Date   

Updates on New Jersey and Colorado Legislation Affecting Access to Genealogically Relevant Records #general

jan meisels allen <janmallen@...>
 

Dear Jewish Genners:

The IAJGS Public Records Monitoring and Access Committee
(PRAMC) monitors legislation that impacts access to vital genealogical
records (birth, marriage, death) and census. In that vein I am informing
you some good and bad news with you regarding pending legislation:

For the good news:

New Jersey A 1390:

IAJGS has been working with the Genealogical Society of New Jersey (GSNJ)-
who is the lead on working on this bill in New Jersey. Representatives of
the GSNJ met with Assemblywoman Quigley, author of NJ A 1390, earlier this
week to discuss how the bill could be amended to meet the needs of
genealogists. The following is culled >from a report by GSNJ on the meeting
to IAJGS PRAMC which has been working with the GSNJ on getting the
bill amended. For all of you who have contacted your New Jersey legislator
or the authors and Assembly Speaker- thank you! It appears all of our contacts
have made significant progress and everyone should be very pleased with
what appears to be amendments in progress! The new language is not yet
available, and of course until it is seen, and we see it does address
adequately all of our concerns we need to remain vigilant.

It will be May before any further legislative progress on the bill will happen
due to the New Jersey Legislature budget process in April.

The following are highlights of what the GSNJ and Assemblywoman Quigley
agreed on to amend the bill:

GSNJ representatives met with Assemblywoman Quigley, author of NJ A 1390, to
work on possible amendments to this bill which would, if enacted as
currently drafted: "remove vital records (birth, marriage, death, fetal
death and domestic partnership records) >from public records and genealogists
would no longer have access to vital records including genealogical copies
that are currently permitted in New Jersey. It also would prevent anyone
including genealogists >from sharing, selling, reproducing or disclosing the
information contained in the vital record. The penalties for violating this
provision are a crime and would prevent the person/genealogist from
applying for vital records in the future. "

At the meeting, Assemblywoman Quigley readily agreed that the years we
suggested remain readily accessible (80 years for births, 50 for marriages
and 40 for deaths) were more than reasonable. She seemed to suggest that
adding in language that allows for informational or non-certified copies
within those guidelines would be no problem. Assemblywoman Quigley also
said that she had no problem with simply deleting the section that said no
sharing or disclosing the information. These were all points also made in
the letters and contacts made by the genealogical community, including IAJGS
to the Assemblywoman.

In addition, the GSNJ representatives discussed the possibility of further
changing the bill, using language that was recently drafted by the Advocates
and GSNJ with guidance and input >from the NJ State Archives. It might be
possible to basically redraft the whole bill and make it a really good bill
from all viewpoints. This language is not yet posted anywhere.
The new language would make more clear what records would be "restricted"
and who and how people would be able to get those more
recent records. It would also make clear what records would remain and
become available and allow for more ready access to them. The newer
language GSNJ suggested also includes language that would allow for (or
actually require) the Dept of Health to turn over more of the older records
to the archives. This would continue to make them available to the public
to search and would allow for archives staff (rather than the Health Dept)
to service the mail requests for copies of the records.

Assemblywoman Quigley was interested in the proposal and promised to
consider the newer suggestions. She offered to allow GSNJ to see a draft
of the new language before it gets released so that we can make sure that it
meets the genealogical communities' needs.

When IAJGS PRAMC receives the new language I will let you know if it indeed
meets our needs and if letters need to be written in support or suggesting
amendments.

The bad news

Colorado H 1357

Earlier this week I was made aware of Colorado H 1357, which had already
passed the Colorado House of Representatives. The bill would restrict access
to immediate family members information contained in marriage applications.
For genealogists, this meant we would not have access to data not otherwise
contained in the marriage license but only in the application: last name if
different at birth, date of birth, parents names, addresses, marital status
and social security numbers. While we do not require Social Security numbers
the other data elements are of major interest to us.

A hearing was scheduled earlier this week in the Colorado Senate Judiciary
Committee. IAJGS PRAMC contacted the authors and sent a statement on our
concerns-to them and the Senate Judiciary Committee for its hearing,
suggesting a 50-year waiting period before the information on the marriage
applications would be available to the public (stating we did not need the
Social Security number, and appreciated the concern about protecting
Coloradans >from identity theft- the underlying reason for the bill).

IAJGS worked with the Colorado Genealogical Council who testified at the
hearing. While the authors were amenable to the 50-year waiting period, the
lobbyists for the County Clerks Association opposed that proposal and the
bill the passed out of the committee unamended by a unanimous vote. It
next goes to the Senate floor for voting. While the bill restricts
information on marriage applications the bill specifically states the
restriction does not apply to vital records, such as the marriage license or
license certificate.

Jan Meisels Allen director
IAJGS and chairperson, Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Updates on New Jersey and Colorado Legislation Affecting Access to Genealogically Relevant Records #general

jan meisels allen <janmallen@...>
 

Dear Jewish Genners:

The IAJGS Public Records Monitoring and Access Committee
(PRAMC) monitors legislation that impacts access to vital genealogical
records (birth, marriage, death) and census. In that vein I am informing
you some good and bad news with you regarding pending legislation:

For the good news:

New Jersey A 1390:

IAJGS has been working with the Genealogical Society of New Jersey (GSNJ)-
who is the lead on working on this bill in New Jersey. Representatives of
the GSNJ met with Assemblywoman Quigley, author of NJ A 1390, earlier this
week to discuss how the bill could be amended to meet the needs of
genealogists. The following is culled >from a report by GSNJ on the meeting
to IAJGS PRAMC which has been working with the GSNJ on getting the
bill amended. For all of you who have contacted your New Jersey legislator
or the authors and Assembly Speaker- thank you! It appears all of our contacts
have made significant progress and everyone should be very pleased with
what appears to be amendments in progress! The new language is not yet
available, and of course until it is seen, and we see it does address
adequately all of our concerns we need to remain vigilant.

It will be May before any further legislative progress on the bill will happen
due to the New Jersey Legislature budget process in April.

The following are highlights of what the GSNJ and Assemblywoman Quigley
agreed on to amend the bill:

GSNJ representatives met with Assemblywoman Quigley, author of NJ A 1390, to
work on possible amendments to this bill which would, if enacted as
currently drafted: "remove vital records (birth, marriage, death, fetal
death and domestic partnership records) >from public records and genealogists
would no longer have access to vital records including genealogical copies
that are currently permitted in New Jersey. It also would prevent anyone
including genealogists >from sharing, selling, reproducing or disclosing the
information contained in the vital record. The penalties for violating this
provision are a crime and would prevent the person/genealogist from
applying for vital records in the future. "

At the meeting, Assemblywoman Quigley readily agreed that the years we
suggested remain readily accessible (80 years for births, 50 for marriages
and 40 for deaths) were more than reasonable. She seemed to suggest that
adding in language that allows for informational or non-certified copies
within those guidelines would be no problem. Assemblywoman Quigley also
said that she had no problem with simply deleting the section that said no
sharing or disclosing the information. These were all points also made in
the letters and contacts made by the genealogical community, including IAJGS
to the Assemblywoman.

In addition, the GSNJ representatives discussed the possibility of further
changing the bill, using language that was recently drafted by the Advocates
and GSNJ with guidance and input >from the NJ State Archives. It might be
possible to basically redraft the whole bill and make it a really good bill
from all viewpoints. This language is not yet posted anywhere.
The new language would make more clear what records would be "restricted"
and who and how people would be able to get those more
recent records. It would also make clear what records would remain and
become available and allow for more ready access to them. The newer
language GSNJ suggested also includes language that would allow for (or
actually require) the Dept of Health to turn over more of the older records
to the archives. This would continue to make them available to the public
to search and would allow for archives staff (rather than the Health Dept)
to service the mail requests for copies of the records.

Assemblywoman Quigley was interested in the proposal and promised to
consider the newer suggestions. She offered to allow GSNJ to see a draft
of the new language before it gets released so that we can make sure that it
meets the genealogical communities' needs.

When IAJGS PRAMC receives the new language I will let you know if it indeed
meets our needs and if letters need to be written in support or suggesting
amendments.

The bad news

Colorado H 1357

Earlier this week I was made aware of Colorado H 1357, which had already
passed the Colorado House of Representatives. The bill would restrict access
to immediate family members information contained in marriage applications.
For genealogists, this meant we would not have access to data not otherwise
contained in the marriage license but only in the application: last name if
different at birth, date of birth, parents names, addresses, marital status
and social security numbers. While we do not require Social Security numbers
the other data elements are of major interest to us.

A hearing was scheduled earlier this week in the Colorado Senate Judiciary
Committee. IAJGS PRAMC contacted the authors and sent a statement on our
concerns-to them and the Senate Judiciary Committee for its hearing,
suggesting a 50-year waiting period before the information on the marriage
applications would be available to the public (stating we did not need the
Social Security number, and appreciated the concern about protecting
Coloradans >from identity theft- the underlying reason for the bill).

IAJGS worked with the Colorado Genealogical Council who testified at the
hearing. While the authors were amenable to the 50-year waiting period, the
lobbyists for the County Clerks Association opposed that proposal and the
bill the passed out of the committee unamended by a unanimous vote. It
next goes to the Senate floor for voting. While the bill restricts
information on marriage applications the bill specifically states the
restriction does not apply to vital records, such as the marriage license or
license certificate.

Jan Meisels Allen director
IAJGS and chairperson, Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Re: Information from State Archive #latvia

Robin Aaronson <robin@...>
 

Sue Levy wrote:

I received today a package >from the Latvia State Archive, containing
information about my ancestors in Friedrichstadt and elsewhere, with
full translations of documents.

An extremely thorough piece of work, which I'll check against what I
already have. I've spotted one discrepancy of names, which I'll query
with them.

I think this has been money well spent.
-------------------------------------
I too have just received a package >from the State Archive and am
very pleased with what they have discovered about my ancestors.
The information that registrants were required to fill in on the
documents is revealing in itself. There is a list of Jewish
families living in Mitau-Bausk who did not originate >from Courland.
It asks questions like "Whether he has a craft certificate, when
issued and in what craft, or any other documents giving a clear
right of residence."

The one that intrigues me is "Position as to property qualification",
to which the answer in the case of my gg father is that he earned
1-1.5 roubles a week.

Does anyone know where I could research what rights went with what
level of income and how rich or poor one would be on 1-1.5 roubles
a week?

Robin Aaronson
Bristol, UK


Latvia SIG #Latvia Re: Information from State Archive #latvia

Robin Aaronson <robin@...>
 

Sue Levy wrote:

I received today a package >from the Latvia State Archive, containing
information about my ancestors in Friedrichstadt and elsewhere, with
full translations of documents.

An extremely thorough piece of work, which I'll check against what I
already have. I've spotted one discrepancy of names, which I'll query
with them.

I think this has been money well spent.
-------------------------------------
I too have just received a package >from the State Archive and am
very pleased with what they have discovered about my ancestors.
The information that registrants were required to fill in on the
documents is revealing in itself. There is a list of Jewish
families living in Mitau-Bausk who did not originate >from Courland.
It asks questions like "Whether he has a craft certificate, when
issued and in what craft, or any other documents giving a clear
right of residence."

The one that intrigues me is "Position as to property qualification",
to which the answer in the case of my gg father is that he earned
1-1.5 roubles a week.

Does anyone know where I could research what rights went with what
level of income and how rich or poor one would be on 1-1.5 roubles
a week?

Robin Aaronson
Bristol, UK


Looking for David Sandler, Australia. #general

Beryl. B <balden@...>
 

I am trying to contact David SANDLER whom I
belives lives in Perth, or some other town in Australia
and who originated >from Johannesburg, South Africa.
His father was Mike Sandler, and his grand-
parents were Zalman and Gertie SANDLER >from Johannesburg.

If either David or anyone knowing him reads this message please
contact me with his address, as I have done a Sandler family tree
in which he is included and would like to share this
with him.

Thank you
Beryl Baleson
Israel.
balden@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Looking for David Sandler, Australia. #general

Beryl. B <balden@...>
 

I am trying to contact David SANDLER whom I
belives lives in Perth, or some other town in Australia
and who originated >from Johannesburg, South Africa.
His father was Mike Sandler, and his grand-
parents were Zalman and Gertie SANDLER >from Johannesburg.

If either David or anyone knowing him reads this message please
contact me with his address, as I have done a Sandler family tree
in which he is included and would like to share this
with him.

Thank you
Beryl Baleson
Israel.
balden@...


LASSMAN #france

Susan Monty <susan@...>
 

I am searching for relatives of Bella and Andre LASSMAN, their children
Renee, Rachel and Gerald, who lived in Lille before the second world war.
The parents escaped to Switzerland and left their children in the care of
Catholics during the war. I understand that they all survived and were
re-united after the war. I would appreciate any ideas on how to start
researching this family. Thank you

from Susan Monty
MODERATOR: We do need your location Town and Country


French SIG #France LASSMAN #france

Susan Monty <susan@...>
 

I am searching for relatives of Bella and Andre LASSMAN, their children
Renee, Rachel and Gerald, who lived in Lille before the second world war.
The parents escaped to Switzerland and left their children in the care of
Catholics during the war. I understand that they all survived and were
re-united after the war. I would appreciate any ideas on how to start
researching this family. Thank you

from Susan Monty
MODERATOR: We do need your location Town and Country


Kujdanor #general

Alexander Sharon
 

"Dr. Josef ASH" wrote

Shalom,
I search the BASICHIS family >from Koidanovo (now Dzrezhinsk, near Minsk)
in Belarus.
In the Ellis Island database I found four young girls BASICHES, who
arrived by "Aquitania" >from Cherbourg on Sept 9, 1921.
It would be wonderful, but the town of the last residence is clearly typed
as Kojdanor. I understand, that the hand-written "v" and "r" may be
interchanged, but the country is typed as Poland. Minsk was always
included in the USSR and is not in the Western Belarus, which was the part
of Poland until the WWII.
I couldn't find Kojdanor in Poland, the name doesn't soud like a Polish
word. May be the researchers of Poland know such a shtetl?
I would like to adopt these girls into the family, but how can I manage
their "last residence"?
Thank you,
Hi,

Listed in Ellis Island records town "Kujdanor" most probably should read
Kujdanow (currently Kuydanov in western Ukraine).
This town was located in Buczacz district, Tarnopol Province.

Please note that there over 80 entries for Baseches (also spelled as
Basiches, Basseches) in JGI-P database for the Tarnopol region alone and
more are isted in the nearby Stanislawow Province.

I could not verify names of the four young ladies listed in the Ellis Island
manifest since the JRI-P listed records are mostly cover the XIX century
period.

Regards,

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Alberta, Canada


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Kujdanor #general

Alexander Sharon
 

"Dr. Josef ASH" wrote

Shalom,
I search the BASICHIS family >from Koidanovo (now Dzrezhinsk, near Minsk)
in Belarus.
In the Ellis Island database I found four young girls BASICHES, who
arrived by "Aquitania" >from Cherbourg on Sept 9, 1921.
It would be wonderful, but the town of the last residence is clearly typed
as Kojdanor. I understand, that the hand-written "v" and "r" may be
interchanged, but the country is typed as Poland. Minsk was always
included in the USSR and is not in the Western Belarus, which was the part
of Poland until the WWII.
I couldn't find Kojdanor in Poland, the name doesn't soud like a Polish
word. May be the researchers of Poland know such a shtetl?
I would like to adopt these girls into the family, but how can I manage
their "last residence"?
Thank you,
Hi,

Listed in Ellis Island records town "Kujdanor" most probably should read
Kujdanow (currently Kuydanov in western Ukraine).
This town was located in Buczacz district, Tarnopol Province.

Please note that there over 80 entries for Baseches (also spelled as
Basiches, Basseches) in JGI-P database for the Tarnopol region alone and
more are isted in the nearby Stanislawow Province.

I could not verify names of the four young ladies listed in the Ellis Island
manifest since the JRI-P listed records are mostly cover the XIX century
period.

Regards,

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, Alberta, Canada


Re: Matatias Carp book #romania

Rosanne Leeson <rdleeson@...>
 

We are aware of this site, and the webmaster has already been asked to
create a link to this book for our web page. We hope it will be
available shortly.

Rosanne and Paula
Your Co-Coordinators
--------------------
SFeuerstein wrote:

I just discovered this online book:
Matatias Carp: The Holocaust Revealed
http://www.logon.org/_domain/holocaustrevealed.org/Romania/Matatias/Matatias.htm
Apologies, if everyone else on the list has read it
already. I still decided to point it out to those who
by chance may not have done so just yet.

Sarah Feuerstein
Toronto, Canada





Romania SIG #Romania Re: Matatias Carp book #romania

Rosanne Leeson <rdleeson@...>
 

We are aware of this site, and the webmaster has already been asked to
create a link to this book for our web page. We hope it will be
available shortly.

Rosanne and Paula
Your Co-Coordinators
--------------------
SFeuerstein wrote:

I just discovered this online book:
Matatias Carp: The Holocaust Revealed
http://www.logon.org/_domain/holocaustrevealed.org/Romania/Matatias/Matatias.htm
Apologies, if everyone else on the list has read it
already. I still decided to point it out to those who
by chance may not have done so just yet.

Sarah Feuerstein
Toronto, Canada





Re: Need help with translation of Vienna Archives Letter #romania

Renate Bielefeld <renate.bielefeld@...>
 

"Romania SIG digest" <rom-sig@...> schrieb:

Hello Beatrice,
Send me your letter, I will translate it for you as a native speaker.

Renate
In Germany


Romania SIG #Romania Re: Need help with translation of Vienna Archives Letter #romania

Renate Bielefeld <renate.bielefeld@...>
 

"Romania SIG digest" <rom-sig@...> schrieb:

Hello Beatrice,
Send me your letter, I will translate it for you as a native speaker.

Renate
In Germany


lodz criminal records #lodz #poland

Susan Monty <susan@...>
 

Family lore states that my great grandfather,Simcha Bunim Goldwasser was a
bootmaker in the old town of Lodz. He was murdered in his shop by assassins
in a case of mistaken identity. they were seeking to kill his assistant who
was at lunch. They turned up at the funeral, presumably still seeking their
man, and were arrested. This must have occurred between 1900 and 1913. Is it
possible that any criminal or press records might exist? How would I begin
to investigate this. Many thanks.

Susan Monty


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland lodz criminal records #lodz #poland

Susan Monty <susan@...>
 

Family lore states that my great grandfather,Simcha Bunim Goldwasser was a
bootmaker in the old town of Lodz. He was murdered in his shop by assassins
in a case of mistaken identity. they were seeking to kill his assistant who
was at lunch. They turned up at the funeral, presumably still seeking their
man, and were arrested. This must have occurred between 1900 and 1913. Is it
possible that any criminal or press records might exist? How would I begin
to investigate this. Many thanks.

Susan Monty


Matatias Carp book #romania

SFeuerstein <ethnoca@...>
 

I just discovered this online book:
Matatias Carp: The Holocaust Revealed
http://www.logon.org/_domain/holocaustrevealed.org/Romania/Matatias/Matatias.htm
Apologies, if everyone else on the list has read it
already. I still decided to point it out to those who
by chance may not have done so just yet.

Sarah Feuerstein
Toronto, Canada


__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
http://mail.yahoo.com


Romania SIG #Romania Matatias Carp book #romania

SFeuerstein <ethnoca@...>
 

I just discovered this online book:
Matatias Carp: The Holocaust Revealed
http://www.logon.org/_domain/holocaustrevealed.org/Romania/Matatias/Matatias.htm
Apologies, if everyone else on the list has read it
already. I still decided to point it out to those who
by chance may not have done so just yet.

Sarah Feuerstein
Toronto, Canada


__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
http://mail.yahoo.com


Translation - Lithuanian Archives Document #lithuania

James R. Platt <jrplatt@...>
 

Help translating this one page document >from the Lithuanian Central State
Archives is very much appreciated.

The address:
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=7686

Please respond directly to jrplatt@...

Thank you.

James R. Platt


Researching Surname LEVIN #lithuania

edward steiner <nedsteiner@...>
 

Researching surname LEVIN.

Sarah, Jacob H., Isadore Henry, and Herman Harry LEVIN
immigrated >from Lithuania to the U.S. circa 1885.
They settled in Minneapolis, MN. The Levin Bros
became well-known furniture manufacturers.

Other information: Sarah LEVIN was married to Harry
LEVITZ/LEVITCH. Both born 1868.

I welcome any information that Members may have about
this family.

Regards,

Ned Steiner
Washington DC

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately.