Date   

Why Latvia? (Libau) #ukraine

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

I'd like to chime in on Mark Shofron's query:

<<In 1906 my family immigrated to the US >from Pereyaslav, Ukraine (about 100
miles SE of Kiev.) They boarded a ship to the US in Libau, Latvia. They
lived a relatively short distance to the Black Sea. Why would they travel
all the way to Latvia to embark for America?>>

I recently discovered that my Hungarian grandmother (and family) also
emigrated through Libau to America. I say "through" because it is clear
that they traveled >from northeastern Hungary (Szabolcs County), very close
to the Russian (today, Ukrainian) border, to Libau in Latvia, then on to
England, and sailed >from Liverpool to the United States.

They could have gone through Budapest, or traveled to German or Dutch ports,
but instead chose Libau. I discovered an old railway map which showed a
train line >from that part of Hungary which went directly to Cracow, and,
after that, perhaps continued north, but I suspect that there were steamship
line ticket brokers who encouraged many in Hungary, and, perhaps, Ukraine,
to take this route.

Because Libau was in Corland, part of Russia, it's possible that Mark's
relatives chose to leave >from there because they held Russian passports,
making the entire process simpler--versus departing >from ports in other
countries. Insights into this port are offered in the JewishGen article by
Deborah Glassman at:

www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/lyakhovichi/European%20Ports.htm

where she writes:

<<Many more women than men exited this way because men had to show proof of
discharge >from military service and sometimes also >from reserve status
before they could qualify for a passport. The passport should have been
issued in their home town but been recorded by the Libau police before
allowing boarding. Around 25,000 Jews exited via this port in the year 1904
alone. Use an exit >from this port as a strong indication that your ancestor
was traveling on valid Russian papers!
Russian-America Line, after WWI renamed Baltic-America Line. Founded in 1900
by a company headquartered in Copenhagen, the East Asiatic Company. In 1906,
its mission to run services >from Russia and Asia was cancelled after the
Russo-Japanese War of 1905 and it was given the Libau-NYC run in 1906.>>

At the IAJGS conference in New York, Professor Nick Evans will be giving a
talk which touches on the port of Libau in his session: "Jewish
Transmigration Through Britain, 1836-1924."

In an article he wrote for the "Moving Here" UK website at:

www.movinghere.org.uk/galleries/ histories/jewish/journeys/thames1.htm

-he also explains how the opening of the railway line between Kovno (today,
Kaunas, Lithuania) made emigration easier for Jews in the most northerly
parts of the Pale of Settlement, but it is clear that train routing
contributed to emigration choices.

There's also an interesting article available online which mentions
migration through Libau at:

"Trains, Shelters and Ships" at:

www.le.ac.uk/hi/centres/burton/pubs/pdf/trains.pdf

If any other genners have information, research, or theories about why
sailing >from or via Libau was chosen, please let us know!

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@hotmail.com


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Why Latvia? (Libau) #ukraine

Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@...>
 

I'd like to chime in on Mark Shofron's query:

<<In 1906 my family immigrated to the US >from Pereyaslav, Ukraine (about 100
miles SE of Kiev.) They boarded a ship to the US in Libau, Latvia. They
lived a relatively short distance to the Black Sea. Why would they travel
all the way to Latvia to embark for America?>>

I recently discovered that my Hungarian grandmother (and family) also
emigrated through Libau to America. I say "through" because it is clear
that they traveled >from northeastern Hungary (Szabolcs County), very close
to the Russian (today, Ukrainian) border, to Libau in Latvia, then on to
England, and sailed >from Liverpool to the United States.

They could have gone through Budapest, or traveled to German or Dutch ports,
but instead chose Libau. I discovered an old railway map which showed a
train line >from that part of Hungary which went directly to Cracow, and,
after that, perhaps continued north, but I suspect that there were steamship
line ticket brokers who encouraged many in Hungary, and, perhaps, Ukraine,
to take this route.

Because Libau was in Corland, part of Russia, it's possible that Mark's
relatives chose to leave >from there because they held Russian passports,
making the entire process simpler--versus departing >from ports in other
countries. Insights into this port are offered in the JewishGen article by
Deborah Glassman at:

www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/lyakhovichi/European%20Ports.htm

where she writes:

<<Many more women than men exited this way because men had to show proof of
discharge >from military service and sometimes also >from reserve status
before they could qualify for a passport. The passport should have been
issued in their home town but been recorded by the Libau police before
allowing boarding. Around 25,000 Jews exited via this port in the year 1904
alone. Use an exit >from this port as a strong indication that your ancestor
was traveling on valid Russian papers!
Russian-America Line, after WWI renamed Baltic-America Line. Founded in 1900
by a company headquartered in Copenhagen, the East Asiatic Company. In 1906,
its mission to run services >from Russia and Asia was cancelled after the
Russo-Japanese War of 1905 and it was given the Libau-NYC run in 1906.>>

At the IAJGS conference in New York, Professor Nick Evans will be giving a
talk which touches on the port of Libau in his session: "Jewish
Transmigration Through Britain, 1836-1924."

In an article he wrote for the "Moving Here" UK website at:

www.movinghere.org.uk/galleries/ histories/jewish/journeys/thames1.htm

-he also explains how the opening of the railway line between Kovno (today,
Kaunas, Lithuania) made emigration easier for Jews in the most northerly
parts of the Pale of Settlement, but it is clear that train routing
contributed to emigration choices.

There's also an interesting article available online which mentions
migration through Libau at:

"Trains, Shelters and Ships" at:

www.le.ac.uk/hi/centres/burton/pubs/pdf/trains.pdf

If any other genners have information, research, or theories about why
sailing >from or via Libau was chosen, please let us know!

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@hotmail.com


Need help with addresses for German reparations #general

Rita Margolies <b4kids@...>
 

My mother-in-law, a Holocaust survivor, died a few weeks ago. She
received monthly reparations checks >from Germany.
First we cannot figure out where to return the checks no that she has
died. We have tried contacting the return addresses on the envelopes to
change the address since we moved her >from Fla. to Seattle for care, but
that has not resulted in any response in the last two months. The checks are
still going to Florida and we have gotten no other kind of response. Is this
usual?
Second, my mother in law has told my husband repeatedly that because
he was born in Germany (after the war though) that he is eligible to receive
some of the payments. We have his original Bergen Belsen birth certificate.
How do we approach this?
The question is this: Is there anyone out there who is knowledgeable
about these payments that could help us make contact with these offices so
that we get a reply? I have found a list of different offices in Germany
that deal with reparations. Would my husband's claim go to a different
place? Is there anything else we need to know? TIA. Please reply privately.
Rita Margolies, Redmond WA


Re: Why Latvia #latvia

Sarah L Meyer <sarahlmeyer@...>
 

Dear Genners,
I had a similar situation in my family; some of the family went
from Kolonie L'vovo, Kherson Guberniya to Libau before coming to the US.
Then I learned that the entire shtetl was formed in 1840 by floating
down the Dniepr River >from Courland (Latvia) to Kolonie L'vovo, which
was one of the Jewish Agricultural Colonies.
I was able to get a list of the family members (surname
specified), who left Courland in 1840 (for Kherson Guberniya). From
this list and a family letter, I was able to trace my family back to
Latvia and link up with the branches that did not leave Latvia in 1840.
So the short answer is, to say good-bye to family before they
crossed the ocean.
Sarah L. M. Christiansen,
Researching EDELBERG, EIDELBERG, SCHLAMOVITCH, KART, ARONSON, BAUM in
Latvia, Russia Ukraine
BIRGARDOVSKY, HITE, PERCHIK, MAGRUTSKY Ukraine
PERLSTADT, ANK(I)ER, KARMEL(EK), SZPILBAUM, FRO(U)M, NUTA,
BIGOS,KIRSHROT, WAGNER, ALPERN, ASPERSTEIN Poland
KAFRI, KOLODNY, ARIAV, ANKER, in Israel




Subject: Why Latvia?
From: Mark Shofron <shofron@yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2006 16:07:06 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 1

Genners:

In 1906 my family immigrated to the US from
Pereyaslav, Ukraine (about 100 miles SE of Kiev.) They
boarded a ship to the US in Libau, Latvia. They lived
a relatively short distance to the Black Sea. Why
would they travel all the way to Latvia to embark for
America? Any ideas?

Mark Shofron
Mesa Arizona

Researching SHOFRON, SCHIFF/ SCHEWEZENSKY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Need help with addresses for German reparations #general

Rita Margolies <b4kids@...>
 

My mother-in-law, a Holocaust survivor, died a few weeks ago. She
received monthly reparations checks >from Germany.
First we cannot figure out where to return the checks no that she has
died. We have tried contacting the return addresses on the envelopes to
change the address since we moved her >from Fla. to Seattle for care, but
that has not resulted in any response in the last two months. The checks are
still going to Florida and we have gotten no other kind of response. Is this
usual?
Second, my mother in law has told my husband repeatedly that because
he was born in Germany (after the war though) that he is eligible to receive
some of the payments. We have his original Bergen Belsen birth certificate.
How do we approach this?
The question is this: Is there anyone out there who is knowledgeable
about these payments that could help us make contact with these offices so
that we get a reply? I have found a list of different offices in Germany
that deal with reparations. Would my husband's claim go to a different
place? Is there anything else we need to know? TIA. Please reply privately.
Rita Margolies, Redmond WA


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine RE: Why Latvia #ukraine

Sarah L Meyer <sarahlmeyer@...>
 

Dear Genners,
I had a similar situation in my family; some of the family went
from Kolonie L'vovo, Kherson Guberniya to Libau before coming to the US.
Then I learned that the entire shtetl was formed in 1840 by floating
down the Dniepr River >from Courland (Latvia) to Kolonie L'vovo, which
was one of the Jewish Agricultural Colonies.
I was able to get a list of the family members (surname
specified), who left Courland in 1840 (for Kherson Guberniya). From
this list and a family letter, I was able to trace my family back to
Latvia and link up with the branches that did not leave Latvia in 1840.
So the short answer is, to say good-bye to family before they
crossed the ocean.
Sarah L. M. Christiansen,
Researching EDELBERG, EIDELBERG, SCHLAMOVITCH, KART, ARONSON, BAUM in
Latvia, Russia Ukraine
BIRGARDOVSKY, HITE, PERCHIK, MAGRUTSKY Ukraine
PERLSTADT, ANK(I)ER, KARMEL(EK), SZPILBAUM, FRO(U)M, NUTA,
BIGOS,KIRSHROT, WAGNER, ALPERN, ASPERSTEIN Poland
KAFRI, KOLODNY, ARIAV, ANKER, in Israel




Subject: Why Latvia?
From: Mark Shofron <shofron@yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2006 16:07:06 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 1

Genners:

In 1906 my family immigrated to the US from
Pereyaslav, Ukraine (about 100 miles SE of Kiev.) They
boarded a ship to the US in Libau, Latvia. They lived
a relatively short distance to the Black Sea. Why
would they travel all the way to Latvia to embark for
America? Any ideas?

Mark Shofron
Mesa Arizona

Researching SHOFRON, SCHIFF/ SCHEWEZENSKY


History project: towns in Tarnopol region #ukraine

Jędrzej Sarnecki <exarkun@...>
 

Hi!

I am doing a history project about relations between nations before and during WWII in small towns near Tarnopol. Mostly I am interested in the history of Darachow (or Darakhov) in which my ancestors lived. I would like to ask anyone of you who knows someone or was there during that times to contact me. I just need people's description of how it was back then. In return for any information about the life of Jews in small Towns near Tarnopol, I can somehow help some of your researches, as I
will probably be visiting Ukraine this month!

Cheers,
Jêdrzej


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine History project: towns in Tarnopol region #ukraine

Jędrzej Sarnecki <exarkun@...>
 

Hi!

I am doing a history project about relations between nations before and during WWII in small towns near Tarnopol. Mostly I am interested in the history of Darachow (or Darakhov) in which my ancestors lived. I would like to ask anyone of you who knows someone or was there during that times to contact me. I just need people's description of how it was back then. In return for any information about the life of Jews in small Towns near Tarnopol, I can somehow help some of your researches, as I
will probably be visiting Ukraine this month!

Cheers,
Jêdrzej


Translate Birth Certificates #belarus

Adar Belinkoff <adar@...>
 

I have received to Polish Birth Certificates that appear to for my mother
and an uncle. I would appreciate someone's help in translating them. They
may be found at (http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate), numbers V8153 in Russian and
V8154 in Polish. Many thanks in advance to anyone who can help me. Please reply
privately.

Adar Belinkoff
Claremont, CA


Belarus SIG #Belarus Translate Birth Certificates #belarus

Adar Belinkoff <adar@...>
 

I have received to Polish Birth Certificates that appear to for my mother
and an uncle. I would appreciate someone's help in translating them. They
may be found at (http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate), numbers V8153 in Russian and
V8154 in Polish. Many thanks in advance to anyone who can help me. Please reply
privately.

Adar Belinkoff
Claremont, CA


Please Translate my Viewmate Image of a postcard #germany

herbad <herbad@...>
 

I have posted an image (Both Sides-1 image) of a Postcard written in German
dated 1932. I would very much appreciate a translation.
Please go to
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=8157
and respond privately to herbad@adelphia.net

Herb Adler, Florida <herbad@adelphia.net>


German SIG #Germany Please Translate my Viewmate Image of a postcard #germany

herbad <herbad@...>
 

I have posted an image (Both Sides-1 image) of a Postcard written in German
dated 1932. I would very much appreciate a translation.
Please go to
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=8157
and respond privately to herbad@adelphia.net

Herb Adler, Florida <herbad@adelphia.net>


Re: Info Requested on Ancestral Roots of Frohlich family of Bavaria #germany

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 7/9/2006 Gary.Frohlich@genzyme.com writes:
"....I'm new to JewishGen. My paternal family came >from the area of Wurzburg
(actually UnderAlterheim) in Bavaria. Burkhardt was the son of
HENLEIN & Karolina FROHLICH. Henlein was a cattle dealer in Baviria. I
believe my family name was a "taken" name after Naploean freed the Jews of
Bavaria (?1812?). So my question is how can I go back further? If my
family name was taken because we were a happy family (FROHLICH in German
means happy) appropriate in 1812 how do I trace back me "original family
name". I have documented my paternal family tree going forward >from the
mid-1800s, how do I go back in time? "

==Lars Menk in his Dictionary of German-Jewish Surnnames (look it up in a
good library), has a long list of Froehlichs, some of whom had the surname
before 1800. He gives a location for each first occurrence. Rexingen seems to
have been one frequent source.

==There is no way you can find what surname they had before they had the new
surname. They didn't; that's why Jews were compelled by law to take
surnames. You'll have to work back >from BMD records and tombstones.
Fortunately, the old names and new names of Jews were meticulously entered in
special registers ("Matrikel") often recopied or repeated, and aklmost all of
these registers >from Germany have been preserved, many in Jerusalem at the
Archives for the History of the Jewish People.

==I don't think they took the name Forehlich because of a joyful
disposition. I think it may have been taken >from a patronymic Simchah or Simche
("Joy") or derived >from other names such as Avraham ("Froyman" or "Froml"),
Ephraim ("Froym"), or Freudman.

==The EncycJudaica lists a British scientist Herbert Froehlich, born 1905 in
Rexingen. The Jews of Rexingen were a powerful community and once constituted
over half of their village. Many of them emigrated as a group to Palestine and
set up a cooperative settlement named Shavei Tziyon on the coast north of Acre.

==For what it helps, I had a classmate at the Hasmonean Grammar School in
London in 1945, named Eric[h] Froehlich. They were, as I recall, >from the
Frankfurt area. His father was a kosher butcher who served the German Orthodox
community in Golders Green, London.

Michael Bernet, New York MBernet@aol.com


German SIG #Germany Re: Info Requested on Ancestral Roots of Frohlich family of Bavaria #germany

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 7/9/2006 Gary.Frohlich@genzyme.com writes:
"....I'm new to JewishGen. My paternal family came >from the area of Wurzburg
(actually UnderAlterheim) in Bavaria. Burkhardt was the son of
HENLEIN & Karolina FROHLICH. Henlein was a cattle dealer in Baviria. I
believe my family name was a "taken" name after Naploean freed the Jews of
Bavaria (?1812?). So my question is how can I go back further? If my
family name was taken because we were a happy family (FROHLICH in German
means happy) appropriate in 1812 how do I trace back me "original family
name". I have documented my paternal family tree going forward >from the
mid-1800s, how do I go back in time? "

==Lars Menk in his Dictionary of German-Jewish Surnnames (look it up in a
good library), has a long list of Froehlichs, some of whom had the surname
before 1800. He gives a location for each first occurrence. Rexingen seems to
have been one frequent source.

==There is no way you can find what surname they had before they had the new
surname. They didn't; that's why Jews were compelled by law to take
surnames. You'll have to work back >from BMD records and tombstones.
Fortunately, the old names and new names of Jews were meticulously entered in
special registers ("Matrikel") often recopied or repeated, and aklmost all of
these registers >from Germany have been preserved, many in Jerusalem at the
Archives for the History of the Jewish People.

==I don't think they took the name Forehlich because of a joyful
disposition. I think it may have been taken >from a patronymic Simchah or Simche
("Joy") or derived >from other names such as Avraham ("Froyman" or "Froml"),
Ephraim ("Froym"), or Freudman.

==The EncycJudaica lists a British scientist Herbert Froehlich, born 1905 in
Rexingen. The Jews of Rexingen were a powerful community and once constituted
over half of their village. Many of them emigrated as a group to Palestine and
set up a cooperative settlement named Shavei Tziyon on the coast north of Acre.

==For what it helps, I had a classmate at the Hasmonean Grammar School in
London in 1945, named Eric[h] Froehlich. They were, as I recall, >from the
Frankfurt area. His father was a kosher butcher who served the German Orthodox
community in Golders Green, London.

Michael Bernet, New York MBernet@aol.com


Julius Aufrichtig and Anna Aufrichtig nee Wipperich #france

Charlie Roberts <charlie.roberts@...>
 

My father had a cousin Julius Aufrichtig who together with his wife Anna
Aufrichtig nee Wipperich fled Vienna before the war and settled in Tangiers,
Morocco. Together they opened up a dance school in Tangiers.

Julius Aufrichtig b.3 Jan 1892 died in Tangiers on 9 December 1947 and we
have a photo of his gravestone in the Tangiers Jewish cemetery. However we
have not been able to find out what happened to his wife Anna. Recently I
received information which seems to indicate that Anna might not have been
Jewish.

I would appreciate information on contacts in Tangiers (Jewish or non
Jewish) to find out what happened to Anna and any records of the Dance
school. Does anyone have information on any Christian cemeteries in Tangiers
in case Anna is buried there?

My paternal family originated in Moravia and most had migrated to Vienna by
the beginning of World War 1. I am also a member of the Austria-Czech SIG.

However I am interested in the family name AUFRICHTIG wordwide so would be
glad to hear >from any of the French SIG members who have come across this
name.

Charlie Roberts (previously Aufrichtig)
London, England

Researching AUFRICHTIG worldwide


French SIG #France Julius Aufrichtig and Anna Aufrichtig nee Wipperich #france

Charlie Roberts <charlie.roberts@...>
 

My father had a cousin Julius Aufrichtig who together with his wife Anna
Aufrichtig nee Wipperich fled Vienna before the war and settled in Tangiers,
Morocco. Together they opened up a dance school in Tangiers.

Julius Aufrichtig b.3 Jan 1892 died in Tangiers on 9 December 1947 and we
have a photo of his gravestone in the Tangiers Jewish cemetery. However we
have not been able to find out what happened to his wife Anna. Recently I
received information which seems to indicate that Anna might not have been
Jewish.

I would appreciate information on contacts in Tangiers (Jewish or non
Jewish) to find out what happened to Anna and any records of the Dance
school. Does anyone have information on any Christian cemeteries in Tangiers
in case Anna is buried there?

My paternal family originated in Moravia and most had migrated to Vienna by
the beginning of World War 1. I am also a member of the Austria-Czech SIG.

However I am interested in the family name AUFRICHTIG wordwide so would be
glad to hear >from any of the French SIG members who have come across this
name.

Charlie Roberts (previously Aufrichtig)
London, England

Researching AUFRICHTIG worldwide


Re: Trying to find name of ship that father arrived on in Halifax, Nova Scotia #general

Alan <ahssha_at_rcn_dot_com@...>
 

rzaionz@rogers.com (ruthiezaionz) wrote:

Dear Genners: I have just come into possession of a copy of my late
father's passport, showing his arrival date >from Danzig, Germany to Halifax,
Nova Scotia, Canada.

Would anybody have knowledge how I might be able to find out the name of the
ship that my father travelled on.

Thank you in advance.

Ruthie Zaionz
Thornhill, Ontario, Canada
If he arrived during 1925-1935, you can search at
http://www.collectionscanada.ca/archivianet/020118_e.html.

--
Alan Shuchat, Newton, Mass.
ahssha at rcn dot com

SHUCHAT (Talnoye, Simferopol, Sevastopol, Odessa, Balta (Abazovka),
Tavrig, Pogrebishche)
VINOKUR (Talnoye), KURIS (Mogilev-Podolskiy, Ataki, Berdichev)
SILVERMAN (Soroki, Kremenets), BIRNBAUM (Kamenets-Podolskiy)
KITAIGORODSKI (Zvenigorodka)


Brooklyn naturalization records #general

Paula Zieselman <paulaz@...>
 

As someone who worked on this project for JGSNY, I remember the volumes of
Declarations and Petitions being filmed by LDS as we finished up. The
microfilmed Brooklyn naturalizations are now listed in the Family History
Library Catalog. They show 2 volumes of Petitions "missing" -- volumes 292
and 302 which were there when we did the index! We could not find
Declaration vol 85 nor Petition vol 31. Neither is listed as missing but
the numbers are skipped in the catalog.

Paula Zieselman
NYC


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Trying to find name of ship that father arrived on in Halifax, Nova Scotia #general

Alan <ahssha_at_rcn_dot_com@...>
 

rzaionz@rogers.com (ruthiezaionz) wrote:

Dear Genners: I have just come into possession of a copy of my late
father's passport, showing his arrival date >from Danzig, Germany to Halifax,
Nova Scotia, Canada.

Would anybody have knowledge how I might be able to find out the name of the
ship that my father travelled on.

Thank you in advance.

Ruthie Zaionz
Thornhill, Ontario, Canada
If he arrived during 1925-1935, you can search at
http://www.collectionscanada.ca/archivianet/020118_e.html.

--
Alan Shuchat, Newton, Mass.
ahssha at rcn dot com

SHUCHAT (Talnoye, Simferopol, Sevastopol, Odessa, Balta (Abazovka),
Tavrig, Pogrebishche)
VINOKUR (Talnoye), KURIS (Mogilev-Podolskiy, Ataki, Berdichev)
SILVERMAN (Soroki, Kremenets), BIRNBAUM (Kamenets-Podolskiy)
KITAIGORODSKI (Zvenigorodka)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Brooklyn naturalization records #general

Paula Zieselman <paulaz@...>
 

As someone who worked on this project for JGSNY, I remember the volumes of
Declarations and Petitions being filmed by LDS as we finished up. The
microfilmed Brooklyn naturalizations are now listed in the Family History
Library Catalog. They show 2 volumes of Petitions "missing" -- volumes 292
and 302 which were there when we did the index! We could not find
Declaration vol 85 nor Petition vol 31. Neither is listed as missing but
the numbers are skipped in the catalog.

Paula Zieselman
NYC