemetery in France #general

HPOLLINS@...
 

In a message dated 20/08/2006 05:00:55 GMT Standard Time,
rdleeson@sbcglobal.net writes:
When visiting the American Cemetery >from WWI in Verdun, France, a
few years ago, I noticed a small German cemetery on the road
to the American cemetery which is enormous. There is also a British
one in the vicinity. I would assume that these countries also have
records >from their Verdun area cemeteries, just as the US does.
Unfortunately, I do not know where these records might be kept.
Perhaps someone else can help with that?
------

There is a German War Graves Commission which keeps records of German
fatalities.
Its address is
Volksbund Deutsche Kriegsgraeberfuersorge e.V.
Bundesgeschaeftsstelle
Werner-Hilpert-Strasse 2
D 34112 Kassel

[the 'ae', 'ue', and 'ae' signify umlauts]

e-mail: Info@VOLKSBUND.de

You can write to them in English but you will get a reply in German.

Harold Pollins
Oxford


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: German WWI cemetery in France #general

HPOLLINS@...
 

In a message dated 20/08/2006 05:00:55 GMT Standard Time,
rdleeson@sbcglobal.net writes:
When visiting the American Cemetery >from WWI in Verdun, France, a
few years ago, I noticed a small German cemetery on the road
to the American cemetery which is enormous. There is also a British
one in the vicinity. I would assume that these countries also have
records >from their Verdun area cemeteries, just as the US does.
Unfortunately, I do not know where these records might be kept.
Perhaps someone else can help with that?
------

There is a German War Graves Commission which keeps records of German
fatalities.
Its address is
Volksbund Deutsche Kriegsgraeberfuersorge e.V.
Bundesgeschaeftsstelle
Werner-Hilpert-Strasse 2
D 34112 Kassel

[the 'ae', 'ue', and 'ae' signify umlauts]

e-mail: Info@VOLKSBUND.de

You can write to them in English but you will get a reply in German.

Harold Pollins
Oxford


1897 all-Russia Census #general

E F Hisgen <elaena@...>
 

I think I found my Grandpa on your website in the Belarus 1897 census.
The name was misspelled in the same way it was in the 1930 US Census
(Kalner instead of Kelner). The family is >from Odessa.

I am new at genealogy and my ultimate goal is to see if there are living
descendants in Russia. My grandparents came here in 1905, according to the
1920 US Census.

Now that I think I have found my Grandpa, where do I go >from here? How can
I actually know the information in the 1897 Russian census so that I may
investigate further?

Thank you very much for your work and greetings >from Southern California.
Regards, Elaena

E. Hisgen

MODERATOR NOTE: Have you checked the JewishGen Family Finder yet?
The JGFF is a database of genealogists, searchable by the surnames and
towns they are researching. You can look for KALNER / KELNER / etc.
(it has a soundex option to find similar versions in one search),
and please use the "enter" option to register your own research
information so that future genealogists can find *you*.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen 1897 all-Russia Census #general

E F Hisgen <elaena@...>
 

I think I found my Grandpa on your website in the Belarus 1897 census.
The name was misspelled in the same way it was in the 1930 US Census
(Kalner instead of Kelner). The family is >from Odessa.

I am new at genealogy and my ultimate goal is to see if there are living
descendants in Russia. My grandparents came here in 1905, according to the
1920 US Census.

Now that I think I have found my Grandpa, where do I go >from here? How can
I actually know the information in the 1897 Russian census so that I may
investigate further?

Thank you very much for your work and greetings >from Southern California.
Regards, Elaena

E. Hisgen

MODERATOR NOTE: Have you checked the JewishGen Family Finder yet?
The JGFF is a database of genealogists, searchable by the surnames and
towns they are researching. You can look for KALNER / KELNER / etc.
(it has a soundex option to find similar versions in one search),
and please use the "enter" option to register your own research
information so that future genealogists can find *you*.