Date   

The Best Advice To A New Genealogy Researcher #general

Stephen Denker
 

Many times my wife and I have been asked by friends starting to do genealogy
research – "Where should we look for information?"

We always say start by interviewing all of your living relatives. They have
critical information that no one else has. Keep interviewing them as you
find more information and become more skillful.

My own second best advice – is getting your spouse to do her or his
genealogy a the same time you are. We constantly test ideas and find items
that we would miss doing solo research.

Opps. That’s 2 bits of advice.

What’s yours?

Elayne and Stephen Denker
Brookline, MA

Looking for EPSTEIN, SOLOVEITCHIK, DENKER, BILLMAN, KRUGER, STUTZ, EBER,
STUTZKI

MODERATOR NOTE: Ours would be, start with the FAQ! JewishGen's list
of Frequently Asked Questions is a pretty good starting point for any
genealogist: http://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/faq.html


Anniversary of one death: "Aschava"? #general

duccio leoni <duccio.leoni@...>
 

Dear Genners
I am translating >from Italian into English the will of one of my ancestors
who lived in Trieste, Italy.
Among one of his requests is that the Temple in Ebelsbach, Bavaria, where he
was born should recite the Kaddish and the "Aschava" (?) and lit a candle in
his memory.

I cannot find a suitable translation for the latter prayer, can anyone help
me?
Duccio
England
217885


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen The Best Advice To A New Genealogy Researcher #general

Stephen Denker
 

Many times my wife and I have been asked by friends starting to do genealogy
research – "Where should we look for information?"

We always say start by interviewing all of your living relatives. They have
critical information that no one else has. Keep interviewing them as you
find more information and become more skillful.

My own second best advice – is getting your spouse to do her or his
genealogy a the same time you are. We constantly test ideas and find items
that we would miss doing solo research.

Opps. That’s 2 bits of advice.

What’s yours?

Elayne and Stephen Denker
Brookline, MA

Looking for EPSTEIN, SOLOVEITCHIK, DENKER, BILLMAN, KRUGER, STUTZ, EBER,
STUTZKI

MODERATOR NOTE: Ours would be, start with the FAQ! JewishGen's list
of Frequently Asked Questions is a pretty good starting point for any
genealogist: http://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/faq.html


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Anniversary of one death: "Aschava"? #general

duccio leoni <duccio.leoni@...>
 

Dear Genners
I am translating >from Italian into English the will of one of my ancestors
who lived in Trieste, Italy.
Among one of his requests is that the Temple in Ebelsbach, Bavaria, where he
was born should recite the Kaddish and the "Aschava" (?) and lit a candle in
his memory.

I cannot find a suitable translation for the latter prayer, can anyone help
me?
Duccio
England
217885


Re: My Bukowina roots #romania

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

Bernie Levy asked about STIERs, KAUDERERs, and BURGs in Bukowina. In the
1924/1925 Romanian business directories available on the Library of
Congress' website and searchable at www.kalter.org/search, there are a few
STIERs, no KAUDERERs, and some BURGs (many more BERGs). Below is the STIER
information, sufficiently little that I am willing to extract it myself.
Note that both STIERs and BURGs appear in Cernauti.

In Cernauti, occupation carciumari: STIER Dawid, strada Rosch 65; STIER
Manczie, str. Cuciurul Mare 16
In Cernauti, occupation tamplari: STIER Aron J., str. Wexler 80
In Storojinet, occupation vita: STIER Lusssor [sic]
In Satmar (not in Bukowina), occupation barbieri: STIER Ignatz, Regina Maria
2
In Bucuresti (not in Bukowina), occupation ceasornicari: STIER D., Smardan
41

Best regards,

Logan Kleinwaks
kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu
near Washington, D.C.


Romania SIG #Romania RE: My Bukowina roots #romania

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

Bernie Levy asked about STIERs, KAUDERERs, and BURGs in Bukowina. In the
1924/1925 Romanian business directories available on the Library of
Congress' website and searchable at www.kalter.org/search, there are a few
STIERs, no KAUDERERs, and some BURGs (many more BERGs). Below is the STIER
information, sufficiently little that I am willing to extract it myself.
Note that both STIERs and BURGs appear in Cernauti.

In Cernauti, occupation carciumari: STIER Dawid, strada Rosch 65; STIER
Manczie, str. Cuciurul Mare 16
In Cernauti, occupation tamplari: STIER Aron J., str. Wexler 80
In Storojinet, occupation vita: STIER Lusssor [sic]
In Satmar (not in Bukowina), occupation barbieri: STIER Ignatz, Regina Maria
2
In Bucuresti (not in Bukowina), occupation ceasornicari: STIER D., Smardan
41

Best regards,

Logan Kleinwaks
kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu
near Washington, D.C.


Incorrect hyperlink #unitedkingdom

Louise Messik at JCR-UK <jcr-uk-mod@...>
 

I apologise. In my last mailing the hyperlink to the following had part of
it missing. You will find in the repeated paragraph below the link
corrected.

<quote>

It was Harold's wish that these names should be shown in static list form
and I have bowed to his instruction. I must add that this method of display
is unlikely to be repeated. A detailed description of the list and links to
the four PDF files is to be found at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/UK/Jewish_Civilians_dataset_description.htm

<end quote>

Louise Messik


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Incorrect hyperlink #unitedkingdom

Louise Messik at JCR-UK <jcr-uk-mod@...>
 

I apologise. In my last mailing the hyperlink to the following had part of
it missing. You will find in the repeated paragraph below the link
corrected.

<quote>

It was Harold's wish that these names should be shown in static list form
and I have bowed to his instruction. I must add that this method of display
is unlikely to be repeated. A detailed description of the list and links to
the four PDF files is to be found at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/UK/Jewish_Civilians_dataset_description.htm

<end quote>

Louise Messik


photos of first transport of Jews to Auschwitz #general

Feige Stern
 

Hello to my fellow Jgenners,
I am hoping to find information regarding the first transport of Jews to
Auschwitz >from Poprad in Poland, specifically the numbers beginning at
1000. My friend's mother, Berta Berkovicova, was >from Vysna Pysana in
Poland. She was on that transport on March 23 or 26 1942. Her number
was1048.

I am hoping to find out if anyone might know the whereabouts of photos
that were taken on that day. My friend just completed a trip to
Poland. He was hoping to find those photos at Auschwitz. They were not
there. Does anyone have any ideas where else he might look for them?

Thanks to anyone who might help,

Feige Kauvar Stern
Researching: KLEVARSKY (Kauvar), Seduva, Lithuania; SILVERSTEIN,
Rasseiniai, Lithuania,; NAFTEL, Rasseiniai, Lithuania; HOFFMAN,
Kishinev, Moldova; SCHENKER, Dankera, Latvia; SCHWARTZ, Braila,
Rumania; STERN, Russia; FRIEDMAN, Odessa; SOBEL, Kleparov, Ukraine;
PROBST, Lvov, Ukraine.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen photos of first transport of Jews to Auschwitz #general

Feige Stern
 

Hello to my fellow Jgenners,
I am hoping to find information regarding the first transport of Jews to
Auschwitz >from Poprad in Poland, specifically the numbers beginning at
1000. My friend's mother, Berta Berkovicova, was >from Vysna Pysana in
Poland. She was on that transport on March 23 or 26 1942. Her number
was1048.

I am hoping to find out if anyone might know the whereabouts of photos
that were taken on that day. My friend just completed a trip to
Poland. He was hoping to find those photos at Auschwitz. They were not
there. Does anyone have any ideas where else he might look for them?

Thanks to anyone who might help,

Feige Kauvar Stern
Researching: KLEVARSKY (Kauvar), Seduva, Lithuania; SILVERSTEIN,
Rasseiniai, Lithuania,; NAFTEL, Rasseiniai, Lithuania; HOFFMAN,
Kishinev, Moldova; SCHENKER, Dankera, Latvia; SCHWARTZ, Braila,
Rumania; STERN, Russia; FRIEDMAN, Odessa; SOBEL, Kleparov, Ukraine;
PROBST, Lvov, Ukraine.


Re: Unusual naming procedures #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

Every-one of these sons named their first born son either Jacob Morris,
Jacob Maurice, or Jacob Moses, clearly named after Jaacov Moshe, who died
before any of the Grand-Children were born, which would be usual Ashkenazi
procedure, naming first born after a deceased relative, usually their
Grand-Father. What really puzzles me is that the sons of Avram and Icyk both
died very young, and they then named a second son by the same name later on.
Clearly the Father was very dear to them, as each son was determined to give
the name to his son, but I always thought it unlucky to give a brother the
same name as one who died so young.
I can offer an anecdote >from my own tree. My great-grandmother had a son,
the elder brother of my grandmother, named Hersz, for her father; the child
died at ten years of age. She bore subsequently another son, and gave him
the same name. As you have put it, she was determined that this name
continue.

Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form
there.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Unusual naming procedures #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

Every-one of these sons named their first born son either Jacob Morris,
Jacob Maurice, or Jacob Moses, clearly named after Jaacov Moshe, who died
before any of the Grand-Children were born, which would be usual Ashkenazi
procedure, naming first born after a deceased relative, usually their
Grand-Father. What really puzzles me is that the sons of Avram and Icyk both
died very young, and they then named a second son by the same name later on.
Clearly the Father was very dear to them, as each son was determined to give
the name to his son, but I always thought it unlucky to give a brother the
same name as one who died so young.
I can offer an anecdote >from my own tree. My great-grandmother had a son,
the elder brother of my grandmother, named Hersz, for her father; the child
died at ten years of age. She bore subsequently another son, and gave him
the same name. As you have put it, she was determined that this name
continue.

Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form
there.


Re: Unusual naming procedures #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

At 12:20 PM +0100 8/20/06, Nick Rich wrote:
What really puzzles me is that the sons of Avram and Icyk both died
very young, and they then named a second son by the same name later
on. Clearly the Father was very dear to them, as each son was
determined to give the name to his son, but I always thought it
unlucky to give a brother the same name as one who died so young. I
then thought that maybe the Grand-Father Jaacov Moshe, was so
important in his community that it was a foregone conclusion that
each son was to name one of his sons the same name, but I have now
discovered that the original man was a carpenter.

Can anyone offer any suggestions as to why they would have chosen to
name in this way. This is just a matter of curiosity for me, but has
nagged at me for some time now. Any suggestions would be appreciated.
Bearing in mind that naming taboos are just superstitions, and not a
matter of Jewish law, there seem to have been two schools of thought
on this matter. I too have discovered cases where a later-born child
was given the name of an earlier sibling who had died.

In general, following the Enlightenment, Western European Jews, with
a higher level of general education, seem to have abandoned the
naming superstitions that continued to be observed by Eastern
European communities. In my own Anglo-Dutch Jewish ancestry there
are many cases of children being named after the child's still-living
grandparents (though never for living parents -- which is of course a
common convention among gentiles. My family included numerous Johns
and Adelaides named for my great-grandparents during their lifetime.

The most fascinating instance of naming conventions in my family
relates to one of my great-uncles, who married twice during the
first decade of the 20th century. The first marriage was a
common-law union with a gentile woman -- no doubt because both
families adamantly opposed the marriage. This couple produced three
children -- two of whom were named John and Adelaide after my
great-uncle's still-living parents (who may not even have known of
their existence!) Later, my great-uncle contracted a legal
marriage with a Jewish woman. The eight children of that marriage
included a second Adelaide (born shortly after the death of her
grandmother Adelaide) and a second John (born shortly after the
death of his grandfather John).

Clearly, my great-uncle felt constrained to follow the custom of
naming these children after recently deceased grandparents -- even
though he already had two children >from the first union with those
names! If that fact was indeed concealed >from his second family,
failure to memorialize his parents via this virtually universal
Jewish naming convention might have been hard for him to explain.....

Judith Romney Wegner


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Unusual naming procedures #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

At 12:20 PM +0100 8/20/06, Nick Rich wrote:
What really puzzles me is that the sons of Avram and Icyk both died
very young, and they then named a second son by the same name later
on. Clearly the Father was very dear to them, as each son was
determined to give the name to his son, but I always thought it
unlucky to give a brother the same name as one who died so young. I
then thought that maybe the Grand-Father Jaacov Moshe, was so
important in his community that it was a foregone conclusion that
each son was to name one of his sons the same name, but I have now
discovered that the original man was a carpenter.

Can anyone offer any suggestions as to why they would have chosen to
name in this way. This is just a matter of curiosity for me, but has
nagged at me for some time now. Any suggestions would be appreciated.
Bearing in mind that naming taboos are just superstitions, and not a
matter of Jewish law, there seem to have been two schools of thought
on this matter. I too have discovered cases where a later-born child
was given the name of an earlier sibling who had died.

In general, following the Enlightenment, Western European Jews, with
a higher level of general education, seem to have abandoned the
naming superstitions that continued to be observed by Eastern
European communities. In my own Anglo-Dutch Jewish ancestry there
are many cases of children being named after the child's still-living
grandparents (though never for living parents -- which is of course a
common convention among gentiles. My family included numerous Johns
and Adelaides named for my great-grandparents during their lifetime.

The most fascinating instance of naming conventions in my family
relates to one of my great-uncles, who married twice during the
first decade of the 20th century. The first marriage was a
common-law union with a gentile woman -- no doubt because both
families adamantly opposed the marriage. This couple produced three
children -- two of whom were named John and Adelaide after my
great-uncle's still-living parents (who may not even have known of
their existence!) Later, my great-uncle contracted a legal
marriage with a Jewish woman. The eight children of that marriage
included a second Adelaide (born shortly after the death of her
grandmother Adelaide) and a second John (born shortly after the
death of his grandfather John).

Clearly, my great-uncle felt constrained to follow the custom of
naming these children after recently deceased grandparents -- even
though he already had two children >from the first union with those
names! If that fact was indeed concealed >from his second family,
failure to memorialize his parents via this virtually universal
Jewish naming convention might have been hard for him to explain.....

Judith Romney Wegner


MUSHINs in Minsk and Dokhshitsy #general

Annette Stolberg <annettes@...>
 

Unless anyone knows Abram MUSHIN, of Minsk and Dokhshitsy, who
fathered Leah, Jacob David and Sarah, (and maybe others), my family
tree search stops with the names of my great grandfather Abram, and
his children, Leah being my grandmother. I hope someone out there
can help. The time period 1876 to 1880 - any hints where to go for
the recording of births at this time?

Thanks,
Annette Stolberg


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen MUSHINs in Minsk and Dokhshitsy #general

Annette Stolberg <annettes@...>
 

Unless anyone knows Abram MUSHIN, of Minsk and Dokhshitsy, who
fathered Leah, Jacob David and Sarah, (and maybe others), my family
tree search stops with the names of my great grandfather Abram, and
his children, Leah being my grandmother. I hope someone out there
can help. The time period 1876 to 1880 - any hints where to go for
the recording of births at this time?

Thanks,
Annette Stolberg


Researching PRUZAN VELONSKY RAYMOND DIAMONDSTONE BLUMENTHAL from Jurbarkas, Vilna, London (Soho) and SF. #general

peter hills <pmhills@...>
 

It is some time since I last posted a message so here is reminder of the
names and towns I am researching. Naturally very happy to hear >from anyone
with an interest in these names and places. Thank you.

Peter Hills
London

Researching
PRUZAN Seattle and London
VELONSKY Jurbarkas and West End of London (Soho)
RIMAN/RAYMOND/RAYMAN Vilna and West End of London (Soho)
BLUMENTHAL Ozerkov, Kalisz and London (Soho)
DIAMONDSTONE Dvinsk
PHILLIPS Dvinsk, Los Angeles and San Francisco


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Researching PRUZAN VELONSKY RAYMOND DIAMONDSTONE BLUMENTHAL from Jurbarkas, Vilna, London (Soho) and SF. #general

peter hills <pmhills@...>
 

It is some time since I last posted a message so here is reminder of the
names and towns I am researching. Naturally very happy to hear >from anyone
with an interest in these names and places. Thank you.

Peter Hills
London

Researching
PRUZAN Seattle and London
VELONSKY Jurbarkas and West End of London (Soho)
RIMAN/RAYMOND/RAYMAN Vilna and West End of London (Soho)
BLUMENTHAL Ozerkov, Kalisz and London (Soho)
DIAMONDSTONE Dvinsk
PHILLIPS Dvinsk, Los Angeles and San Francisco


bounced e-mail: Fleischmann #general

Roni Pelled <pelled2@...>
 

Dear Genners,

An e-mail I sent to Laureen A. Fleischmann (Robert Fleischmann
London) has bounced.
Does anyone know his current address?

Thanks for your help,

Roni Peled, Israel
pelled@ry.org.il


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen bounced e-mail: Fleischmann #general

Roni Pelled <pelled2@...>
 

Dear Genners,

An e-mail I sent to Laureen A. Fleischmann (Robert Fleischmann
London) has bounced.
Does anyone know his current address?

Thanks for your help,

Roni Peled, Israel
pelled@ry.org.il