Date   

Yizkor Book Project Report for february 2006 #lodz #poland

Joyce Field
 

For the month of February 2006 nine updates, four new entries, and
one new book went online at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. All the new
material has flags in the index for easy identification.

New book:

-Rietavas, Lithuania

Updates:

-Chelm, Poland
-Czestochowa, Poland
-Ilya, Belarus
-Kalusz, Ukraine
-Novogrudok, Belarus
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Sosnowiec, Poland
-Svencionys,Lithuania
-Zloczew, Poland

-New entries:

-Branszczyk, Poland: Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, vol. 4
-Brest, Belarus: Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, vol. 5
-Kostopil, Ukraine: Pinkas HaKehillot, vol. 5
-Zaliztsi, Ukraine: Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, vol. 2

Many yizkor books are being translated by professional translators
paid by donations to the project fund. Donations to support these
worthy projects can be made at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23.
Please also consider a donation to the JewishGen General Fund to
support the infrastructure for all online projects.

To start a translation project of a yizkor book of your ancestral
town, please contact me privately.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland Yizkor Book Project Report for february 2006 #lodz #poland

Joyce Field
 

For the month of February 2006 nine updates, four new entries, and
one new book went online at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. All the new
material has flags in the index for easy identification.

New book:

-Rietavas, Lithuania

Updates:

-Chelm, Poland
-Czestochowa, Poland
-Ilya, Belarus
-Kalusz, Ukraine
-Novogrudok, Belarus
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Sosnowiec, Poland
-Svencionys,Lithuania
-Zloczew, Poland

-New entries:

-Branszczyk, Poland: Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, vol. 4
-Brest, Belarus: Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, vol. 5
-Kostopil, Ukraine: Pinkas HaKehillot, vol. 5
-Zaliztsi, Ukraine: Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, vol. 2

Many yizkor books are being translated by professional translators
paid by donations to the project fund. Donations to support these
worthy projects can be made at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23.
Please also consider a donation to the JewishGen General Fund to
support the infrastructure for all online projects.

To start a translation project of a yizkor book of your ancestral
town, please contact me privately.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


re> Samuels #yiddish

Gene Warech <operawriter@...>
 

Here is an answer that might be of use. When my wife's great uncle,
Kalmen Yuwiler, arrived in this country (with 20 members of his
troupe) they each listed a theatre in New York City as their
destination. This was because Yuwiler and his troupe had been hired
to do a season at that theatre. So the theatre address was a sign of
gainful employment.
Similarly you might look at any remaining records of that vaudeville
house to see if your ggf performed there. Also it is always worth
a look at Zilberzweig's Lexicon of Yiddish Theatre (written in
Yiddish) for his name.
Gene Warech

Moderator's Note: The index to the "Lexicon" mention by Gene Warech can be
found on the NY Public Library web site:
http://www.nypl.org/research/chss/jws/leksikonindex.html

On Mar 2, 2006, at 10:00 PM, YTandV Research Group digest wrote:
Subject: SAMUELS
From: Robin ESP <robinesp@...>
Hello,
My G-Grandfather came >from Romania through Ellis
Island. On the passenger record it says he was going
to a Vaudeville House in Portland, Maine. He lived in
Chicago, had a family and ended up in Los Angeles, CA.
Did alot of people travel >from Europe and head
directly to Vaudeville Houses? Did they live at the
houses?
Thanks for any info,
Robin Samuels


Yiddish Theatre and Vadeville #YiddishTheatre re> Samuels #yiddish

Gene Warech <operawriter@...>
 

Here is an answer that might be of use. When my wife's great uncle,
Kalmen Yuwiler, arrived in this country (with 20 members of his
troupe) they each listed a theatre in New York City as their
destination. This was because Yuwiler and his troupe had been hired
to do a season at that theatre. So the theatre address was a sign of
gainful employment.
Similarly you might look at any remaining records of that vaudeville
house to see if your ggf performed there. Also it is always worth
a look at Zilberzweig's Lexicon of Yiddish Theatre (written in
Yiddish) for his name.
Gene Warech

Moderator's Note: The index to the "Lexicon" mention by Gene Warech can be
found on the NY Public Library web site:
http://www.nypl.org/research/chss/jws/leksikonindex.html

On Mar 2, 2006, at 10:00 PM, YTandV Research Group digest wrote:
Subject: SAMUELS
From: Robin ESP <robinesp@...>
Hello,
My G-Grandfather came >from Romania through Ellis
Island. On the passenger record it says he was going
to a Vaudeville House in Portland, Maine. He lived in
Chicago, had a family and ended up in Los Angeles, CA.
Did alot of people travel >from Europe and head
directly to Vaudeville Houses? Did they live at the
houses?
Thanks for any info,
Robin Samuels


Jewish Chronicle Archives #unitedkingdom

Laurence Harris <Laurence@...>
 

The Jewish Chronicle have digistised all their editions >from 1841 to 2006 and it
is now possible to do a simple search for a relevant article.

This is a great achievement. Well done the JC.

I have tried the system and by searching on "Chapkofsky" found an obituary
for a relative who died in World War 1. The obituary helped me prove that the
records that I had for Corpl. Lane did, in fact, relate someone with the surname
of CHAPKOFSKY in my family.

My only criticism, which I hope will be corrected in due course, is that the
searching facilities are very basic and are effectively limited to an exactly
spelled word or phrase (with no part-word or sounds-like type searches available). However, this is only a minor issue compared with the new research opportunities opened by this great facility.

There are charges and to gain full use you do need to subscribe to the JC.

For further details go to www.thejc.com and click on the blue box with the text
"The JC Archives".

Laurence Harris
Pinner, Middlesex, England
Researching: CHAPKOFSKY and all variant spellings (and there are lots of them!!)


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Jewish Chronicle Archives #unitedkingdom

Laurence Harris <Laurence@...>
 

The Jewish Chronicle have digistised all their editions >from 1841 to 2006 and it
is now possible to do a simple search for a relevant article.

This is a great achievement. Well done the JC.

I have tried the system and by searching on "Chapkofsky" found an obituary
for a relative who died in World War 1. The obituary helped me prove that the
records that I had for Corpl. Lane did, in fact, relate someone with the surname
of CHAPKOFSKY in my family.

My only criticism, which I hope will be corrected in due course, is that the
searching facilities are very basic and are effectively limited to an exactly
spelled word or phrase (with no part-word or sounds-like type searches available). However, this is only a minor issue compared with the new research opportunities opened by this great facility.

There are charges and to gain full use you do need to subscribe to the JC.

For further details go to www.thejc.com and click on the blue box with the text
"The JC Archives".

Laurence Harris
Pinner, Middlesex, England
Researching: CHAPKOFSKY and all variant spellings (and there are lots of them!!)


Arenberg, Tovbin, Towbin #ukraine

j.furba@...
 

Researching Arenberg, Tovbin, Tovbin in Ukraine, Moldova and Novorossia
(south Russia and Ukraine 18-19 century)
Janet Furba, Germany


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Arenberg, Tovbin, Towbin #ukraine

j.furba@...
 

Researching Arenberg, Tovbin, Tovbin in Ukraine, Moldova and Novorossia
(south Russia and Ukraine 18-19 century)
Janet Furba, Germany


Online submission to Yad Vashem (no paper needed!) #general

Zev Griner <zgriner@...>
 

Here is the link to the online submission for Yad Vashem:
http://names.yadvashem.org/wps/portal/!ut/p/_s.7_0_A/7_0_9M
If that doesn't work, go here:
http://www1.yadvashem.org/how_to/index_how_to.html and click on the
second item.

The guide for the online submission is here:
http://www1.yadvashem.org/remembrance/names/site/Guide_to_Submitting.pdf

The instructions on page 4 of the above guide states:
"5. Sign and send the paper form to Yad Vashem. *While it is not
mandatory*, (my emphasis) Yad Vashem encourages all those who submit
online Pages of Testimony to send a completed hard copy of the
above-mentioned PDF-file, printed and signed by the submitter, which
will be preserved in the Hall of Names at Yad Vashem."

*In other words*, you do not have to hassle with paper, it would be
nice for posterity. Perhaps I am a Luddite - I like to hold paper.

Zev Griner
PANCER,GRINER,BAUM/BOIM,ZAJDEL,LEJZER/LEIZER/LAZER,SAVARICK,LAPERDON


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Online submission to Yad Vashem (no paper needed!) #general

Zev Griner <zgriner@...>
 

Here is the link to the online submission for Yad Vashem:
http://names.yadvashem.org/wps/portal/!ut/p/_s.7_0_A/7_0_9M
If that doesn't work, go here:
http://www1.yadvashem.org/how_to/index_how_to.html and click on the
second item.

The guide for the online submission is here:
http://www1.yadvashem.org/remembrance/names/site/Guide_to_Submitting.pdf

The instructions on page 4 of the above guide states:
"5. Sign and send the paper form to Yad Vashem. *While it is not
mandatory*, (my emphasis) Yad Vashem encourages all those who submit
online Pages of Testimony to send a completed hard copy of the
above-mentioned PDF-file, printed and signed by the submitter, which
will be preserved in the Hall of Names at Yad Vashem."

*In other words*, you do not have to hassle with paper, it would be
nice for posterity. Perhaps I am a Luddite - I like to hold paper.

Zev Griner
PANCER,GRINER,BAUM/BOIM,ZAJDEL,LEJZER/LEIZER/LAZER,SAVARICK,LAPERDON


Re: Urgent request from Yad Vashem #general

Tilford Bartman <bartmant@...>
 

There is something called historical accuracy. If we don't pay any
attention to it I can assure you there are others who most certainly
will. When people did the POTs in the 50's and 60's I'm sure they could
not have imagined that 50 years later there would be a cottage industry
of holocaust deniers and minimizers. Also we owe it to future
generations to be as accurate and truthful as possible in terms of the
information we hand them down. While it may not make much difference to
many of us the nitty gritty specifics of our relatives deaths in the
holocaust there are those who will make a whole lot of these matters. I
really urge people to be very thoughtful about what they put on POTs

Tilford Bartman



Zev Griner wrote:

In principle, I agree that, if someone submits a POT, the information
should be irrefutable, and not hearsay. At least 40% of my mother's
father's family were murdered. Most of the POTs claim they died in
Belzec. Some of my relatives have 5 POTs, each claiming they died in a
different place and time - does it really matter?

If ancestors were killed by Nazis, Poles, Ukranians, Lithuanians, or
any number of accomplices because they were Jewish - does it *really*
make a difference? They could have been killed by bombs, progroms,
Einsatzgruppen, ghettos, shot, burned, gassed, hunger, elements,
disease, etc.
snip <


Re: Urgent request from Yad Vashem #general

David Lewin <davidlewin@...>
 

How does one cope with the practicality?

Quite rightly Yad Vashem, in its instructions of "how to submit" asks
that you check that someone is not there already

Also - quite rightly - it asks for individually signed and printed
forms. There is no electronic submission.

I have data of my own parents, and my and those of my wife - between
us we must have some 200 individuals who have perished. I can get
the computer software to select them - but the next set of demands is
daunting, especially with regular 12 - 15 hour "working days"

David Lewin
London


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Urgent request from Yad Vashem #general

Tilford Bartman <bartmant@...>
 

There is something called historical accuracy. If we don't pay any
attention to it I can assure you there are others who most certainly
will. When people did the POTs in the 50's and 60's I'm sure they could
not have imagined that 50 years later there would be a cottage industry
of holocaust deniers and minimizers. Also we owe it to future
generations to be as accurate and truthful as possible in terms of the
information we hand them down. While it may not make much difference to
many of us the nitty gritty specifics of our relatives deaths in the
holocaust there are those who will make a whole lot of these matters. I
really urge people to be very thoughtful about what they put on POTs

Tilford Bartman



Zev Griner wrote:

In principle, I agree that, if someone submits a POT, the information
should be irrefutable, and not hearsay. At least 40% of my mother's
father's family were murdered. Most of the POTs claim they died in
Belzec. Some of my relatives have 5 POTs, each claiming they died in a
different place and time - does it really matter?

If ancestors were killed by Nazis, Poles, Ukranians, Lithuanians, or
any number of accomplices because they were Jewish - does it *really*
make a difference? They could have been killed by bombs, progroms,
Einsatzgruppen, ghettos, shot, burned, gassed, hunger, elements,
disease, etc.
snip <


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Urgent request from Yad Vashem #general

David Lewin <davidlewin@...>
 

How does one cope with the practicality?

Quite rightly Yad Vashem, in its instructions of "how to submit" asks
that you check that someone is not there already

Also - quite rightly - it asks for individually signed and printed
forms. There is no electronic submission.

I have data of my own parents, and my and those of my wife - between
us we must have some 200 individuals who have perished. I can get
the computer software to select them - but the next set of demands is
daunting, especially with regular 12 - 15 hour "working days"

David Lewin
London


Danzig tour in NY - RSVP #poland #danzig #gdansk #germany

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

Dear SIG members,

If you will be in New York during August 14-18, regardless of whether you
will be attending the IAJGS Conference during that period, please read this
message and respond privately to me with the requested information as soon
as you can.

As you may know, the Jewish community of Danzig shipped its precious ritual
objects and other valuables to New York in 1939, and, in exchange, received
money to finance the escape of its remaining members. This important
collection of objects >from Danzig is now housed at The Jewish Museum in New
York.

Since some of us will be gathering in New York for the IAJGS Conference, it
seemed to me this would be an ideal opportunity to arrange a tour of these
objects for the Danzig SIG. I have been corresponding with the Museum about
this, and have received wonderful cooperation. The Museum is very
enthusiastic about our visit, and its curators have planned a meeting to
"figure out how we can make this a truly special visit into your past at our
Museum." There is a possibility that Vivian Mann, who curated the major
1980 exhibition at the Museum "Danzig 1939: Treasures of a Destroyed
Community" (for which there is a published catalog), will lead our tour --
or, if she is unable, one of the other chief curators will. The Museum is
also checking what information it has associating objects with particular
families, which might enable you to know that certain objects were used by
your relatives (genealogical information that our SIG uncovers by then might
also be useful in this regard).

To help plan the tour, I would appreciate your writing to me privately with
the following information (none of which is binding), if you might join the
tour:

1) What date/time would you prefer for the tour? We might be able to
arrange more than one tour, to try to accomodate everyone. Possibilities
are:

Thursday: The tour could begin 11 AM - 6:45 PM. An evening tour would not
conflict with the IAJGS Conference lectures. I do not know whether it would
conflict with the Gala banquet, though (the keynote for the banquet is
listed as occuring 8 PM - 9 PM).

Monday-Wednesday: The tour could begin 11 AM - 4:30 PM. This would conflict
with the IAJGS Conference schedule (though some of you might wish to miss
Conference sessions to go on the tour).

Friday: The tour could begin 11 AM - 2 PM. Towards the end of this time
would not conflict with the IAJGS Conference schedule.

2) How many people (including yourself) would you be bringing on the tour?

3) Would you or anyone you would be bringing have any accessibility needs?

4) If the tour were Thursday evening, would you be interested in going out
to dinner with the group afterwards? (This would be outside the Conference
and separate >from a SIG meeting -- not a SIG lunch -- during the Conference,
which I am also trying to arrange.)

5) Do you already know that certain objects at the Museum were associated
with your family? If so, please send me the details.


Thanks very much and best regards,

Logan Kleinwaks
Coordinator, JewishGen Danzig/Gdansk SIG
kleinwaks@...
near Washington, D.C.


Danzig/Gedansk SIG #Danzig #Gdansk #Germany #Poland Danzig tour in NY - RSVP #danzig #gdansk #germany #poland

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

Dear SIG members,

If you will be in New York during August 14-18, regardless of whether you
will be attending the IAJGS Conference during that period, please read this
message and respond privately to me with the requested information as soon
as you can.

As you may know, the Jewish community of Danzig shipped its precious ritual
objects and other valuables to New York in 1939, and, in exchange, received
money to finance the escape of its remaining members. This important
collection of objects >from Danzig is now housed at The Jewish Museum in New
York.

Since some of us will be gathering in New York for the IAJGS Conference, it
seemed to me this would be an ideal opportunity to arrange a tour of these
objects for the Danzig SIG. I have been corresponding with the Museum about
this, and have received wonderful cooperation. The Museum is very
enthusiastic about our visit, and its curators have planned a meeting to
"figure out how we can make this a truly special visit into your past at our
Museum." There is a possibility that Vivian Mann, who curated the major
1980 exhibition at the Museum "Danzig 1939: Treasures of a Destroyed
Community" (for which there is a published catalog), will lead our tour --
or, if she is unable, one of the other chief curators will. The Museum is
also checking what information it has associating objects with particular
families, which might enable you to know that certain objects were used by
your relatives (genealogical information that our SIG uncovers by then might
also be useful in this regard).

To help plan the tour, I would appreciate your writing to me privately with
the following information (none of which is binding), if you might join the
tour:

1) What date/time would you prefer for the tour? We might be able to
arrange more than one tour, to try to accomodate everyone. Possibilities
are:

Thursday: The tour could begin 11 AM - 6:45 PM. An evening tour would not
conflict with the IAJGS Conference lectures. I do not know whether it would
conflict with the Gala banquet, though (the keynote for the banquet is
listed as occuring 8 PM - 9 PM).

Monday-Wednesday: The tour could begin 11 AM - 4:30 PM. This would conflict
with the IAJGS Conference schedule (though some of you might wish to miss
Conference sessions to go on the tour).

Friday: The tour could begin 11 AM - 2 PM. Towards the end of this time
would not conflict with the IAJGS Conference schedule.

2) How many people (including yourself) would you be bringing on the tour?

3) Would you or anyone you would be bringing have any accessibility needs?

4) If the tour were Thursday evening, would you be interested in going out
to dinner with the group afterwards? (This would be outside the Conference
and separate >from a SIG meeting -- not a SIG lunch -- during the Conference,
which I am also trying to arrange.)

5) Do you already know that certain objects at the Museum were associated
with your family? If so, please send me the details.


Thanks very much and best regards,

Logan Kleinwaks
Coordinator, JewishGen Danzig/Gdansk SIG
kleinwaks@...
near Washington, D.C.


Re: applying for reparations from the German govenment #general

Chloe2000@...
 

Hi everyone. I have a question regarding the process by which an
individual applies for reparations >from the German goverment. Has
anyone gone through this process? I have a relative that applied back
in 1990. She is now deceased, but apparently a notice related to her
claim was posted in the federal gazette in Germany this past January
2006. Her heirs are interested in pursuing this claim, but are at a
loss as to where they need to begin. It seems that there has been some
movement on the claim as they placed a public notice about it probably
as a result of not being able to reach the original applicant or her
family.

If anyone can offer any advice as to how to proceed, please let me
know. It will be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

Jill Newmark (NEWMARK, Poland; GANS, Hebenshausen, Germany; ULLMANN,
Sprendlingen, Hesse, Darmstadt; GUTTENBERG, Ermreuth, Bavaria;
FEINGOLD, Odessa and Kaminents-Podilskiy, Ukarine; LEPOWITZ, Przemsyl, Poland)

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen re: applying for reparations from the German govenment #general

Chloe2000@...
 

Hi everyone. I have a question regarding the process by which an
individual applies for reparations >from the German goverment. Has
anyone gone through this process? I have a relative that applied back
in 1990. She is now deceased, but apparently a notice related to her
claim was posted in the federal gazette in Germany this past January
2006. Her heirs are interested in pursuing this claim, but are at a
loss as to where they need to begin. It seems that there has been some
movement on the claim as they placed a public notice about it probably
as a result of not being able to reach the original applicant or her
family.

If anyone can offer any advice as to how to proceed, please let me
know. It will be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

Jill Newmark (NEWMARK, Poland; GANS, Hebenshausen, Germany; ULLMANN,
Sprendlingen, Hesse, Darmstadt; GUTTENBERG, Ermreuth, Bavaria;
FEINGOLD, Odessa and Kaminents-Podilskiy, Ukarine; LEPOWITZ, Przemsyl, Poland)

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately.


Re: Name derivation #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Fri, 3 Mar 2006 20:20:25 UTC, rpgersh@... (Rochelle
Gershenow) opined:

A fellow researcher, using Beider's book, just provided me with information
on the surname PURINSON. "The Purinson name is one of many variant names
derived >from the feminine personal name 'Tsipora' with the meaning 'son of
Tsipora.' Other similar names derived in the same path include 'Purevich',
'Puris', 'Purovich', and ' Purisman'." This is the first I have heard about
a surname being derived >from the mother's first name rather than >from the
father's first name. Is this unusual? Is there another explanation such as
no one knew who the father was?

Rochelle Gershenow
Potomac, MD
There is certainly nothing unusual about it. Consider the following,
all in a single pattern:

Peskin(d) Pessie's kind
Rivkin(d) Rivka's kind
Suskin(d) Sussie's kind
Sorkin(d) Sora's kind

And others of the same ilk. There are other patterns, this is the one
that pops into my head at the moment.

If you wonder how this comes about, I can tell you that in my extended
family there were, when I was a child, two other boys with whom I
shared a given name. When my various aunts chattered, they had to
distinguish which of us they were speaking about -- I was "Stan
Eva's", even when they were speaking English. In Yiddish, that could
easily turn into a surname, and you can see, if you consult the
Montgomery County telephone directory that you have, it often did.

No, you can't draw any conclusions about "nobody knew who the father
was". Bite your tongue.

The fact that somebody had such a surname doesn't mean that he didn't
use a real patronymic to use as a part of his Hebrew name. If there is
a deceased person in your family with a surname such as you describe,
you might check his matzeva, where his Hebrew name should appear
complete with conventional patronymic.

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the
URL is: http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address
is not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the
URL above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email
form there.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Name derivation #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Fri, 3 Mar 2006 20:20:25 UTC, rpgersh@... (Rochelle
Gershenow) opined:

A fellow researcher, using Beider's book, just provided me with information
on the surname PURINSON. "The Purinson name is one of many variant names
derived >from the feminine personal name 'Tsipora' with the meaning 'son of
Tsipora.' Other similar names derived in the same path include 'Purevich',
'Puris', 'Purovich', and ' Purisman'." This is the first I have heard about
a surname being derived >from the mother's first name rather than >from the
father's first name. Is this unusual? Is there another explanation such as
no one knew who the father was?

Rochelle Gershenow
Potomac, MD
There is certainly nothing unusual about it. Consider the following,
all in a single pattern:

Peskin(d) Pessie's kind
Rivkin(d) Rivka's kind
Suskin(d) Sussie's kind
Sorkin(d) Sora's kind

And others of the same ilk. There are other patterns, this is the one
that pops into my head at the moment.

If you wonder how this comes about, I can tell you that in my extended
family there were, when I was a child, two other boys with whom I
shared a given name. When my various aunts chattered, they had to
distinguish which of us they were speaking about -- I was "Stan
Eva's", even when they were speaking English. In Yiddish, that could
easily turn into a surname, and you can see, if you consult the
Montgomery County telephone directory that you have, it often did.

No, you can't draw any conclusions about "nobody knew who the father
was". Bite your tongue.

The fact that somebody had such a surname doesn't mean that he didn't
use a real patronymic to use as a part of his Hebrew name. If there is
a deceased person in your family with a surname such as you describe,
you might check his matzeva, where his Hebrew name should appear
complete with conventional patronymic.

--
Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the
URL is: http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address
is not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the
URL above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email
form there.