Date   

Re: Castle Garden Web sites #general

Martin Fischer
 

Nancy Kendrick <adamsny@f2s.com> responded to a query >from Ida & Joseph
Schwarcz <idayosef@013.net> about Ida's parents' arrival in the U.S. in 1923
via Ellis Island. Ida recalled her parents speaking of "Kessel Gurten" as
the generic name for the arrival point in the U.S. among Yiddish speakers.

Nancy's response listed several interesting Web sites about the history of
Castle Garden, the immigrants' entry point into New York City prior to the
establishment of Ellis Island.

Nancy listed these Web sites:

Lower Manhatten Information:
http://www.lowermanhattan.info/history/didyouknow/castle_clinton_83528.asp

The Battery
http://www.thebattery.org/castle/

Ellis Island Immigrants.org
http://www.ellisislandimmigrants.org/ellis_island_history.htm

Castle Garden, 1855-1890, by Ruby Coleman
http://www.genealogytoday.com/columns/ruby/011117.html

I would like to add to that list a site that includes a free searchable
database of immigrants' arrivals >from 1830 through 1892 via Castle Garden:

http://castlegarden.org/

It is a useful site for researching arrivals of ancestors in New York City
before Ellis Island became the entry point.

Martin Fischer
Oak Park, Illinois, USA

---
The Fischer and Levin family history Web site is at:
http://mefischer1.home.comcast.net/


Thanks, and a suggestion for a "brick wall" #general

Sharon R. Korn <s.r.korn@...>
 

Hello,

I am writing to express my thanks for two reasons. First, I asked for help
with a View Mate translation of Hebrew on a tombstone and have had quite a
few responses, all giving basically the same meaning. Judith Romney
Wegner's explanation was especially detailed. Thank you to all who wrote.

I also wish to thank those who responded to my request for help in finding
my great-grandfather's grave, which I have tried to do for a very long time
without success. Allan Jordan's excellent suggestion seems to have broken
down my "brick wall," and I would like to repeat it here for the benefit of
those who may be having a similar problem. My great-grandfather's
Americanized name (Jacob JACOBSON) was extremely common, and his age was not
definitively known (apparently even to his children). Allan suggested I
look for my great-grandmother. As it happens, I am the descendant of the
first wife (Rochel OSSUR), so I hadn't been making any effort to pursue the
second wife. However, my great-grandmother died without immigrating, and it
was logical (though I hadn't thought of it) that the children of the second
wife (Bella JACOBSON) would choose to bury their parents together. Getting
the death certificate of the second wife, which had her husband's name on
it, and calling the cemetery have led me to conclude with a high degree of
certainty that I have finally found the right person. Of course, I have
requested the death certificate to be 100% sure. This approach might be
helpful to others in a similar situation.

Sharon Korn
San Diego, CA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Castle Garden Web sites #general

Martin Fischer
 

Nancy Kendrick <adamsny@f2s.com> responded to a query >from Ida & Joseph
Schwarcz <idayosef@013.net> about Ida's parents' arrival in the U.S. in 1923
via Ellis Island. Ida recalled her parents speaking of "Kessel Gurten" as
the generic name for the arrival point in the U.S. among Yiddish speakers.

Nancy's response listed several interesting Web sites about the history of
Castle Garden, the immigrants' entry point into New York City prior to the
establishment of Ellis Island.

Nancy listed these Web sites:

Lower Manhatten Information:
http://www.lowermanhattan.info/history/didyouknow/castle_clinton_83528.asp

The Battery
http://www.thebattery.org/castle/

Ellis Island Immigrants.org
http://www.ellisislandimmigrants.org/ellis_island_history.htm

Castle Garden, 1855-1890, by Ruby Coleman
http://www.genealogytoday.com/columns/ruby/011117.html

I would like to add to that list a site that includes a free searchable
database of immigrants' arrivals >from 1830 through 1892 via Castle Garden:

http://castlegarden.org/

It is a useful site for researching arrivals of ancestors in New York City
before Ellis Island became the entry point.

Martin Fischer
Oak Park, Illinois, USA

---
The Fischer and Levin family history Web site is at:
http://mefischer1.home.comcast.net/


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Thanks, and a suggestion for a "brick wall" #general

Sharon R. Korn <s.r.korn@...>
 

Hello,

I am writing to express my thanks for two reasons. First, I asked for help
with a View Mate translation of Hebrew on a tombstone and have had quite a
few responses, all giving basically the same meaning. Judith Romney
Wegner's explanation was especially detailed. Thank you to all who wrote.

I also wish to thank those who responded to my request for help in finding
my great-grandfather's grave, which I have tried to do for a very long time
without success. Allan Jordan's excellent suggestion seems to have broken
down my "brick wall," and I would like to repeat it here for the benefit of
those who may be having a similar problem. My great-grandfather's
Americanized name (Jacob JACOBSON) was extremely common, and his age was not
definitively known (apparently even to his children). Allan suggested I
look for my great-grandmother. As it happens, I am the descendant of the
first wife (Rochel OSSUR), so I hadn't been making any effort to pursue the
second wife. However, my great-grandmother died without immigrating, and it
was logical (though I hadn't thought of it) that the children of the second
wife (Bella JACOBSON) would choose to bury their parents together. Getting
the death certificate of the second wife, which had her husband's name on
it, and calling the cemetery have led me to conclude with a high degree of
certainty that I have finally found the right person. Of course, I have
requested the death certificate to be 100% sure. This approach might be
helpful to others in a similar situation.

Sharon Korn
San Diego, CA


Wolinsky's from Ukraine #general

Steve Orlen
 

Dear Cousins,

With the help of a researcher in Kiev, I've found more specific
information on my VOLINSKIJ (Russian spelling)/WOLINSKY/WOLINS family
from the Ukraine. The tree now goes back to a man named Aron born
circa 1780. Between at least that time & the late 1800s, the family
lived in several towns about 60 to 70 miles S of Kiev: Boguslav -
where the family was registered -, Stepantsy, Zvenigorodka, & Medvin.
One branch relocated to Ekaterinoslav. After 1900 (as I already knew)
family members emigrated to Alexandria, Egypt, Palestine, Melbourne,
Australia, London, NY, LA, Phila & Atlantic City. I've already found
most of them, though not all.

But I know have the names of a number of children born in Boguslav in
the 19th century - all new to me - whose whereabouts I'm going to
have to track down. I'm especially interested in Srul/Israel, born in
1847, who went to London. I find him as first name Israel & as both
VOLENSKI & WOLIN on his (2) marriage certificate(s) to the widow
Betsy ESSERLE nee SOKOLSKY dated Feb 1897 at the East London
Synagogue in the parish of Mile End in Old Town. On the record I
found that he was divorced >from "Ethel," whose whereabouts I can't
find, although she may have been in an asylum in Eccleston. I find
the new couple in the 1901 London Census, living with Betsy' & her
two daughters. However, >from the new research I discovered that he &
presumably Ethel had at least two children in Boguslav: Simka, &
Aizyk married to Sura who had a son named Srul. My guess is that
Simka &/or Aizyk &/or Srul may have also immigated to London. If any
of you out there know of such a London family, please let me know.

And Yankel, one of Israel's brothers, had children I wasn't aware of:
Volko who moved to America in 1891; Berko; Sura who got married in
1889; Khaya who married in 1891; & Nekhama who may have immigrated to
Philadelphia with her widowed mother Manya. I have no idea what new
(given) names Nekhama, Volko & Berko took on. This sort of minimal
information was all the researcher was able to obtain >from the archives.

And, the patriarch Aron may have had a brother named Volko. The
sketchy tree includes a son Froim born in 1827 married to Golda. Children:

Mikhel born 1854 married to Rukhyla & their children:
Avrum, Leiba, Ekha, Khaya-Mura who died in 1889.
Shevel married to Elka, with children Aron & Itsko-Gersh, all of whom
moved away in 1886.
Berko who moved to Ekaterinoslav in 1890.
Liba who got married in 1890.

If anyone has recommendations for tracing any of the above, please
let me know - privately, as we say, unless the information is useful to others.

Best, Steve Orlen
Tucson, Arizona


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Wolinsky's from Ukraine #general

Steve Orlen
 

Dear Cousins,

With the help of a researcher in Kiev, I've found more specific
information on my VOLINSKIJ (Russian spelling)/WOLINSKY/WOLINS family
from the Ukraine. The tree now goes back to a man named Aron born
circa 1780. Between at least that time & the late 1800s, the family
lived in several towns about 60 to 70 miles S of Kiev: Boguslav -
where the family was registered -, Stepantsy, Zvenigorodka, & Medvin.
One branch relocated to Ekaterinoslav. After 1900 (as I already knew)
family members emigrated to Alexandria, Egypt, Palestine, Melbourne,
Australia, London, NY, LA, Phila & Atlantic City. I've already found
most of them, though not all.

But I know have the names of a number of children born in Boguslav in
the 19th century - all new to me - whose whereabouts I'm going to
have to track down. I'm especially interested in Srul/Israel, born in
1847, who went to London. I find him as first name Israel & as both
VOLENSKI & WOLIN on his (2) marriage certificate(s) to the widow
Betsy ESSERLE nee SOKOLSKY dated Feb 1897 at the East London
Synagogue in the parish of Mile End in Old Town. On the record I
found that he was divorced >from "Ethel," whose whereabouts I can't
find, although she may have been in an asylum in Eccleston. I find
the new couple in the 1901 London Census, living with Betsy' & her
two daughters. However, >from the new research I discovered that he &
presumably Ethel had at least two children in Boguslav: Simka, &
Aizyk married to Sura who had a son named Srul. My guess is that
Simka &/or Aizyk &/or Srul may have also immigated to London. If any
of you out there know of such a London family, please let me know.

And Yankel, one of Israel's brothers, had children I wasn't aware of:
Volko who moved to America in 1891; Berko; Sura who got married in
1889; Khaya who married in 1891; & Nekhama who may have immigrated to
Philadelphia with her widowed mother Manya. I have no idea what new
(given) names Nekhama, Volko & Berko took on. This sort of minimal
information was all the researcher was able to obtain >from the archives.

And, the patriarch Aron may have had a brother named Volko. The
sketchy tree includes a son Froim born in 1827 married to Golda. Children:

Mikhel born 1854 married to Rukhyla & their children:
Avrum, Leiba, Ekha, Khaya-Mura who died in 1889.
Shevel married to Elka, with children Aron & Itsko-Gersh, all of whom
moved away in 1886.
Berko who moved to Ekaterinoslav in 1890.
Liba who got married in 1890.

If anyone has recommendations for tracing any of the above, please
let me know - privately, as we say, unless the information is useful to others.

Best, Steve Orlen
Tucson, Arizona


Re: Web etiquette for posting family trees #general

adamsny@...
 

Personally, I would get permission - - - it is just proper etiquette.

In addition, if you have a genealogy software program, most allow you to make
information of those still living "private." Choosing the "private" option is
another thing I believe should be proper ettiquette in genealogy, whether you
get permission or not. Doing so will allow visitors to your web site the
opportunity to see the names, but it does not post dates, etc., which should
never be posted for those still living.

If you offer visitors an email address they can contact you personally for
follow-up, i.e. dates, etc. This allows you to protect all your relatives,
screen peoople who may just be attempting identity theft, and gives you and
your relatives peace of mind.

Of course, in the long run it is personal preference.

Good luck in your research!
Nancy Ring Kendrick
Port Orange, FL
Searching BLOCH / BUGEN / DZIEKIEWICZ / GROSS / KISH / RING / TOWNSLEY
http://tinyurl.com/gxu7l

Quoting Sue Hillman <suehillman@ukonline.co.uk>:

I am thinking about laoding my family tree onto the web. Do I have
to get permission >from each of the living family members?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Web etiquette for posting family trees #general

adamsny@...
 

Personally, I would get permission - - - it is just proper etiquette.

In addition, if you have a genealogy software program, most allow you to make
information of those still living "private." Choosing the "private" option is
another thing I believe should be proper ettiquette in genealogy, whether you
get permission or not. Doing so will allow visitors to your web site the
opportunity to see the names, but it does not post dates, etc., which should
never be posted for those still living.

If you offer visitors an email address they can contact you personally for
follow-up, i.e. dates, etc. This allows you to protect all your relatives,
screen peoople who may just be attempting identity theft, and gives you and
your relatives peace of mind.

Of course, in the long run it is personal preference.

Good luck in your research!
Nancy Ring Kendrick
Port Orange, FL
Searching BLOCH / BUGEN / DZIEKIEWICZ / GROSS / KISH / RING / TOWNSLEY
http://tinyurl.com/gxu7l

Quoting Sue Hillman <suehillman@ukonline.co.uk>:

I am thinking about laoding my family tree onto the web. Do I have
to get permission >from each of the living family members?


Re: Web etiquette for posting family trees #general

Simon Tardell
 

Sue Hillman of Glasgow, Scotland wrote:

I am thinking about laoding my family tree onto the web. Do I have
to get permission >from each of the living family members?
Yes. The (member state implementation of the) data protection directive
(EU directive 95/46/EG of 24 October 1995, see
http://europa.eu.int/comm/justice_home/fsj/privacy/) applies. You can
only process other people's personal data if you have their consent, or
if it is for a strictly private purpose (publishing on the web is per
definition not), or if it is for a purpose which you are required by law
(e.g. bookkeeping). Genealogical data is extremely sensitive.

The data protection agency in Sweden ruled recently that while personal
data for dead people are not protected, data about dead people could
imply data about living people (e.g. if you publish that a dead person
with an uncommon name is jewish, you are implying that living people
with the same name are jewish, and hence is the data on that dead person
to be considered personal data about living people which would require
you to get the consent of all living descendants with the same name
before publishing that data). The UK implementation of the data
protection directive probably differs in details >from the Swedish
implementation, but still.

There are a number of other ways genealogical data is sensitive.
Identity theft is commonly mentioned on this list, at least by our
American friends. In some countries there are people compiling lists of
jews in order to be prepared when their day comes. You don't want to
give them a hand. Perhaps you inadvertently reveal the whereabouts of a
woman who is in hiding >from her ex-husband. Or maybe someone has taken
exception to your uncle's business practice and wants to take it out on
your cousin (who married to a different name). The bottom line is: You
don't know what irreparable harm you could cause in other people's
lives, so you should leave the judgement call on whether to publish or
not to the people concerned (the "data subjects" in the parlance of the
directive).

My advice is that, instead of publishing your genealogy for everyone to
see, make it a website open by invitation only to people (family) whom
you know.

Simon Tardell,
Stockholm, Sweden.

--
Simon Tardell, simon@tardell.se


GOLDFARB in USA - Seeking descendants of Yosef Yitschak #general

Yehudh bn Shlmo
 

I am looking for current email addresses of direct
descendants of Pessah Rifke SCHNEIDER b.1871 in
Krekenava. She married Yosef Yitschak GOLDFARB in
1892 in Lithuania. They had 2 children Thomas and
Frank that came to America. Later they divorced and
Yitschak GOLDFARB remarried.

In America, Thomas GOLDFARB married Anna Weinstein
in 1919 and had 4 children, Charlene, Paul Grayson,
Gerald and Beverley

In America, Frank GOLDFARB married Fannie Weiner in
NY, and had 3 children Bessie, Leo and Robert.

The GOLDFARB family tree of Yitschak and Pessah is in
the FTJP. I am hoping a living relative might have
information on Pessah Rifke.

Yehudah ben Shlomo
U.S.A.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Web etiquette for posting family trees #general

Simon Tardell
 

Sue Hillman of Glasgow, Scotland wrote:

I am thinking about laoding my family tree onto the web. Do I have
to get permission >from each of the living family members?
Yes. The (member state implementation of the) data protection directive
(EU directive 95/46/EG of 24 October 1995, see
http://europa.eu.int/comm/justice_home/fsj/privacy/) applies. You can
only process other people's personal data if you have their consent, or
if it is for a strictly private purpose (publishing on the web is per
definition not), or if it is for a purpose which you are required by law
(e.g. bookkeeping). Genealogical data is extremely sensitive.

The data protection agency in Sweden ruled recently that while personal
data for dead people are not protected, data about dead people could
imply data about living people (e.g. if you publish that a dead person
with an uncommon name is jewish, you are implying that living people
with the same name are jewish, and hence is the data on that dead person
to be considered personal data about living people which would require
you to get the consent of all living descendants with the same name
before publishing that data). The UK implementation of the data
protection directive probably differs in details >from the Swedish
implementation, but still.

There are a number of other ways genealogical data is sensitive.
Identity theft is commonly mentioned on this list, at least by our
American friends. In some countries there are people compiling lists of
jews in order to be prepared when their day comes. You don't want to
give them a hand. Perhaps you inadvertently reveal the whereabouts of a
woman who is in hiding >from her ex-husband. Or maybe someone has taken
exception to your uncle's business practice and wants to take it out on
your cousin (who married to a different name). The bottom line is: You
don't know what irreparable harm you could cause in other people's
lives, so you should leave the judgement call on whether to publish or
not to the people concerned (the "data subjects" in the parlance of the
directive).

My advice is that, instead of publishing your genealogy for everyone to
see, make it a website open by invitation only to people (family) whom
you know.

Simon Tardell,
Stockholm, Sweden.

--
Simon Tardell, simon@tardell.se


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen GOLDFARB in USA - Seeking descendants of Yosef Yitschak #general

Yehudh bn Shlmo
 

I am looking for current email addresses of direct
descendants of Pessah Rifke SCHNEIDER b.1871 in
Krekenava. She married Yosef Yitschak GOLDFARB in
1892 in Lithuania. They had 2 children Thomas and
Frank that came to America. Later they divorced and
Yitschak GOLDFARB remarried.

In America, Thomas GOLDFARB married Anna Weinstein
in 1919 and had 4 children, Charlene, Paul Grayson,
Gerald and Beverley

In America, Frank GOLDFARB married Fannie Weiner in
NY, and had 3 children Bessie, Leo and Robert.

The GOLDFARB family tree of Yitschak and Pessah is in
the FTJP. I am hoping a living relative might have
information on Pessah Rifke.

Yehudah ben Shlomo
U.S.A.


Searching: RACHBAL/RAPHAEL -> Kowal/Kutno, Poland #general

Inbal Livne <me@...>
 

I am looking for anyone else searching for the RACHBAL/RAPHAEL family in
Kutno or Kowal, Poland. My ancestors left for Darlington, England in about
1905. I have not yet come across either surname in either town and am
beginning to wondering if I have started with the correct location! anyone
who has come across these names please get in touch either through this
website or at me@inballivne.plus.com
Thanks

Inbal Livne, Edinburgh, Scotland


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching: RACHBAL/RAPHAEL -> Kowal/Kutno, Poland #general

Inbal Livne <me@...>
 

I am looking for anyone else searching for the RACHBAL/RAPHAEL family in
Kutno or Kowal, Poland. My ancestors left for Darlington, England in about
1905. I have not yet come across either surname in either town and am
beginning to wondering if I have started with the correct location! anyone
who has come across these names please get in touch either through this
website or at me@inballivne.plus.com
Thanks

Inbal Livne, Edinburgh, Scotland


Rabbi Yosef Shmuel of Bagdad #rabbinic

rsisseroff
 

BS"D

Looking for information on Rabbi Yosef Shmuel.
Lived in Baghdad, Iraq about 1900 - 1920

All the best,
Raanan Shalom Isseroff


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Rabbi Yosef Shmuel of Bagdad #rabbinic

rsisseroff
 

BS"D

Looking for information on Rabbi Yosef Shmuel.
Lived in Baghdad, Iraq about 1900 - 1920

All the best,
Raanan Shalom Isseroff


Yizkor Book Project Report for April 2006 #latvia

Joyce Field
 

For the month of April 2006 the Yizkor Book Project added three new
entries and 15 updates. All can be accessed >from the Project's
Translation Index Page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. New material has
been flagged for easy visibility. Note that the translations into
languages other than English are now in a separate section, "Other
Languages."

New entries:

-Ryki, Poland: Pinkas HaKehillot, Polin, vol. VII, translated into
Polish, http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol7_00550p.html

-Pinkas HaKehillot, Polin, vol. VI: History of the Jews in the
Districts and List of Communities

-Pinkas HaKehillot Lita: Table of Contents and List of Communities

Updates:

-Bielsk-Podlaski, Poland
-Braslaw, Belarus
-Dabrowa, Poland
-Drogobych, Ukraine
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Hlybokaye, Belarus
-Kurenets, Belarus
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Leipalingis, Lithuania
-Minsk, Belarus
-Oradea, Romania
-Pinkas HaKehillot List of communities in the eight Polish volumes
has been updated.
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol0_00001.html
-Radzyn Podalski,Poland
-Thessaloniki, Greece
-Zelechow, Poland: Pinkas HaKehillot, Polin, vol. VII: translated
into Polish.
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol7_00199bp.html

At
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
please check the yizkor books that are fundraising projects, meaning
that professional translators are hired to translated these books.
The translators are paid with donations made to JewishGen. In other
words, no money, no translation. Help us continue our work of making
these precious books available to English-speaking researchers by
contributing generously to these projects and to JewishGen, which
provides the infrastructure to house this material online.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition
jfield@jewishgen.org


Yizkor Book Project Report for April 2006 #scandinavia

Joyce Field
 

For the month of April 2006 the Yizkor Book Project added three new
entries and 15 updates. All can be accessed >from the Project's
Translation Index Page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. New material has
been flagged for easy visibility. Note that the translations into
languages other than English are now in a separate section, "Other
Languages."

New entries:

-Ryki, Poland: Pinkas HaKehillot, Polin, vol. VII, translated into
Polish, http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol7_00550p.html

-Pinkas HaKehillot, Polin, vol. VI: History of the Jews in the
Districts and List of Communities

-Pinkas HaKehillot Lita: Table of Contents and List of Communities

Updates:

-Bielsk-Podlaski, Poland
-Braslaw, Belarus
-Dabrowa, Poland
-Drogobych, Ukraine
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Hlybokaye, Belarus
-Kurenets, Belarus
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Leipalingis, Lithuania
-Minsk, Belarus
-Oradea, Romania
-Pinkas HaKehillot List of communities in the eight Polish volumes
has been updated.
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol0_00001.html
-Radzyn Podalski,Poland
-Thessaloniki, Greece
-Zelechow, Poland: Pinkas HaKehillot, Polin, vol. VII: translated
into Polish.
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol7_00199bp.html

At
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
please check the yizkor books that are fundraising projects, meaning
that professional translators are hired to translated these books.
The translators are paid with donations made to JewishGen. In other
words, no money, no translation. Help us continue our work of making
these precious books available to English-speaking researchers by
contributing generously to these projects and to JewishGen, which
provides the infrastructure to house this material online.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition
jfield@jewishgen.org


Latvia SIG #Latvia Yizkor Book Project Report for April 2006 #latvia

Joyce Field
 

For the month of April 2006 the Yizkor Book Project added three new
entries and 15 updates. All can be accessed >from the Project's
Translation Index Page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. New material has
been flagged for easy visibility. Note that the translations into
languages other than English are now in a separate section, "Other
Languages."

New entries:

-Ryki, Poland: Pinkas HaKehillot, Polin, vol. VII, translated into
Polish, http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol7_00550p.html

-Pinkas HaKehillot, Polin, vol. VI: History of the Jews in the
Districts and List of Communities

-Pinkas HaKehillot Lita: Table of Contents and List of Communities

Updates:

-Bielsk-Podlaski, Poland
-Braslaw, Belarus
-Dabrowa, Poland
-Drogobych, Ukraine
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Hlybokaye, Belarus
-Kurenets, Belarus
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Leipalingis, Lithuania
-Minsk, Belarus
-Oradea, Romania
-Pinkas HaKehillot List of communities in the eight Polish volumes
has been updated.
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol0_00001.html
-Radzyn Podalski,Poland
-Thessaloniki, Greece
-Zelechow, Poland: Pinkas HaKehillot, Polin, vol. VII: translated
into Polish.
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol7_00199bp.html

At
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
please check the yizkor books that are fundraising projects, meaning
that professional translators are hired to translated these books.
The translators are paid with donations made to JewishGen. In other
words, no money, no translation. Help us continue our work of making
these precious books available to English-speaking researchers by
contributing generously to these projects and to JewishGen, which
provides the infrastructure to house this material online.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition
jfield@jewishgen.org


Scandinavia SIG #Scandinavia Yizkor Book Project Report for April 2006 #scandinavia

Joyce Field
 

For the month of April 2006 the Yizkor Book Project added three new
entries and 15 updates. All can be accessed >from the Project's
Translation Index Page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. New material has
been flagged for easy visibility. Note that the translations into
languages other than English are now in a separate section, "Other
Languages."

New entries:

-Ryki, Poland: Pinkas HaKehillot, Polin, vol. VII, translated into
Polish, http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol7_00550p.html

-Pinkas HaKehillot, Polin, vol. VI: History of the Jews in the
Districts and List of Communities

-Pinkas HaKehillot Lita: Table of Contents and List of Communities

Updates:

-Bielsk-Podlaski, Poland
-Braslaw, Belarus
-Dabrowa, Poland
-Drogobych, Ukraine
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Hlybokaye, Belarus
-Kurenets, Belarus
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Leipalingis, Lithuania
-Minsk, Belarus
-Oradea, Romania
-Pinkas HaKehillot List of communities in the eight Polish volumes
has been updated.
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol0_00001.html
-Radzyn Podalski,Poland
-Thessaloniki, Greece
-Zelechow, Poland: Pinkas HaKehillot, Polin, vol. VII: translated
into Polish.
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol7_00199bp.html

At
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
please check the yizkor books that are fundraising projects, meaning
that professional translators are hired to translated these books.
The translators are paid with donations made to JewishGen. In other
words, no money, no translation. Help us continue our work of making
these precious books available to English-speaking researchers by
contributing generously to these projects and to JewishGen, which
provides the infrastructure to house this material online.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition
jfield@jewishgen.org