Date   

Lenin, Belarus cemetery - wooden grave markers #belarus

nulevich@...
 

I spent two days in Lenin, Belarus in June. The cemetery there contains both stone
and wooden grave markers. During a brief discussion in Pinsk with someone who has
visited numerous cemeteries the individual mentioned that he had seen wooden grave
markers only in the Lenin cemetery, not in others. Can any auditors of this list
cite other Belarus cemeteries in which wooden grave markers appear? Or is their
use rare?

Neal Ulevich
Denver, Colorado, USA


Re: Info requested on surname of SCHALLOM #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Wed, 12 Jul 2006 03:06:45 UTC, pam@shilo-farms.com (Pam) wrote:

I'm looking for information or history on the SCHALLOM/SCHOLLUM/SCHALOM
surname.

The info I have is sketchy - but goes back to Wenzel SCHALOM of Otesice m.
to Elisabetha BEZDEK with son Christoph Schalom (1764);

Christoph Schalom, Merklin #35 m. Marianna BAXA and children were Johan
Schallom (7-30-1813 to 1892) and Anna Schallom (1821);

from Johan SCHALLOM - I then have a place listed as Celakovy, m. to Maria
WEISS (1819) and m. 4-26-1842 in Stankov Town - children were Josephine,
Charles, Wenzel, George.

My line comes thru Chrarles who m. Catharina FRIERDICH (Friedrich) (which is
also my line on my paternal side) they married 4-21-1868 in Monroe County,
IL - they had Charles Jr., Louise, Wenzel, George, Katherine, Mary B. (my
gggrandmother), Peter Joseph, Agnes and Sylvie . They settled in Monroe
County, IL

I have not been able to trace any info on whether the name SCHALLOM is >from
Jewish ancestry or not - but the name is so close to 'shalom' that I can not
help but wonder if my 'catholic' heritage was originally of the Jewish
faith. Other names in the same areas (Moravia) that are connected with this
surname are MICHALEK, REIS (RIESS), GOLD, SCHUBERT, SCHRAMM,
Nothing is impossible, but to me it seems unlikely that someone who gives
his son the name "Christof" is a Jew (or is _still_ a Jew). There are
people here that are far more familiar with German-speaking societies of the
period than me, but my inclination would be to look for an alternate
defivation of the admittedly tempting surname.
--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form there.


Belarus SIG #Belarus Lenin, Belarus cemetery - wooden grave markers #belarus

nulevich@...
 

I spent two days in Lenin, Belarus in June. The cemetery there contains both stone
and wooden grave markers. During a brief discussion in Pinsk with someone who has
visited numerous cemeteries the individual mentioned that he had seen wooden grave
markers only in the Lenin cemetery, not in others. Can any auditors of this list
cite other Belarus cemeteries in which wooden grave markers appear? Or is their
use rare?

Neal Ulevich
Denver, Colorado, USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Info requested on surname of SCHALLOM #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Wed, 12 Jul 2006 03:06:45 UTC, pam@shilo-farms.com (Pam) wrote:

I'm looking for information or history on the SCHALLOM/SCHOLLUM/SCHALOM
surname.

The info I have is sketchy - but goes back to Wenzel SCHALOM of Otesice m.
to Elisabetha BEZDEK with son Christoph Schalom (1764);

Christoph Schalom, Merklin #35 m. Marianna BAXA and children were Johan
Schallom (7-30-1813 to 1892) and Anna Schallom (1821);

from Johan SCHALLOM - I then have a place listed as Celakovy, m. to Maria
WEISS (1819) and m. 4-26-1842 in Stankov Town - children were Josephine,
Charles, Wenzel, George.

My line comes thru Chrarles who m. Catharina FRIERDICH (Friedrich) (which is
also my line on my paternal side) they married 4-21-1868 in Monroe County,
IL - they had Charles Jr., Louise, Wenzel, George, Katherine, Mary B. (my
gggrandmother), Peter Joseph, Agnes and Sylvie . They settled in Monroe
County, IL

I have not been able to trace any info on whether the name SCHALLOM is >from
Jewish ancestry or not - but the name is so close to 'shalom' that I can not
help but wonder if my 'catholic' heritage was originally of the Jewish
faith. Other names in the same areas (Moravia) that are connected with this
surname are MICHALEK, REIS (RIESS), GOLD, SCHUBERT, SCHRAMM,
Nothing is impossible, but to me it seems unlikely that someone who gives
his son the name "Christof" is a Jew (or is _still_ a Jew). There are
people here that are far more familiar with German-speaking societies of the
period than me, but my inclination would be to look for an alternate
defivation of the admittedly tempting surname.
--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the URL is:
http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address is
not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the URL
above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email form there.


Lida District Birds-of-a-Feather Thursday, Aug. 17 at 11 a.m. #belarus

Jrbaston
 

There will be a Lida District Birds of a Feather meeting on Thursday,
August 17 >from 11 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. in the Gramercy Room, on the
7th Floor of the hotel.

We will give researchers >from Lida District towns (see below) an informal
opportunity to network among ourselves, and we will also review the many
research resources available for Lida District towns in the All-Belarus and
All-Lithuania Databases, as well as on the Lida District Researchers page
< http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Lida-District/lida-dist.htm >
and in the Yizkor Book translations:

Towns of registration in the Lida District include Eisiskes/Eishishok
(now in Lithuania);and Belitsy, Lida, Nowy Dwor, Orlya, Ostrynia,
Radun, Rozanka, Scucyn, Vashilishki, Voronova, and Zaludok, (now in
Belarus). Our families also came >from many small villages in the area.

If you're a Lida District researcher attending the IAJGS conference, we
hope to see you at this Birds-of-a-Feather meeting. Please write me
privately and let me know whether you'll be participating.

Judy Baston
JRBaston@aol.com

RESEARCHING: BASTUNSKI and KAGANOVICH >from Eishishok; BASTUNSKI
and Abramovich >from Sokoly and Voronovo.


Belarus SIG #Belarus Lida District Birds-of-a-Feather Thursday, Aug. 17 at 11 a.m. #belarus

Jrbaston
 

There will be a Lida District Birds of a Feather meeting on Thursday,
August 17 >from 11 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. in the Gramercy Room, on the
7th Floor of the hotel.

We will give researchers >from Lida District towns (see below) an informal
opportunity to network among ourselves, and we will also review the many
research resources available for Lida District towns in the All-Belarus and
All-Lithuania Databases, as well as on the Lida District Researchers page
< http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Lida-District/lida-dist.htm >
and in the Yizkor Book translations:

Towns of registration in the Lida District include Eisiskes/Eishishok
(now in Lithuania);and Belitsy, Lida, Nowy Dwor, Orlya, Ostrynia,
Radun, Rozanka, Scucyn, Vashilishki, Voronova, and Zaludok, (now in
Belarus). Our families also came >from many small villages in the area.

If you're a Lida District researcher attending the IAJGS conference, we
hope to see you at this Birds-of-a-Feather meeting. Please write me
privately and let me know whether you'll be participating.

Judy Baston
JRBaston@aol.com

RESEARCHING: BASTUNSKI and KAGANOVICH >from Eishishok; BASTUNSKI
and Abramovich >from Sokoly and Voronovo.


Fw: Trip Report and Thanks #ukraine

Stephen R. Low <steve.low@...>
 

To all:

I'm writing to thank the many subscribers to the Hungarian, Romanian, and
Ukrainian SIGs who offered great suggestions over the past few months that
led to my recent trip to Eastern Europe and more. I have tried to retain the
names and e-mail addresses for many of you and over the next several weeks,
I will try to respond individually. In the meantime, here is a blanket
"thanks," a brief report on what I did, and an offer to help others by
sharing my contacts and experience.

As you will see, this was a very personal journey, filled with symbolism,
and very moving--even with my hard heart.

On June 3, I left >from Boston on a journey that would take me to the
birthplaces of my four grandparents: Kiliya, Ukraine; Iasi, Halmeu, and
Seini, Romania. (Halmeu and Seine were Hungarian when my grandparents left
them.) I also visited Odessa and Ismail in Ukraine, Kishinev; the capital of
Moldova; and Sighet, Satu Mare, and Baia Mare, Romania. In each place, I
spent >from 1 to 4 days. My goal was not to conduct research, but rather to
see these places and to get a feel for what they were like 100-115 years
ago, when these grandparents came to the U.S. In the end, I did conduct a
small amount of research in Halmeu and Seine, and these efforts were
extraordinary.

I traveled between these places by bus, by rented car, and by rabbi (yes, a
rabbi drove me >from Odessa to Ismail!). The car rental permitted me to drive
from Iasi to Satu Mare, crossing the Carpathians, with an overnight stop in
Sighet (the birthplace of Elie Wiesel, whose home has been turned into a
museum).

All along the way, I met wonderful people and had some wonderful guides. I
never was concerned about safety. I found that speaking only English, while
a handicap, did not present great problems. I kept a very detailed diary and
took many photos that are referenced within its pages, and I will spend the
next many weeks integrating the words and photos into a single document.
from Satu Mare, on June 22, I took a bus to Budapest, where my wife joined
me. We spent four days there as tourists, although we did visit the Great
Synagogue and attended Friday night services there. On June 26 we began a
four train/25 hour marathon: >from Budapest to Vienna to Paris (on the Orient
Express) to London (on Eurostar, through the Chunnel) to Southampton,
arriving there just 2 ½ hours before sailing back to the U.S. on the Queen
Mary 2 to New York. Six nights later, on July 3, we got out of bed at 3:45
and were on deck at 4 am in the morning to watch us enter New York harbor,
sail underneath the Verrazano Narrows Bridge, and pass the Statue of
Liberty—fulfilling a dream I’ve had for 30 years.
In New York, we dropped our luggage at the hotel, and went immediately to
(where else?) Ellis Island! That evening and the next, we managed to meet
two NY cousins I had never met before, and on our final day, July 5, we
rented a car for the drive back to the Boston area. But first, we drove to
Mt. Hebron, Mt. Zion, and Riverside (in NJ) cemeteries and visited the
graves of my parents, all four grandparents, and four of my eight
great-grandparents.
A spectacular trip. And I would do it again.
As I indicated, I'd be happy to share my specific experiences with anyone
contemplating similar travel. Also, part of my planning involved technology:
cell phone and a word processor, and I'd be happy to report on how I handled
these important parts of the trip.

Regards,
Steve Low
Lincoln MA

Researching:

LOW >from Satu Mare/Seini, Romania (i.e., Szatmar/Szinervaraljá, Hungary) to
New York

SCHWARTZ >from Halmeu, Romania (I.e., Halmi, Hungary) to New York

WITTNER >from Iasi, Romania to New York; Manchester, England; Australia

LANDO/LANDA/LANDAU >from Kiliya, Ukraine and Kishinev, Moldova to New York
and
Palestine


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Fw: Trip Report and Thanks #ukraine

Stephen R. Low <steve.low@...>
 

To all:

I'm writing to thank the many subscribers to the Hungarian, Romanian, and
Ukrainian SIGs who offered great suggestions over the past few months that
led to my recent trip to Eastern Europe and more. I have tried to retain the
names and e-mail addresses for many of you and over the next several weeks,
I will try to respond individually. In the meantime, here is a blanket
"thanks," a brief report on what I did, and an offer to help others by
sharing my contacts and experience.

As you will see, this was a very personal journey, filled with symbolism,
and very moving--even with my hard heart.

On June 3, I left >from Boston on a journey that would take me to the
birthplaces of my four grandparents: Kiliya, Ukraine; Iasi, Halmeu, and
Seini, Romania. (Halmeu and Seine were Hungarian when my grandparents left
them.) I also visited Odessa and Ismail in Ukraine, Kishinev; the capital of
Moldova; and Sighet, Satu Mare, and Baia Mare, Romania. In each place, I
spent >from 1 to 4 days. My goal was not to conduct research, but rather to
see these places and to get a feel for what they were like 100-115 years
ago, when these grandparents came to the U.S. In the end, I did conduct a
small amount of research in Halmeu and Seine, and these efforts were
extraordinary.

I traveled between these places by bus, by rented car, and by rabbi (yes, a
rabbi drove me >from Odessa to Ismail!). The car rental permitted me to drive
from Iasi to Satu Mare, crossing the Carpathians, with an overnight stop in
Sighet (the birthplace of Elie Wiesel, whose home has been turned into a
museum).

All along the way, I met wonderful people and had some wonderful guides. I
never was concerned about safety. I found that speaking only English, while
a handicap, did not present great problems. I kept a very detailed diary and
took many photos that are referenced within its pages, and I will spend the
next many weeks integrating the words and photos into a single document.
from Satu Mare, on June 22, I took a bus to Budapest, where my wife joined
me. We spent four days there as tourists, although we did visit the Great
Synagogue and attended Friday night services there. On June 26 we began a
four train/25 hour marathon: >from Budapest to Vienna to Paris (on the Orient
Express) to London (on Eurostar, through the Chunnel) to Southampton,
arriving there just 2 ½ hours before sailing back to the U.S. on the Queen
Mary 2 to New York. Six nights later, on July 3, we got out of bed at 3:45
and were on deck at 4 am in the morning to watch us enter New York harbor,
sail underneath the Verrazano Narrows Bridge, and pass the Statue of
Liberty—fulfilling a dream I’ve had for 30 years.
In New York, we dropped our luggage at the hotel, and went immediately to
(where else?) Ellis Island! That evening and the next, we managed to meet
two NY cousins I had never met before, and on our final day, July 5, we
rented a car for the drive back to the Boston area. But first, we drove to
Mt. Hebron, Mt. Zion, and Riverside (in NJ) cemeteries and visited the
graves of my parents, all four grandparents, and four of my eight
great-grandparents.
A spectacular trip. And I would do it again.
As I indicated, I'd be happy to share my specific experiences with anyone
contemplating similar travel. Also, part of my planning involved technology:
cell phone and a word processor, and I'd be happy to report on how I handled
these important parts of the trip.

Regards,
Steve Low
Lincoln MA

Researching:

LOW >from Satu Mare/Seini, Romania (i.e., Szatmar/Szinervaraljá, Hungary) to
New York

SCHWARTZ >from Halmeu, Romania (I.e., Halmi, Hungary) to New York

WITTNER >from Iasi, Romania to New York; Manchester, England; Australia

LANDO/LANDA/LANDAU >from Kiliya, Ukraine and Kishinev, Moldova to New York
and
Palestine


Fw: Trip Report and Thanks #romania

Stephen R. Low <steve.low@...>
 

To all:
I'm writing to thank the many subscribers to the Hungarian, Romanian, and
Ukrainian SIGs who offered great suggestions over the past few months that
led to my recent trip to Eastern Europe and more. I have tried to retain the
names and e-mail addresses for many of you and over the next several weeks,
I will try to respond individually. In the meantime, here is a blanket
"thanks," a brief report on what I did, and an offer to help others by
sharing my contacts and experience.
As you will see, this was a very personal journey, filled with symbolism,
and very moving--even with my hard heart.
On June 3, I left >from Boston on a journey that would take me to the
birthplaces of my four grandparents: Kiliya, Ukraine; Iasi, Halmeu, and
Seini, Romania. (Halmeu and Seine were Hungarian when my grandparents left
them.) I also visited Odessa and Ismail in Ukraine, Kishinev; the capital of
Moldova; and Sighet, Satu Mare, and Baia Mare, Romania. In each place, I
spent >from 1 to 4 days. My goal was not to conduct research, but rather to
see these places and to get a feel for what they were like 100-115 years
ago, when these grandparents came to the U.S. In the end, I did conduct a
small amount of research in Halmeu and Seine, and these efforts were
extraordinary.
I traveled between these places by bus, by rented car, and by rabbi (yes, a
rabbi drove me >from Odessa to Ismail!). The car rental permitted me to drive
from Iasi to Satu Mare, crossing the Carpathians, with an overnight stop in
Sighet (the birthplace of Elie Wiesel, whose home has been turned into a
museum).
All along the way, I met wonderful people and had some wonderful guides. I
never was concerned about safety. I found that speaking only English, while
a handicap, did not present great problems. I kept a very detailed diary and
took many photos that are referenced within its pages, and I will spend the
next many weeks integrating the words and photos into a single document.
from Satu Mare, on June 22, I took a bus to Budapest, where my wife joined
me. We spent four days there as tourists, although we did visit the Great
Synagogue and attended Friday night services there. On June 26 we began a
four train/25 hour marathon: >from Budapest to Vienna to Paris (on the Orient
Express) to London (on Eurostar, through the Chunnel) to Southampton,
arriving there just 2 ½ hours before sailing back to the U.S. on the Queen
Mary 2 to New York. Six nights later, on July 3, we got out of bed at 3:45
and were on deck at 4 am in the morning to watch us enter New York harbor,
sail underneath the Verrazano Narrows Bridge, and pass the Statue of
Liberty—fulfilling a dream I’ve had for 30 years.
In New York, we dropped our luggage at the hotel, and went immediately to
(where else?) Ellis Island! That evening and the next, we managed to meet
two NY cousins I had never met before, and on our final day, July 5, we
rented a car for the drive back to the Boston area. But first, we drove to
Mt. Hebron, Mt. Zion, and Riverside (in NJ) cemeteries and visited the
graves of my parents, all four grandparents, and four of my eight
great-grandparents.
A spectacular trip. And I would do it again.
As I indicated, I'd be happy to share my specific experiences with anyone
contemplating similar travel. Also, part of my planning involved technology:
cell phone and a word processor, and I'd be happy to report on how I handled
these important parts of the trip.

Regards,
Steve Low
Lincoln MA

Researching:

LOW >from Satu Mare/Seini, Romania (i.e., Szatmar/Szinervaraljá, Hungary) to
New York
SCHWARTZ >from Halmeu, Romania (I.e., Halmi, Hungary) to New York
WITTNER >from Iasi, Romania to New York; Manchester, England; Australia
LANDO/LANDA/LANDAU >from Kiliya, Ukraine and Kishinev, Moldova to New York
and Palestine


Romania SIG #Romania Fw: Trip Report and Thanks #romania

Stephen R. Low <steve.low@...>
 

To all:
I'm writing to thank the many subscribers to the Hungarian, Romanian, and
Ukrainian SIGs who offered great suggestions over the past few months that
led to my recent trip to Eastern Europe and more. I have tried to retain the
names and e-mail addresses for many of you and over the next several weeks,
I will try to respond individually. In the meantime, here is a blanket
"thanks," a brief report on what I did, and an offer to help others by
sharing my contacts and experience.
As you will see, this was a very personal journey, filled with symbolism,
and very moving--even with my hard heart.
On June 3, I left >from Boston on a journey that would take me to the
birthplaces of my four grandparents: Kiliya, Ukraine; Iasi, Halmeu, and
Seini, Romania. (Halmeu and Seine were Hungarian when my grandparents left
them.) I also visited Odessa and Ismail in Ukraine, Kishinev; the capital of
Moldova; and Sighet, Satu Mare, and Baia Mare, Romania. In each place, I
spent >from 1 to 4 days. My goal was not to conduct research, but rather to
see these places and to get a feel for what they were like 100-115 years
ago, when these grandparents came to the U.S. In the end, I did conduct a
small amount of research in Halmeu and Seine, and these efforts were
extraordinary.
I traveled between these places by bus, by rented car, and by rabbi (yes, a
rabbi drove me >from Odessa to Ismail!). The car rental permitted me to drive
from Iasi to Satu Mare, crossing the Carpathians, with an overnight stop in
Sighet (the birthplace of Elie Wiesel, whose home has been turned into a
museum).
All along the way, I met wonderful people and had some wonderful guides. I
never was concerned about safety. I found that speaking only English, while
a handicap, did not present great problems. I kept a very detailed diary and
took many photos that are referenced within its pages, and I will spend the
next many weeks integrating the words and photos into a single document.
from Satu Mare, on June 22, I took a bus to Budapest, where my wife joined
me. We spent four days there as tourists, although we did visit the Great
Synagogue and attended Friday night services there. On June 26 we began a
four train/25 hour marathon: >from Budapest to Vienna to Paris (on the Orient
Express) to London (on Eurostar, through the Chunnel) to Southampton,
arriving there just 2 ½ hours before sailing back to the U.S. on the Queen
Mary 2 to New York. Six nights later, on July 3, we got out of bed at 3:45
and were on deck at 4 am in the morning to watch us enter New York harbor,
sail underneath the Verrazano Narrows Bridge, and pass the Statue of
Liberty—fulfilling a dream I’ve had for 30 years.
In New York, we dropped our luggage at the hotel, and went immediately to
(where else?) Ellis Island! That evening and the next, we managed to meet
two NY cousins I had never met before, and on our final day, July 5, we
rented a car for the drive back to the Boston area. But first, we drove to
Mt. Hebron, Mt. Zion, and Riverside (in NJ) cemeteries and visited the
graves of my parents, all four grandparents, and four of my eight
great-grandparents.
A spectacular trip. And I would do it again.
As I indicated, I'd be happy to share my specific experiences with anyone
contemplating similar travel. Also, part of my planning involved technology:
cell phone and a word processor, and I'd be happy to report on how I handled
these important parts of the trip.

Regards,
Steve Low
Lincoln MA

Researching:

LOW >from Satu Mare/Seini, Romania (i.e., Szatmar/Szinervaraljá, Hungary) to
New York
SCHWARTZ >from Halmeu, Romania (I.e., Halmi, Hungary) to New York
WITTNER >from Iasi, Romania to New York; Manchester, England; Australia
LANDO/LANDA/LANDAU >from Kiliya, Ukraine and Kishinev, Moldova to New York
and Palestine


BENVENISTE, HOROWITZ, and EPSTEIN -- Y-DNA Study #general

Itzhak Epstein
 

I have just established the Benveniste & Sons Family Tree DNA -
JewishGen surname project. Painless mouth swab genetic testing
procedures are being used as a promising tool for breaking through
our genealogical brick walls. It might help you to greatly expand
your family tree, and may also help our surname project.

Two prominent Ashkenazi families claim descent >from two brothers
who lived in Spain during the 13th Century CE . The EPSTEINs - alleged
patriarch is Rabbi Aharon de na Clara ben Yosef haLevi. The
HOROWITZes - alleged patriarch is Rabbi Pinhas, Rabbi Aharon's older
brother and mentor. These brothers are the direct male descendants
of Rabbi Zerahyah ben Yitzhak haLevi Gerondi (died after 1186).

EPSTEIN family lore asserts that Aharon's surname was BENVENISTE. The lack of
documentary evidence has, until now, raised doubts about the veracity
of these claims. Recent advances in genetic science may help us to
determine the extent to which the claimed connections between these
families are true.

The first known male HOROWITZ is Yishayahu ben Moshe haLevi ish
Horowitz who came to Prague in the late15th Century >from the village
of Horovice. The first known male EPSTEIN is Yaakov (Koppelman) ben
Natan haLevi von Eppstein who came to Frankfurt am Main in the early
15th Century >from the town of Eppstein.

BENVENISTEs were prominent in Spain and later in the Balkans. I do not know
whether there have been several BENVENISTE families or only one. We know that
many Jews assumed the EPSTEIN and HOROWITZ surnames in the 19th Century.

Several EPSTEINs have already joined in a surname project. We
have identified members of one paternal Levite lineage that has
borne the Epstein surname for several centuries. Most of the project's
current members, however, are patrilineally unrelated to each other.

In addition, the BENVENISTE & sons DNA project was established to
explore the connection among these families and to also enable
BENVENISTEs and historic HOROWITZes to connect to cousins. To
accomplish these goals and to create as broad a search as possible,
we need male BENVENISTEs and historic HOROWITZes and EPSTEINs
to contribute a cheek swab as a DNA sample. If you are female
member of these families or a member through female ancestors, a
sample >from a qualified male relative can represent your family in
the test. If you are not a member of these families, please share
this message with BENVENISTEs, HOROWITZes and EPSTEINs who
may want to participate in this project.

To join the BENVENISTE & Sons surname project, go to=
http://tinyurl.com/meyr9 .
To also join the EPSTEIN surname project, go to http://tinyurl.com/nyh6z .

The basic, and most affordable, twelve marker test will indicate to
whom you are probably related. The more advanced tests could help
to identify closer and more certain relationships. If we confirm the
families' common ancestry, we will need several high resolution tests
to identify the Y-DNA chromosomes of the common ancestor. You
can start with the 12 marker test and add to it at a later date, using
the same sample.

More information about DNA testing and JewishGen's involvement
in it can be found at http://www.jewishgen.org/dna/

Itzhak Epstein New York, NY
iegen@earthlink.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen BENVENISTE, HOROWITZ, and EPSTEIN -- Y-DNA Study #general

Itzhak Epstein
 

I have just established the Benveniste & Sons Family Tree DNA -
JewishGen surname project. Painless mouth swab genetic testing
procedures are being used as a promising tool for breaking through
our genealogical brick walls. It might help you to greatly expand
your family tree, and may also help our surname project.

Two prominent Ashkenazi families claim descent >from two brothers
who lived in Spain during the 13th Century CE . The EPSTEINs - alleged
patriarch is Rabbi Aharon de na Clara ben Yosef haLevi. The
HOROWITZes - alleged patriarch is Rabbi Pinhas, Rabbi Aharon's older
brother and mentor. These brothers are the direct male descendants
of Rabbi Zerahyah ben Yitzhak haLevi Gerondi (died after 1186).

EPSTEIN family lore asserts that Aharon's surname was BENVENISTE. The lack of
documentary evidence has, until now, raised doubts about the veracity
of these claims. Recent advances in genetic science may help us to
determine the extent to which the claimed connections between these
families are true.

The first known male HOROWITZ is Yishayahu ben Moshe haLevi ish
Horowitz who came to Prague in the late15th Century >from the village
of Horovice. The first known male EPSTEIN is Yaakov (Koppelman) ben
Natan haLevi von Eppstein who came to Frankfurt am Main in the early
15th Century >from the town of Eppstein.

BENVENISTEs were prominent in Spain and later in the Balkans. I do not know
whether there have been several BENVENISTE families or only one. We know that
many Jews assumed the EPSTEIN and HOROWITZ surnames in the 19th Century.

Several EPSTEINs have already joined in a surname project. We
have identified members of one paternal Levite lineage that has
borne the Epstein surname for several centuries. Most of the project's
current members, however, are patrilineally unrelated to each other.

In addition, the BENVENISTE & sons DNA project was established to
explore the connection among these families and to also enable
BENVENISTEs and historic HOROWITZes to connect to cousins. To
accomplish these goals and to create as broad a search as possible,
we need male BENVENISTEs and historic HOROWITZes and EPSTEINs
to contribute a cheek swab as a DNA sample. If you are female
member of these families or a member through female ancestors, a
sample >from a qualified male relative can represent your family in
the test. If you are not a member of these families, please share
this message with BENVENISTEs, HOROWITZes and EPSTEINs who
may want to participate in this project.

To join the BENVENISTE & Sons surname project, go to=
http://tinyurl.com/meyr9 .
To also join the EPSTEIN surname project, go to http://tinyurl.com/nyh6z .

The basic, and most affordable, twelve marker test will indicate to
whom you are probably related. The more advanced tests could help
to identify closer and more certain relationships. If we confirm the
families' common ancestry, we will need several high resolution tests
to identify the Y-DNA chromosomes of the common ancestor. You
can start with the 12 marker test and add to it at a later date, using
the same sample.

More information about DNA testing and JewishGen's involvement
in it can be found at http://www.jewishgen.org/dna/

Itzhak Epstein New York, NY
iegen@earthlink.net


Re: Need help with addresses for German reparations #general

Philip Stuehler-Walter <das-rumpelstilzchen@...>
 

Maybe you should try to contact the "Bundesverwaltungsamt" for further
information.

Postal Address:

Bundesverwaltungsamt
50728 Köln
Germany

Telefon: 0049-1888-358-0
Fax: 0049-1888-358-2823
E-Mail: poststelle@bva.bund.de

Good luck,

Philip

<<Rita Margolies writes: My mother-in-law, a Holocaust survivor, died a
few weeks ago. She received monthly reparations checks >from Germany.
First we cannot figure out where to return the checks ...... We have
tried contacting the return addresses on the envelopes to change the
address ...... but that has not resulted in any response in the
last two months. ........ Second, my mother in law has told my
husband repeatedly that because he was born in Germany (after the war
though) that he is eligible to receive some of the payments. We have
his original Bergen Belsen birth certificate. How do we approach this?>>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Need help with addresses for German reparations #general

Philip Stuehler-Walter <das-rumpelstilzchen@...>
 

Maybe you should try to contact the "Bundesverwaltungsamt" for further
information.

Postal Address:

Bundesverwaltungsamt
50728 Köln
Germany

Telefon: 0049-1888-358-0
Fax: 0049-1888-358-2823
E-Mail: poststelle@bva.bund.de

Good luck,

Philip

<<Rita Margolies writes: My mother-in-law, a Holocaust survivor, died a
few weeks ago. She received monthly reparations checks >from Germany.
First we cannot figure out where to return the checks ...... We have
tried contacting the return addresses on the envelopes to change the
address ...... but that has not resulted in any response in the
last two months. ........ Second, my mother in law has told my
husband repeatedly that because he was born in Germany (after the war
though) that he is eligible to receive some of the payments. We have
his original Bergen Belsen birth certificate. How do we approach this?>>


Any ideas? #ukraine

Binnieyeates@...
 

Hi, Genners,

The family story I grew up with was that my gfather made it >from Zborow to
England at the very beginning of the 20th century without a passport. Anyone
have any ideas / information as to how he could have managed it? I'm writing a
history of the family, and it's really a very important piece of the story,
so I'd be so grateful for your thoughts on this.

Binnie Yeates
Hove, UK


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Any ideas? #ukraine

Binnieyeates@...
 

Hi, Genners,

The family story I grew up with was that my gfather made it >from Zborow to
England at the very beginning of the 20th century without a passport. Anyone
have any ideas / information as to how he could have managed it? I'm writing a
history of the family, and it's really a very important piece of the story,
so I'd be so grateful for your thoughts on this.

Binnie Yeates
Hove, UK


Re: SCHOR from Ruskant or Ruskand #general

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Miguel A. Schneider writes >from Argentina: <My grandfather and his
brother come >from Ukrania to Argentina about the 1912/13. They lived
in Moises Ville, and they said that they was born in Ruskant or
Ruskand. Does anyone now where is this place located. Their names was
Mendel and Peise SCHOR.>

My interest is in the SCHOR/SCHORR name - I have helped a SCHORR
member of the Austria-Czech SIG >from Argentina find roots in Austria,
Galicia and Israel. You will find many messages >from SCHORR in the
General Discussion Group archives:

http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~archives

I wonder if there is a link?

Celia Male [U.K.]


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: SCHOR from Ruskant or Ruskand #general

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Miguel A. Schneider writes >from Argentina: <My grandfather and his
brother come >from Ukrania to Argentina about the 1912/13. They lived
in Moises Ville, and they said that they was born in Ruskant or
Ruskand. Does anyone now where is this place located. Their names was
Mendel and Peise SCHOR.>

My interest is in the SCHOR/SCHORR name - I have helped a SCHORR
member of the Austria-Czech SIG >from Argentina find roots in Austria,
Galicia and Israel. You will find many messages >from SCHORR in the
General Discussion Group archives:

http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~archives

I wonder if there is a link?

Celia Male [U.K.]


Purchase of cemetery book #latvia

Arlene Beare <arl@...>
 

I suggest that you contact the author Meyer Melers at the Email
address of the Museum

ebreji.latvija@apollo.lv

He will let you know what you need to do to purchase the cemetery book.
Arlene Beare
UK


Latvia SIG #Latvia Purchase of cemetery book #latvia

Arlene Beare <arl@...>
 

I suggest that you contact the author Meyer Melers at the Email
address of the Museum

ebreji.latvija@apollo.lv

He will let you know what you need to do to purchase the cemetery book.
Arlene Beare
UK