Date   

Re: Web etiquette for posting family trees #general

Simon Tardell
 

Sue Hillman of Glasgow, Scotland wrote:

I am thinking about laoding my family tree onto the web. Do I have
to get permission >from each of the living family members?
Yes. The (member state implementation of the) data protection directive
(EU directive 95/46/EG of 24 October 1995, see
http://europa.eu.int/comm/justice_home/fsj/privacy/) applies. You can
only process other people's personal data if you have their consent, or
if it is for a strictly private purpose (publishing on the web is per
definition not), or if it is for a purpose which you are required by law
(e.g. bookkeeping). Genealogical data is extremely sensitive.

The data protection agency in Sweden ruled recently that while personal
data for dead people are not protected, data about dead people could
imply data about living people (e.g. if you publish that a dead person
with an uncommon name is jewish, you are implying that living people
with the same name are jewish, and hence is the data on that dead person
to be considered personal data about living people which would require
you to get the consent of all living descendants with the same name
before publishing that data). The UK implementation of the data
protection directive probably differs in details >from the Swedish
implementation, but still.

There are a number of other ways genealogical data is sensitive.
Identity theft is commonly mentioned on this list, at least by our
American friends. In some countries there are people compiling lists of
jews in order to be prepared when their day comes. You don't want to
give them a hand. Perhaps you inadvertently reveal the whereabouts of a
woman who is in hiding >from her ex-husband. Or maybe someone has taken
exception to your uncle's business practice and wants to take it out on
your cousin (who married to a different name). The bottom line is: You
don't know what irreparable harm you could cause in other people's
lives, so you should leave the judgement call on whether to publish or
not to the people concerned (the "data subjects" in the parlance of the
directive).

My advice is that, instead of publishing your genealogy for everyone to
see, make it a website open by invitation only to people (family) whom
you know.

Simon Tardell,
Stockholm, Sweden.

--
Simon Tardell, simon@tardell.se


GOLDFARB in USA - Seeking descendants of Yosef Yitschak #general

Yehudh bn Shlmo
 

I am looking for current email addresses of direct
descendants of Pessah Rifke SCHNEIDER b.1871 in
Krekenava. She married Yosef Yitschak GOLDFARB in
1892 in Lithuania. They had 2 children Thomas and
Frank that came to America. Later they divorced and
Yitschak GOLDFARB remarried.

In America, Thomas GOLDFARB married Anna Weinstein
in 1919 and had 4 children, Charlene, Paul Grayson,
Gerald and Beverley

In America, Frank GOLDFARB married Fannie Weiner in
NY, and had 3 children Bessie, Leo and Robert.

The GOLDFARB family tree of Yitschak and Pessah is in
the FTJP. I am hoping a living relative might have
information on Pessah Rifke.

Yehudah ben Shlomo
U.S.A.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Web etiquette for posting family trees #general

Simon Tardell
 

Sue Hillman of Glasgow, Scotland wrote:

I am thinking about laoding my family tree onto the web. Do I have
to get permission >from each of the living family members?
Yes. The (member state implementation of the) data protection directive
(EU directive 95/46/EG of 24 October 1995, see
http://europa.eu.int/comm/justice_home/fsj/privacy/) applies. You can
only process other people's personal data if you have their consent, or
if it is for a strictly private purpose (publishing on the web is per
definition not), or if it is for a purpose which you are required by law
(e.g. bookkeeping). Genealogical data is extremely sensitive.

The data protection agency in Sweden ruled recently that while personal
data for dead people are not protected, data about dead people could
imply data about living people (e.g. if you publish that a dead person
with an uncommon name is jewish, you are implying that living people
with the same name are jewish, and hence is the data on that dead person
to be considered personal data about living people which would require
you to get the consent of all living descendants with the same name
before publishing that data). The UK implementation of the data
protection directive probably differs in details >from the Swedish
implementation, but still.

There are a number of other ways genealogical data is sensitive.
Identity theft is commonly mentioned on this list, at least by our
American friends. In some countries there are people compiling lists of
jews in order to be prepared when their day comes. You don't want to
give them a hand. Perhaps you inadvertently reveal the whereabouts of a
woman who is in hiding >from her ex-husband. Or maybe someone has taken
exception to your uncle's business practice and wants to take it out on
your cousin (who married to a different name). The bottom line is: You
don't know what irreparable harm you could cause in other people's
lives, so you should leave the judgement call on whether to publish or
not to the people concerned (the "data subjects" in the parlance of the
directive).

My advice is that, instead of publishing your genealogy for everyone to
see, make it a website open by invitation only to people (family) whom
you know.

Simon Tardell,
Stockholm, Sweden.

--
Simon Tardell, simon@tardell.se


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen GOLDFARB in USA - Seeking descendants of Yosef Yitschak #general

Yehudh bn Shlmo
 

I am looking for current email addresses of direct
descendants of Pessah Rifke SCHNEIDER b.1871 in
Krekenava. She married Yosef Yitschak GOLDFARB in
1892 in Lithuania. They had 2 children Thomas and
Frank that came to America. Later they divorced and
Yitschak GOLDFARB remarried.

In America, Thomas GOLDFARB married Anna Weinstein
in 1919 and had 4 children, Charlene, Paul Grayson,
Gerald and Beverley

In America, Frank GOLDFARB married Fannie Weiner in
NY, and had 3 children Bessie, Leo and Robert.

The GOLDFARB family tree of Yitschak and Pessah is in
the FTJP. I am hoping a living relative might have
information on Pessah Rifke.

Yehudah ben Shlomo
U.S.A.


Searching: RACHBAL/RAPHAEL -> Kowal/Kutno, Poland #general

Inbal Livne <me@...>
 

I am looking for anyone else searching for the RACHBAL/RAPHAEL family in
Kutno or Kowal, Poland. My ancestors left for Darlington, England in about
1905. I have not yet come across either surname in either town and am
beginning to wondering if I have started with the correct location! anyone
who has come across these names please get in touch either through this
website or at me@inballivne.plus.com
Thanks

Inbal Livne, Edinburgh, Scotland


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching: RACHBAL/RAPHAEL -> Kowal/Kutno, Poland #general

Inbal Livne <me@...>
 

I am looking for anyone else searching for the RACHBAL/RAPHAEL family in
Kutno or Kowal, Poland. My ancestors left for Darlington, England in about
1905. I have not yet come across either surname in either town and am
beginning to wondering if I have started with the correct location! anyone
who has come across these names please get in touch either through this
website or at me@inballivne.plus.com
Thanks

Inbal Livne, Edinburgh, Scotland


Rabbi Yosef Shmuel of Bagdad #rabbinic

rsisseroff
 

BS"D

Looking for information on Rabbi Yosef Shmuel.
Lived in Baghdad, Iraq about 1900 - 1920

All the best,
Raanan Shalom Isseroff


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Rabbi Yosef Shmuel of Bagdad #rabbinic

rsisseroff
 

BS"D

Looking for information on Rabbi Yosef Shmuel.
Lived in Baghdad, Iraq about 1900 - 1920

All the best,
Raanan Shalom Isseroff


Yizkor Book Project Report for April 2006 #latvia

Joyce Field
 

For the month of April 2006 the Yizkor Book Project added three new
entries and 15 updates. All can be accessed >from the Project's
Translation Index Page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. New material has
been flagged for easy visibility. Note that the translations into
languages other than English are now in a separate section, "Other
Languages."

New entries:

-Ryki, Poland: Pinkas HaKehillot, Polin, vol. VII, translated into
Polish, http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol7_00550p.html

-Pinkas HaKehillot, Polin, vol. VI: History of the Jews in the
Districts and List of Communities

-Pinkas HaKehillot Lita: Table of Contents and List of Communities

Updates:

-Bielsk-Podlaski, Poland
-Braslaw, Belarus
-Dabrowa, Poland
-Drogobych, Ukraine
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Hlybokaye, Belarus
-Kurenets, Belarus
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Leipalingis, Lithuania
-Minsk, Belarus
-Oradea, Romania
-Pinkas HaKehillot List of communities in the eight Polish volumes
has been updated.
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol0_00001.html
-Radzyn Podalski,Poland
-Thessaloniki, Greece
-Zelechow, Poland: Pinkas HaKehillot, Polin, vol. VII: translated
into Polish.
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol7_00199bp.html

At
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
please check the yizkor books that are fundraising projects, meaning
that professional translators are hired to translated these books.
The translators are paid with donations made to JewishGen. In other
words, no money, no translation. Help us continue our work of making
these precious books available to English-speaking researchers by
contributing generously to these projects and to JewishGen, which
provides the infrastructure to house this material online.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition
jfield@jewishgen.org


Yizkor Book Project Report for April 2006 #scandinavia

Joyce Field
 

For the month of April 2006 the Yizkor Book Project added three new
entries and 15 updates. All can be accessed >from the Project's
Translation Index Page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. New material has
been flagged for easy visibility. Note that the translations into
languages other than English are now in a separate section, "Other
Languages."

New entries:

-Ryki, Poland: Pinkas HaKehillot, Polin, vol. VII, translated into
Polish, http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol7_00550p.html

-Pinkas HaKehillot, Polin, vol. VI: History of the Jews in the
Districts and List of Communities

-Pinkas HaKehillot Lita: Table of Contents and List of Communities

Updates:

-Bielsk-Podlaski, Poland
-Braslaw, Belarus
-Dabrowa, Poland
-Drogobych, Ukraine
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Hlybokaye, Belarus
-Kurenets, Belarus
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Leipalingis, Lithuania
-Minsk, Belarus
-Oradea, Romania
-Pinkas HaKehillot List of communities in the eight Polish volumes
has been updated.
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol0_00001.html
-Radzyn Podalski,Poland
-Thessaloniki, Greece
-Zelechow, Poland: Pinkas HaKehillot, Polin, vol. VII: translated
into Polish.
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol7_00199bp.html

At
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
please check the yizkor books that are fundraising projects, meaning
that professional translators are hired to translated these books.
The translators are paid with donations made to JewishGen. In other
words, no money, no translation. Help us continue our work of making
these precious books available to English-speaking researchers by
contributing generously to these projects and to JewishGen, which
provides the infrastructure to house this material online.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition
jfield@jewishgen.org


Latvia SIG #Latvia Yizkor Book Project Report for April 2006 #latvia

Joyce Field
 

For the month of April 2006 the Yizkor Book Project added three new
entries and 15 updates. All can be accessed >from the Project's
Translation Index Page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. New material has
been flagged for easy visibility. Note that the translations into
languages other than English are now in a separate section, "Other
Languages."

New entries:

-Ryki, Poland: Pinkas HaKehillot, Polin, vol. VII, translated into
Polish, http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol7_00550p.html

-Pinkas HaKehillot, Polin, vol. VI: History of the Jews in the
Districts and List of Communities

-Pinkas HaKehillot Lita: Table of Contents and List of Communities

Updates:

-Bielsk-Podlaski, Poland
-Braslaw, Belarus
-Dabrowa, Poland
-Drogobych, Ukraine
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Hlybokaye, Belarus
-Kurenets, Belarus
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Leipalingis, Lithuania
-Minsk, Belarus
-Oradea, Romania
-Pinkas HaKehillot List of communities in the eight Polish volumes
has been updated.
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol0_00001.html
-Radzyn Podalski,Poland
-Thessaloniki, Greece
-Zelechow, Poland: Pinkas HaKehillot, Polin, vol. VII: translated
into Polish.
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol7_00199bp.html

At
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
please check the yizkor books that are fundraising projects, meaning
that professional translators are hired to translated these books.
The translators are paid with donations made to JewishGen. In other
words, no money, no translation. Help us continue our work of making
these precious books available to English-speaking researchers by
contributing generously to these projects and to JewishGen, which
provides the infrastructure to house this material online.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition
jfield@jewishgen.org


Scandinavia SIG #Scandinavia Yizkor Book Project Report for April 2006 #scandinavia

Joyce Field
 

For the month of April 2006 the Yizkor Book Project added three new
entries and 15 updates. All can be accessed >from the Project's
Translation Index Page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. New material has
been flagged for easy visibility. Note that the translations into
languages other than English are now in a separate section, "Other
Languages."

New entries:

-Ryki, Poland: Pinkas HaKehillot, Polin, vol. VII, translated into
Polish, http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol7_00550p.html

-Pinkas HaKehillot, Polin, vol. VI: History of the Jews in the
Districts and List of Communities

-Pinkas HaKehillot Lita: Table of Contents and List of Communities

Updates:

-Bielsk-Podlaski, Poland
-Braslaw, Belarus
-Dabrowa, Poland
-Drogobych, Ukraine
-Holocaust in Belarus
-Hlybokaye, Belarus
-Kurenets, Belarus
-Lanovtsy, Ukraine
-Leipalingis, Lithuania
-Minsk, Belarus
-Oradea, Romania
-Pinkas HaKehillot List of communities in the eight Polish volumes
has been updated.
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol0_00001.html
-Radzyn Podalski,Poland
-Thessaloniki, Greece
-Zelechow, Poland: Pinkas HaKehillot, Polin, vol. VII: translated
into Polish.
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol7_00199bp.html

At
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
please check the yizkor books that are fundraising projects, meaning
that professional translators are hired to translated these books.
The translators are paid with donations made to JewishGen. In other
words, no money, no translation. Help us continue our work of making
these precious books available to English-speaking researchers by
contributing generously to these projects and to JewishGen, which
provides the infrastructure to house this material online.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition
jfield@jewishgen.org


Translators needed - Hebrew or Russian #romania

Bob Wascou <robertw252@...>
 

We have just received permission to begin the indexing
of vital records >from Bender, Causeni, Balti and
additional records >from Kishinev, Moldova (formerly
Bessarabia). We can use more people who are fluent in
either Russian or Hebrew to work on these indexing
projects. These records include birth, marriage,
divorce and death records. All of the records are
handwritten and not printed.

When completed the data will be placed in the
JewishGen Romanian database
<http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Romania/> and the
JewishGen Ukraine database
<http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Ukraine/>.

Please contact me at robertw252@aol.com if you are
interested in joining the energetic group of people
who have volunteered to work on this project.

Bob Wascou
ROM-SIG Research Coordinator


Romania SIG #Romania Translators needed - Hebrew or Russian #romania

Bob Wascou <robertw252@...>
 

We have just received permission to begin the indexing
of vital records >from Bender, Causeni, Balti and
additional records >from Kishinev, Moldova (formerly
Bessarabia). We can use more people who are fluent in
either Russian or Hebrew to work on these indexing
projects. These records include birth, marriage,
divorce and death records. All of the records are
handwritten and not printed.

When completed the data will be placed in the
JewishGen Romanian database
<http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Romania/> and the
JewishGen Ukraine database
<http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Ukraine/>.

Please contact me at robertw252@aol.com if you are
interested in joining the energetic group of people
who have volunteered to work on this project.

Bob Wascou
ROM-SIG Research Coordinator


Re: Seeking Richard WEISS, Marc WEISS and Mildred WEISS #general

Avrum
 

This is an easy search using Stephen Morse search engines. First,
using "Birthdays and Related Persons" enter Mildred WEISS AND New York
(state), search, and scan the list until you see a related group with
Mildred, Mark, and Richard (and -- although deceased -- Melvin is
listed too). Note the age of each individual and the town(s). [By
searching each name individually, you can also obtain each exact
birthdate]. Next, using "Birthdays and Addresses" put in the birth
year and search each name again. Note the towns and phones. Next,
using "Phonebook lookups" put in the name and the town and run it again
to ascertain that the address and phone you have found is the current
listing. This provides valid information on address and phone for
Richard J. WEISS in Port Washington, NY and for Mark R. WEISS in
Princeton Junction, NJ. [Mildred was not as readily found -- it is, of
course, easier to find phone listings under men's names than women's
names].

Avrum Geller
New York, NY

Jim Bennett wrote:

Richard and Marc WEISS are in their 50's, the sons of the late Melvin WEISS
and Mildred WEISS. In the 1960's, at least, they lived in Elmont, Nassau County.

They're my second cousins. Does anyone know them?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Seeking Richard WEISS, Marc WEISS and Mildred WEISS #general

Avrum
 

This is an easy search using Stephen Morse search engines. First,
using "Birthdays and Related Persons" enter Mildred WEISS AND New York
(state), search, and scan the list until you see a related group with
Mildred, Mark, and Richard (and -- although deceased -- Melvin is
listed too). Note the age of each individual and the town(s). [By
searching each name individually, you can also obtain each exact
birthdate]. Next, using "Birthdays and Addresses" put in the birth
year and search each name again. Note the towns and phones. Next,
using "Phonebook lookups" put in the name and the town and run it again
to ascertain that the address and phone you have found is the current
listing. This provides valid information on address and phone for
Richard J. WEISS in Port Washington, NY and for Mark R. WEISS in
Princeton Junction, NJ. [Mildred was not as readily found -- it is, of
course, easier to find phone listings under men's names than women's
names].

Avrum Geller
New York, NY

Jim Bennett wrote:

Richard and Marc WEISS are in their 50's, the sons of the late Melvin WEISS
and Mildred WEISS. In the 1960's, at least, they lived in Elmont, Nassau County.

They're my second cousins. Does anyone know them?


Re: Viewmate #7781 #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

At 8:28 AM -0700 5/4/06, Sharon R. Korn wrote:

I am requesting help with a translation of Hebrew lettering on a
tombstone. Please go to View Mate # VM 7781 and reply to me
privately, if you can interpret this.
Sharon,

Although you invited a private reply, your question happens to be of
general application because it is relevant to every traditional
Jewish tombstone (at least, every stone that I have ever seen); so I
am responding also to the list for the benefit of others who may un
familiar with conventions regarding the lettering on traditional
tombstones.

These five letters are absolutely standard; so much so, that they
usually appear even on stones that have no other Hebrew words at all
(including, for instance, those of my maternal grandparents in
London -- probably because the inclusion of these five letters was
required by the cemetery authorities). And it goes without saying
that they always form part of the wording of stones that do have
actual Hebrew inscriptions of the names and death dates of the
departed.

These five letters are an abbreviation for a standard prayer for the
soul of the departed that is routinely included.

The letters (reading >from right to left) are Taf - Nun - Tsaddi -
Bet - Heh. These are the initial letters of the words of a
standard Hebrew prayer:

Tehi Nafsho (or, for a woman, Nafshah) Tserurah Bi-tsror Ha-hayyim.

which means:

May his (or her) soul be bound up in the bond of life [meaning in
this context, "eternal life"].

In this particular photograph, the letters appear only once, and thus
seem to be doing double duty for both of the departed. This is
perfectly feasible because the letter "Nun" is the initial letter
both of the word Naf-sho ("his soul") and of the word Naf-shah ("her
soul") That "works" in Hebrew because the pronoun "his" or "her" as
the case may be is attached directly as a pronominal suffix to the
noun "nefesh", meaning "soul"; consequently it does not affect the
initial letter of the word as a whole)

Thus the abbreviation can be read -- and this case was apparently
intended to be read -- as referring to both the man and his wife.

Judith Romney Wegner
jrw@brown.edu

MODERATOR NOTE: Any comments relating to the points of Hebrew grammar
raised by Dr Wegner should be sent privately. We will consider
genealogy-related responses for posting.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Viewmate #7781 #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

At 8:28 AM -0700 5/4/06, Sharon R. Korn wrote:

I am requesting help with a translation of Hebrew lettering on a
tombstone. Please go to View Mate # VM 7781 and reply to me
privately, if you can interpret this.
Sharon,

Although you invited a private reply, your question happens to be of
general application because it is relevant to every traditional
Jewish tombstone (at least, every stone that I have ever seen); so I
am responding also to the list for the benefit of others who may un
familiar with conventions regarding the lettering on traditional
tombstones.

These five letters are absolutely standard; so much so, that they
usually appear even on stones that have no other Hebrew words at all
(including, for instance, those of my maternal grandparents in
London -- probably because the inclusion of these five letters was
required by the cemetery authorities). And it goes without saying
that they always form part of the wording of stones that do have
actual Hebrew inscriptions of the names and death dates of the
departed.

These five letters are an abbreviation for a standard prayer for the
soul of the departed that is routinely included.

The letters (reading >from right to left) are Taf - Nun - Tsaddi -
Bet - Heh. These are the initial letters of the words of a
standard Hebrew prayer:

Tehi Nafsho (or, for a woman, Nafshah) Tserurah Bi-tsror Ha-hayyim.

which means:

May his (or her) soul be bound up in the bond of life [meaning in
this context, "eternal life"].

In this particular photograph, the letters appear only once, and thus
seem to be doing double duty for both of the departed. This is
perfectly feasible because the letter "Nun" is the initial letter
both of the word Naf-sho ("his soul") and of the word Naf-shah ("her
soul") That "works" in Hebrew because the pronoun "his" or "her" as
the case may be is attached directly as a pronominal suffix to the
noun "nefesh", meaning "soul"; consequently it does not affect the
initial letter of the word as a whole)

Thus the abbreviation can be read -- and this case was apparently
intended to be read -- as referring to both the man and his wife.

Judith Romney Wegner
jrw@brown.edu

MODERATOR NOTE: Any comments relating to the points of Hebrew grammar
raised by Dr Wegner should be sent privately. We will consider
genealogy-related responses for posting.


Translators needed - Hebrew or Russian #general

Bob Wascou <robertw252@...>
 

We have just received permission to begin the indexing
of vital records >from Bender, Causeni, Balti and
additional records >from Kishinev, Moldova (formerly
Bessarabia). We can use more people who are fluent in
either Russian or Hebrew to work on these indexing
projects. These records include birth, marriage,
divorce and death records. All of the records are
handwritten and not printed.

When completed the data will be placed in the
JewishGen Romanian database
<http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Romania/> and the
JewishGen Ukraine database
<http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Ukraine/>.

Please contact me at robertw252@aol.com if you are
interested in joining the energetic group of people
who have volunteered to work on this project.

Bob Wascou
ROM-SIG Research Coordinator


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Translators needed - Hebrew or Russian #general

Bob Wascou <robertw252@...>
 

We have just received permission to begin the indexing
of vital records >from Bender, Causeni, Balti and
additional records >from Kishinev, Moldova (formerly
Bessarabia). We can use more people who are fluent in
either Russian or Hebrew to work on these indexing
projects. These records include birth, marriage,
divorce and death records. All of the records are
handwritten and not printed.

When completed the data will be placed in the
JewishGen Romanian database
<http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Romania/> and the
JewishGen Ukraine database
<http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Ukraine/>.

Please contact me at robertw252@aol.com if you are
interested in joining the energetic group of people
who have volunteered to work on this project.

Bob Wascou
ROM-SIG Research Coordinator