Date   

Mariupol marriages #ukraine

philapple@...
 

Can anyone tell me how, or even if it is possible, to obtain the record of a marriage that took place in Mariupol, in February 1894?

Phillip Applebaum
Oak Park, Michigan, USA


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Mariupol marriages #ukraine

philapple@...
 

Can anyone tell me how, or even if it is possible, to obtain the record of a marriage that took place in Mariupol, in February 1894?

Phillip Applebaum
Oak Park, Michigan, USA


Re: Seeking Pages of Testimony Remitter Miriam DUNKELBLUM #general

Big Al <asilberf@...>
 

Eli Savada wrote "I believe this is Jozef Hirsch Sternberg who married
Chaja Sara Korngold in Krakow in 1913. Chaja's mother's name was Hanna Rywka
DUNKELBLUM. I have recently located remnants of this Korngold branch
in the United States."

I do not know the connection, but I am the third great grandson of Szeindel
Korngold who married Aaron Pinkus Horowicz in Kazimiers, about 1790. I have
some Dunkelblums, including Hanna Rywka Dunkelblum, the daughter of Shimon
Dunkelblum and Feigel Zucker in my database. I am not a blood relative of Hanna
Rywka Dunkelblum but I would like to correspond regarding a possible connection
to the family in the United States. Please reply privately.

Alfred M. Silberfeld,
President Emeritus
Jewish Genealogical Society of
Palm Beach County Inc. Florida.
my email address is asilberf@...

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Seeking Pages of Testimony Remitter Miriam DUNKELBLUM #general

Big Al <asilberf@...>
 

Eli Savada wrote "I believe this is Jozef Hirsch Sternberg who married
Chaja Sara Korngold in Krakow in 1913. Chaja's mother's name was Hanna Rywka
DUNKELBLUM. I have recently located remnants of this Korngold branch
in the United States."

I do not know the connection, but I am the third great grandson of Szeindel
Korngold who married Aaron Pinkus Horowicz in Kazimiers, about 1790. I have
some Dunkelblums, including Hanna Rywka Dunkelblum, the daughter of Shimon
Dunkelblum and Feigel Zucker in my database. I am not a blood relative of Hanna
Rywka Dunkelblum but I would like to correspond regarding a possible connection
to the family in the United States. Please reply privately.

Alfred M. Silberfeld,
President Emeritus
Jewish Genealogical Society of
Palm Beach County Inc. Florida.
my email address is asilberf@...

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately.


Re: the Brilling Collections and The Jewish Museum, Frankfurt #germany

Roger Lustig <trovato@...>
 

Rabbi Dr. Bernhard Brilling's legacy is much of what makes our work
possible. As a young man, he wished to devote his life to studying and
documenting the history of German Jewry, especially that of the eastern
parts. Specifically, he wished to be a Jewish archivist. To this end,
he became a rabbi. He emigrated to Palestine in 1939. In the 1950's he
returned to Germany, received a doctorate, and spent the rest of his
life near the sources of his research.

Those of you who have worked with the "Gatermann" LDS films (numbered
1184377-1184461, covering Germany east of the Oder-Neisse line,
primarily synagogue records and transcriptions of civil records) may
have come across Brilling's name and even his handwriting, for several
of the filmed items are referred to as coming >from his collection, or
having been transcribed by him for the Breslau Jewish archive, where he worked.

Others may know his indispensible _Die juedischen Gemeinden
Mittelschlesiens: Enststehung und Geschichte_ (Stuttgart, etc.: 1972) or
his work on the Jews of the Rheinland. (He lived in Muenster in his later years.)

A short biography in German is available at:
http://juedischesmuseum.de/einrichtungen/brilling.html

A better photo of Dr. Brilling than the one at that site (taken about
the same time, by my father) is available >from me.

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ <trovato@...>

Rosl Reuther, Coburg <gundr.reuther@...> wrote:
At the Jewish Museum of Frankfurt there is the Dr. Brilling - collection.
I don't know what it is about. But after having mentioned the Jewish Museum in
an e-amil I was asked by a Gersigger for [more information about] this.
For her I contacted the museum. [For more information] >from there, here is the
address of Mr. Lenarz: michael.lenarz@...


German SIG #Germany Re: the Brilling Collections and The Jewish Museum, Frankfurt #germany

Roger Lustig <trovato@...>
 

Rabbi Dr. Bernhard Brilling's legacy is much of what makes our work
possible. As a young man, he wished to devote his life to studying and
documenting the history of German Jewry, especially that of the eastern
parts. Specifically, he wished to be a Jewish archivist. To this end,
he became a rabbi. He emigrated to Palestine in 1939. In the 1950's he
returned to Germany, received a doctorate, and spent the rest of his
life near the sources of his research.

Those of you who have worked with the "Gatermann" LDS films (numbered
1184377-1184461, covering Germany east of the Oder-Neisse line,
primarily synagogue records and transcriptions of civil records) may
have come across Brilling's name and even his handwriting, for several
of the filmed items are referred to as coming >from his collection, or
having been transcribed by him for the Breslau Jewish archive, where he worked.

Others may know his indispensible _Die juedischen Gemeinden
Mittelschlesiens: Enststehung und Geschichte_ (Stuttgart, etc.: 1972) or
his work on the Jews of the Rheinland. (He lived in Muenster in his later years.)

A short biography in German is available at:
http://juedischesmuseum.de/einrichtungen/brilling.html

A better photo of Dr. Brilling than the one at that site (taken about
the same time, by my father) is available >from me.

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ <trovato@...>

Rosl Reuther, Coburg <gundr.reuther@...> wrote:
At the Jewish Museum of Frankfurt there is the Dr. Brilling - collection.
I don't know what it is about. But after having mentioned the Jewish Museum in
an e-amil I was asked by a Gersigger for [more information about] this.
For her I contacted the museum. [For more information] >from there, here is the
address of Mr. Lenarz: michael.lenarz@...


Re: GWIAZDOWSKI/STERN {was "name changes"} #general

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Evelyn Palmer asked: <My mother's maiden name was GWIAZDOWSKI , .... when she
arrived in Canada in 1920. When her brother Julius arrived the next year his
surname was STERN. They both have same parents.

... when her ggrandfather came >from Silesia to the Zdunska Wola - Lodz area his
name was Balzer STERN and he changed the name to GWIAZDOWSKI. This would have
been around the 1820's. What would prompt him to change his name then? ... Also
is the name STERN a Jewish name or German?">

Dr Josef Ash and Roger Lustig have already told us helpfully that Gwiazda is the
Polish for star {STERN in German].

I would like to add that STERN is perceived as both a German and a Jewish name
and people changed their name >from STERN to meld into their local communities.

I maintain a "name-change list" which I find one of my useful genealogical
tools. It grows daily. There was a large wave of Hungarification of German
{and Jewish -whatever they can be defined as} surnames. STERN was a prime
candidate. Few will not have heard of the great conductor Georg Solti - he was
born Gyorgy STERN - http://www.georgsolti.com/main.html

I know of a Hungarian CSILLAG family who were at school with me in Alexandria,
Egypt. They were also originally STERN. Prof. Jules Levin kindly sent me this
valuable on-line translation tool:

http://www.multilingualbooks.com/onlinedicts.html

there you can confirm for yourselves that CSILLAG is Hungarian for STAR which
is English for STERN. There are two other words listed: CSILLAGZAT and SZTAR.

The RadixIndex http://www.radixindex.com/ maintains a section for subscribers
only: "Surname changes in Hungary 1800-1893". There are hits for STERN which I
cannot access; here you may find other variants.

Fast forward to Yad Vashem {online} and sadly you will find very many CSILLAG,
SZILAGY and STARY victims we remember here today. There are also 21 SOLTI - but
I think this is a "made-up" name.

So this particular name-change was a general phenomenon. I expect there are
English/US/Canadian etc STAR or STARR families who were originally STERN or
variants.

Celia Male [U.K.]

MODERATOR NOTE: The Radixindex is a fee-based subscription database and
qualifies for a one-time only mention.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: GWIAZDOWSKI/STERN {was "name changes"} #general

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Evelyn Palmer asked: <My mother's maiden name was GWIAZDOWSKI , .... when she
arrived in Canada in 1920. When her brother Julius arrived the next year his
surname was STERN. They both have same parents.

... when her ggrandfather came >from Silesia to the Zdunska Wola - Lodz area his
name was Balzer STERN and he changed the name to GWIAZDOWSKI. This would have
been around the 1820's. What would prompt him to change his name then? ... Also
is the name STERN a Jewish name or German?">

Dr Josef Ash and Roger Lustig have already told us helpfully that Gwiazda is the
Polish for star {STERN in German].

I would like to add that STERN is perceived as both a German and a Jewish name
and people changed their name >from STERN to meld into their local communities.

I maintain a "name-change list" which I find one of my useful genealogical
tools. It grows daily. There was a large wave of Hungarification of German
{and Jewish -whatever they can be defined as} surnames. STERN was a prime
candidate. Few will not have heard of the great conductor Georg Solti - he was
born Gyorgy STERN - http://www.georgsolti.com/main.html

I know of a Hungarian CSILLAG family who were at school with me in Alexandria,
Egypt. They were also originally STERN. Prof. Jules Levin kindly sent me this
valuable on-line translation tool:

http://www.multilingualbooks.com/onlinedicts.html

there you can confirm for yourselves that CSILLAG is Hungarian for STAR which
is English for STERN. There are two other words listed: CSILLAGZAT and SZTAR.

The RadixIndex http://www.radixindex.com/ maintains a section for subscribers
only: "Surname changes in Hungary 1800-1893". There are hits for STERN which I
cannot access; here you may find other variants.

Fast forward to Yad Vashem {online} and sadly you will find very many CSILLAG,
SZILAGY and STARY victims we remember here today. There are also 21 SOLTI - but
I think this is a "made-up" name.

So this particular name-change was a general phenomenon. I expect there are
English/US/Canadian etc STAR or STARR families who were originally STERN or
variants.

Celia Male [U.K.]

MODERATOR NOTE: The Radixindex is a fee-based subscription database and
qualifies for a one-time only mention.


Hans Peter Grab <hpgrab@...>
 

Dear Genners,

Please take a look at the list of family names at the bottom of the page at
http://www.grab-family.com.

Perhaps someone can help me.

Thank you in advance for your help.

Hanus Grab


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Tree #austria-czech

Hans Peter Grab <hpgrab@...>
 

Dear Genners,

Please take a look at the list of family names at the bottom of the page at
http://www.grab-family.com.

Perhaps someone can help me.

Thank you in advance for your help.

Hanus Grab


Hermann SPEIER {of Jaslo} receives permission to marry -1857 #poland

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

We recently had a query here about wedding banns.
An item has just come up on an internet auction which
illustrates the procedure.

It is a licence to marry dated 17. February 1857, at
Jaslo and stamped with a 15 kr. seal and two District
seals of the K.K. Jasloer District Office. The text
states: As the Jew Herman SPEIER satisfactorarily
passed all the necessary religious and other required
customary tests in Vienna on 22 December 1856, he
hereby receives permission to marry.

Signed on behalf of the K.K. District authorities
[signature illegible].

My thanks as alway to Eric Elias, a co-Sigger on
Austria-Czech, for alerting me to this.

For details of Jaslo see:
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/krosno/krosnojaslo.htm

Celia Male [U.K.]

Footnote: the direct link to this item is given here -
http://tinyurl.com/ql9jt


JRI Poland #Poland Hermann SPEIER {of Jaslo} receives permission to marry -1857 #poland

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

We recently had a query here about wedding banns.
An item has just come up on an internet auction which
illustrates the procedure.

It is a licence to marry dated 17. February 1857, at
Jaslo and stamped with a 15 kr. seal and two District
seals of the K.K. Jasloer District Office. The text
states: As the Jew Herman SPEIER satisfactorarily
passed all the necessary religious and other required
customary tests in Vienna on 22 December 1856, he
hereby receives permission to marry.

Signed on behalf of the K.K. District authorities
[signature illegible].

My thanks as alway to Eric Elias, a co-Sigger on
Austria-Czech, for alerting me to this.

For details of Jaslo see:
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/krosno/krosnojaslo.htm

Celia Male [U.K.]

Footnote: the direct link to this item is given here -
http://tinyurl.com/ql9jt


Mariampole Gymnasia Jubilee Book available #lithuania

Susan Goldsmith
 

Dear SIG,
The well-known auction site offers Mariampole Gymnasia Jubilee Book:
The First Jewish Gymnasia in Lita and Diaspora. It is found under a
search for Lita Jewish; it does not appear when searching under Lithuania.
The book has many photos, documents, articles by Avraham Tory, Baruch Ben
Yehuda and others.

Best Regards,
Susan Goldsmith
SF Bay Area


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Mariampole Gymnasia Jubilee Book available #lithuania

Susan Goldsmith
 

Dear SIG,
The well-known auction site offers Mariampole Gymnasia Jubilee Book:
The First Jewish Gymnasia in Lita and Diaspora. It is found under a
search for Lita Jewish; it does not appear when searching under Lithuania.
The book has many photos, documents, articles by Avraham Tory, Baruch Ben
Yehuda and others.

Best Regards,
Susan Goldsmith
SF Bay Area


Where are early BDM records from Danzig? #danzig #gdansk #germany #poland

Rodney Eisfelder <eisfelder@...>
 

My connection to Danzig is that my gg-gm Mathilda (known as Johanna)
WUNDERMACHER was born there around 1825.

I have looked at one microfilm including records >from Danzig,
corresponding to FHL film 1184410 Items 1-3. This contained two
lists of Jewish citizens, one of them supposedly >from 1814 (but
typed, presumably at a later date), and a list of burials.

The typed list entries includes a sequential number, the new name
(including surname) and the "old" name with patronymn (which is
typically the same as the new name, but without the surname). Only
heads of families are listed. There are no dates or places of birth.

The second list of citizens seemed to be undated, but I think its
origins are a little later than the typed list.
It contains just the new name and a number (which differs >from the
number in the typed list). Again, only heads of families are listed.

The number is probably a cross reference to the original name
adoptions list (which I haven't seen), which might give some
more information.

The typed list contained only one WUNDERMACHER - Hirsch Pincus
Wundermacher, who was an uncle of my ancestor Johanna W.

The second list has two WUNDERMACHERs - in addition to Hirsch Pincus
W, my ggg-gf Itzig Pincus Wundermacher appears with the notation
"anhang 1" (ie appendix 1) (This is why I think it is later than the
source of the typed list).

I found about 10 members of the WUNDERMACHER family listed in the
burials, with dates >from 1833 to 1870. This has raised almost as
many questions form me as it answered.

Now we get to my questions:
Where can one find birth, death and marriage records >from Danzig
for the period >from 1814 to about 1840?

For what it is worth, the WUNDERMACHER family came to Danzig
from Flatow (now known as Zlotow). Both Hirsch and Itzig appear
in Flatow's 1812 citizenship list with their mother.
Itzig Pincus WUNDERMACHER left Danzig sometime between 1833
and 1853 for Koenigsberg, but some of his brother's descendants
remained in Danzig until at least 1887.

Rodney Eisfelder
Melbourne, Australia
<eisfelder@...>


Keidan: Chapter 2 #lithuania

Olga Zabludoff <ozabludoff@...>
 

On Friday I distributed the complete set of translated Keidan birth
records to qualified donors. The file consists of 50 years of records
totaling 4,262 registered births which span the years 1822-1914.
This translation effort was accomplished in less than a year.

Without a moment's break our dedicated translator is already producing
marriage records. Keidan has a large number of surviving vital records
for the medium-sized shtetl it was. I estimate that the translation of
marriage, divorce and death records will continue for another two
years. It will continue as long as we have the funds to pay our
translator. All related work in this project is voluntary.

Like other 19th-century Russian-Jewish vital records, Keidan has its
share of documents with missing surnames--120 out of 4,262 birth
records. These no-surname entries occur mainly during the 1850s
and 1860s before the use of surnames became uniformly conventional.
Hoping there might be a way to fish out the missing surnames >from other
records in the database, I contacted the ingenious Steve Morse about
this challenge. He came back with a suggested method of sorting the
files, but so far we have not had hits.

Meanwhile Jose Gutstein's imagination was triggered. He has developed
a series of variously sorted files that display the records in a unique
manner. Much like wearing night-vision goggles to discover invisible
images, you can suddenly see connections in the records which you
never saw before. All new contributors to the Keidan Vital Records
project will receive these additional sorted files with a minimum donation
of $100.

Once you become a member of the Keidan VRI group, you remain a
member for the life of the project. Please support this promising
effort as we begin Chapter 2.

Visit the LitvakSIG Vital Records Indexing Project website for status
reports and to download the VRI donor form:

http://mysite.verizon.net/vzeol99x/

Olga Zabludoff
Kedainiai VRI coordinator


Danzig/Gedansk SIG #Danzig #Gdansk #Germany #Poland Where are early BDM records from Danzig? #danzig #gdansk #germany #poland

Rodney Eisfelder <eisfelder@...>
 

My connection to Danzig is that my gg-gm Mathilda (known as Johanna)
WUNDERMACHER was born there around 1825.

I have looked at one microfilm including records >from Danzig,
corresponding to FHL film 1184410 Items 1-3. This contained two
lists of Jewish citizens, one of them supposedly >from 1814 (but
typed, presumably at a later date), and a list of burials.

The typed list entries includes a sequential number, the new name
(including surname) and the "old" name with patronymn (which is
typically the same as the new name, but without the surname). Only
heads of families are listed. There are no dates or places of birth.

The second list of citizens seemed to be undated, but I think its
origins are a little later than the typed list.
It contains just the new name and a number (which differs >from the
number in the typed list). Again, only heads of families are listed.

The number is probably a cross reference to the original name
adoptions list (which I haven't seen), which might give some
more information.

The typed list contained only one WUNDERMACHER - Hirsch Pincus
Wundermacher, who was an uncle of my ancestor Johanna W.

The second list has two WUNDERMACHERs - in addition to Hirsch Pincus
W, my ggg-gf Itzig Pincus Wundermacher appears with the notation
"anhang 1" (ie appendix 1) (This is why I think it is later than the
source of the typed list).

I found about 10 members of the WUNDERMACHER family listed in the
burials, with dates >from 1833 to 1870. This has raised almost as
many questions form me as it answered.

Now we get to my questions:
Where can one find birth, death and marriage records >from Danzig
for the period >from 1814 to about 1840?

For what it is worth, the WUNDERMACHER family came to Danzig
from Flatow (now known as Zlotow). Both Hirsch and Itzig appear
in Flatow's 1812 citizenship list with their mother.
Itzig Pincus WUNDERMACHER left Danzig sometime between 1833
and 1853 for Koenigsberg, but some of his brother's descendants
remained in Danzig until at least 1887.

Rodney Eisfelder
Melbourne, Australia
<eisfelder@...>


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Keidan: Chapter 2 #lithuania

Olga Zabludoff <ozabludoff@...>
 

On Friday I distributed the complete set of translated Keidan birth
records to qualified donors. The file consists of 50 years of records
totaling 4,262 registered births which span the years 1822-1914.
This translation effort was accomplished in less than a year.

Without a moment's break our dedicated translator is already producing
marriage records. Keidan has a large number of surviving vital records
for the medium-sized shtetl it was. I estimate that the translation of
marriage, divorce and death records will continue for another two
years. It will continue as long as we have the funds to pay our
translator. All related work in this project is voluntary.

Like other 19th-century Russian-Jewish vital records, Keidan has its
share of documents with missing surnames--120 out of 4,262 birth
records. These no-surname entries occur mainly during the 1850s
and 1860s before the use of surnames became uniformly conventional.
Hoping there might be a way to fish out the missing surnames >from other
records in the database, I contacted the ingenious Steve Morse about
this challenge. He came back with a suggested method of sorting the
files, but so far we have not had hits.

Meanwhile Jose Gutstein's imagination was triggered. He has developed
a series of variously sorted files that display the records in a unique
manner. Much like wearing night-vision goggles to discover invisible
images, you can suddenly see connections in the records which you
never saw before. All new contributors to the Keidan Vital Records
project will receive these additional sorted files with a minimum donation
of $100.

Once you become a member of the Keidan VRI group, you remain a
member for the life of the project. Please support this promising
effort as we begin Chapter 2.

Visit the LitvakSIG Vital Records Indexing Project website for status
reports and to download the VRI donor form:

http://mysite.verizon.net/vzeol99x/

Olga Zabludoff
Kedainiai VRI coordinator


Vri records distribution - Raseiniai #lithuania

Joel Ratner
 

The VRI project is pleased to announce the translations of vital records
for the town of Raseiniai have been distributed to qualified donors. These
translations encompass birth, marriage and death records for the years
1844 and 1845.

New researchers interested in the Raseiniai vital records who have not
contributed yet may do so by using the online donor form which can be
downloaded. A donor qualifies to receive the translations with a $100
minimum donation. The VRI web site can be found at
http://mysite.verizon.net/vzeol99x/ .


Joel Ratner


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Vri records distribution - Raseiniai #lithuania

Joel Ratner
 

The VRI project is pleased to announce the translations of vital records
for the town of Raseiniai have been distributed to qualified donors. These
translations encompass birth, marriage and death records for the years
1844 and 1845.

New researchers interested in the Raseiniai vital records who have not
contributed yet may do so by using the online donor form which can be
downloaded. A donor qualifies to receive the translations with a $100
minimum donation. The VRI web site can be found at
http://mysite.verizon.net/vzeol99x/ .


Joel Ratner