Date   

More information on New York-New Jersey cemetery databases #general

steve725@...
 

Greetings,
A few more notes on the newly-formed and upcoming cemetery databases.

Mt. Carmel Cemetery:
Until it is corrected, you should not use the Section, Block or Map/Path search
fields, as they are reversed, i.e. what should be the Section field is currently
the Map/Path field, and what is the Block field is currently the Section field. It
would not matter if you added a correct name. So if you want to use their database
to search, please search only by name for now until it is corrected. The better
alternative is to use Stephen P. Morse's new search engine created for both
Mt. Hebron and Mt. Carmel. The URL is www.stevemorse.org. He has adjusted the
Mt. Carmel search capabilities so that, until this field mix-up is corrected, it
will not affect your search. Once the Mt. Carmel site is fixed, he will readjust
his Mt. Carmel search engine to reflect the correction.
Lastly, with regards only to the Mt. Carmel database, if you search only by
society name, e.g., and reach the limit of 200 per search, the resultant burials
will be presented according to date of death (perhaps they use date of burial,
though the field label says date of death). The first entries will usually be the
listings that have no date of death attached to them; after that, you will find
the oldest burials listed first.

The next website will be for Mt. Zion Cemetery, then probably Mt. Judah, and
lastly Mt. Ararat. These will probably be the last of the databases built for any
of the area cemeteries unless other cemeteries decide at a later date to get it
done.

Regards,
Steve Lasky
New York
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen More information on New York-New Jersey cemetery databases #general

steve725@...
 

Greetings,
A few more notes on the newly-formed and upcoming cemetery databases.

Mt. Carmel Cemetery:
Until it is corrected, you should not use the Section, Block or Map/Path search
fields, as they are reversed, i.e. what should be the Section field is currently
the Map/Path field, and what is the Block field is currently the Section field. It
would not matter if you added a correct name. So if you want to use their database
to search, please search only by name for now until it is corrected. The better
alternative is to use Stephen P. Morse's new search engine created for both
Mt. Hebron and Mt. Carmel. The URL is www.stevemorse.org. He has adjusted the
Mt. Carmel search capabilities so that, until this field mix-up is corrected, it
will not affect your search. Once the Mt. Carmel site is fixed, he will readjust
his Mt. Carmel search engine to reflect the correction.
Lastly, with regards only to the Mt. Carmel database, if you search only by
society name, e.g., and reach the limit of 200 per search, the resultant burials
will be presented according to date of death (perhaps they use date of burial,
though the field label says date of death). The first entries will usually be the
listings that have no date of death attached to them; after that, you will find
the oldest burials listed first.

The next website will be for Mt. Zion Cemetery, then probably Mt. Judah, and
lastly Mt. Ararat. These will probably be the last of the databases built for any
of the area cemeteries unless other cemeteries decide at a later date to get it
done.

Regards,
Steve Lasky
New York
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com


new article Belarus SIG newsletter #general

Fran Bock
 

Dear Fellow Genners,

Please click on the link below:

http://www.jewishgen.org/Belarus/newsletter/bnl_index.htm

for a special contribution by Vitaly Charny, who has translated the Minsk
city budget for the year 1877.


Frances A. Bock,
Editor, Belarus SIG Newsletter


Re: HARTMAN in Scotland #general

Harvey L Kaplan <harvey@...>
 

Diane Cudo writes:

I have traced an ancestor, Casper HARTMAN to Scotland, b. 1684, arrived
America 1730, d. Pennsylvania, USA 1777. I am not having luck tracing his
birth back in Scotland.
There is no evidence of Jewish communities in Scotland before Edinburgh in
1816 and Glasgow in 1823. There were a handful of Jewish individuals and
families in Scotland >from the late 1600s onwards - often converts teaching
at the universities, medical students or traders.

Civil registration of births, marriages and deaths in Scotland started in
1855.

So the only way of finding anything about Caspar is if he was a Christian
and appears somewhere in the Old Parish Records.

Harvey L Kaplan
Glasgow, Scotland


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen new article Belarus SIG newsletter #general

Fran Bock
 

Dear Fellow Genners,

Please click on the link below:

http://www.jewishgen.org/Belarus/newsletter/bnl_index.htm

for a special contribution by Vitaly Charny, who has translated the Minsk
city budget for the year 1877.


Frances A. Bock,
Editor, Belarus SIG Newsletter


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: HARTMAN in Scotland #general

Harvey L Kaplan <harvey@...>
 

Diane Cudo writes:

I have traced an ancestor, Casper HARTMAN to Scotland, b. 1684, arrived
America 1730, d. Pennsylvania, USA 1777. I am not having luck tracing his
birth back in Scotland.
There is no evidence of Jewish communities in Scotland before Edinburgh in
1816 and Glasgow in 1823. There were a handful of Jewish individuals and
families in Scotland >from the late 1600s onwards - often converts teaching
at the universities, medical students or traders.

Civil registration of births, marriages and deaths in Scotland started in
1855.

So the only way of finding anything about Caspar is if he was a Christian
and appears somewhere in the Old Parish Records.

Harvey L Kaplan
Glasgow, Scotland


PELSINGER #general

mushmush@inbox.com <mushmush@...>
 

My name is Dawn PELSINGER NICHTENHAUSER. My parents, Leo and Sandra,
divorced when I was five, and my mother and I lost contact with the
pelsingers. I had a relationship with my father, for a time, in the
1980s. then lost contact again.. However, before that, he married a
woman named Millicent.
My father died in 1993. I believe Millicent passenger lives in
Florida. I very much want to get in contact with her. If anyone has
any knowledge of her whereabouts, please email me. Thank you.
mushmush@...
Dawn PELSINGER NICHTENHAUSER

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately


LitvakSIG Vital Records Translation Project #general

Davida Handler <dnhiowa@...>
 

The LitvakSIG Vital Records Translation Project is translating the records
filmed by the LDS, for which the LDS, the Vilnius Archives, and LitvakSIG
signed a legal and binding 3-way agreement. The Vilnius Archives allowed
the LDS to film the records - and the LDS then supplied more than 200,000
digital images - each containing multiple records - on CDs to LitvakSIG to
process, sort, and translate them.

When LitvakSIG received the images containing approximately half a million
records - they were filmed just as they sat in the archives - going up one
stack and down another. Many were mislabeled - so our first job was to
reorganize them into shtetl and year so as to facilitate translations.

A Locality Index was produced by the LDS, and incorporated into the
JewishGen web site as a guide, listing all films pertaining to a given town.
After the images were sorted, we found numerous errors in the Locality
Index. These have been noted and a corrected locality index is being
produced.

Our translations are done >from the old Cyrillic, Hebrew, and to a lesser
extent German and Lithuanian. The ability of LitvakSIG translators to take
into account information on the Hebrew side of the record in many cases
gives us additional information not provided in the Cyrillic. A great many
of these records are ready to go up onto the All Lithuania Database - and as
you know - LitvakSIG has been sending the Excel files of the translations to
our qualified contributors - allowing them to search for relatives of the
original name they were looking for.

Translations of records for several towns have already been completed. These
include Shirvint, Rasein, Kernave, and Moletai. Significant work has been
accomplished for Keidan, Birzai, Pumpenai, Zasliai, Vilkija, and Vilna. Work
has begun for several other towns as well, including Kovno and Vilijampole
among the larger sets of records. To find out the old Yiddish, and current
Lithuanian names for these towns, go to
http://www.jewishgen.org/Litvak/HTML/sug.xls.

Our translation team includes a Rabbi, a historian with a Ph.D., a former US
Government translator with 39 years experience in Slavic languages, as well
as a Slavic language librarian. We also have at our disposal a teacher of
Lithuanian attached to the US State Dept. We recently secured an additional
translator capable of working in Russian, German, Hebrew, Polish and
Lithuanian. This brings to three the number of translators fluent in at
least two of the languages present in the vital records. Additional
translators are working >from one language, either Russian or Hebrew - and
the translations >from each language are compared for accuracy.

The fields included in these translations include most, if not all of the
information recorded in the metrical registers. To further clarify this
issue, the name of the project has been amended to Vital Records Translation
Project.

We welcome efforts to translate records other than those that LitvakSIG has
already acquired and on which LitvakSIG is working. We hope that any other
project will avoid duplication of work and resources.

Any questions regarding the project should be directed to Joel Ratner at
joelrat1@....

Joel Ratner, LitvakSIG Vital Records Project Manager
Davida Noyek Handler, LitvakSIG President


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen PELSINGER #general

mushmush@inbox.com <mushmush@...>
 

My name is Dawn PELSINGER NICHTENHAUSER. My parents, Leo and Sandra,
divorced when I was five, and my mother and I lost contact with the
pelsingers. I had a relationship with my father, for a time, in the
1980s. then lost contact again.. However, before that, he married a
woman named Millicent.
My father died in 1993. I believe Millicent passenger lives in
Florida. I very much want to get in contact with her. If anyone has
any knowledge of her whereabouts, please email me. Thank you.
mushmush@...
Dawn PELSINGER NICHTENHAUSER

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen LitvakSIG Vital Records Translation Project #general

Davida Handler <dnhiowa@...>
 

The LitvakSIG Vital Records Translation Project is translating the records
filmed by the LDS, for which the LDS, the Vilnius Archives, and LitvakSIG
signed a legal and binding 3-way agreement. The Vilnius Archives allowed
the LDS to film the records - and the LDS then supplied more than 200,000
digital images - each containing multiple records - on CDs to LitvakSIG to
process, sort, and translate them.

When LitvakSIG received the images containing approximately half a million
records - they were filmed just as they sat in the archives - going up one
stack and down another. Many were mislabeled - so our first job was to
reorganize them into shtetl and year so as to facilitate translations.

A Locality Index was produced by the LDS, and incorporated into the
JewishGen web site as a guide, listing all films pertaining to a given town.
After the images were sorted, we found numerous errors in the Locality
Index. These have been noted and a corrected locality index is being
produced.

Our translations are done >from the old Cyrillic, Hebrew, and to a lesser
extent German and Lithuanian. The ability of LitvakSIG translators to take
into account information on the Hebrew side of the record in many cases
gives us additional information not provided in the Cyrillic. A great many
of these records are ready to go up onto the All Lithuania Database - and as
you know - LitvakSIG has been sending the Excel files of the translations to
our qualified contributors - allowing them to search for relatives of the
original name they were looking for.

Translations of records for several towns have already been completed. These
include Shirvint, Rasein, Kernave, and Moletai. Significant work has been
accomplished for Keidan, Birzai, Pumpenai, Zasliai, Vilkija, and Vilna. Work
has begun for several other towns as well, including Kovno and Vilijampole
among the larger sets of records. To find out the old Yiddish, and current
Lithuanian names for these towns, go to
http://www.jewishgen.org/Litvak/HTML/sug.xls.

Our translation team includes a Rabbi, a historian with a Ph.D., a former US
Government translator with 39 years experience in Slavic languages, as well
as a Slavic language librarian. We also have at our disposal a teacher of
Lithuanian attached to the US State Dept. We recently secured an additional
translator capable of working in Russian, German, Hebrew, Polish and
Lithuanian. This brings to three the number of translators fluent in at
least two of the languages present in the vital records. Additional
translators are working >from one language, either Russian or Hebrew - and
the translations >from each language are compared for accuracy.

The fields included in these translations include most, if not all of the
information recorded in the metrical registers. To further clarify this
issue, the name of the project has been amended to Vital Records Translation
Project.

We welcome efforts to translate records other than those that LitvakSIG has
already acquired and on which LitvakSIG is working. We hope that any other
project will avoid duplication of work and resources.

Any questions regarding the project should be directed to Joel Ratner at
joelrat1@....

Joel Ratner, LitvakSIG Vital Records Project Manager
Davida Noyek Handler, LitvakSIG President


Re: Procedures at Ellis Island: Was the newcomer given... #general

adamsny@...
 

If there is any truth to the book "The Jew Store," written by Stella Suberman
(excellent book), it happened to her father when he arrived at Ellis Island.

According to the author her father left Podolska and immigrated to the United
States around 1910 +/-. Her father spoke Yiddish and a bit of Russian. When
asked his name by officials at Ellis Island, Stella's father, not speaking
English, did not answer. Asked again he answered "Avram Droskowitz." It was
written down on the official papers. The name used in America? Aaron Bronson.
The store was named Bronson's Low-Priced Store.
Nancy Ring Kendrick
Port Orange, FL
BLOCH / DZIEKIEWICZ / GROSS / KISH / RING
Bielska-Biala, Bystra, Grybow, Kenty, Nowy Sacz, Tarnow.
http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/k/e/n/Nancy-R-Kendrick/?Welco
me=1018348985

What happened at Ellis Island was usually very simple: each passenger
was checked off against the passenger list on the ship's manifest, and
was examined for disease, etc. If you look at a manifest page or two at
the Ellis Island site, you'll see the big check marks.

The "Ellis Island myth" is often actually true, except for small matters
of who, where, and when. The name on the manifest is the one that was
written down by someone at the port of embarkation, which could have
been in England, Germany, Greece, France, etc. I believe that there
*were* some US immigration/customs officials in some ports at some
times, but there's no easy way to determine the identity, position, or
nationality of the person filling out the manifest.

My grandfather-in-law got off the boat and was checked off as CAMBUS.
(Same with his mother and several siblings.) His family, some of whom
were already in New York, had never used that name, and never used it
afterwards either. The ones already here were CAMPUSes. Back home
they'd been CAMPEANU, so it may well be that they gave their expected
new name (CAMPUS) when embarking; and either it got spelled wrong by the
scribe, whoever he was--or they themselves had it wrong!

No matter what the cause, the name on the manifest never caused them a
moment's trouble--or thought. They probably never saw their names
written on that page. They knew they'd been CAMPEANUs, and were going
to be CAMPUSes, and acted accordingly. When we discovered the manifest
page, CAMBUS was complete news to everyone in the family when we told them.

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Procedures at Ellis Island: Was the newcomer given... #general

adamsny@...
 

If there is any truth to the book "The Jew Store," written by Stella Suberman
(excellent book), it happened to her father when he arrived at Ellis Island.

According to the author her father left Podolska and immigrated to the United
States around 1910 +/-. Her father spoke Yiddish and a bit of Russian. When
asked his name by officials at Ellis Island, Stella's father, not speaking
English, did not answer. Asked again he answered "Avram Droskowitz." It was
written down on the official papers. The name used in America? Aaron Bronson.
The store was named Bronson's Low-Priced Store.
Nancy Ring Kendrick
Port Orange, FL
BLOCH / DZIEKIEWICZ / GROSS / KISH / RING
Bielska-Biala, Bystra, Grybow, Kenty, Nowy Sacz, Tarnow.
http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/k/e/n/Nancy-R-Kendrick/?Welco
me=1018348985

What happened at Ellis Island was usually very simple: each passenger
was checked off against the passenger list on the ship's manifest, and
was examined for disease, etc. If you look at a manifest page or two at
the Ellis Island site, you'll see the big check marks.

The "Ellis Island myth" is often actually true, except for small matters
of who, where, and when. The name on the manifest is the one that was
written down by someone at the port of embarkation, which could have
been in England, Germany, Greece, France, etc. I believe that there
*were* some US immigration/customs officials in some ports at some
times, but there's no easy way to determine the identity, position, or
nationality of the person filling out the manifest.

My grandfather-in-law got off the boat and was checked off as CAMBUS.
(Same with his mother and several siblings.) His family, some of whom
were already in New York, had never used that name, and never used it
afterwards either. The ones already here were CAMPUSes. Back home
they'd been CAMPEANU, so it may well be that they gave their expected
new name (CAMPUS) when embarking; and either it got spelled wrong by the
scribe, whoever he was--or they themselves had it wrong!

No matter what the cause, the name on the manifest never caused them a
moment's trouble--or thought. They probably never saw their names
written on that page. They knew they'd been CAMPEANUs, and were going
to be CAMPUSes, and acted accordingly. When we discovered the manifest
page, CAMBUS was complete news to everyone in the family when we told them.

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA


Gordon from Mogilov-Podolsk #ukraine

C Lipman <cslipman@...>
 

My father came >from Mogilov-Podolsk. He emigrated
with the name Schlomo GORDON. His mother's name was
Malka. Does anyone have information about this
family? I can't seem to find anything.

Corinne Lipman

Moderator note: It would be most helpful to include your
City/State so that responses could direct you to local
resources in addition to web-based resources.


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Gordon from Mogilov-Podolsk #ukraine

C Lipman <cslipman@...>
 

My father came >from Mogilov-Podolsk. He emigrated
with the name Schlomo GORDON. His mother's name was
Malka. Does anyone have information about this
family? I can't seem to find anything.

Corinne Lipman

Moderator note: It would be most helpful to include your
City/State so that responses could direct you to local
resources in addition to web-based resources.


Re: How often were people not counted in the census? #general

Sally Bruckheimer <sallybru@...>
 

"If it's 3% nationwide, that means there is a 97% probability that your target
person is on the census, but because of other factors, difficult to find."

This is fine for the general public, but for immigrant ancestors, perhaps
living several to a room in a boarding house style tenament apartment, there
would be much greater chance of being missed. Add to that the chance that
the census-taker might not understand Yiddish speaking tenants. Add to
that, fear of the Tsar/Emperor and government in general.

For the general public, one apartment might have one family or a couple of
single room-mates who spoke English. For recent immigrants, the
census-taker might not be told of (or just miss) one or more of several
people away at work, who don't want any part of the government.

Sally Bruckheimer
Bridgewater, NJ


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: How often were people not counted in the census? #general

Sally Bruckheimer <sallybru@...>
 

"If it's 3% nationwide, that means there is a 97% probability that your target
person is on the census, but because of other factors, difficult to find."

This is fine for the general public, but for immigrant ancestors, perhaps
living several to a room in a boarding house style tenament apartment, there
would be much greater chance of being missed. Add to that the chance that
the census-taker might not understand Yiddish speaking tenants. Add to
that, fear of the Tsar/Emperor and government in general.

For the general public, one apartment might have one family or a couple of
single room-mates who spoke English. For recent immigrants, the
census-taker might not be told of (or just miss) one or more of several
people away at work, who don't want any part of the government.

Sally Bruckheimer
Bridgewater, NJ


HARTMAN in Scotland #general

Diane Cudo <tikvah7@...>
 

Dear JewishGen group,

I have traced an ancestor, Casper HARTMAN to Scotland, b. 1684, arrived
America 1730, d. Pennsylvania, USA 1777. I am not having luck tracing his birth
back in Scotland.

Does anyone have a suggestion?

Diane Hartman Cudo Small town Israel
Tikvah7@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen HARTMAN in Scotland #general

Diane Cudo <tikvah7@...>
 

Dear JewishGen group,

I have traced an ancestor, Casper HARTMAN to Scotland, b. 1684, arrived
America 1730, d. Pennsylvania, USA 1777. I am not having luck tracing his birth
back in Scotland.

Does anyone have a suggestion?

Diane Hartman Cudo Small town Israel
Tikvah7@...


Re: Klonimus Kalman #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 4/29/2006 6:26:22 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
matt@... writes:

< I have tried to find a documented link to the Kalonymus/Klonimus
origin, but have been unsuccessful. My great grandfather was a
Kalmanowitz, born in Vilna, Poland, and my father changed the name to
Kalman. >

Kalman is the kinnuy of Kalonymos. Like Kalonymos, it has acquired th
status of Shem kadosh, sacred name, that can be used in a ketubah, in a get, at
circumcision and when calling someone to the Torah. Except for the rare case
where someone has been given/assumed the secular, non-Jewish Hungarian name,
Kalman, you can assume that every Jewish Kalman is named after a Kalonymos.

Kalmanowitz means simply Son of Kalman. At some point in your ancestry
you're 99.84% certain to find a Kalonymos. If you go back even further you might
find a ShemTov--the Hebrew name of which Kalonymos is a Greek translation.

Michael Bernet, New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Klonimus Kalman #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 4/29/2006 6:26:22 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
matt@... writes:

< I have tried to find a documented link to the Kalonymus/Klonimus
origin, but have been unsuccessful. My great grandfather was a
Kalmanowitz, born in Vilna, Poland, and my father changed the name to
Kalman. >

Kalman is the kinnuy of Kalonymos. Like Kalonymos, it has acquired th
status of Shem kadosh, sacred name, that can be used in a ketubah, in a get, at
circumcision and when calling someone to the Torah. Except for the rare case
where someone has been given/assumed the secular, non-Jewish Hungarian name,
Kalman, you can assume that every Jewish Kalman is named after a Kalonymos.

Kalmanowitz means simply Son of Kalman. At some point in your ancestry
you're 99.84% certain to find a Kalonymos. If you go back even further you might
find a ShemTov--the Hebrew name of which Kalonymos is a Greek translation.

Michael Bernet, New York