Date   

Re: Origin, meaning & variations of the woman's name FINKEL #germany

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Ellen Cleary posted as follows:
"It looks like a female ancestor of mine may have been named Finkel.
I would like to know more about the origin, meaning, and variations of this name.

I have tried searching on JewishGen for this information, but have not
found anything, which may be my shortcoming. I would appreciate any
ideas you might have about this name and/or suggestions of other resources."

====>Finkl is a Yiddish given name that was used sparsely in a number of central
and eastern European countries by women. The name means "Little Spark".

In addition to having been but sparsely used, it also did not generate many
nicknames or other variants of the basic Yiddish name. Some nicknames that
were used by women with the name Finkl were: Finkla, Finkle, Finklye, and
Finke, depending on the country of interest.

I did not find the name in the Germany archival documents which I have
used, but it does appear in other countries data bases farther east. The
name may be seen on the Poland (and some other countries) Given Names Data
Base on the JewishGen web site at the address:

< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames/ >

by searching for the name Finkl, the Legal name used in documents. Shavua tov,

Professor G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel <jerry@vms.huji.ac.il>


Re: JACOB/JACOBS #poland

Steven Bloom <sbloom@...>
 

You did not say where your grandfather's family ended up after Poland, so
it may be hard to give you the maximum amount of guidance, but here are
some suggestions:

1. For whatever country they migrated to, try to find immigration records
(such as a ship manifest). If its the US, this may not be so hard, but for
other countries, depending on what they are, it could be more difficult.
These records often give a town name and or country (often mispelled
though, so be careful).

2. Though names such as "Poland" and "Russia" might have different meanings
to different people depending on time period, you might as well assume they
were >from a part of Poland that is in the JRI-Poland records indicies, and l
ook through them. Yes, there are probably hundreds of Jacobs, and thousands
of Cohens, but you can search by given names as well, or search for two
surnames together, etc. Who knows, maybe someone is even trying that as this
gets written.

3. Again, there are other options dependent on country they eventually went
to (such as social security applications in the US, etc.).


I have recently discovered that my JACOBS family come >from Poland. I
have since then discovered that my great - grandmothers name was Hannah
nee COHEN. My grandfather's birth certificate shows our JACOBS surname
as JACOB. My grandfather's name was Woolf (b + - 1887/8 ) and his
parents were Abraham Jaocob / s and Hannah ( nee COHEN). I am struggling
to find where in Poland they came from.


************************************************
Steven D. Bloom
Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy

email: sbloom@email.hsc.edu

Department of Physics and Astronomy
Hampden-Sydney College


German SIG #Germany Re: Origin, meaning & variations of the woman's name FINKEL #germany

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Ellen Cleary posted as follows:
"It looks like a female ancestor of mine may have been named Finkel.
I would like to know more about the origin, meaning, and variations of this name.

I have tried searching on JewishGen for this information, but have not
found anything, which may be my shortcoming. I would appreciate any
ideas you might have about this name and/or suggestions of other resources."

====>Finkl is a Yiddish given name that was used sparsely in a number of central
and eastern European countries by women. The name means "Little Spark".

In addition to having been but sparsely used, it also did not generate many
nicknames or other variants of the basic Yiddish name. Some nicknames that
were used by women with the name Finkl were: Finkla, Finkle, Finklye, and
Finke, depending on the country of interest.

I did not find the name in the Germany archival documents which I have
used, but it does appear in other countries data bases farther east. The
name may be seen on the Poland (and some other countries) Given Names Data
Base on the JewishGen web site at the address:

< http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames/ >

by searching for the name Finkl, the Legal name used in documents. Shavua tov,

Professor G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel <jerry@vms.huji.ac.il>


JRI Poland #Poland Re: JACOB/JACOBS #poland

Steven Bloom <sbloom@...>
 

You did not say where your grandfather's family ended up after Poland, so
it may be hard to give you the maximum amount of guidance, but here are
some suggestions:

1. For whatever country they migrated to, try to find immigration records
(such as a ship manifest). If its the US, this may not be so hard, but for
other countries, depending on what they are, it could be more difficult.
These records often give a town name and or country (often mispelled
though, so be careful).

2. Though names such as "Poland" and "Russia" might have different meanings
to different people depending on time period, you might as well assume they
were >from a part of Poland that is in the JRI-Poland records indicies, and l
ook through them. Yes, there are probably hundreds of Jacobs, and thousands
of Cohens, but you can search by given names as well, or search for two
surnames together, etc. Who knows, maybe someone is even trying that as this
gets written.

3. Again, there are other options dependent on country they eventually went
to (such as social security applications in the US, etc.).


I have recently discovered that my JACOBS family come >from Poland. I
have since then discovered that my great - grandmothers name was Hannah
nee COHEN. My grandfather's birth certificate shows our JACOBS surname
as JACOB. My grandfather's name was Woolf (b + - 1887/8 ) and his
parents were Abraham Jaocob / s and Hannah ( nee COHEN). I am struggling
to find where in Poland they came from.


************************************************
Steven D. Bloom
Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy

email: sbloom@email.hsc.edu

Department of Physics and Astronomy
Hampden-Sydney College


Thanks to all who helped- VM8092 #germany

Tamar Amit <tamar.amit@...>
 

Dear Genners,
Thank you very much - I received translation of the answer from
Standesamt I Berlin that I had posted on View-Mate.

Tamar Amit Givatayim, Israel


German SIG #Germany Thanks to all who helped- VM8092 #germany

Tamar Amit <tamar.amit@...>
 

Dear Genners,
Thank you very much - I received translation of the answer from
Standesamt I Berlin that I had posted on View-Mate.

Tamar Amit Givatayim, Israel


postings on Viewmate #germany

Christopher Massur <cmassur@...>
 

Dear Tamar and genners,
I would like to use this example to give my thoughts on translations on
viewmate. Many times I have translated postings.

I find it unrewarding to \ranslate a pc written letter without knowing how many
other people have taken the trouble to do so. Old German script is much more a
challenge. It would be perhaps a help to add to the thumbnails at least the
information how many people have opened the posting and looked at it.

If there have been 30 interested, one or two might have taken the trouble already
to translate.

If none looked at it, probably no answer yet. Lately, I get around to asking
the poster first before I translate. Some are not truthful and like as many
answers as possible. Longer originals take time. Another thing: if I see an
AOL adress, I will not volunteer, because all unknown adresses are filtered
out and the sender nor adressee might be aware of this.

By the way, Tamar, they are letting you know that their workload is heavy,
and your question might take quite some time to be answered. And that
certain documents cannot be looked at because they have been affected by
mildew. Kind regards,

Christopher Massur, Curaçao <cmassur@hotmail.com>


Lodz and Warsaw ghetto - dramas on BBC Radio 4 #poland

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Many of us have relatives who died in the Lodz ghetto.
This Friday's drama documentary, "The Conversation"
on BBC Radio 4 should therefore be of particular
interest and poignancy.

It is based on tape-recorded interviews in the form of
a "question and answer" dialogue with a survivor and
the son of a survivor, whose father arrived in Britain
in 1945 aged 20 and never told him anything of his
horrendous youthful experiences. It was 24 years after
his father's death that he finally knew the facts.
"The Conversation" is described as a dramatic
reconstruction of a conversation between Trevor
FRIEDMAN whose father was a Jewish slave labourer in
the War and Roman HALTER, who had shared the same
experience.

You can listen to it on "BBC Listen Again" till the
coming Friday - it is informative and horrific.
Stutthof conditions are also discussed as are
Mengele's sadistic selection processes - all in a
matter-of-fact calm manner.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/progs/listenagain.shtml

Go to "The Afternoon Play (45 min)
Broadcast on Radio 4 - Fri 30 Jun - 14:15

The drama I am just listening - "Dr Korczak's Example"
about the orphanage in the Warsaw ghetto is also
well-worth listening to: read about Dr KORCZAK here:

http://korczak.com/Biography/kap-0.htm
http://korczak.com/Biography/kap-1who.htm

Unfortunately, the play will bring tears to your eyes
-especially the last ten minutes describing the
liquidation of the orphanage and the transportation of
he children to Treblinka.

Dr KORCZAK's legacy to world at large is the the
United Nation's "Rights of the Child".

Go the the Saturday Play - on Radio 4 "Listen
again." You have one week to listen to it.

Celia Male [U.K.]


German SIG #Germany postings on Viewmate #germany

Christopher Massur <cmassur@...>
 

Dear Tamar and genners,
I would like to use this example to give my thoughts on translations on
viewmate. Many times I have translated postings.

I find it unrewarding to \ranslate a pc written letter without knowing how many
other people have taken the trouble to do so. Old German script is much more a
challenge. It would be perhaps a help to add to the thumbnails at least the
information how many people have opened the posting and looked at it.

If there have been 30 interested, one or two might have taken the trouble already
to translate.

If none looked at it, probably no answer yet. Lately, I get around to asking
the poster first before I translate. Some are not truthful and like as many
answers as possible. Longer originals take time. Another thing: if I see an
AOL adress, I will not volunteer, because all unknown adresses are filtered
out and the sender nor adressee might be aware of this.

By the way, Tamar, they are letting you know that their workload is heavy,
and your question might take quite some time to be answered. And that
certain documents cannot be looked at because they have been affected by
mildew. Kind regards,

Christopher Massur, Curaçao <cmassur@hotmail.com>


JRI Poland #Poland Lodz and Warsaw ghetto - dramas on BBC Radio 4 #poland

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Many of us have relatives who died in the Lodz ghetto.
This Friday's drama documentary, "The Conversation"
on BBC Radio 4 should therefore be of particular
interest and poignancy.

It is based on tape-recorded interviews in the form of
a "question and answer" dialogue with a survivor and
the son of a survivor, whose father arrived in Britain
in 1945 aged 20 and never told him anything of his
horrendous youthful experiences. It was 24 years after
his father's death that he finally knew the facts.
"The Conversation" is described as a dramatic
reconstruction of a conversation between Trevor
FRIEDMAN whose father was a Jewish slave labourer in
the War and Roman HALTER, who had shared the same
experience.

You can listen to it on "BBC Listen Again" till the
coming Friday - it is informative and horrific.
Stutthof conditions are also discussed as are
Mengele's sadistic selection processes - all in a
matter-of-fact calm manner.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/progs/listenagain.shtml

Go to "The Afternoon Play (45 min)
Broadcast on Radio 4 - Fri 30 Jun - 14:15

The drama I am just listening - "Dr Korczak's Example"
about the orphanage in the Warsaw ghetto is also
well-worth listening to: read about Dr KORCZAK here:

http://korczak.com/Biography/kap-0.htm
http://korczak.com/Biography/kap-1who.htm

Unfortunately, the play will bring tears to your eyes
-especially the last ten minutes describing the
liquidation of the orphanage and the transportation of
he children to Treblinka.

Dr KORCZAK's legacy to world at large is the the
United Nation's "Rights of the Child".

Go the the Saturday Play - on Radio 4 "Listen
again." You have one week to listen to it.

Celia Male [U.K.]


Jewish male births in Lower Franconia between 1797 and 1855 #germany

MBernet@...
 

Avraham Malthcate < jfm@aiu.org > Librarian, responsible for Hebrew
manuscripts at the Alliance Israelite Universelle, informs me that he is
transcribing a Mohelbuch (Circumcisions Journal), listing 687 male
infants in Lower Franconia between 1797 and 1855.

I have his permission to post this message to gersig.

The list includes the circumcision of the future Rabbi Seligman Ber
haLevy Bamberger of Wurzburg (the Wurzburger Rov), an older
brother, and four of his sons.

I have seen only the draft of an article that M. Malthete sent me as an
attachment, which included very clear scans of the BAMBERGER
entries. I have no further information.

the following are among the villages mentioned in the journal.
Altenschoenbach, Bischwind, Breitstadt, Bruennau, Frankenwinheim,
Geiselwind, Grosslangheim, Kirchschoenbach, Kleinlangheim, Luelsfeld,
Mainbernheim, Oberschwarzach, Rehweiler, Rimbach, Roedelsee, Sauerbach,
Stadelschwarzach, Traustadt, Wiesenbronn, Zeilitzheim.

Michael Bernet, New York MBernet@aol.com


German SIG #Germany Jewish male births in Lower Franconia between 1797 and 1855 #germany

MBernet@...
 

Avraham Malthcate < jfm@aiu.org > Librarian, responsible for Hebrew
manuscripts at the Alliance Israelite Universelle, informs me that he is
transcribing a Mohelbuch (Circumcisions Journal), listing 687 male
infants in Lower Franconia between 1797 and 1855.

I have his permission to post this message to gersig.

The list includes the circumcision of the future Rabbi Seligman Ber
haLevy Bamberger of Wurzburg (the Wurzburger Rov), an older
brother, and four of his sons.

I have seen only the draft of an article that M. Malthete sent me as an
attachment, which included very clear scans of the BAMBERGER
entries. I have no further information.

the following are among the villages mentioned in the journal.
Altenschoenbach, Bischwind, Breitstadt, Bruennau, Frankenwinheim,
Geiselwind, Grosslangheim, Kirchschoenbach, Kleinlangheim, Luelsfeld,
Mainbernheim, Oberschwarzach, Rehweiler, Rimbach, Roedelsee, Sauerbach,
Stadelschwarzach, Traustadt, Wiesenbronn, Zeilitzheim.

Michael Bernet, New York MBernet@aol.com


Re: Driesen #general

Evertjan. <exjxw.hannivoort@...>
 

wrote on 01 jul 2006 in soc.genealogy.jewish:

Can anyone tell me where or how to find out information on a place
called Driesen in the Empire of Germany during the period 1835+? I
discovered on obtaining Naturalisation Information >from the PRO UK
that two of my ancestors, William and Solomon Ullmann came >from there
before moving to the UK.
Not Driesen but Dresden <http://www.dresden.de/>.

<http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Search/Census/individual_record.asp?
indi_code=1881BR%5F676172%5F0&lds=5&region=1&regionfriendly=1881
+British+Census&frompage=99>

or

<http://tinyurl.com/p465y>


--
Evertjan Hannivoort.
The Netherlands.
(Please change the x'es to dots in my emailaddress)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Driesen #general

Evertjan. <exjxw.hannivoort@...>
 

wrote on 01 jul 2006 in soc.genealogy.jewish:

Can anyone tell me where or how to find out information on a place
called Driesen in the Empire of Germany during the period 1835+? I
discovered on obtaining Naturalisation Information >from the PRO UK
that two of my ancestors, William and Solomon Ullmann came >from there
before moving to the UK.
Not Driesen but Dresden <http://www.dresden.de/>.

<http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Search/Census/individual_record.asp?
indi_code=1881BR%5F676172%5F0&lds=5&region=1&regionfriendly=1881
+British+Census&frompage=99>

or

<http://tinyurl.com/p465y>


--
Evertjan Hannivoort.
The Netherlands.
(Please change the x'es to dots in my emailaddress)


Re: My Eastern European Trip #general

Vivian Kahn
 

Dear Sue,

My suggestion is to embark on your trip with the objective of learning as much
as you can about the life and times of the places where your families
lived and realize that it may be difficult to find specific locations. That's
what I did last summer when I went on my own family-finding expedition to Hungary
and Slovakia.

I suspect that my father went through Budapest's Keleti Station in January 1921
when he left Michalovce, Slovakia, never to return. My great-
grandparents remained behind and continued to live on Andrassy utca in
Michalovce. This street was obliterated after WWII and all that remains are
Soviet-era apartment blocks but many similar old
buildings remain in nearby areas where most of the community's Jewish population
once lived and many of the turn-of the-century buildings along Michalovce's main
street remain providing a glimpse of what the city once looked like.

I also walked the streets of Sobrance where the family lived in the
late 19th century and saw the fields that my great-grandfathers farmed in what
is now eastern Slovakia. Doesn't look like much has changed in this
agricultural area where storks still walk through the fields and fly home to
nests on poles in older residential neighborhoods.
In an amazing case of "bashert" I stopped and took pictures of a
house in Sobrance where a survivor I know once lived and the shops on the
Sobrance main street that were once owned by his parents and uncles. The apparent
coincidence seems amazing but, in fact,
may not be all that astounding given the small population in places like this.

Realizing that it would be very difficult, if not impossible, to find the
buildings where my relatives once lived, I decided to just soak up the
environment in these places--buildings, parks, the natural enviornment, arts,
music, museums, nature, and, of course, food. Walking
the streets of Budapest, Kosice, Miskolc, Michalovce, Sobrance and
Bratislava in August 2005 it is very hard, but also very important, to try and
evoke mental images of the Jewish communities that once existed in these places
but you can find clues. If you can find the graves of your
relatives that will be an important part of your trip. My father never returned
to Hungary and, as far as my know, neither did any of his siblings so I am the
only immediate family member who has visited the graves of my grandfather and
great-grandparents in Michalovce. That's the kind of memory that will always
remain.

Hope that your trip is as memorable as mine was,

Vivian Kah, Oakland, CA

I am leaving in a few days for a lower Danube River cruise which will take me
to many interesting places, including Romania/ Bucharest. While in Romania I
have hired a driver/translator for a day. Hope to get to Podu Turcului,where
I believe my father ( Yankel HAIMOVITZ) was born. I will be in the
following places- Vienna,, Budapest, Belgrade, towns in Hungary,
Serbia-Montenegro, Slovakia and Czech Republic. I have done some research
and will definitely get to the Doheny Street Synagogue in Budapest, the
Stadttempel in Vienna and the synagogue in Bucharest. Does anyone have any
other places of Jewish significance that I should attempt to visit in these
locations? Of course, while I am in Bucharest, I will try to start to learn
more about my father and his family. I also would like to contact a lady
who wrote in who lives in Bucharest. Her name is Claudia Ionita.
If you read this Claudia, please write me personally @ casakeller@comcast.net .
I am leaving on July 4.
Thank you,
Sue Keller


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: My Eastern European Trip #general

Vivian Kahn
 

Dear Sue,

My suggestion is to embark on your trip with the objective of learning as much
as you can about the life and times of the places where your families
lived and realize that it may be difficult to find specific locations. That's
what I did last summer when I went on my own family-finding expedition to Hungary
and Slovakia.

I suspect that my father went through Budapest's Keleti Station in January 1921
when he left Michalovce, Slovakia, never to return. My great-
grandparents remained behind and continued to live on Andrassy utca in
Michalovce. This street was obliterated after WWII and all that remains are
Soviet-era apartment blocks but many similar old
buildings remain in nearby areas where most of the community's Jewish population
once lived and many of the turn-of the-century buildings along Michalovce's main
street remain providing a glimpse of what the city once looked like.

I also walked the streets of Sobrance where the family lived in the
late 19th century and saw the fields that my great-grandfathers farmed in what
is now eastern Slovakia. Doesn't look like much has changed in this
agricultural area where storks still walk through the fields and fly home to
nests on poles in older residential neighborhoods.
In an amazing case of "bashert" I stopped and took pictures of a
house in Sobrance where a survivor I know once lived and the shops on the
Sobrance main street that were once owned by his parents and uncles. The apparent
coincidence seems amazing but, in fact,
may not be all that astounding given the small population in places like this.

Realizing that it would be very difficult, if not impossible, to find the
buildings where my relatives once lived, I decided to just soak up the
environment in these places--buildings, parks, the natural enviornment, arts,
music, museums, nature, and, of course, food. Walking
the streets of Budapest, Kosice, Miskolc, Michalovce, Sobrance and
Bratislava in August 2005 it is very hard, but also very important, to try and
evoke mental images of the Jewish communities that once existed in these places
but you can find clues. If you can find the graves of your
relatives that will be an important part of your trip. My father never returned
to Hungary and, as far as my know, neither did any of his siblings so I am the
only immediate family member who has visited the graves of my grandfather and
great-grandparents in Michalovce. That's the kind of memory that will always
remain.

Hope that your trip is as memorable as mine was,

Vivian Kah, Oakland, CA

I am leaving in a few days for a lower Danube River cruise which will take me
to many interesting places, including Romania/ Bucharest. While in Romania I
have hired a driver/translator for a day. Hope to get to Podu Turcului,where
I believe my father ( Yankel HAIMOVITZ) was born. I will be in the
following places- Vienna,, Budapest, Belgrade, towns in Hungary,
Serbia-Montenegro, Slovakia and Czech Republic. I have done some research
and will definitely get to the Doheny Street Synagogue in Budapest, the
Stadttempel in Vienna and the synagogue in Bucharest. Does anyone have any
other places of Jewish significance that I should attempt to visit in these
locations? Of course, while I am in Bucharest, I will try to start to learn
more about my father and his family. I also would like to contact a lady
who wrote in who lives in Bucharest. Her name is Claudia Ionita.
If you read this Claudia, please write me personally @ casakeller@comcast.net .
I am leaving on July 4.
Thank you,
Sue Keller


Re: Ordering from National Archives #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Fri, 30 Jun 2006 19:13:49 UTC, JBarnett@MrNoah.com (JEF BARNETT) opined:

Great news that we can now order on line >from the US National Archives. I
was trying to find the fee schedule and it looks like to order
naturalization records, the charge is the same $.50/page (regular size
paper) that they charge to do it when at the Archives? Minimum order is $10?

This seems too cheap. Did I miss the right schedule? Can someone give me the
link to the fees?
$.50/page is the price for making Xerox copies on their machine when you are
there doing it yourself. I think the price for ordering a page is $10.


Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form there.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Ordering from National Archives #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Fri, 30 Jun 2006 19:13:49 UTC, JBarnett@MrNoah.com (JEF BARNETT) opined:

Great news that we can now order on line >from the US National Archives. I
was trying to find the fee schedule and it looks like to order
naturalization records, the charge is the same $.50/page (regular size
paper) that they charge to do it when at the Archives? Minimum order is $10?

This seems too cheap. Did I miss the right schedule? Can someone give me the
link to the fees?
$.50/page is the price for making Xerox copies on their machine when you are
there doing it yourself. I think the price for ordering a page is $10.


Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form there.


for those of you who want to see more than 200 names in the NY cemtery databases #general

Rose Feldman <rosef@...>
 

Steve Morse has developed a search engine for the 3 cemeteries in NY. If you
use it, at the bottom there is a search by year. It can be done together
with the name of one of the societies too.You will get a list with a button
at the bottom for going to the next page.

http://www.stevemorse.org/vital/cem.html

Rose Feldman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen for those of you who want to see more than 200 names in the NY cemtery databases #general

Rose Feldman <rosef@...>
 

Steve Morse has developed a search engine for the 3 cemeteries in NY. If you
use it, at the bottom there is a search by year. It can be done together
with the name of one of the societies too.You will get a list with a button
at the bottom for going to the next page.

http://www.stevemorse.org/vital/cem.html

Rose Feldman