Date   

Re: Jewish Community in Birnbaum 1800's #germany

C. Eberstadt <cpa-eberstadt@...>
 

Having read McCaig's mail, I stumbled over a gravestone in the old
Frankenthal Jewish Cemetery during a trip last weekend: It is marking
the burial site of Salomon SCHWERINER, born April 29, 1822 in Birnbaum,
died April 30, 1904 in Frankenthal. Without doubt to me, this Birnbaum
is the same Helen McCaig mentioned, because Schwerin is a German town in
Northeastern Germany and East of it is Poland (a very rough description, I know).

Christof Eberstadt
researching EBERSTADT and WORMS Jewish families


ACHBAR #lithuania

Arlene & Louis Zetler <arlene@...>
 

And I am sure that someone has already told you that "achbar" in Hebrew
means a mouse!

Louis ZETLER
Hoshaya, ISRAEL


Town/Village of DRAUSTINE previously known as DANILOVICHYAY ( DANILOVICIAI?) #lithuania

Eric Svirskis
 

Hi,

I always thought my late father came >from PANEVEZYS but his passport says
DANILOVICIAI & family says he came >from a "small village, near" Panevezys.
On Mapquest I found DANILOVICHYAY (now DRAUSTINE) & although it is only 83
miles >from VILNIUS I presume it is the same place.

Does anyone know about this place which seems to be elusive even on detailed
maps, and how I can get any information?

Thanks,

Eric Svirskis, Melbourne, Australia.
svire@melbpc.org.au

Interested in: FLEXER, GANTOVNIK, OKUN, MUSZKATBLAT, SRAGOWITZ, SVIRSKIS or
SWIRSKY (Panevesz/Panecevysz), & ZILBERMAN (Widze/Vidzy).


German SIG #Germany Re: Jewish Community in Birnbaum 1800's #germany

C. Eberstadt <cpa-eberstadt@...>
 

Having read McCaig's mail, I stumbled over a gravestone in the old
Frankenthal Jewish Cemetery during a trip last weekend: It is marking
the burial site of Salomon SCHWERINER, born April 29, 1822 in Birnbaum,
died April 30, 1904 in Frankenthal. Without doubt to me, this Birnbaum
is the same Helen McCaig mentioned, because Schwerin is a German town in
Northeastern Germany and East of it is Poland (a very rough description, I know).

Christof Eberstadt
researching EBERSTADT and WORMS Jewish families


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania ACHBAR #lithuania

Arlene & Louis Zetler <arlene@...>
 

And I am sure that someone has already told you that "achbar" in Hebrew
means a mouse!

Louis ZETLER
Hoshaya, ISRAEL


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Town/Village of DRAUSTINE previously known as DANILOVICHYAY ( DANILOVICIAI?) #lithuania

Eric Svirskis
 

Hi,

I always thought my late father came >from PANEVEZYS but his passport says
DANILOVICIAI & family says he came >from a "small village, near" Panevezys.
On Mapquest I found DANILOVICHYAY (now DRAUSTINE) & although it is only 83
miles >from VILNIUS I presume it is the same place.

Does anyone know about this place which seems to be elusive even on detailed
maps, and how I can get any information?

Thanks,

Eric Svirskis, Melbourne, Australia.
svire@melbpc.org.au

Interested in: FLEXER, GANTOVNIK, OKUN, MUSZKATBLAT, SRAGOWITZ, SVIRSKIS or
SWIRSKY (Panevesz/Panecevysz), & ZILBERMAN (Widze/Vidzy).


Tykocin Memorial Ceremony #poland

G. A. Cabat <pairuvdocs2-geneology@...>
 

I recently learned >from another SIG member that
"On August, 24 at 3 pm. will be official Ceremony in honour of Holocaust
of Tykocin Jews in 65 anniversary of their death .

The large group of people >from Israel will arrive to Tykocin to celebrate
this Ceremony and of courses Polish people."

I can't go. It would be great if those interested could "post" their
e-mail addresses so that attendees could contact those with similar
interests.

I e-mailed (in English) Mrs Ewa Wroczynska, director of the Tykocin
Synagogue Museum to see if there was any way we could post our e-mail
addresses for contacts, but I as yet have not received a reply.

Does anyone have the contacts to make this happen?

George Cabat

MODERATOR'S NOTE: If anyone is planning to go and wants to be in touch
with other landslayt who may be reading this discussion group, you can
send a message to this list.


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Tykocin Memorial Ceremony #poland

G. A. Cabat <pairuvdocs2-geneology@...>
 

I recently learned >from another SIG member that
"On August, 24 at 3 pm. will be official Ceremony in honour of Holocaust
of Tykocin Jews in 65 anniversary of their death .

The large group of people >from Israel will arrive to Tykocin to celebrate
this Ceremony and of courses Polish people."

I can't go. It would be great if those interested could "post" their
e-mail addresses so that attendees could contact those with similar
interests.

I e-mailed (in English) Mrs Ewa Wroczynska, director of the Tykocin
Synagogue Museum to see if there was any way we could post our e-mail
addresses for contacts, but I as yet have not received a reply.

Does anyone have the contacts to make this happen?

George Cabat

MODERATOR'S NOTE: If anyone is planning to go and wants to be in touch
with other landslayt who may be reading this discussion group, you can
send a message to this list.


family #poland

David Young <DavidYoung@...>
 

we are trying to contact any relatives of the Kagan family who lived in
siemiatycze up to the beginning of WW2.

we are also searching for the rubinstien family >from bialystock last
heard of at the beginning of WW2.

also the yudinsky family who went to philadelphia usa.

David Young


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland family #poland

David Young <DavidYoung@...>
 

we are trying to contact any relatives of the Kagan family who lived in
siemiatycze up to the beginning of WW2.

we are also searching for the rubinstien family >from bialystock last
heard of at the beginning of WW2.

also the yudinsky family who went to philadelphia usa.

David Young


Zucker Jaslo Photo #poland

Mary Zucker <mzucker32@...>
 

The second photo I have is a professional photo of a Jewish gentleman
who we assume is a gr+grandfather or uncle. On the back of the photo,
professionally printed is:

ZAKLAD FOTOGRAFICZNY
translation provided by Polish Rootsweb volunteer
PHOTO STUDIO

Professionally written in fancy font:
J. F(Z)ajaczkowskiego
translation provided by Polish Rootsweb volunteer
OWNER OF PHOTO STUDIO - [J.FAJACZKOWSKI'S STUDIO]

My observation:
The F may be a fancy Z. I have not been able to find a photo studio
F(Z)AJACZKOWSKI'S still in operation in Jaslo.

Professionally printed:
w
Jasle
Ulica basztowa No. 31

In Jaslo on Street Basztowa No. 31
There seems to be a Hotel located near this address at present. I have
not been able to find this photo studio at this address in any
directories.

(naprzeciw dawnego Gimnazyum obok szkoly ludowej)
translation provided by Polish Rootsweb volunteer
OPPOSITE OF OLD GRAMMAR [HIGH ?] SCHOOL NEAR PEOPLE SCHOOL

Klisze przechowuje sie
translation provided by Polish Rootsweb volunteer
FILMS ARE KEPT

In pencil someone printed:
Zotzy or Zot 24 - no translation PROBABLY PRICE OF PHOTO 24 ZLOTY

Hand written in pen is:
Zucker z Lopoi(or L T)nize
translation provided by Polish Rootsweb volunteer
ZUCKER >from ???
I cannot find a street, town, suburb beginning with LOPO but am
wondering if the writing could be old characters for alternate spelling
of Siepietnica.

On the front of the photo the names are spelled:
J. F(Z)ajaczkowski Jaslo

Any help regarding translation, ideas about time-frame this photo may
have been taken, other resources I should look into, etc. would be
appreciated.

Thank you,
Mary Zucker


JRI Poland #Poland Zucker Jaslo Photo #poland

Mary Zucker <mzucker32@...>
 

The second photo I have is a professional photo of a Jewish gentleman
who we assume is a gr+grandfather or uncle. On the back of the photo,
professionally printed is:

ZAKLAD FOTOGRAFICZNY
translation provided by Polish Rootsweb volunteer
PHOTO STUDIO

Professionally written in fancy font:
J. F(Z)ajaczkowskiego
translation provided by Polish Rootsweb volunteer
OWNER OF PHOTO STUDIO - [J.FAJACZKOWSKI'S STUDIO]

My observation:
The F may be a fancy Z. I have not been able to find a photo studio
F(Z)AJACZKOWSKI'S still in operation in Jaslo.

Professionally printed:
w
Jasle
Ulica basztowa No. 31

In Jaslo on Street Basztowa No. 31
There seems to be a Hotel located near this address at present. I have
not been able to find this photo studio at this address in any
directories.

(naprzeciw dawnego Gimnazyum obok szkoly ludowej)
translation provided by Polish Rootsweb volunteer
OPPOSITE OF OLD GRAMMAR [HIGH ?] SCHOOL NEAR PEOPLE SCHOOL

Klisze przechowuje sie
translation provided by Polish Rootsweb volunteer
FILMS ARE KEPT

In pencil someone printed:
Zotzy or Zot 24 - no translation PROBABLY PRICE OF PHOTO 24 ZLOTY

Hand written in pen is:
Zucker z Lopoi(or L T)nize
translation provided by Polish Rootsweb volunteer
ZUCKER >from ???
I cannot find a street, town, suburb beginning with LOPO but am
wondering if the writing could be old characters for alternate spelling
of Siepietnica.

On the front of the photo the names are spelled:
J. F(Z)ajaczkowski Jaslo

Any help regarding translation, ideas about time-frame this photo may
have been taken, other resources I should look into, etc. would be
appreciated.

Thank you,
Mary Zucker


Zucker and Herman Rock Store #poland

Mary Zucker <mzucker32@...>
 

I am new to this list.
I have recently come into possession of two photos. Photo one is of a
large building - looks like a barn converted to a store - in the
middle of flat lands with a horse drawn cart in front. The photo is
wide but small; probably taken by an amateur photographer. There are
two signs posted on the building. We have put them under a microscope
and a Rootsweb Polish volunteer has provided the translation.

Sign 1
SKLEP TOW MIESZANYCH
WYSZYNK PIWA, WINA
HERMAN ROCK

Translation into Polish
STORE OF MIXED COMMODITIES (ARTICLES), BEER AND WINE BAR HERMAN ROCK

Sign 2
Very hard to read. First and second lines look like:
POSTERUNEK PP [POLICJI PANSTWOWEJ]
W SKI(A)...SZYN
The third and fourth lines are illegible

Translation into Polish
POST OF STATE POLICE
IN SKI(A)...SZYN

We are hoping the photo can provide some clues regarding where the
Zucker family lived in the 20th Century. They gave their country of
origin as Austria-Galicia. I have another photo, >from J. ?Z?ajaczkowski
Studio in Jaslo and will write a separate request regarding that photo.
Zuckers may have been in Krakow, and/or Majdan Gorny as well. They were
in the "spirits" business; they might have been brewers as well as
sellers. The patriarch was probably named Aron Judah. His children were
born between 1872 - 1884. The sons were: Max, Simon Samuel, Isador,
Emil, Morris. There were two daughters: Serla and Rose. All except
Serla immigrated to NY, then NJ in the 1890s. Serla married a Landau
and was still in Siepietnica after 1914, but we think that she came to
the USA some time before WWII.

Any help would be appreciated.

Thank you,
Mary Zucker


JRI Poland #Poland Zucker and Herman Rock Store #poland

Mary Zucker <mzucker32@...>
 

I am new to this list.
I have recently come into possession of two photos. Photo one is of a
large building - looks like a barn converted to a store - in the
middle of flat lands with a horse drawn cart in front. The photo is
wide but small; probably taken by an amateur photographer. There are
two signs posted on the building. We have put them under a microscope
and a Rootsweb Polish volunteer has provided the translation.

Sign 1
SKLEP TOW MIESZANYCH
WYSZYNK PIWA, WINA
HERMAN ROCK

Translation into Polish
STORE OF MIXED COMMODITIES (ARTICLES), BEER AND WINE BAR HERMAN ROCK

Sign 2
Very hard to read. First and second lines look like:
POSTERUNEK PP [POLICJI PANSTWOWEJ]
W SKI(A)...SZYN
The third and fourth lines are illegible

Translation into Polish
POST OF STATE POLICE
IN SKI(A)...SZYN

We are hoping the photo can provide some clues regarding where the
Zucker family lived in the 20th Century. They gave their country of
origin as Austria-Galicia. I have another photo, >from J. ?Z?ajaczkowski
Studio in Jaslo and will write a separate request regarding that photo.
Zuckers may have been in Krakow, and/or Majdan Gorny as well. They were
in the "spirits" business; they might have been brewers as well as
sellers. The patriarch was probably named Aron Judah. His children were
born between 1872 - 1884. The sons were: Max, Simon Samuel, Isador,
Emil, Morris. There were two daughters: Serla and Rose. All except
Serla immigrated to NY, then NJ in the 1890s. Serla married a Landau
and was still in Siepietnica after 1914, but we think that she came to
the USA some time before WWII.

Any help would be appreciated.

Thank you,
Mary Zucker


Polish gangster Urke Nachalnik (Wizna, Vilnius, Warsaw and Otwock) - Part 3 #poland

Jose Gutstein
 

I've added a third article about famous Polish gangster Urke Nachalnik. This
one appeared in The Yiddish Forward on June 23, 2006, and deals mostly with
Urke's literary life. Also included is the original Yiddish version.

http://www.wizna.com/urke3.htm

Urke was born Icek Farberowicz in Wizna in 1897, to a wealthy family, but
his life took a rebellious turn after his father's second marriage. Urke
went >from Yeshiva boy, to a criminal, and then, to a self-made author who
was famous in his time and made a good living at it. And finally, to his
heroic end, in underground actions against the Germans, in Otwock, Poland
(near Warsaw). He was caught derailing Nazi trains, and killed as a result.
His books and stories were published in several languages, and made into
theater plays and newspaper serial stories. Likewise, numerous books and
articles about Polish gangsters have included sections about Urke. Urke's
wife Liza (>from Vilnius) and son Shmuel were last seen in the Warsaw Ghetto.

If you have connections to, and have stories (or photos) about Urke or his
wife, please contact me privately.

Jose Gutstein
E-Mail: Gutstein@bellsouth.net
Radzilow web page: http://www.radzilow.com
Szczuczyn web page: http://www.szczuczyn.com
Wizna web page: http://www.wizna.com
Gutstein web page: http://www.gutstein.net


JRI Poland #Poland Polish gangster Urke Nachalnik (Wizna, Vilnius, Warsaw and Otwock) - Part 3 #poland

Jose Gutstein
 

I've added a third article about famous Polish gangster Urke Nachalnik. This
one appeared in The Yiddish Forward on June 23, 2006, and deals mostly with
Urke's literary life. Also included is the original Yiddish version.

http://www.wizna.com/urke3.htm

Urke was born Icek Farberowicz in Wizna in 1897, to a wealthy family, but
his life took a rebellious turn after his father's second marriage. Urke
went >from Yeshiva boy, to a criminal, and then, to a self-made author who
was famous in his time and made a good living at it. And finally, to his
heroic end, in underground actions against the Germans, in Otwock, Poland
(near Warsaw). He was caught derailing Nazi trains, and killed as a result.
His books and stories were published in several languages, and made into
theater plays and newspaper serial stories. Likewise, numerous books and
articles about Polish gangsters have included sections about Urke. Urke's
wife Liza (>from Vilnius) and son Shmuel were last seen in the Warsaw Ghetto.

If you have connections to, and have stories (or photos) about Urke or his
wife, please contact me privately.

Jose Gutstein
E-Mail: Gutstein@bellsouth.net
Radzilow web page: http://www.radzilow.com
Szczuczyn web page: http://www.szczuczyn.com
Wizna web page: http://www.wizna.com
Gutstein web page: http://www.gutstein.net


Tarnow Schools Project Announcement #poland

Howard Fink <HowGen@...>
 

Jewish Record Indexing (JRI)-Poland has great news for those
researching family >from Tarnow and area. Records >from several schools

have been made available at the Tarnow Polish State Archives. JRI-
Poland has arranged for an archivist to enter the data >from these
school registers into a database. The Jewish students are identified
in these records, and only those entries are included.

In most cases these records are comparable to birth records; records
typically include birth date, town and parents' names. Even when the
exact birth year is not present the birth date can be approximated
from the school year information. Note that it is common to find the
same student entered year after year. Record photocopies (see the
example at the link below) may include even more information, like
subjects and status that are not present in the spreadsheet.

The records for some schools start as early as the 1870s and in some
cases are available up to World War II. For more information about
specific records and years, please contact me privately.

So far almost 14,000 records have been entered, >from five of the
schools:

I Gimnazjum im. K. Brodzinskiego w Tarnowie
III Gimnazjum im. A. Mickiewicza w Tarnowie
Szkola Wydzialowa Meska im. M. Kopernika w Tarnowie
Szkola Wydzialowa im. M. Konopnickiej w Tarnowie
Szkola Podstawowa im. J. Slowackiego w Tarnowie

The other schools available are:

II Gimnazjum im. hetm. J. Tarnowskiego w Tarnowie
Szkola Podstawowa im. T Kosciuszki w Tarnowie
Panstwowe Seminarium Nauczycielskie Meskie im. J. Sniadeckiego w
Tarnowie
Prywatne Seminarium Nauczycielski Zenskie z prawami publicznymi w
Tarnowie
Szkola Ludowa im. K. Brodzinskiego w Tarnowie
Szkola Podstawowa im. T. Czackiego w Tarnowie
Szkola Podstawowa im. K. Hoffmanowej w Tarnowie
Szkola Powszechna im. H. Sienkiewicza w Tarnowie
Szkola Podstawowa im. St. Sztaszica w Tarnowie
Szkola Podstawowa im. St. Konarskiego w Tarnowie
Szkola Powszechna im. Krolowej Jadwigi w Tarnowie
Szkola Podstawowa Nr. 8 w Tarnowie Moscicach

A surname frequency list >from the first schools entered may be
downloaded at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/psa/TarnowSchools_surn.htm

Students came >from towns and villages all around Tarnow. There are
four hundred different towns of birth listed already; those most
frequently mentioned are
Tarnow, Krakow, Dabrowa, Rzeszow, Wieden, Tuchow, Lwow, Nowy Sacz,
Brzesko, Mielec, Zabno, Koszyce Wielkie, Jaroslaw, Przemysl,
Radomysl, Rzedzin, Bochnia, Berlin, Pilzno, Tarnobrzeg, Debica,
Drohobycz, Podgorze, Bircza, Nowy Jork, Bobowa, Sambor, Budapeszt,
Palesnica, Siedliszowice, Lodz, Jaslo, Lublin, Sanok, Warszawa,
Zbylitowska Gora, Brzostek, Frauenkirchen, Klikowa, Baranow, Lancut,
Szdziszow, Radlow, Rozwadow, Staszow and Ujscie Solne. Yes, there are

eighteen students listed >from New York!

A sample record >from I Gimnazjum im. K. Brodzinskiego w Tarnowie can
be seen at:
http://www.jri-poland.org/TarnowSchoolSample.jpg

The work to date has been pre-funded. The final project cost is
unknown, but will be on the order of several thousand dollars, so the
participation of all Tarnow researchers will be important to enable
us to continue work on this project.

Researchers donating $100 or more can become Qualifying Contributors
and be eligible to obtain all of the Tarnow School files. Each school

file will be distributed as we receive it. Until the project is
complete none of the schools' data will be available through the
online search engine. Qualified Contributors will be able to order
photocopies of these records >from the Polish State Archives
immediately. When the entry and funding of all schools' records is
complete everyone will be able to order these using the JRI-Poland
Order Basket system.

Just think of the thrill you will feel as you finally learn where
that strong gene in Math comes from! (Or maybe that problem with
Chemistry!) These records provide a little more than the dry vital
statistics that we get >from most of our historical research.

Howard Fink
HowGen@verizon.net
Tarnow Archives Coordinator


JRI Poland #Poland Tarnow Schools Project Announcement #poland

Howard Fink <HowGen@...>
 

Jewish Record Indexing (JRI)-Poland has great news for those
researching family >from Tarnow and area. Records >from several schools

have been made available at the Tarnow Polish State Archives. JRI-
Poland has arranged for an archivist to enter the data >from these
school registers into a database. The Jewish students are identified
in these records, and only those entries are included.

In most cases these records are comparable to birth records; records
typically include birth date, town and parents' names. Even when the
exact birth year is not present the birth date can be approximated
from the school year information. Note that it is common to find the
same student entered year after year. Record photocopies (see the
example at the link below) may include even more information, like
subjects and status that are not present in the spreadsheet.

The records for some schools start as early as the 1870s and in some
cases are available up to World War II. For more information about
specific records and years, please contact me privately.

So far almost 14,000 records have been entered, >from five of the
schools:

I Gimnazjum im. K. Brodzinskiego w Tarnowie
III Gimnazjum im. A. Mickiewicza w Tarnowie
Szkola Wydzialowa Meska im. M. Kopernika w Tarnowie
Szkola Wydzialowa im. M. Konopnickiej w Tarnowie
Szkola Podstawowa im. J. Slowackiego w Tarnowie

The other schools available are:

II Gimnazjum im. hetm. J. Tarnowskiego w Tarnowie
Szkola Podstawowa im. T Kosciuszki w Tarnowie
Panstwowe Seminarium Nauczycielskie Meskie im. J. Sniadeckiego w
Tarnowie
Prywatne Seminarium Nauczycielski Zenskie z prawami publicznymi w
Tarnowie
Szkola Ludowa im. K. Brodzinskiego w Tarnowie
Szkola Podstawowa im. T. Czackiego w Tarnowie
Szkola Podstawowa im. K. Hoffmanowej w Tarnowie
Szkola Powszechna im. H. Sienkiewicza w Tarnowie
Szkola Podstawowa im. St. Sztaszica w Tarnowie
Szkola Podstawowa im. St. Konarskiego w Tarnowie
Szkola Powszechna im. Krolowej Jadwigi w Tarnowie
Szkola Podstawowa Nr. 8 w Tarnowie Moscicach

A surname frequency list >from the first schools entered may be
downloaded at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/psa/TarnowSchools_surn.htm

Students came >from towns and villages all around Tarnow. There are
four hundred different towns of birth listed already; those most
frequently mentioned are
Tarnow, Krakow, Dabrowa, Rzeszow, Wieden, Tuchow, Lwow, Nowy Sacz,
Brzesko, Mielec, Zabno, Koszyce Wielkie, Jaroslaw, Przemysl,
Radomysl, Rzedzin, Bochnia, Berlin, Pilzno, Tarnobrzeg, Debica,
Drohobycz, Podgorze, Bircza, Nowy Jork, Bobowa, Sambor, Budapeszt,
Palesnica, Siedliszowice, Lodz, Jaslo, Lublin, Sanok, Warszawa,
Zbylitowska Gora, Brzostek, Frauenkirchen, Klikowa, Baranow, Lancut,
Szdziszow, Radlow, Rozwadow, Staszow and Ujscie Solne. Yes, there are

eighteen students listed >from New York!

A sample record >from I Gimnazjum im. K. Brodzinskiego w Tarnowie can
be seen at:
http://www.jri-poland.org/TarnowSchoolSample.jpg

The work to date has been pre-funded. The final project cost is
unknown, but will be on the order of several thousand dollars, so the
participation of all Tarnow researchers will be important to enable
us to continue work on this project.

Researchers donating $100 or more can become Qualifying Contributors
and be eligible to obtain all of the Tarnow School files. Each school

file will be distributed as we receive it. Until the project is
complete none of the schools' data will be available through the
online search engine. Qualified Contributors will be able to order
photocopies of these records >from the Polish State Archives
immediately. When the entry and funding of all schools' records is
complete everyone will be able to order these using the JRI-Poland
Order Basket system.

Just think of the thrill you will feel as you finally learn where
that strong gene in Math comes from! (Or maybe that problem with
Chemistry!) These records provide a little more than the dry vital
statistics that we get >from most of our historical research.

Howard Fink
HowGen@verizon.net
Tarnow Archives Coordinator


JGSLA July Meeting: Family Reunions & Newsletters #general

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

This Sunday, July 16, 2006, the Jewish Genealogical Society of Los Angeles
is hosting a meeting >from 1:30PM - 4:00PM at the Santa Monica Public
Library:

"The Whole Mishpocha:
Writing Family Newsletters and Planning Family Reunions"

You’ve spent years researching your family tree, pursuing elusive relatives
and sending out detailed family histories in countless e-mails. Isn’t it
time to share the fruits of your genealogical research in a more organized
and productive fashion by writing a family newsletter or coordinating a
reunion? Reunions are wonderful events to show off your research and share
old photographs and family tree charts. Connecting with relatives you’ve
never met before is a fringe benefit. Newsletters help to continue those
relationships by soliciting new information that gets circulated to your
extended family.

JGSLA members Joan Glanz Rimmon and Lori Miller will share their expertise
in making your hard work pay off by explaining the best ways to embark on
these ambitious, but rewarding projects.

Joan Glanz Rimmon will explain how to get started in publishing a family
newsletter, and how to decide who and what to put into it. She will show you
how a one-page typewritten letter to a few cousins in 1987 grew into a
website and her latest publication of eight pages with photos and stories,
which elicited raves >from her cousins on an address list of over 900. Joan
began her genealogical career in 1986 during a period of empty-nest
syndrome. Her family’s six generations in America were unknown before she
began researching her maternal lines and discovering her
great-great-grandmother’s grave in Baltimore. With such a long history in
the U.S., it was not difficult to track down relatives. Her friends say,
“She opens cupboards, and relatives fall out!” Joan’s research has not been
limited to America, and she has shlepped her husband, Sinclair, all over the
world tracking down cousins.

Lori Miller became interested in her family genealogy more than 15 years ago
while interviewing her then 94 year old great aunt. Since that time she has
traveled to Argentina, Ukraine and Canada to meet family members she has
discovered. Her experience working in support of JewishGen for over eight
years, and teaching classes and giving talks on behalf of JGSLA, prepared
her for the nest step: a family reunion. Lori was inspired by a photo she
found – dated 1906 – which showed five family members and a poem, inscribed
in Russian, which said, in part, “When I am dead and gone…you remember me.”
To that aim, in 2002 she organized 145 family members who joined together in
Los Angeles to remember their aunts and uncles and thus their family
heritage. Lori will tell us how she organized the reunion and incorporated
her family history research into the event.

*Note: If you would like to bring examples of printed family trees, photo
displays, charts, newsletters and reunion photo albums to share on a display
table at the meeting, please do so. We will leave time before and after the
program to look over these examples and get hints and tips >from other
members with experience in these areas.

Location: Santa Monica Public Library, Martin Luther King Auditorium, 601
Santa Monica Blvd. (between 5th and 6th Streets), Santa Monica, CA 90401.
(310) 458-8600

For more meeting information and directions go to our website:

http://www.jewishgen.org/jgsla/Meeting%20Pages/Jul_16_2006_Mtg.htm

This meeting is free of charge to all.

Pamela Weisberger
Program Chair, JGSLA
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@hotmail.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGSLA July Meeting: Family Reunions & Newsletters #general

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

This Sunday, July 16, 2006, the Jewish Genealogical Society of Los Angeles
is hosting a meeting >from 1:30PM - 4:00PM at the Santa Monica Public
Library:

"The Whole Mishpocha:
Writing Family Newsletters and Planning Family Reunions"

You’ve spent years researching your family tree, pursuing elusive relatives
and sending out detailed family histories in countless e-mails. Isn’t it
time to share the fruits of your genealogical research in a more organized
and productive fashion by writing a family newsletter or coordinating a
reunion? Reunions are wonderful events to show off your research and share
old photographs and family tree charts. Connecting with relatives you’ve
never met before is a fringe benefit. Newsletters help to continue those
relationships by soliciting new information that gets circulated to your
extended family.

JGSLA members Joan Glanz Rimmon and Lori Miller will share their expertise
in making your hard work pay off by explaining the best ways to embark on
these ambitious, but rewarding projects.

Joan Glanz Rimmon will explain how to get started in publishing a family
newsletter, and how to decide who and what to put into it. She will show you
how a one-page typewritten letter to a few cousins in 1987 grew into a
website and her latest publication of eight pages with photos and stories,
which elicited raves >from her cousins on an address list of over 900. Joan
began her genealogical career in 1986 during a period of empty-nest
syndrome. Her family’s six generations in America were unknown before she
began researching her maternal lines and discovering her
great-great-grandmother’s grave in Baltimore. With such a long history in
the U.S., it was not difficult to track down relatives. Her friends say,
“She opens cupboards, and relatives fall out!” Joan’s research has not been
limited to America, and she has shlepped her husband, Sinclair, all over the
world tracking down cousins.

Lori Miller became interested in her family genealogy more than 15 years ago
while interviewing her then 94 year old great aunt. Since that time she has
traveled to Argentina, Ukraine and Canada to meet family members she has
discovered. Her experience working in support of JewishGen for over eight
years, and teaching classes and giving talks on behalf of JGSLA, prepared
her for the nest step: a family reunion. Lori was inspired by a photo she
found – dated 1906 – which showed five family members and a poem, inscribed
in Russian, which said, in part, “When I am dead and gone…you remember me.”
To that aim, in 2002 she organized 145 family members who joined together in
Los Angeles to remember their aunts and uncles and thus their family
heritage. Lori will tell us how she organized the reunion and incorporated
her family history research into the event.

*Note: If you would like to bring examples of printed family trees, photo
displays, charts, newsletters and reunion photo albums to share on a display
table at the meeting, please do so. We will leave time before and after the
program to look over these examples and get hints and tips >from other
members with experience in these areas.

Location: Santa Monica Public Library, Martin Luther King Auditorium, 601
Santa Monica Blvd. (between 5th and 6th Streets), Santa Monica, CA 90401.
(310) 458-8600

For more meeting information and directions go to our website:

http://www.jewishgen.org/jgsla/Meeting%20Pages/Jul_16_2006_Mtg.htm

This meeting is free of charge to all.

Pamela Weisberger
Program Chair, JGSLA
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@hotmail.com