Date   

Re: Town or City in Hungary (Gychanhzas) #hungary

tom klein <h-sig@...>
 

i don't think there is a place with that name (i can't even figure out how to pronounce it!), so the trick is to figure out what place name could have been mangled into "gychanhzas".

it's always best to start with the original document, so if you could please provide a reference to the manifest page, perhaps someone would be able to figure out what it's supposed to say. (the manifest usually also has such useful bits of information as the date of arrival, and sometimes even the port of departure can be a clue, since germans use different spelling rules than italians, for example.) the transcriptions are often not correct.

another tool for locating towns in "greater hungary" is the online gazetteer at bogardi.com, which includes all the areas that now belong to romania, ukraine, slovakia, etc, and it can also do wildcard searches.



....... tom klein, toronto

ps. the only place i found that might have a similar name is "szentegyhazasfalu" in udvarhely, in present-day romania. (you can see why an english-speaking clerk might have had trouble spelling it.)

"rebeka" <ionidia@hotmail.com> wwrote

Does somebody know where is Gychanhzas in Hungary or if there is in
Romania now A ship record testify that my great-grandfather (Moldovan
Elisic(e) ) was resident there before to emigrate in America.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Town or City in Hungary (Gychanhzas) #hungary

tom klein <h-sig@...>
 

i don't think there is a place with that name (i can't even figure out how to pronounce it!), so the trick is to figure out what place name could have been mangled into "gychanhzas".

it's always best to start with the original document, so if you could please provide a reference to the manifest page, perhaps someone would be able to figure out what it's supposed to say. (the manifest usually also has such useful bits of information as the date of arrival, and sometimes even the port of departure can be a clue, since germans use different spelling rules than italians, for example.) the transcriptions are often not correct.

another tool for locating towns in "greater hungary" is the online gazetteer at bogardi.com, which includes all the areas that now belong to romania, ukraine, slovakia, etc, and it can also do wildcard searches.



....... tom klein, toronto

ps. the only place i found that might have a similar name is "szentegyhazasfalu" in udvarhely, in present-day romania. (you can see why an english-speaking clerk might have had trouble spelling it.)

"rebeka" <ionidia@hotmail.com> wwrote

Does somebody know where is Gychanhzas in Hungary or if there is in
Romania now A ship record testify that my great-grandfather (Moldovan
Elisic(e) ) was resident there before to emigrate in America.


MOLDOVAN family #hungary

rebeka
 

Dear Diane

Up to the manifest , Elisie Moldovan with his 5 friends are located to a man
:MOSE (MOSANU) TA(0)NI (?) the brother or brother in law of one of them
named Ferencs(z) Tani(Toni, Tavi, Tare, Dere?). They are all directed to
Berwich in Maine.
I found The 1910 census report and the name become Elissie, the other 5 are
not with him. His address is Ohio, Mahonning, Joungstown. But the first
record says he knows to write and to read, the census says he don't. On the
1920 or 1930 census there is no sign of this person. Maybe change the name..
Maybe come back in Romania or maybe died . ... I try to find death
refferences about this name, but I find nothing. The names of his friends on
the ship :
Bara(Boro) Janos,
Pap Laszlo.
Teri(?) Ferencz(s)
Rusz Janos
Papp Jakob.
I know that my mother family come >from Dej(s) county... That village
Gyxxxxxxxxxx... Have no relation with that area... I 'm conffused...
And about the other record that I found for Flisic( Ilisie) Moldovan , from
szaszdalya - Hungary, who come in nov 1912i found out he goes to Torrington
Connecticut, and he has some cousins there on 25 Harold str. - Babes Simon (
Simonne) and Ellen.
Tanks to all of you for your help.

Claudia ionita
Bucharest - Romania


Hungary SIG #Hungary MOLDOVAN family #hungary

rebeka
 

Dear Diane

Up to the manifest , Elisie Moldovan with his 5 friends are located to a man
:MOSE (MOSANU) TA(0)NI (?) the brother or brother in law of one of them
named Ferencs(z) Tani(Toni, Tavi, Tare, Dere?). They are all directed to
Berwich in Maine.
I found The 1910 census report and the name become Elissie, the other 5 are
not with him. His address is Ohio, Mahonning, Joungstown. But the first
record says he knows to write and to read, the census says he don't. On the
1920 or 1930 census there is no sign of this person. Maybe change the name..
Maybe come back in Romania or maybe died . ... I try to find death
refferences about this name, but I find nothing. The names of his friends on
the ship :
Bara(Boro) Janos,
Pap Laszlo.
Teri(?) Ferencz(s)
Rusz Janos
Papp Jakob.
I know that my mother family come >from Dej(s) county... That village
Gyxxxxxxxxxx... Have no relation with that area... I 'm conffused...
And about the other record that I found for Flisic( Ilisie) Moldovan , from
szaszdalya - Hungary, who come in nov 1912i found out he goes to Torrington
Connecticut, and he has some cousins there on 25 Harold str. - Babes Simon (
Simonne) and Ellen.
Tanks to all of you for your help.

Claudia ionita
Bucharest - Romania


BENVENISTE-HOROWITZ-EPSTEIN Y-DNA Study #rabbinic

Itzhak Epstein
 

I have just established the Benveniste & Sons Family Tree DNA
JewishGen surname project. Painless mouth swab genetic testing
procedures are being used as a promising tool for breaking through
our genealogical brick walls. It might help you to greatly expand
your family tree, and may also help our surname project.

Two prominent Ashkenazi families claim descent >from two brothers
who lived in Spain during the 13th Century CE . The EPSTEINs' alleged
patriarch is Rabbi Aharon de na Clara ben Yosef haLevi. The
HOROWITZs' alleged patriarch is Rabbi Pinhas, Rabbi Aharon's older
brother and mentor. These brothers are the direct male descendants
of Rabbi Zerahyah ben Yitzhak haLevi Gerondi (died after 1186). EPSTEIN
family lore asserts that Aharon's surname was BENVENISTE. The lack of
documentary evidence has, until now, raised doubts about the veracity
of these claims. Recent advances in genetic science may help us to
determine the extent to which the claimed connections between these
families are true.

The first known male HOROWITZ is Yishayahu ben Moshe haLevi ish
Horowitz who came to Prague in the late 15th Century >from the village
of Horovice. The first known male EPSTEIN is Yaakov (Koppelman) ben
Natan haLevi von Eppstein who came to Frankfurt am Main in the early
15th Century >from the town of Eppstein. BENVENISTEs were prominent in
Spain and later in the Balkans. I do not know whether there have been
several BENVENISTE families or only one. We know that many Jews
assumed the EPSTEIN and HOROWITZ surnames in the 19th Century.

12345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890123456789012345
Several EPSTEINs have already joined in a surname project. We
have identified members of one paternal Levite lineage that has
borne the Epstein surname for several centuries. Most of the project's
current members, however, are patrilineally unrelated to each other.

In addition, the BENVENISTE & sons DNA project was established to
explore the connection among these families and to also enable
BENVENISTEs and historic HOROWITZes to connect to cousins. To
accomplish these goals and to create as broad a search as possible,
we need male BENVENISTEs and historic HOROWITZes and EPSTEINs
to contribute a cheek swab as a DNA sample. If you are female
member of these families or a member through female ancestors, a
sample >from a qualified male relative can represent your family in
the test. If you are not a member of these families, please share
this message with BENVENISTEs, HOROWITZes and EPSTEINs who
may want to participate in this project.

To join the BENVENISTE & Sons surname project, go to
http://tinyurl.com/meyr9 .
To also join the EPSTEIN surname project, go to http://tinyurl.com/nyh6z .
The basic, and most affordable, twelve marker test will indicate to
whom you are probably related. The more advanced tests could help
to identify closer and more certain relationships. If we confirm the
families' common ancestry, we will need several high resolution tests
to identify the Y-DNA chromosomes of the common ancestor. You
can start with the 12 marker test and add to it at a later date, using
the same sample.

More information about DNA testing and JewishGen's involvement
in it can be found at http://www.jewishgen.org/dna/

Itzhak Epstein New York, NY


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic BENVENISTE-HOROWITZ-EPSTEIN Y-DNA Study #rabbinic

Itzhak Epstein
 

I have just established the Benveniste & Sons Family Tree DNA
JewishGen surname project. Painless mouth swab genetic testing
procedures are being used as a promising tool for breaking through
our genealogical brick walls. It might help you to greatly expand
your family tree, and may also help our surname project.

Two prominent Ashkenazi families claim descent >from two brothers
who lived in Spain during the 13th Century CE . The EPSTEINs' alleged
patriarch is Rabbi Aharon de na Clara ben Yosef haLevi. The
HOROWITZs' alleged patriarch is Rabbi Pinhas, Rabbi Aharon's older
brother and mentor. These brothers are the direct male descendants
of Rabbi Zerahyah ben Yitzhak haLevi Gerondi (died after 1186). EPSTEIN
family lore asserts that Aharon's surname was BENVENISTE. The lack of
documentary evidence has, until now, raised doubts about the veracity
of these claims. Recent advances in genetic science may help us to
determine the extent to which the claimed connections between these
families are true.

The first known male HOROWITZ is Yishayahu ben Moshe haLevi ish
Horowitz who came to Prague in the late 15th Century >from the village
of Horovice. The first known male EPSTEIN is Yaakov (Koppelman) ben
Natan haLevi von Eppstein who came to Frankfurt am Main in the early
15th Century >from the town of Eppstein. BENVENISTEs were prominent in
Spain and later in the Balkans. I do not know whether there have been
several BENVENISTE families or only one. We know that many Jews
assumed the EPSTEIN and HOROWITZ surnames in the 19th Century.

12345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890123456789012345
Several EPSTEINs have already joined in a surname project. We
have identified members of one paternal Levite lineage that has
borne the Epstein surname for several centuries. Most of the project's
current members, however, are patrilineally unrelated to each other.

In addition, the BENVENISTE & sons DNA project was established to
explore the connection among these families and to also enable
BENVENISTEs and historic HOROWITZes to connect to cousins. To
accomplish these goals and to create as broad a search as possible,
we need male BENVENISTEs and historic HOROWITZes and EPSTEINs
to contribute a cheek swab as a DNA sample. If you are female
member of these families or a member through female ancestors, a
sample >from a qualified male relative can represent your family in
the test. If you are not a member of these families, please share
this message with BENVENISTEs, HOROWITZes and EPSTEINs who
may want to participate in this project.

To join the BENVENISTE & Sons surname project, go to
http://tinyurl.com/meyr9 .
To also join the EPSTEIN surname project, go to http://tinyurl.com/nyh6z .
The basic, and most affordable, twelve marker test will indicate to
whom you are probably related. The more advanced tests could help
to identify closer and more certain relationships. If we confirm the
families' common ancestry, we will need several high resolution tests
to identify the Y-DNA chromosomes of the common ancestor. You
can start with the 12 marker test and add to it at a later date, using
the same sample.

More information about DNA testing and JewishGen's involvement
in it can be found at http://www.jewishgen.org/dna/

Itzhak Epstein New York, NY


questioning the "cohen gene" #dna

Joan Hartman <joanhartman@...>
 

Does anyone have any science-based response to the following paraphrase
from an anthropology blog, which challenges the conventional understanding
of the "cohen gene" (the blog is written anonymously so I cannot evaluate
the author's credentials):

"One of the first applications of Y-chromosome testing was the discovery
that Jewish Cohanim exhibited a particular Y-chromosome haplotype, called
the Cohen Modal Haplotype (CMH). The first letter announcing this discovery
(www.familytreedna.com/nature97385.html) showed a spectacular difference
between Cohanim and non-Cohanim. The Cohanim had trace frequencies of
haplogroup E3b, and a particular DYS19 allele at high frequency. While this
finding proved different histories for priests and non-priests, it did not
prove descent >from a single individual because the YAP- DYS19B combination
is not a monophyletic lineage. (If two men have the same haplotype, it
does not mean that they are descended >from the same ancestor. This is due
to the fact that microsatellites defining haplotypes mutate quite fast, so
two unrelated men may have the same haplotype by chance. The probability of
this increases as the number of microsatellites decreases.) In another
study
(www.journals.uchicago.edu/AJHG/journal/issues/v66n2/990488/990488.html),
the authors discovered a more extended version of the same haplotype
(DYS19-14, DYS388-16, DYS390-23, DYS391-10, DYS392-11, DYS393-12) at high
frequencies.

The Cohen modal haplotype belongs to a Y-chromosome haplogroup called J (or
HG-9). A haplogroup is defined by a unique event polymorphism, and men who
belong to the same haplogroup are indeed descended >from a single man. But,
in the case of J, that single man lived more than 10,000 years ago, long
before the time of Aaron. However, J is split into two lineages that are
also more than 10,000 years old: J2 (or Eu9) and J1 (or Eu10). If people
who have the CMH are always in just one of these groups -- either only in
J1 or only in J2 -- then the CMH could reflect descent >from a single
individual. But, if it is found in both, then by definition the CMH could
not reflect descent >from Aaron, because he lived approximately 3500 years
ago, much after the common ancestor of J1 and J2. Both groups can't be
descended >from Aaron. In this study
(bioanthropology.huji.ac.il/pdf/Nebel_2001b.pdf), 22 out of 25 individuals
with the CMH belonged to J1. But the appendix of the same study shows that
haplotype 108 is also part of the CMH, but haplotype 108 belongs to
haplogroup J2. In another study
(www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=11592923&dopt=Abstract)
the authors state that: "By typing a limited number of Italian Cohanim for
the STRs used here, we determined" that the CMH "does indeed belong to
network 1.2." Network 1.2 falls under the J2 haplogroup. In the
supplementary materials of the following comprehensive article on Ashkenazi
Jewish Y-chromosome variation, 28 of the Jewish CMHs belong to J1 and 25
belong to J2.
(www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=14740294&dopt=Abstract)

Note that in Anatolia, in region 6 (south), 12% of the population belongs
to the
J1-CMH. (hpgl.stanford.edu/publications/HG_2004_v114_p127-148.pdf). Among
Armenians in the West region, the CMH frequency is
4.4%. (www.ucl.ac.uk/tcga/tcgapdf/Weale-HG-01-Armenia.pdf).

Thus, several studies have now shown that the CMH occurs among Jews in both
J1 and J2 and does not represent a single lineage. More importantly, the
CMH was first identified because of its high frequency compared to other
haplotypes. The strength of this evidence is diminished by the finding that
CMH chromosomes belong to two unrelated lineages. Furthermore, the dating
of CMH chromosomes to Aaron's time should be reconsidered, and the
molecular variation within J1 and J2-background CMH and its neighbors
should be considered separately. In conclusion, the true genetic identity
of Aaron remains elusive."

Joan Hartman


DNA Research #DNA questioning the "cohen gene" #dna

Joan Hartman <joanhartman@...>
 

Does anyone have any science-based response to the following paraphrase
from an anthropology blog, which challenges the conventional understanding
of the "cohen gene" (the blog is written anonymously so I cannot evaluate
the author's credentials):

"One of the first applications of Y-chromosome testing was the discovery
that Jewish Cohanim exhibited a particular Y-chromosome haplotype, called
the Cohen Modal Haplotype (CMH). The first letter announcing this discovery
(www.familytreedna.com/nature97385.html) showed a spectacular difference
between Cohanim and non-Cohanim. The Cohanim had trace frequencies of
haplogroup E3b, and a particular DYS19 allele at high frequency. While this
finding proved different histories for priests and non-priests, it did not
prove descent >from a single individual because the YAP- DYS19B combination
is not a monophyletic lineage. (If two men have the same haplotype, it
does not mean that they are descended >from the same ancestor. This is due
to the fact that microsatellites defining haplotypes mutate quite fast, so
two unrelated men may have the same haplotype by chance. The probability of
this increases as the number of microsatellites decreases.) In another
study
(www.journals.uchicago.edu/AJHG/journal/issues/v66n2/990488/990488.html),
the authors discovered a more extended version of the same haplotype
(DYS19-14, DYS388-16, DYS390-23, DYS391-10, DYS392-11, DYS393-12) at high
frequencies.

The Cohen modal haplotype belongs to a Y-chromosome haplogroup called J (or
HG-9). A haplogroup is defined by a unique event polymorphism, and men who
belong to the same haplogroup are indeed descended >from a single man. But,
in the case of J, that single man lived more than 10,000 years ago, long
before the time of Aaron. However, J is split into two lineages that are
also more than 10,000 years old: J2 (or Eu9) and J1 (or Eu10). If people
who have the CMH are always in just one of these groups -- either only in
J1 or only in J2 -- then the CMH could reflect descent >from a single
individual. But, if it is found in both, then by definition the CMH could
not reflect descent >from Aaron, because he lived approximately 3500 years
ago, much after the common ancestor of J1 and J2. Both groups can't be
descended >from Aaron. In this study
(bioanthropology.huji.ac.il/pdf/Nebel_2001b.pdf), 22 out of 25 individuals
with the CMH belonged to J1. But the appendix of the same study shows that
haplotype 108 is also part of the CMH, but haplotype 108 belongs to
haplogroup J2. In another study
(www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=11592923&dopt=Abstract)
the authors state that: "By typing a limited number of Italian Cohanim for
the STRs used here, we determined" that the CMH "does indeed belong to
network 1.2." Network 1.2 falls under the J2 haplogroup. In the
supplementary materials of the following comprehensive article on Ashkenazi
Jewish Y-chromosome variation, 28 of the Jewish CMHs belong to J1 and 25
belong to J2.
(www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=14740294&dopt=Abstract)

Note that in Anatolia, in region 6 (south), 12% of the population belongs
to the
J1-CMH. (hpgl.stanford.edu/publications/HG_2004_v114_p127-148.pdf). Among
Armenians in the West region, the CMH frequency is
4.4%. (www.ucl.ac.uk/tcga/tcgapdf/Weale-HG-01-Armenia.pdf).

Thus, several studies have now shown that the CMH occurs among Jews in both
J1 and J2 and does not represent a single lineage. More importantly, the
CMH was first identified because of its high frequency compared to other
haplotypes. The strength of this evidence is diminished by the finding that
CMH chromosomes belong to two unrelated lineages. Furthermore, the dating
of CMH chromosomes to Aaron's time should be reconsidered, and the
molecular variation within J1 and J2-background CMH and its neighbors
should be considered separately. In conclusion, the true genetic identity
of Aaron remains elusive."

Joan Hartman


Re: Usher Florman #general

Joseph Hirschfield
 

The name Usher is very likely >from the Hebrew Osher or Asher in English.
Asher can be recognized as the name of one of biblical Jacob's twelve sons,
this is the name of one of the tribes of Israel.

Joseph Hirschfield
Portage, MI USA
HIRSCHFELD, LINDENBAUM, BUXBAUM, BUCHSBAUM -Sielec Bienkow, Kamionka
Strumoliwa, Gliniany, Galicia
MINOWITSKY, TOBIASZ- Brest-Livovsk, Belarus


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Usher Florman #general

Joseph Hirschfield
 

The name Usher is very likely >from the Hebrew Osher or Asher in English.
Asher can be recognized as the name of one of biblical Jacob's twelve sons,
this is the name of one of the tribes of Israel.

Joseph Hirschfield
Portage, MI USA
HIRSCHFELD, LINDENBAUM, BUXBAUM, BUCHSBAUM -Sielec Bienkow, Kamionka
Strumoliwa, Gliniany, Galicia
MINOWITSKY, TOBIASZ- Brest-Livovsk, Belarus


Attn. Brooklyn Mavens (circa 1952) #general

Carol Raspler
 

Dear All: Can anyone out there tell me what sort of a location the address
of: 1120 Brighton Beach Avenue would have represented in 1952?? Was it an
apartment house? a hospital? etc.?
Thanks! Carol Raspler, Delray Beach, FL


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Attn. Brooklyn Mavens (circa 1952) #general

Carol Raspler
 

Dear All: Can anyone out there tell me what sort of a location the address
of: 1120 Brighton Beach Avenue would have represented in 1952?? Was it an
apartment house? a hospital? etc.?
Thanks! Carol Raspler, Delray Beach, FL


Usher Florman #general

Rss1130@...
 

On the Ellis Island Database I found a given name of USHER. He was >from
Poland. Does anyone have any idea of what Usher would be called in the United
States.

Thanks you for your help.

Richard Florman Siegel
_rss1130@aol.com_ (mailto:rss1130@aol.com)

SEACHING FLORMAN, DEROW, SIEGEL


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Usher Florman #general

Rss1130@...
 

On the Ellis Island Database I found a given name of USHER. He was >from
Poland. Does anyone have any idea of what Usher would be called in the United
States.

Thanks you for your help.

Richard Florman Siegel
_rss1130@aol.com_ (mailto:rss1130@aol.com)

SEACHING FLORMAN, DEROW, SIEGEL


Translation of Polish Documents #general

Karen Pratt <kvpratt@...>
 

Dear Genners,
Need help in the translation of Polish documents. These are in the
condition received...unfortunately not too sharp.

If you have expertise, I will be in your debt. <g>

Send any translating (even partial) to: kvpratt@bellsouth.net
TIA,
Karen Pratt

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=3D8169

Birth Record in Polish.

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=3D8170

Description: Need the Marriage Record of Israel KNOLLER m. Frimcie
DUKATENZEILER in 1887 translated into English, please.

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=3D8171

Description: Would like to have the Birth Record of Hillel Hersch =
PODZAMCZER
(1892) translated into English, please.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Translation of Polish Documents #general

Karen Pratt <kvpratt@...>
 

Dear Genners,
Need help in the translation of Polish documents. These are in the
condition received...unfortunately not too sharp.

If you have expertise, I will be in your debt. <g>

Send any translating (even partial) to: kvpratt@bellsouth.net
TIA,
Karen Pratt

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=3D8169

Birth Record in Polish.

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=3D8170

Description: Need the Marriage Record of Israel KNOLLER m. Frimcie
DUKATENZEILER in 1887 translated into English, please.

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=3D8171

Description: Would like to have the Birth Record of Hillel Hersch =
PODZAMCZER
(1892) translated into English, please.


Nurron-ISSEROFF #southafrica

Saul Issroff <saul@...>
 

I found a reference:

KAB
*SOURCE* MOOC
*VOLUME_NO* 6/9/706 *SYSTEM* 01
*REFERENCE* 41 *PART* 1
*DESCRIPTION* NURRON, ANNIE. NEE *ISSEROFF.* DEATH NOTICE.
*STARTING* 19130000 *ENDING* 19130000

This name does not appear in any of the SA Jewish Rootsbank databases
nor elsewhere in the SA National Archives.
Does anyone have further information about which Isseroff she maried?

Saul Issroff


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica Nurron-ISSEROFF #southafrica

Saul Issroff <saul@...>
 

I found a reference:

KAB
*SOURCE* MOOC
*VOLUME_NO* 6/9/706 *SYSTEM* 01
*REFERENCE* 41 *PART* 1
*DESCRIPTION* NURRON, ANNIE. NEE *ISSEROFF.* DEATH NOTICE.
*STARTING* 19130000 *ENDING* 19130000

This name does not appear in any of the SA Jewish Rootsbank databases
nor elsewhere in the SA National Archives.
Does anyone have further information about which Isseroff she maried?

Saul Issroff


Re: BARUK Again #southafrica

Hazel Dakers
 

As he was part of the Parker Party, Ralph Baruk will have either been from
London or Irish. So presumably anyone interested to research further will
check in those places.

Hazel Dakers, London UK

Researching: NORDEN (London & South Africa); HEIMANN (Luegde, Germany and
South Africa); GOLD (Zgierz and Lodz, Poland), BIRNBAUM (Zgierz and Lodz,
Poland)

---------Original message---------

Subject: RE: BARUK Again
From: "Ann Rabinowitz" <annrab@bellsouth.net>
Date: Wed, 12 Jul 2006 19:09:42 -0400

Despite the fact that I had not found the name BARUK in a listing of
Amersterdam families >from 1669 - 1850, I did indeed find a record which
mentioned BARUK.

The record was found in the IGI, the International Genealogical Index
sponsored by the Mormons and which can be accessed on their site. You can
find it by going to:

http://www.familysearch.org/

What I found was a marriage record referenced for July 15, 1695, for a
Rebecca Baruk and an Isaac Sarfattim, who married in Amersterdam. No
further info was given.

So, now there is a Jewish Dutch record with a family named Baruk. Moves
closer to considering that the family in England with that name is quite
possibly Jewish too, especially since the father spoke Dutch.

Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@bellsouth.net


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica RE: BARUK Again #southafrica

Hazel Dakers
 

As he was part of the Parker Party, Ralph Baruk will have either been from
London or Irish. So presumably anyone interested to research further will
check in those places.

Hazel Dakers, London UK

Researching: NORDEN (London & South Africa); HEIMANN (Luegde, Germany and
South Africa); GOLD (Zgierz and Lodz, Poland), BIRNBAUM (Zgierz and Lodz,
Poland)

---------Original message---------

Subject: RE: BARUK Again
From: "Ann Rabinowitz" <annrab@bellsouth.net>
Date: Wed, 12 Jul 2006 19:09:42 -0400

Despite the fact that I had not found the name BARUK in a listing of
Amersterdam families >from 1669 - 1850, I did indeed find a record which
mentioned BARUK.

The record was found in the IGI, the International Genealogical Index
sponsored by the Mormons and which can be accessed on their site. You can
find it by going to:

http://www.familysearch.org/

What I found was a marriage record referenced for July 15, 1695, for a
Rebecca Baruk and an Isaac Sarfattim, who married in Amersterdam. No
further info was given.

So, now there is a Jewish Dutch record with a family named Baruk. Moves
closer to considering that the family in England with that name is quite
possibly Jewish too, especially since the father spoke Dutch.

Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@bellsouth.net