Date   

Odessa surnames #general

Matzoball48@...
 

I am looking for several surnames. My father's father was >from Odessa when
they came to New York the surname was SPIELER. I was told in Odessa it was a
different surname. How can I research this? I am also looking for my father's
mother's family. They also came >from Odessa and their last name was
FASTOFSKY. I am looking for my mother's father's family the last name is
WILANSKY.
I am not sure where they came >from I think it was Belarus. I am also looking
for my mother's mother's family the last name was BERGER but I am not sure
where they came from.
Thankyou Tamar Hollander
_matzoball48@aol.com_ (mailto:matzoball48@aol.com)

MODERATOR NOTE: Chances of success in your research will be greatly
enhanced if you register the name(s) you are searching for in
the JewishGen Family Finder. Go to www.jewishgen.org/jgff


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Odessa surnames #general

Matzoball48@...
 

I am looking for several surnames. My father's father was >from Odessa when
they came to New York the surname was SPIELER. I was told in Odessa it was a
different surname. How can I research this? I am also looking for my father's
mother's family. They also came >from Odessa and their last name was
FASTOFSKY. I am looking for my mother's father's family the last name is
WILANSKY.
I am not sure where they came >from I think it was Belarus. I am also looking
for my mother's mother's family the last name was BERGER but I am not sure
where they came from.
Thankyou Tamar Hollander
_matzoball48@aol.com_ (mailto:matzoball48@aol.com)

MODERATOR NOTE: Chances of success in your research will be greatly
enhanced if you register the name(s) you are searching for in
the JewishGen Family Finder. Go to www.jewishgen.org/jgff


Once Upon A Time in Lithuania; Book and Exhibition by Naomi Alexander #general

Saul Issroff <saul@...>
 

JGSGB member Naomi Alexander has produced a book : "Once Upon A Time in
Lithuania". Sketches and paintings. There is also an exhibition that
will show old Jewish homes and synagogues of Lithuania.
The exhibition to be held at the London Jewish Cultural Centre, >from the
11 May to the 6th July. (Note this is London, United Kingdom!).
Opening times: Monday, Tuesday and Thursday, 11 - 4 pm, Wednesday
closed, 11 to 3 pm Friday. Private view Thursday the 11 May 5:30 - 7:30 pm.
To be opened by Sir Sigmund Sternberg in the presence of Anthony Green RA.

The book "Once Upon A Time in Lithuania" published by David Paul will be
on sale though the exhibition.
Once Upon a Time in Lithuania. Naomi Alexander, May 2006, Paperback (160
pages) , ISBN 0954848217. London: Papadakis publishers
http://tinyurl.com/kjbxw for full details and orders.

Naomi Alexander is a figurative artist and was invited by the Europas Parkas
Museum (Vilnius) to be their first painter in residence. Her decision to
portray Jewish culture was based on family roots going back to Lithuania
(18th century).
Naomi portrays the forests, the poor people now living in homes previously owned
by Jews villages with churches, dilapidated buildings, defunct synagogues,
cemeteries, and old Jewish areas. There is additional information about the
contemporary struggles of Lithuanian Jewry

The book has introductory articles by John Russell Taylor (The Times art
Critic), and by Prof. Aubrey Newman, (Emeritus Professor of History,
University of Leicester).

Amongst collections that have Naomi’s paintings are those of the Duke of
Devonshire’s at Chatsworth, also the Sultan of Oman’s. She is a regular exhibitor
at the Royal Academy, the New English Art Club and the Mall
Galleries. Three of her paintings are in the Victoria and Albert Museum.
Some Lithuania paintings are in the Europas Parkas Museum collection in Vilnius.
A member of the Royal Institute of Oil Painters, she is also an experienced Old
Master picture restorer.

Note: The London Jewish Cultural Centre is located at Ivy house, 94 - 96 North
End Road, NW11. tel: 0208 457 5000

Saul Issroff


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Once Upon A Time in Lithuania; Book and Exhibition by Naomi Alexander #general

Saul Issroff <saul@...>
 

JGSGB member Naomi Alexander has produced a book : "Once Upon A Time in
Lithuania". Sketches and paintings. There is also an exhibition that
will show old Jewish homes and synagogues of Lithuania.
The exhibition to be held at the London Jewish Cultural Centre, >from the
11 May to the 6th July. (Note this is London, United Kingdom!).
Opening times: Monday, Tuesday and Thursday, 11 - 4 pm, Wednesday
closed, 11 to 3 pm Friday. Private view Thursday the 11 May 5:30 - 7:30 pm.
To be opened by Sir Sigmund Sternberg in the presence of Anthony Green RA.

The book "Once Upon A Time in Lithuania" published by David Paul will be
on sale though the exhibition.
Once Upon a Time in Lithuania. Naomi Alexander, May 2006, Paperback (160
pages) , ISBN 0954848217. London: Papadakis publishers
http://tinyurl.com/kjbxw for full details and orders.

Naomi Alexander is a figurative artist and was invited by the Europas Parkas
Museum (Vilnius) to be their first painter in residence. Her decision to
portray Jewish culture was based on family roots going back to Lithuania
(18th century).
Naomi portrays the forests, the poor people now living in homes previously owned
by Jews villages with churches, dilapidated buildings, defunct synagogues,
cemeteries, and old Jewish areas. There is additional information about the
contemporary struggles of Lithuanian Jewry

The book has introductory articles by John Russell Taylor (The Times art
Critic), and by Prof. Aubrey Newman, (Emeritus Professor of History,
University of Leicester).

Amongst collections that have Naomi’s paintings are those of the Duke of
Devonshire’s at Chatsworth, also the Sultan of Oman’s. She is a regular exhibitor
at the Royal Academy, the New English Art Club and the Mall
Galleries. Three of her paintings are in the Victoria and Albert Museum.
Some Lithuania paintings are in the Europas Parkas Museum collection in Vilnius.
A member of the Royal Institute of Oil Painters, she is also an experienced Old
Master picture restorer.

Note: The London Jewish Cultural Centre is located at Ivy house, 94 - 96 North
End Road, NW11. tel: 0208 457 5000

Saul Issroff


volunteers needed for Published by JewishGen Project #poland #lodz

Carol W. Skydell <cskydell@...>
 

Dear JewishGenner's
We have need for volunteers with very specific skills and experience.
Please review this list of
"help wanted" and let us know if you would like to offer your time to the
Published by JewishGen project.

1. Editor and proofreader : This requires previous experience as an
editor because the role can be challenging. It involves editing material
originally written in another language and then translated into English.
The end goal is to come up with a document that maintains the integrity
and style of the writer, but observes basic English grammar. Is this
something you can do while working in a word processing program that
will ultimately be converted to a pdf file for delivery to the printer?

2. Layout editor who can take the above described material and convert it
to a pdf file following the requirements for printing.

3. Graphics editor who will take on the responsibility of designing the
cover of a book, selection of font and style and "look" of the finished product

4. Experienced advertising writer who can provide messages promoting the
finished product, not only to our own constituency but to libraries
that maintain collections relating to the topics of our publications.

If you have an interest and previous experience, please let us hear >from
you.

Carol

Carol W. Skydell, Published by JewishGen Project Manager
Vice President, JewishGen Special Projects


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland volunteers needed for Published by JewishGen Project #lodz #poland

Carol W. Skydell <cskydell@...>
 

Dear JewishGenner's
We have need for volunteers with very specific skills and experience.
Please review this list of
"help wanted" and let us know if you would like to offer your time to the
Published by JewishGen project.

1. Editor and proofreader : This requires previous experience as an
editor because the role can be challenging. It involves editing material
originally written in another language and then translated into English.
The end goal is to come up with a document that maintains the integrity
and style of the writer, but observes basic English grammar. Is this
something you can do while working in a word processing program that
will ultimately be converted to a pdf file for delivery to the printer?

2. Layout editor who can take the above described material and convert it
to a pdf file following the requirements for printing.

3. Graphics editor who will take on the responsibility of designing the
cover of a book, selection of font and style and "look" of the finished product

4. Experienced advertising writer who can provide messages promoting the
finished product, not only to our own constituency but to libraries
that maintain collections relating to the topics of our publications.

If you have an interest and previous experience, please let us hear >from
you.

Carol

Carol W. Skydell, Published by JewishGen Project Manager
Vice President, JewishGen Special Projects


Lodz Jewish Cemetery Database #poland #lodz

Jim Bennett <bennett@...>
 

Many of you have explored the website www.jewishlodzcemetery.org If you
click on "Cemetery Plan" a map appears, showing some 160 numbered/lettered
sections of the vast "new"cemetery, where at least 160,000 Jews were buried
from 1892 to 1944 [and later?].
from the cemetery records--a vast card index--a primitive digital index is
being developed with funding >from Josef Buchman of Frankfurt, and the
results are being put on the website. Currently the names of about 32,000
Jews buried in 61 sections [called "quarters"] have been put into the site.
If you click on any of the colored "quarters" a window at the lower right
corner opens up showing hundreds of names of Jews buried in that quarter..

There are no details of the burial. No dates of death, age, name of father,
address. Just the full name and the number/letter of the quarter in which
he/she is buried. Most of the quarters were designated for: men only,
women only, children--boys and girls in separate quarters, and "boys" and
"girls" also in separate sections. There were also some mixed male/female
quarters.

It could be that "boys" and "girls"--as distinct >from "children" are
actually unmarried men and women of all ages, and that the boy/girl
designation is a poor translation >from Hebrew, through Polish, of the
"titles" Bachur and Betula. If anyone knows about this, please speak up.

Because of the tedium of searching for names in all 61 different quarters
lists, in a couple of hours I copied and pasted all of them into an Excel
database, and then sorted it by family name. The result is a 31,802-name
A-Z database It's of somewhat limited value because it contains only about
20% of the burials and no details about the Jew who is buried. But for
uncommon family names it can be very useful.

I understand that the team in Lodz will continue to add more quarters to the
website until the entire job is completed.

In the meantime I will try to arrange to make my databse available in
JewishGen, hopefully in JRI-Poland. .

I can do lookups in the meantime.

Jim Bennett
Haifa


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland Lodz Jewish Cemetery Database #lodz #poland

Jim Bennett <bennett@...>
 

Many of you have explored the website www.jewishlodzcemetery.org If you
click on "Cemetery Plan" a map appears, showing some 160 numbered/lettered
sections of the vast "new"cemetery, where at least 160,000 Jews were buried
from 1892 to 1944 [and later?].
from the cemetery records--a vast card index--a primitive digital index is
being developed with funding >from Josef Buchman of Frankfurt, and the
results are being put on the website. Currently the names of about 32,000
Jews buried in 61 sections [called "quarters"] have been put into the site.
If you click on any of the colored "quarters" a window at the lower right
corner opens up showing hundreds of names of Jews buried in that quarter..

There are no details of the burial. No dates of death, age, name of father,
address. Just the full name and the number/letter of the quarter in which
he/she is buried. Most of the quarters were designated for: men only,
women only, children--boys and girls in separate quarters, and "boys" and
"girls" also in separate sections. There were also some mixed male/female
quarters.

It could be that "boys" and "girls"--as distinct >from "children" are
actually unmarried men and women of all ages, and that the boy/girl
designation is a poor translation >from Hebrew, through Polish, of the
"titles" Bachur and Betula. If anyone knows about this, please speak up.

Because of the tedium of searching for names in all 61 different quarters
lists, in a couple of hours I copied and pasted all of them into an Excel
database, and then sorted it by family name. The result is a 31,802-name
A-Z database It's of somewhat limited value because it contains only about
20% of the burials and no details about the Jew who is buried. But for
uncommon family names it can be very useful.

I understand that the team in Lodz will continue to add more quarters to the
website until the entire job is completed.

In the meantime I will try to arrange to make my databse available in
JewishGen, hopefully in JRI-Poland. .

I can do lookups in the meantime.

Jim Bennett
Haifa


New York-New Jersey cemetery databases #general

steve725@...
 

Greetings,
More than a month ago I announced that Mt. Hebron Cemetery in Flushing, New
York put online a searchable database, where one could look up the burial
records of approx. 217,000 people. Within the last week or two, Mt. Carmel
Cemetery in Ridgewood, New York (85,000 burials) also put online a similar
database. Within the next few months, a few more cemetery databases
will be made available. I will be pleased to announce their readiness when
each becomes available.

There are definitely mistakes in the databases at Mt. Hebron and Mt. Carmel
databases, but overall they are excellent and a boon to us researchers. Some
common mistakes that appear on these databases are the switching of a
Yiddish given name for an English given name and vice versa, and there are
instances of a woman being listed by her maiden name instead of her married
name.

It is important to understand how these names were entered into these
cemetery databases in the first place. One should realize that at some point
in the past, the data that was entered into these cemetery databases were
taken >from the transit permits (i.e. more or less, what document accompanied
the body to the cemetery). I believe that these permits originated >from the
death certificates of the deceased. Of course, we know that often times the
person (usually a family member) who was notified of the death might have
spelled the name of the deceased differently >from how the rest of the family
spelled the name. Mistakes could also have been made by the person inscribing
the deceased's name on the matzeva. So the grieving relative (or
non-relative who probably knew the least how to spell the name correctly.
Maybe he/she only knew the deceased by a nickname, not by their real given
name) giving the info for the death certificate might not have known how to
spell the name correctly, the coroner may have taken it upon himself to
spell the name as he heard it, not to mention the possibilty of mistakes
made by the person copying the name >from the death certificate to the
transmit permit, or >from the permit to the cemetery database.

Regarding searching the above two cemetery databases by society name, the
only way to find every burial for a particular society plot is to do plug in
each letter >from A to Z along with the society name. Also, one should not
just rely on the society name as listed on the JGSNY database to find the
society name that you will need to search these cemetery databases by
society. I have found that many times these names do not match up--not just
because the a word or two need to be abbreviated, but sometimes the society names
from the JGSNY database and the cemetery databases are too dissimilar to
produced the desired results. It is best to use the JGSNY database to learn
of the society name listed and plot location, i.e. block, gate, etc., and
then check the society listings on each cemetery website according to
society name and plot location. Go to the "About Us" link, which
will lead you to their list of society names (their spelling), and copy and paste
that name into the "Society Name" space.

Also recall that I announced that Mt. Moriah Cemetery in Fairview,New Jersey
also has a searchable database (www.mountmoriahcemeteryofnewjersey.org),
but here one can only search by name.
I would strongly recommend that anyone who is looking for a relative who is
buried somewhere in the New York-New Jersey metro area but doesn't know
where they're buried, to check each database.

Also, please remember that on my website, on my Cemetery Directory page,
there is contact info for many cemeteries in the New York-New Jersey area,
and info on how to obtain photographs of matzevot. Also, you will find in my
Cemetery Projects section, overall grounds maps to most of the Jewish
cemeteries in the New York-New Jersey metro area, some in S. Florida, Los
Angeles, Montreal and Waldheim Cemetery in Forest Park (Chicago), Illinois.

Regards,
Steven Lasky
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen New York-New Jersey cemetery databases #general

steve725@...
 

Greetings,
More than a month ago I announced that Mt. Hebron Cemetery in Flushing, New
York put online a searchable database, where one could look up the burial
records of approx. 217,000 people. Within the last week or two, Mt. Carmel
Cemetery in Ridgewood, New York (85,000 burials) also put online a similar
database. Within the next few months, a few more cemetery databases
will be made available. I will be pleased to announce their readiness when
each becomes available.

There are definitely mistakes in the databases at Mt. Hebron and Mt. Carmel
databases, but overall they are excellent and a boon to us researchers. Some
common mistakes that appear on these databases are the switching of a
Yiddish given name for an English given name and vice versa, and there are
instances of a woman being listed by her maiden name instead of her married
name.

It is important to understand how these names were entered into these
cemetery databases in the first place. One should realize that at some point
in the past, the data that was entered into these cemetery databases were
taken >from the transit permits (i.e. more or less, what document accompanied
the body to the cemetery). I believe that these permits originated >from the
death certificates of the deceased. Of course, we know that often times the
person (usually a family member) who was notified of the death might have
spelled the name of the deceased differently >from how the rest of the family
spelled the name. Mistakes could also have been made by the person inscribing
the deceased's name on the matzeva. So the grieving relative (or
non-relative who probably knew the least how to spell the name correctly.
Maybe he/she only knew the deceased by a nickname, not by their real given
name) giving the info for the death certificate might not have known how to
spell the name correctly, the coroner may have taken it upon himself to
spell the name as he heard it, not to mention the possibilty of mistakes
made by the person copying the name >from the death certificate to the
transmit permit, or >from the permit to the cemetery database.

Regarding searching the above two cemetery databases by society name, the
only way to find every burial for a particular society plot is to do plug in
each letter >from A to Z along with the society name. Also, one should not
just rely on the society name as listed on the JGSNY database to find the
society name that you will need to search these cemetery databases by
society. I have found that many times these names do not match up--not just
because the a word or two need to be abbreviated, but sometimes the society names
from the JGSNY database and the cemetery databases are too dissimilar to
produced the desired results. It is best to use the JGSNY database to learn
of the society name listed and plot location, i.e. block, gate, etc., and
then check the society listings on each cemetery website according to
society name and plot location. Go to the "About Us" link, which
will lead you to their list of society names (their spelling), and copy and paste
that name into the "Society Name" space.

Also recall that I announced that Mt. Moriah Cemetery in Fairview,New Jersey
also has a searchable database (www.mountmoriahcemeteryofnewjersey.org),
but here one can only search by name.
I would strongly recommend that anyone who is looking for a relative who is
buried somewhere in the New York-New Jersey metro area but doesn't know
where they're buried, to check each database.

Also, please remember that on my website, on my Cemetery Directory page,
there is contact info for many cemeteries in the New York-New Jersey area,
and info on how to obtain photographs of matzevot. Also, you will find in my
Cemetery Projects section, overall grounds maps to most of the Jewish
cemeteries in the New York-New Jersey metro area, some in S. Florida, Los
Angeles, Montreal and Waldheim Cemetery in Forest Park (Chicago), Illinois.

Regards,
Steven Lasky
www.museumoffamilyhistory.com


Hard to read address on Manifes #general

Burt Hecht <burt1933@...>
 

Hi Genners,

I posted to Viewmate a snippet >from a manifest of an immigrant relative
arriving in New York. The address of his European relative is difficult to
decipher. Are you able to read it. Please find this at ViewMate: it is
file VM7765. Please respond privately. Thank you.

Burt Hecht

MODERATOR NOTE: Direct URL is:
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=7765


registration versus living location in the Pale #general

Ruth Hyman <ruth.hyman@...>
 

Dear Genners:
I seem to have created a monster. I was trying to ask about where Jews
registered in the Pale versus where they lived and was speaking about
revision lists (censuses) without making it very clear. I am searching
for relatives in Latvia/Lithuania, and if the records found are for the
same person, he was registered in Pikiliai, Lithuania but lived in
Leipaja and Aizpute Latvia and perhaps another location in Latvia as
well. All the locations, are quite near each other.

Ruth Hyman
Rockville Centre, NY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Hard to read address on Manifes #general

Burt Hecht <burt1933@...>
 

Hi Genners,

I posted to Viewmate a snippet >from a manifest of an immigrant relative
arriving in New York. The address of his European relative is difficult to
decipher. Are you able to read it. Please find this at ViewMate: it is
file VM7765. Please respond privately. Thank you.

Burt Hecht

MODERATOR NOTE: Direct URL is:
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=7765


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen registration versus living location in the Pale #general

Ruth Hyman <ruth.hyman@...>
 

Dear Genners:
I seem to have created a monster. I was trying to ask about where Jews
registered in the Pale versus where they lived and was speaking about
revision lists (censuses) without making it very clear. I am searching
for relatives in Latvia/Lithuania, and if the records found are for the
same person, he was registered in Pikiliai, Lithuania but lived in
Leipaja and Aizpute Latvia and perhaps another location in Latvia as
well. All the locations, are quite near each other.

Ruth Hyman
Rockville Centre, NY


volunteers needed for Published by JewishGen Project #poland

Carol W. Skydell <cskydell@...>
 

Dear JewishGenners

We have need for volunteers with very specific skills and experience.
Please review this list of "help wanted" and let us know if you would
like to offer your time to the Published by JewishGen project.

1. Editor and proofreader : This requires previous experience as an
editor because the role can be challenging. It involves editing material
originally written in another language and then translated into English.
The end goal is to come up with a document that maintains the integrity
and style of the writer, but observes basic English grammar. Is this
something you can do while working in a word processing program that
will ultimately be converted to a pdf file for delivery to the printer?

2. Layout editor who can take the above described material and convert it
to a pdf file following the requirements for printing.

3. Graphics editor who will take on the responsibility of designing the
cover of a book, selection of font and style and "look" of the finished
product

4. Experienced advertising writer who can provide messages promoting the
finished product, not only to our own constituency but to libraries
that maintain collections relating to the topics of our publications.

If you have an interest and previous experience, please let us hear >from
you.

Carol

Carol W. Skydell, Published by JewishGen Project Manager
Vice President, JewishGen Special Projects


conversions #general

Harvey Kaplan <harvey@...>
 

Orthodox conversions in Britain are handled by the London Beth Din and the
Office of the Chief Rabbi will no doubt have records. Conversions in the past
will also have been performed by local Batei Din in the "provinces"
(including Glasgow). Having said that, I would imagine that most of these records
would be sensitive and not open to the public.
Harvey L Kaplan
Glasgow,Scotland


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland volunteers needed for Published by JewishGen Project #poland

Carol W. Skydell <cskydell@...>
 

Dear JewishGenners

We have need for volunteers with very specific skills and experience.
Please review this list of "help wanted" and let us know if you would
like to offer your time to the Published by JewishGen project.

1. Editor and proofreader : This requires previous experience as an
editor because the role can be challenging. It involves editing material
originally written in another language and then translated into English.
The end goal is to come up with a document that maintains the integrity
and style of the writer, but observes basic English grammar. Is this
something you can do while working in a word processing program that
will ultimately be converted to a pdf file for delivery to the printer?

2. Layout editor who can take the above described material and convert it
to a pdf file following the requirements for printing.

3. Graphics editor who will take on the responsibility of designing the
cover of a book, selection of font and style and "look" of the finished
product

4. Experienced advertising writer who can provide messages promoting the
finished product, not only to our own constituency but to libraries
that maintain collections relating to the topics of our publications.

If you have an interest and previous experience, please let us hear >from
you.

Carol

Carol W. Skydell, Published by JewishGen Project Manager
Vice President, JewishGen Special Projects


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen conversions #general

Harvey Kaplan <harvey@...>
 

Orthodox conversions in Britain are handled by the London Beth Din and the
Office of the Chief Rabbi will no doubt have records. Conversions in the past
will also have been performed by local Batei Din in the "provinces"
(including Glasgow). Having said that, I would imagine that most of these records
would be sensitive and not open to the public.
Harvey L Kaplan
Glasgow,Scotland


Re: Conversion #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

<RUP29@aol.com> wrote in message news:3a7.1e72679.3181243b@aol.com...

How can I find out if someone converted to Judaisim in about 1924
V.Gold
Watford
You don't say which country you are writing from.

It is unclear >from the post how the conversion of someone is explicitly a
(Jewish) genealogy issue.

In the UK, you might be able to write to the relevant synagogal authorities
(ie the Beth Din).

This would be exactly the same process as would take place if they or their
children subsequently wanted to get married in an (Orthodox) synagogue. This
information I would have thought is generally supplied to other synagogues
for this purpose rather than to individuals.

I would suspect that there might be privacy issues for fairly recent
conversions - I don't know where 1924 would fit in to that.

I would imagine that for recent conversions the information would only be
supplied with the permission of the person who had been converted -
certainly this would be the case if they were still alive under the UK Data
Protection Act.

Before anyone else writes in I agree that someone converted in 1924 is
unlikely to be still alive - but no doubt there would be certain procedures
to go to.

--
Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland) WEITZMAN (Cracow), WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany)
KOHN/WEISSKOPF (Wallerstein and Kleinerdlingen,Germany) LANDAU (only adopted
on leaving Belarus or later)/FREDKIN (?) (Gomel, Mogilev, Chernigov, Belarus)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Conversion #general

Nick <tulse04-news@...>
 

<RUP29@aol.com> wrote in message news:3a7.1e72679.3181243b@aol.com...

How can I find out if someone converted to Judaisim in about 1924
V.Gold
Watford
You don't say which country you are writing from.

It is unclear >from the post how the conversion of someone is explicitly a
(Jewish) genealogy issue.

In the UK, you might be able to write to the relevant synagogal authorities
(ie the Beth Din).

This would be exactly the same process as would take place if they or their
children subsequently wanted to get married in an (Orthodox) synagogue. This
information I would have thought is generally supplied to other synagogues
for this purpose rather than to individuals.

I would suspect that there might be privacy issues for fairly recent
conversions - I don't know where 1924 would fit in to that.

I would imagine that for recent conversions the information would only be
supplied with the permission of the person who had been converted -
certainly this would be the case if they were still alive under the UK Data
Protection Act.

Before anyone else writes in I agree that someone converted in 1924 is
unlikely to be still alive - but no doubt there would be certain procedures
to go to.

--
Nick Landau
London, UK

COHNREICH (Anklam, Germany Krajenka, Poland) ATLAS (Wielkie Oczy (near
Lvov/Lemberg), Poland) WEITZMAN (Cracow), WECHSLER(Schwabach, Germany)
KOHN/WEISSKOPF (Wallerstein and Kleinerdlingen,Germany) LANDAU (only adopted
on leaving Belarus or later)/FREDKIN (?) (Gomel, Mogilev, Chernigov, Belarus)