Date   

Yizkor Book Project Report for february 2006 #latvia

Joyce Field
 

For the month of February 2006 nine updates, four new entries, and
one new book went online at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html.

All the new material has flags in the index for easy identification.

New book:

-Rietavas, Lithuania

Updates:

-Chelm, Poland
-Czestochowa, Poland
-Ilya, Belarus
-Kalusz, Ukraine
-Novogrudok, Belarus
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Sosnowiec, Poland
-Svencionys,Lithuania
-Zloczew, Poland

-New entries:

-Branszczyk, Poland: Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, vol. 4
-Brest, Belarus: Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, vol. 5
-Kostopil, Ukraine: Pinkas HaKehillot, vol. 5
-Zaliztsi, Ukraine: Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, vol. 2

Many yizkor books are being translated by professional translators
paid by donations to the project fund. Donations to support these
worthy projects can be made at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23.
Please also consider a donation to the JewishGen General Fund to
support the infrastructure for all online projects.

To start a translation project of a yizkor book of your ancestral
town, please contact me privately.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Yizkor Book Project Report for february 2006 #scandinavia

Joyce Field
 

For the month of February 2006 nine updates, four new entries, and
one new book went online at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html.

All the new material has flags in the index for easy identification.

New book:

-Rietavas, Lithuania

Updates:

-Chelm, Poland
-Czestochowa, Poland
-Ilya, Belarus
-Kalusz, Ukraine
-Novogrudok, Belarus
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Sosnowiec, Poland
-Svencionys,Lithuania
-Zloczew, Poland

-New entries:

-Branszczyk, Poland: Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, vol. 4
-Brest, Belarus: Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, vol. 5
-Kostopil, Ukraine: Pinkas HaKehillot, vol. 5
-Zaliztsi, Ukraine: Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, vol. 2

Many yizkor books are being translated by professional translators
paid by donations to the project fund. Donations to support these
worthy projects can be made at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23.
Please also consider a donation to the JewishGen General Fund to
support the infrastructure for all online projects.

To start a translation project of a yizkor book of your ancestral
town, please contact me privately.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Latvia SIG #Latvia Yizkor Book Project Report for february 2006 #latvia

Joyce Field
 

For the month of February 2006 nine updates, four new entries, and
one new book went online at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html.

All the new material has flags in the index for easy identification.

New book:

-Rietavas, Lithuania

Updates:

-Chelm, Poland
-Czestochowa, Poland
-Ilya, Belarus
-Kalusz, Ukraine
-Novogrudok, Belarus
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Sosnowiec, Poland
-Svencionys,Lithuania
-Zloczew, Poland

-New entries:

-Branszczyk, Poland: Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, vol. 4
-Brest, Belarus: Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, vol. 5
-Kostopil, Ukraine: Pinkas HaKehillot, vol. 5
-Zaliztsi, Ukraine: Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, vol. 2

Many yizkor books are being translated by professional translators
paid by donations to the project fund. Donations to support these
worthy projects can be made at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23.
Please also consider a donation to the JewishGen General Fund to
support the infrastructure for all online projects.

To start a translation project of a yizkor book of your ancestral
town, please contact me privately.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


Scandinavia SIG #Scandinavia Yizkor Book Project Report for february 2006 #scandinavia

Joyce Field
 

For the month of February 2006 nine updates, four new entries, and
one new book went online at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html.

All the new material has flags in the index for easy identification.

New book:

-Rietavas, Lithuania

Updates:

-Chelm, Poland
-Czestochowa, Poland
-Ilya, Belarus
-Kalusz, Ukraine
-Novogrudok, Belarus
-Nowy Sacz, Poland
-Sosnowiec, Poland
-Svencionys,Lithuania
-Zloczew, Poland

-New entries:

-Branszczyk, Poland: Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, vol. 4
-Brest, Belarus: Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, vol. 5
-Kostopil, Ukraine: Pinkas HaKehillot, vol. 5
-Zaliztsi, Ukraine: Pinkas HaKehillot Polin, vol. 2

Many yizkor books are being translated by professional translators
paid by donations to the project fund. Donations to support these
worthy projects can be made at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23.
Please also consider a donation to the JewishGen General Fund to
support the infrastructure for all online projects.

To start a translation project of a yizkor book of your ancestral
town, please contact me privately.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Data Acquisition


1912 Ostrowo Adress Book on Line #germany

Geoff Kaiser <geoff_kaiser@...>
 

Dear Researchers,

I have recently found an electronic version of the 1912 Address Book for
Ostrowo in Posen (now Ostrow Wielkopolski in Poland).

It is downloadable >from the Digital Library of Wielkopolski at:

http://www.wbc.poznan.pl/dlibra.

You will need to do a search using the term Ostrowo, it should be the first
item identified.

Like a previous item I notified these forums about, you need to download
some free software to read the documents. [Details are in the GerSIG Archives.]

The actual adress book is very good and has a series of fascinating business
advertisements at the back that reflect some of the larger business in
Ostrowo in that era. Regards

Geoff Kaiser Melbourne Australia <geoff_kaiser@...>


German SIG #Germany 1912 Ostrowo Adress Book on Line #germany

Geoff Kaiser <geoff_kaiser@...>
 

Dear Researchers,

I have recently found an electronic version of the 1912 Address Book for
Ostrowo in Posen (now Ostrow Wielkopolski in Poland).

It is downloadable >from the Digital Library of Wielkopolski at:

http://www.wbc.poznan.pl/dlibra.

You will need to do a search using the term Ostrowo, it should be the first
item identified.

Like a previous item I notified these forums about, you need to download
some free software to read the documents. [Details are in the GerSIG Archives.]

The actual adress book is very good and has a series of fascinating business
advertisements at the back that reflect some of the larger business in
Ostrowo in that era. Regards

Geoff Kaiser Melbourne Australia <geoff_kaiser@...>


Re: Urgent request from Yad Vashem #general

Cyndee Meystel <cmeys@...>
 

Very true. I found a page of testimony for a relative stating that he was a
Holocaust victim while living family members who knew him state that he died
in 1930 (and have the exact date of death and the yahrtzeit date).
--
Cyndee Meystel

"Tilford Bartman" < bartmant@... > wrote:

Hi,

Yes by all means let no holocaust victim be forgotten! But for the sake of
historical accuracy be sure when you list them to either include only
information that you are certain is true, or if your making assumptions
please label them as such. I found that in the pages of testimony >from my
families shtetl many people were listed as having died in Treblinka, but
this very, very likely only an assumption by the person who listed them,
and not something for which there was any evidence. There are a number of
other possibilities as where else and how else many of these people were
murdered other than at Treblinka. Also I found one prominent individual
from the town who was listed as having died in Treblinka but I know for a
fact that he was arrested by the Soviets in 1940 and died in Siberia. He
was not a Nazi holocaust victim at all. Keep in mind a need for truth and
accuracy.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Urgent request from Yad Vashem #general

Cyndee Meystel <cmeys@...>
 

Very true. I found a page of testimony for a relative stating that he was a
Holocaust victim while living family members who knew him state that he died
in 1930 (and have the exact date of death and the yahrtzeit date).
--
Cyndee Meystel

"Tilford Bartman" < bartmant@... > wrote:

Hi,

Yes by all means let no holocaust victim be forgotten! But for the sake of
historical accuracy be sure when you list them to either include only
information that you are certain is true, or if your making assumptions
please label them as such. I found that in the pages of testimony >from my
families shtetl many people were listed as having died in Treblinka, but
this very, very likely only an assumption by the person who listed them,
and not something for which there was any evidence. There are a number of
other possibilities as where else and how else many of these people were
murdered other than at Treblinka. Also I found one prominent individual
from the town who was listed as having died in Treblinka but I know for a
fact that he was arrested by the Soviets in 1940 and died in Siberia. He
was not a Nazi holocaust victim at all. Keep in mind a need for truth and
accuracy.


Re: Headstone Cleaning & Tracing Question #germany

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 3/2/2006 3:17:08 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
picturethisfilm@... writes:

Does anyone know how to remove graffiti >from old headstones? I'll be going
to the Illingen cemetery in a couple of months and I just read there's been
some vandalism and Nazi graffiti committed there recently. I'd like to try
to clean what I can.
== German authorities are very concerned with preserving Jewish relics and
protecting them >from vandals. I'd assume the damage has already been
corrected--or will be by the time you get there.

==I'd write to the First Burgermeister of Illingen, tell him you're coming,
express your sympathy over the vandalism and your appreciation to the town
for caring for the relics of your ancestors and their fellow-Jews. Ask if any
work still needs to be done to efface the vandalism, are there any cleaning
products you could bring with you >from the USA and tell him you'll be happy to
help out in any cleanup, repair or restoration.

==Before you leave home, prepare a CD with the trees of ancestors buried
there, and information about your family in Illingen and their destinies and
descendants.

==You'll probably get an invitation to visit him. Drop in on him, anyway,
to give him the disks. He'll probably go out of his way to get additional
information, photos, copies etc. for you.

Michael Bernet, New York


Surname mysteries: SILVERMAN variations #general

HeyJudy123@...
 

Linda SHEFLER poses a query about a family name.

SILVERMAN, as she explains it, may have been an invention by American
immigration officials.

Obviously, then, she needs to explore further the "sound-alikes." I have
friends named SILVERMAN whose name, in Poland, reportedly had been ZILBERMINZC.

As for her question as to whether some Ashkenazic Jews can trace their
origins to pre-Inquistion Sephardic Spain, there already has been a bit of
discussion on this forum as to this issue. In a word, the answer was yes.

I seem specifically to remember a correlation between the Sephardic name
SOUSA and certain "Ashkenazic" surnames, including--perhaps, if memory
serves--SUSANN.

And it was agreed, in these earlier discussions, that certain Sephardi, in
their long dispersion while fleeing the Inquisition, definitely made it as far
as the Grand Duchy of Lithuania.

Judy Segal
New York City


German SIG #Germany Re: Headstone Cleaning & Tracing Question #germany

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 3/2/2006 3:17:08 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
picturethisfilm@... writes:

Does anyone know how to remove graffiti >from old headstones? I'll be going
to the Illingen cemetery in a couple of months and I just read there's been
some vandalism and Nazi graffiti committed there recently. I'd like to try
to clean what I can.
== German authorities are very concerned with preserving Jewish relics and
protecting them >from vandals. I'd assume the damage has already been
corrected--or will be by the time you get there.

==I'd write to the First Burgermeister of Illingen, tell him you're coming,
express your sympathy over the vandalism and your appreciation to the town
for caring for the relics of your ancestors and their fellow-Jews. Ask if any
work still needs to be done to efface the vandalism, are there any cleaning
products you could bring with you >from the USA and tell him you'll be happy to
help out in any cleanup, repair or restoration.

==Before you leave home, prepare a CD with the trees of ancestors buried
there, and information about your family in Illingen and their destinies and
descendants.

==You'll probably get an invitation to visit him. Drop in on him, anyway,
to give him the disks. He'll probably go out of his way to get additional
information, photos, copies etc. for you.

Michael Bernet, New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Surname mysteries: SILVERMAN variations #general

HeyJudy123@...
 

Linda SHEFLER poses a query about a family name.

SILVERMAN, as she explains it, may have been an invention by American
immigration officials.

Obviously, then, she needs to explore further the "sound-alikes." I have
friends named SILVERMAN whose name, in Poland, reportedly had been ZILBERMINZC.

As for her question as to whether some Ashkenazic Jews can trace their
origins to pre-Inquistion Sephardic Spain, there already has been a bit of
discussion on this forum as to this issue. In a word, the answer was yes.

I seem specifically to remember a correlation between the Sephardic name
SOUSA and certain "Ashkenazic" surnames, including--perhaps, if memory
serves--SUSANN.

And it was agreed, in these earlier discussions, that certain Sephardi, in
their long dispersion while fleeing the Inquisition, definitely made it as far
as the Grand Duchy of Lithuania.

Judy Segal
New York City


my grandfather -- the almost spy #general

Todd Brody
 

In the 1950s, my grandfather travelled to the former
Soviet Union to participate in fur auctions. When my
brothers and I were kids, my grandfather used to tell
us how he was followed by the KGB on his way >from the
hotel to the synagogue in Leningrad.

On a lark, I decided to send a FOIA ("Freedom of
Information Act") request to the FBI and CIA to see if
they had any files on my grandfather. The letter took
about thirty minutes to write (there are sample FOIA
requests on the websites of both agencies) and the
total cost of the request was the price of a stamp.

Within a week I received my first letters >from the CIA
and FBI telling me that they were reviewing the
request and asking for additional information. (My
wife who saw the mail first said to me "oh my god
Todd, what are you doing now!" -- she isn't as
interested in family history as I am.

A few weeks ago a received a letter >from the CIA
saying that they had no files on my grandfather. So I
figured that this wasn't going to lead anywhere.
That's okay, I didn't really expect anything.

Yesterday, I got a big envelope >from the FBI, which
contained his whole case file, including interviews
with my grandfather (which discuss in detail his trips
to the Soviet Union) and evaluations as to whether he
might be able to serve as a "potential security
informant" or "double agent." The file reads like a
John Le Carre novel. Ultimately, the FBI decided that
he would not be a good spy because he didn't speak
enough Russian and was only in the Soviet Union for
2-3 weeks per year.

My grandfather died a couple of years ago so I
couldn't discuss this with him. My grandmother never
knew about his contact with the FBI -- or so she says!

Did this FOIA request get me any new genealogical
information? Not really. But it did provide a lot of
detail about a part of my grandfather's life that I
never really knew about. And it also refreshed my
grandmother's own memories, which is also helpful. So
I guess that the lesson >from all of this is that there
is a lot of interesting information in unexpected
places and all you need to do is ask.


Todd Brody
Englewood, NJ

Searching: BRAUDE (Telz, Alsiad, Plotel), GLASS (Sandomierz, Montreal),
ROSENBERG (Skaryszew, Montreal), GROSSER (Sieniawa, Przemysl, Jaroslaw), LAMM
(Sieniawa, Przemysl, Jaroslaw), FRANKFORT (Sieniawa), ARFA (Biezun, Zuromin,
Sierpc, Plock), MAJ ((Biezun, Zuromin, Sierpc, Plock).


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen my grandfather -- the almost spy #general

Todd Brody
 

In the 1950s, my grandfather travelled to the former
Soviet Union to participate in fur auctions. When my
brothers and I were kids, my grandfather used to tell
us how he was followed by the KGB on his way >from the
hotel to the synagogue in Leningrad.

On a lark, I decided to send a FOIA ("Freedom of
Information Act") request to the FBI and CIA to see if
they had any files on my grandfather. The letter took
about thirty minutes to write (there are sample FOIA
requests on the websites of both agencies) and the
total cost of the request was the price of a stamp.

Within a week I received my first letters >from the CIA
and FBI telling me that they were reviewing the
request and asking for additional information. (My
wife who saw the mail first said to me "oh my god
Todd, what are you doing now!" -- she isn't as
interested in family history as I am.

A few weeks ago a received a letter >from the CIA
saying that they had no files on my grandfather. So I
figured that this wasn't going to lead anywhere.
That's okay, I didn't really expect anything.

Yesterday, I got a big envelope >from the FBI, which
contained his whole case file, including interviews
with my grandfather (which discuss in detail his trips
to the Soviet Union) and evaluations as to whether he
might be able to serve as a "potential security
informant" or "double agent." The file reads like a
John Le Carre novel. Ultimately, the FBI decided that
he would not be a good spy because he didn't speak
enough Russian and was only in the Soviet Union for
2-3 weeks per year.

My grandfather died a couple of years ago so I
couldn't discuss this with him. My grandmother never
knew about his contact with the FBI -- or so she says!

Did this FOIA request get me any new genealogical
information? Not really. But it did provide a lot of
detail about a part of my grandfather's life that I
never really knew about. And it also refreshed my
grandmother's own memories, which is also helpful. So
I guess that the lesson >from all of this is that there
is a lot of interesting information in unexpected
places and all you need to do is ask.


Todd Brody
Englewood, NJ

Searching: BRAUDE (Telz, Alsiad, Plotel), GLASS (Sandomierz, Montreal),
ROSENBERG (Skaryszew, Montreal), GROSSER (Sieniawa, Przemysl, Jaroslaw), LAMM
(Sieniawa, Przemysl, Jaroslaw), FRANKFORT (Sieniawa), ARFA (Biezun, Zuromin,
Sierpc, Plock), MAJ ((Biezun, Zuromin, Sierpc, Plock).


Re: Hospital Records / Cause of Death - NYC #general

Ira Leviton
 

Dear Cousins,

Sue Jurisz asked (to paraphrase),

I found an e-mail in the Discussion Group archives that stated: 1)
Brooklyn Jewish Hospital is now part of the Interfaith Medical Center and
2) Medical records in New York are only kept for 50 years. Is this a hard
and fast rule? Should I call the hospital, or should I call the
Department of Health?

I answer

Yes, Brooklyn Jewish Hospital is now part of Interfaith. Note that
this was a different hospital than Kingsbrook Jewish, which still exists.

The law for retention of medical records in New York State is that they
are required to be kept for only *seven* years, not 50, except for
pediatric records, which have to be held either for seven years or until
the patient turns 18 (whichever is later). It is very unlikely that any
hospital keeps records much beyond 7 years, since they usually have to
store older records off site, and they have to pay for this storage.

It's even less likely that old hospital records still exist if the
hospital moved, as is the case with Brooklyn Jewish.

Nevertheless, sometimes medical records are kept for a long time, even
when the person is known to be deceased. In New York State this has
perhaps most notably been done by some mental/psychiatric hospitals, which
have held onto them for decades, for reasons that I can't fathom.

For individual records, the N.Y.C. Department of Health has only death
certificates (1949 and afterward), and medical examiner records (I'm not
sure when they start, but I believe it's the 1960's) for suspicious
deaths, accidents, suicides, poisonings, etc. Older death certificates
and medical examiner records are at the Municipal Archives. The
Department of Health does not have medical records of any individual.

Regarding the cause of death, the death certificate is frequently
inaccurate. Decades ago, potential reasons for this included the doctor
not knowing the cause of death at the time of death but still having to
state it, and the general ignorance of medicine compared to nowadays (many
diseases were nearly or completely unknown). Finally, there was laziness
with the paperwork -- this document was not very important to doctors, and
some causes of death were not "permitted" for statistical purposes. For
instance, in New York State a person is allowed to die of lobar pneumonia,
but not pneumonia. Many doctors used the same causes of death for nearly
all their patients so that they didn't have to redo the death certificate.

Ira
Ira Leviton
New York, N.Y.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Hospital Records / Cause of Death - NYC #general

Ira Leviton
 

Dear Cousins,

Sue Jurisz asked (to paraphrase),

I found an e-mail in the Discussion Group archives that stated: 1)
Brooklyn Jewish Hospital is now part of the Interfaith Medical Center and
2) Medical records in New York are only kept for 50 years. Is this a hard
and fast rule? Should I call the hospital, or should I call the
Department of Health?

I answer

Yes, Brooklyn Jewish Hospital is now part of Interfaith. Note that
this was a different hospital than Kingsbrook Jewish, which still exists.

The law for retention of medical records in New York State is that they
are required to be kept for only *seven* years, not 50, except for
pediatric records, which have to be held either for seven years or until
the patient turns 18 (whichever is later). It is very unlikely that any
hospital keeps records much beyond 7 years, since they usually have to
store older records off site, and they have to pay for this storage.

It's even less likely that old hospital records still exist if the
hospital moved, as is the case with Brooklyn Jewish.

Nevertheless, sometimes medical records are kept for a long time, even
when the person is known to be deceased. In New York State this has
perhaps most notably been done by some mental/psychiatric hospitals, which
have held onto them for decades, for reasons that I can't fathom.

For individual records, the N.Y.C. Department of Health has only death
certificates (1949 and afterward), and medical examiner records (I'm not
sure when they start, but I believe it's the 1960's) for suspicious
deaths, accidents, suicides, poisonings, etc. Older death certificates
and medical examiner records are at the Municipal Archives. The
Department of Health does not have medical records of any individual.

Regarding the cause of death, the death certificate is frequently
inaccurate. Decades ago, potential reasons for this included the doctor
not knowing the cause of death at the time of death but still having to
state it, and the general ignorance of medicine compared to nowadays (many
diseases were nearly or completely unknown). Finally, there was laziness
with the paperwork -- this document was not very important to doctors, and
some causes of death were not "permitted" for statistical purposes. For
instance, in New York State a person is allowed to die of lobar pneumonia,
but not pneumonia. Many doctors used the same causes of death for nearly
all their patients so that they didn't have to redo the death certificate.

Ira
Ira Leviton
New York, N.Y.


Mendlowitz - Hungary, Baltimore MD, McKeesport PA #general

Victoria Reed <researchtoldot@...>
 

Dear friends,

I am looking for the family of a Bessie MENDELOWITZ,
the daughter of Sandor Mendlowitz and Sarah BERKOWITZ.


Bessie was born in Hungary around 1899, but was
estranged >from her family when around 1918-19 she
married a Syrian, Harry (Hafez) ESAU. She and Harry
lived in Baltimore, MD at first, then moved to
McKeesport, PA.

I am specifically looking for any relatives on
Bessie's side of the family. The friend who has asked
me to do this does not want me to contact the Esau
side of the family, although I have information on all
of Bessie's children, some of whom are still alive.

He would like to know more about Bessie's parents, and
is hoping that we can find some living relatives,
perhaps the children or grandchildren of Bessie's
possible siblings, with whom he could be reunited.

I have found Bessie and Harry Esau in the 1930 census
(in McKeesport, PA) and in the 1920 census (surname
Eissa in Baltimore, newly married with their first
child), but I have not been able to find them on the
Baltimore, Philadelphia or NY passenger lists.

Bessie supposedly emigrated in 1903, so theoretically
she would have been traveling with her parents.

I have not been able to find Sandor and Sarah on any
of the census, and as I have moved >from SF to Folsom,
no longer have access to the city directories at the
Sutro Library.

I have checked the Hamburg database, but my research
seems to indicate that most passengers leaving Hungary
departed through Bremen.

If anyone is researching this family, or has any ideas
for me, I would appreciate it. I have emailed all the
Jewishgenners on the JGFF who are researching this
name.

Thank you!
Victoria Reed
Folsom, CA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Mendlowitz - Hungary, Baltimore MD, McKeesport PA #general

Victoria Reed <researchtoldot@...>
 

Dear friends,

I am looking for the family of a Bessie MENDELOWITZ,
the daughter of Sandor Mendlowitz and Sarah BERKOWITZ.


Bessie was born in Hungary around 1899, but was
estranged >from her family when around 1918-19 she
married a Syrian, Harry (Hafez) ESAU. She and Harry
lived in Baltimore, MD at first, then moved to
McKeesport, PA.

I am specifically looking for any relatives on
Bessie's side of the family. The friend who has asked
me to do this does not want me to contact the Esau
side of the family, although I have information on all
of Bessie's children, some of whom are still alive.

He would like to know more about Bessie's parents, and
is hoping that we can find some living relatives,
perhaps the children or grandchildren of Bessie's
possible siblings, with whom he could be reunited.

I have found Bessie and Harry Esau in the 1930 census
(in McKeesport, PA) and in the 1920 census (surname
Eissa in Baltimore, newly married with their first
child), but I have not been able to find them on the
Baltimore, Philadelphia or NY passenger lists.

Bessie supposedly emigrated in 1903, so theoretically
she would have been traveling with her parents.

I have not been able to find Sandor and Sarah on any
of the census, and as I have moved >from SF to Folsom,
no longer have access to the city directories at the
Sutro Library.

I have checked the Hamburg database, but my research
seems to indicate that most passengers leaving Hungary
departed through Bremen.

If anyone is researching this family, or has any ideas
for me, I would appreciate it. I have emailed all the
Jewishgenners on the JGFF who are researching this
name.

Thank you!
Victoria Reed
Folsom, CA


Re: LIEBMAN/LIPPMAN a kinnuy for Baruch #general

tom klein <jewishgen@...>
 

I think you are confusing two German/Yiddish words here.

"Lieb", pronounced leehb, is >from the same root as the English "love", while
"Leib" (note the spelling, also "loeb" etc.), pronounced lahyb, is >from the word
for "lion". The first occurs in names such as GOTTLIEB, or LIEBESKIND (or
LIEBMAN), which could be connected to "Baruch" (hebrew for "blessed"), while
the second was often used in association with the name Judah (often in
combinations of Judah/Arye/Leib), because of the biblical verse comparing the
tribe of Judah to a lion.

I think the similarities between "leib" and "levi" might have led people to
connect the two, but I would not automatically assume that any given "Leib" was
a levite.

While the connection between LIEBMAN and LIPPMANN is phonetically plausible,
LIPPMANN sounds suspiciously like an occupational name, but I wouldn't know
exactly what they did, and you would have to do more research into 18th century
middle franconia to find out.


....... Tom Klein, Toronto

Jeremy Goldbloom < j.goldbloom@... > wrote:

I was always told that the Lippmann name ( also Lieb, Loeb and Liebman) was a
derivative of Levi. My mother's branch originated >from the Gunzenhausen area
of Middle Franconia, Germany. There is a book "Our Lippmann Family" by the
late Kurt E.B. Lippmann, ISBN 0 646 27973 4 Melbourne 1995. Kurt wrote a lot
about the German Lippmanns going back to 1776. If any Lippmann descendant
thinks they might be related, try checking the Family Tree of the Jewish People
section on the Jewishgen website.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Re: LIEBMAN/LIPPMAN a kinnuy for Baruch #general

tom klein <jewishgen@...>
 

I think you are confusing two German/Yiddish words here.

"Lieb", pronounced leehb, is >from the same root as the English "love", while
"Leib" (note the spelling, also "loeb" etc.), pronounced lahyb, is >from the word
for "lion". The first occurs in names such as GOTTLIEB, or LIEBESKIND (or
LIEBMAN), which could be connected to "Baruch" (hebrew for "blessed"), while
the second was often used in association with the name Judah (often in
combinations of Judah/Arye/Leib), because of the biblical verse comparing the
tribe of Judah to a lion.

I think the similarities between "leib" and "levi" might have led people to
connect the two, but I would not automatically assume that any given "Leib" was
a levite.

While the connection between LIEBMAN and LIPPMANN is phonetically plausible,
LIPPMANN sounds suspiciously like an occupational name, but I wouldn't know
exactly what they did, and you would have to do more research into 18th century
middle franconia to find out.


....... Tom Klein, Toronto

Jeremy Goldbloom < j.goldbloom@... > wrote:

I was always told that the Lippmann name ( also Lieb, Loeb and Liebman) was a
derivative of Levi. My mother's branch originated >from the Gunzenhausen area
of Middle Franconia, Germany. There is a book "Our Lippmann Family" by the
late Kurt E.B. Lippmann, ISBN 0 646 27973 4 Melbourne 1995. Kurt wrote a lot
about the German Lippmanns going back to 1776. If any Lippmann descendant
thinks they might be related, try checking the Family Tree of the Jewish People
section on the Jewishgen website.