Date   

INTRO - Researching JACOBSON family in Zempelburg, West Prussia or Germany or Poland #germany

Sandy Glass <sandra.r.glass@...>
 

Hello, All. I have been researching my family genealogy for a few
years on and off. My husband completed his family genealogy (resulting
in a published book) and is now well into research on my father's
branch (BRODSKY and RUBINOFSKY >from Odessa, Russia). I am working on
my mother's maternal branch (ABRAHAM >from Berlin, Germany and JACOBSON
from Zempelburg, variously Prussia/Germany/Poland). As an educator, I
have plenty of experience on the internet, as does my husband who is
an academic researcher. Zempelburg is currently known as Sepelno
Krajenskie,Poland. There do not appear to be any records >from this
town prior to 1874. The JACOBSON family reft in 1869.

It appears that the JACOBSONS arrived in the U.W. in 1869. They ended
up in Chicago, Illinois. My great-great grandfather, Lessar JACOBSON,
his wife Amelia and 6 year old daughter, Fannie, arrived together.
According to the 1870 census, they lived in Chicago, Illinois (the
city in which I was raised) in the same building as Lessar's parents
and either a brother or other relative: Hermann JACOBSON (66), Rose
JACOBSON (72) and Jacob JACOBSON (22).

Using JewishGen and the GerSig group, I could not discover an JACOBSON
families in the 1874 registry of Zempelburg residents. I did see the
names of several JACOBUS family members. My goal is to discover if the
JACOBSONS were originally JACOBUS and what made them decide to leave
all they knew, however difficult their lives were, for the U.S. I am
aware that the Franco-Prussian War began in 1870, just after my family
left. Perhaps they feared conscription. Did they have relatives
already in Chicago? How were they able to save enough money to make
the trip? Were other relatives left behind? I do know they were all
tailors once in Chicago.

My JewishGen ID# 734567. I live in Scottsdale, AZ. I look forward to
hearing >from anyone who has any knowledge about Zempelburg (in the
1870s or earlier) >from which my family originated or about any
JACOBSONS emanating >from that area.

Sandy Glass Scottsdale, Arizona @srglass


German SIG #Germany INTRO - Researching JACOBSON family in Zempelburg, West Prussia or Germany or Poland #germany

Sandy Glass <sandra.r.glass@...>
 

Hello, All. I have been researching my family genealogy for a few
years on and off. My husband completed his family genealogy (resulting
in a published book) and is now well into research on my father's
branch (BRODSKY and RUBINOFSKY >from Odessa, Russia). I am working on
my mother's maternal branch (ABRAHAM >from Berlin, Germany and JACOBSON
from Zempelburg, variously Prussia/Germany/Poland). As an educator, I
have plenty of experience on the internet, as does my husband who is
an academic researcher. Zempelburg is currently known as Sepelno
Krajenskie,Poland. There do not appear to be any records >from this
town prior to 1874. The JACOBSON family reft in 1869.

It appears that the JACOBSONS arrived in the U.W. in 1869. They ended
up in Chicago, Illinois. My great-great grandfather, Lessar JACOBSON,
his wife Amelia and 6 year old daughter, Fannie, arrived together.
According to the 1870 census, they lived in Chicago, Illinois (the
city in which I was raised) in the same building as Lessar's parents
and either a brother or other relative: Hermann JACOBSON (66), Rose
JACOBSON (72) and Jacob JACOBSON (22).

Using JewishGen and the GerSig group, I could not discover an JACOBSON
families in the 1874 registry of Zempelburg residents. I did see the
names of several JACOBUS family members. My goal is to discover if the
JACOBSONS were originally JACOBUS and what made them decide to leave
all they knew, however difficult their lives were, for the U.S. I am
aware that the Franco-Prussian War began in 1870, just after my family
left. Perhaps they feared conscription. Did they have relatives
already in Chicago? How were they able to save enough money to make
the trip? Were other relatives left behind? I do know they were all
tailors once in Chicago.

My JewishGen ID# 734567. I live in Scottsdale, AZ. I look forward to
hearing >from anyone who has any knowledge about Zempelburg (in the
1870s or earlier) >from which my family originated or about any
JACOBSONS emanating >from that area.

Sandy Glass Scottsdale, Arizona @srglass


VOLOZINSKY and HARRIS Kaunus to USA #general

Jules Feldman
 

I am looking for the descendants of Harry born VOLOZINSKY who in the USA
changed his surname to HARRIS.
He was born in 1873 probably in Kaunus and migrated to the USA and died in
1922. He married Julie MILLER (1874-1960) who was probably a cousin.
Their children were:
Dorothy born 1903 married Abraham RUBINS
Leon HARRIS born 1904
Saul HARRIS born 1909
George HARRIS born 1912
Janet HARRIS born 1915

This is based on information collected in the 1970's by a cousin in Israel.

Thanks,
Jules Feldman
Kibbutz Yizreel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen VOLOZINSKY and HARRIS Kaunus to USA #general

Jules Feldman
 

I am looking for the descendants of Harry born VOLOZINSKY who in the USA
changed his surname to HARRIS.
He was born in 1873 probably in Kaunus and migrated to the USA and died in
1922. He married Julie MILLER (1874-1960) who was probably a cousin.
Their children were:
Dorothy born 1903 married Abraham RUBINS
Leon HARRIS born 1904
Saul HARRIS born 1909
George HARRIS born 1912
Janet HARRIS born 1915

This is based on information collected in the 1970's by a cousin in Israel.

Thanks,
Jules Feldman
Kibbutz Yizreel


Same Person-Different SSDI Numbers #general

Jackye Sullins <jsullins@...>
 

I am confused. I have an SSDI application for a person beginning with 159
(for PA). However, his death certificate has a completely different number
beginning with 167 (also for PA).

Has anyone come across this situation before and what would be the reason
for two numbers?

Thank you.

Jackye Sullins
In Wauwatosa, WI (at the moment)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Same Person-Different SSDI Numbers #general

Jackye Sullins <jsullins@...>
 

I am confused. I have an SSDI application for a person beginning with 159
(for PA). However, his death certificate has a completely different number
beginning with 167 (also for PA).

Has anyone come across this situation before and what would be the reason
for two numbers?

Thank you.

Jackye Sullins
In Wauwatosa, WI (at the moment)


Re: Your thoughts on birthplace variations listed in US Census forms #general

Marion Werle
 

Julie,

Part of the explanation for the variations in the census enumerations
is in the instructions given to enumerators for the various censuses,
and part has to do with either the enumerator and/or informant. The
enumerator instructions varied >from year to year, and can be found at
the link below:

https://usa.ipums.org/usa/voliii/tEnumInstr.shtml

After World War I, the map of Europe changed siginificantly, and in
the 1930 census, it was deemed "essential that each foreign-born
person be credited to the country in which his birthplace is now
located." <"1930 Census: Instructions to Enumerators", Minnesota
Population Center, IPUMS USA> So this is why, in the 1930 census, one
of my grandmother's brothers shows as having been born in Lithuania
rather than Russia, even though he had been in the U.S. since about
1904 when Lithuania did not exist. His native language was also listed
as "Lithuanian", even though the enumerator instructions stated "...do
not assume that the mother tongue is the same as the country of
birth." In his case, it should have been Yiddish, which is among the
possible languages choices listed for enumerators, and this was
clearly an assumption based on enumerator error, as he would have
spoken either Yiddish and/or Russian in Lithuania at the time.

Hope that helps.

--
Marion Werle
<werleme@...>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Your thoughts on birthplace variations listed in US Census forms #general

Marion Werle
 

Julie,

Part of the explanation for the variations in the census enumerations
is in the instructions given to enumerators for the various censuses,
and part has to do with either the enumerator and/or informant. The
enumerator instructions varied >from year to year, and can be found at
the link below:

https://usa.ipums.org/usa/voliii/tEnumInstr.shtml

After World War I, the map of Europe changed siginificantly, and in
the 1930 census, it was deemed "essential that each foreign-born
person be credited to the country in which his birthplace is now
located." <"1930 Census: Instructions to Enumerators", Minnesota
Population Center, IPUMS USA> So this is why, in the 1930 census, one
of my grandmother's brothers shows as having been born in Lithuania
rather than Russia, even though he had been in the U.S. since about
1904 when Lithuania did not exist. His native language was also listed
as "Lithuanian", even though the enumerator instructions stated "...do
not assume that the mother tongue is the same as the country of
birth." In his case, it should have been Yiddish, which is among the
possible languages choices listed for enumerators, and this was
clearly an assumption based on enumerator error, as he would have
spoken either Yiddish and/or Russian in Lithuania at the time.

Hope that helps.

--
Marion Werle
<werleme@...>


Re: Your thoughts on birthplace variations listed in US Census forms #general

Judith Singer
 

I believe your husband's family was >from what is now Lithuania. Almost
all of the variations you mention can be explained by one of two
facts:

1. There was no "Lithuania" per se between 1795, when it became part
of the Russian Empire, and a few years after the collapse of the
Russian Empire and the end of World War I, when the Lithuanians fought
off most of the claims of Germany, Poland, and Russia to establish
their own country. It did not obtain international recognition and
membership in the League of Nations until 1921 and did not adopt a
constitution until 1922. Therefore, "Russia" was correct for the 1920
and any earlier census; "Lithuania" was correct for the 1930 census -
but many immigrants were not aware in what country their hometown
became located, or thought it was irrelevant, and answered "Russia"
even in the 1930 and later censuses. You don't mention in what year
Charles was naturalized, but it doesn't much matter.

2. Our immigrant ancestors generally wanted to assimilate, and
especially wanted their children to fit in. For that reason, it was
not unusual for them to claim the U.S. as the country of birth of
their children and for them to claim English as their native tongue
(they may also have misunderstood the census question about native
language). Either "Jewish" (=Yiddish) or Russian would have been a
correct response with respect to native language since Russian was the
official language and nearly all Jews in Russia quickly learned
Russian in order to speak to government officials, though they would
have spoken Yiddish within the home and to fellow Jews and Russian,
Polish, or Lithuanian to their Gentile neighbors.

I have no idea why Benjamin said he was >from Czechoslovakia.
Czechoslovakia had been part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, not the
Russian Empire, before World War I.

The paragraph that begins "In 1920, Benjamin listed himself and his
father" contradicts the paragraph above which stated "In 1910 and 1920
the birthplace of Charles and Jennie was listed as "Russia" so I am at
a loss there.

Have you found the World War I and II draft registrations for the men
in the family? or the ship manifests for their passage to the U.S.?
Both are good possibilities for finding the name of the actual town
where they were from.

Good luck - Judith Singer

From: Julie Miller <jumiller6@...>
Date: Mon, 21 May 2018 11:40:18 -0400

My husband's family wasn't so consistent in completing their US Census
forms. Why might this be? What would you do as a next step to figure out
where they're from?

In 1900, the birthplace of Charles and Sonia (Jennie) Miller was
*Russia*. His son, Benjamin was listed as born in *Massachusetts*.

In 1910 and 1920 the birthplace of Charles and Jennie was listed as
*Russia*. The native tongue is English in 1910 and Jewish in 1920.

In 1930 (after Charles has died), Jennie's mother tongue is listed as
unknown with a servant listed as French.

We can't find Benjamin in a 1910 US Census.

In 1920, Benjamin listed himself and his father as being born in *Russia
*with mother tongues of Russian. He listed his mother as being born in
*France* with a mother tongue of French. His younger brothers listed
their parents as born in *Russia*.

In 1930, Benjamin listed that he was born in *Czechoslovakia* with his
mother tongue as Czech. One of his younger brothers listed their parents
as born in *Lithuania, *the other said *Russia*.

Charles naturalization record lists him as being >from *Russia*. His
witnesses are two men with the last name of Alpert. The Millers and the
Alperts all lived in Boston. We don't know if they were related.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Your thoughts on birthplace variations listed in US Census forms #general

Judith Singer
 

I believe your husband's family was >from what is now Lithuania. Almost
all of the variations you mention can be explained by one of two
facts:

1. There was no "Lithuania" per se between 1795, when it became part
of the Russian Empire, and a few years after the collapse of the
Russian Empire and the end of World War I, when the Lithuanians fought
off most of the claims of Germany, Poland, and Russia to establish
their own country. It did not obtain international recognition and
membership in the League of Nations until 1921 and did not adopt a
constitution until 1922. Therefore, "Russia" was correct for the 1920
and any earlier census; "Lithuania" was correct for the 1930 census -
but many immigrants were not aware in what country their hometown
became located, or thought it was irrelevant, and answered "Russia"
even in the 1930 and later censuses. You don't mention in what year
Charles was naturalized, but it doesn't much matter.

2. Our immigrant ancestors generally wanted to assimilate, and
especially wanted their children to fit in. For that reason, it was
not unusual for them to claim the U.S. as the country of birth of
their children and for them to claim English as their native tongue
(they may also have misunderstood the census question about native
language). Either "Jewish" (=Yiddish) or Russian would have been a
correct response with respect to native language since Russian was the
official language and nearly all Jews in Russia quickly learned
Russian in order to speak to government officials, though they would
have spoken Yiddish within the home and to fellow Jews and Russian,
Polish, or Lithuanian to their Gentile neighbors.

I have no idea why Benjamin said he was >from Czechoslovakia.
Czechoslovakia had been part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, not the
Russian Empire, before World War I.

The paragraph that begins "In 1920, Benjamin listed himself and his
father" contradicts the paragraph above which stated "In 1910 and 1920
the birthplace of Charles and Jennie was listed as "Russia" so I am at
a loss there.

Have you found the World War I and II draft registrations for the men
in the family? or the ship manifests for their passage to the U.S.?
Both are good possibilities for finding the name of the actual town
where they were from.

Good luck - Judith Singer

From: Julie Miller <jumiller6@...>
Date: Mon, 21 May 2018 11:40:18 -0400

My husband's family wasn't so consistent in completing their US Census
forms. Why might this be? What would you do as a next step to figure out
where they're from?

In 1900, the birthplace of Charles and Sonia (Jennie) Miller was
*Russia*. His son, Benjamin was listed as born in *Massachusetts*.

In 1910 and 1920 the birthplace of Charles and Jennie was listed as
*Russia*. The native tongue is English in 1910 and Jewish in 1920.

In 1930 (after Charles has died), Jennie's mother tongue is listed as
unknown with a servant listed as French.

We can't find Benjamin in a 1910 US Census.

In 1920, Benjamin listed himself and his father as being born in *Russia
*with mother tongues of Russian. He listed his mother as being born in
*France* with a mother tongue of French. His younger brothers listed
their parents as born in *Russia*.

In 1930, Benjamin listed that he was born in *Czechoslovakia* with his
mother tongue as Czech. One of his younger brothers listed their parents
as born in *Lithuania, *the other said *Russia*.

Charles naturalization record lists him as being >from *Russia*. His
witnesses are two men with the last name of Alpert. The Millers and the
Alperts all lived in Boston. We don't know if they were related.


DEITCH family from Korbyn #belarus

david@...
 

I have reason to believe that one of my Deutsch ancestors came to NE Hungary
from Kobryn, Belarus
It's a long-shot, but I wonder if this SIG has descendants >from the DEITCH (
or similar spellings of the surname) family of Kobryn, who had their Y-DNA tested, and who know if their Haplogroup is J-M=
267 (my haplogroup), which would confirm our suspicions, and break our brick
wall Or, if not Y-DNA-tested yet, who might consider getting tested

At the moment, that we know of, other than my own family, there are no
DEUTSCHES (or related spelling variants) with the J-M267 Y-DNA Haplogroup
If anyone can help locate a fellow person with this surname and with the same
haplogroup, I'd be deeply grateful

Regards to all,

David Deutsch
MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately


Belarus SIG #Belarus DEITCH family from Korbyn #belarus

david@...
 

I have reason to believe that one of my Deutsch ancestors came to NE Hungary
from Kobryn, Belarus
It's a long-shot, but I wonder if this SIG has descendants >from the DEITCH (
or similar spellings of the surname) family of Kobryn, who had their Y-DNA tested, and who know if their Haplogroup is J-M=
267 (my haplogroup), which would confirm our suspicions, and break our brick
wall Or, if not Y-DNA-tested yet, who might consider getting tested

At the moment, that we know of, other than my own family, there are no
DEUTSCHES (or related spelling variants) with the J-M267 Y-DNA Haplogroup
If anyone can help locate a fellow person with this surname and with the same
haplogroup, I'd be deeply grateful

Regards to all,

David Deutsch
MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately


JGS of Maryland May 27 meeting #general

Susan Steeble
 

Speaker: Janice Sellers
Title: "Using Online Historical Jewish Newspapers for Genealogical Research"
Date and Time: Sunday, May 27, 2018, 1:30 p.m.
Location: Pikesville Library's meeting room, 1301 Reisterstown Rd,
Pikesville, MD

Please join us on Sunday, May 27, 2018, to hear Janice Sellers present
"Using Online Historical Jewish Newspapers for Genealogical Research."

Many historical Jewish newspapers are now available online, with more
being added regularly. Most are on free sites. This presentation gives
an overview of what is online and where it is, suggests access
strategies, discusses what to do if you don't read Hebrew or Yiddish,
and shows sample search results.

Janice M. Sellers is a professional genealogist specializing in
Jewish, black, dual citizenship, and newspaper research. She edits two
genealogy publications and serves on the board of San Francisco Bay
Area Jewish Genealogical Society. She is a member of the Association
of Professional Genealogists, the Genealogical Speakers Guild, the
Council for the Advancement of Professional Genealogy, the Jewish
Genealogical Society of Oregon, and the California Genealogical
Society. Her Web site is ancestraldiscoveries.com.

The program is free for paid members and $5 for non-members (applied
to membership fee when a visitor joins JGSMD) after their first
meeting. Refreshments will be available. Please check our web site at
www.jgsmd.org for late updates and for the time, location, and program
of future meetings.

Susan Steeble
Baltimore, MD
JGSMD Public Relations


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGS of Maryland May 27 meeting #general

Susan Steeble
 

Speaker: Janice Sellers
Title: "Using Online Historical Jewish Newspapers for Genealogical Research"
Date and Time: Sunday, May 27, 2018, 1:30 p.m.
Location: Pikesville Library's meeting room, 1301 Reisterstown Rd,
Pikesville, MD

Please join us on Sunday, May 27, 2018, to hear Janice Sellers present
"Using Online Historical Jewish Newspapers for Genealogical Research."

Many historical Jewish newspapers are now available online, with more
being added regularly. Most are on free sites. This presentation gives
an overview of what is online and where it is, suggests access
strategies, discusses what to do if you don't read Hebrew or Yiddish,
and shows sample search results.

Janice M. Sellers is a professional genealogist specializing in
Jewish, black, dual citizenship, and newspaper research. She edits two
genealogy publications and serves on the board of San Francisco Bay
Area Jewish Genealogical Society. She is a member of the Association
of Professional Genealogists, the Genealogical Speakers Guild, the
Council for the Advancement of Professional Genealogy, the Jewish
Genealogical Society of Oregon, and the California Genealogical
Society. Her Web site is ancestraldiscoveries.com.

The program is free for paid members and $5 for non-members (applied
to membership fee when a visitor joins JGSMD) after their first
meeting. Refreshments will be available. Please check our web site at
www.jgsmd.org for late updates and for the time, location, and program
of future meetings.

Susan Steeble
Baltimore, MD
JGSMD Public Relations


Your thoughts on birthplace variations listed in US Census forms #general

Julie Miller
 

My husband's family wasn't so consistent in completing their US Census
forms. Why might this be? What would you do as a next step to figure out
where they're from?

In 1900, the birthplace of Charles and Sonia (Jennie) Miller was
*Russia*. His son, Benjamin was listed as born in *Massachusetts*.

In 1910 and 1920 the birthplace of Charles and Jennie was listed as
*Russia*. The native tongue is English in 1910 and Jewish in 1920.

In 1930 (after Charles has died), Jennie's mother tongue is listed as
unknown with a servant listed as French.

We can't find Benjamin in a 1910 US Census.

In 1920, Benjamin listed himself and his father as being born in *Russia
*with mother tongues of Russian. He listed his mother as being born in
*France* with a mother tongue of French. His younger brothers listed
their parents as born in *Russia*.

In 1930, Benjamin listed that he was born in *Czechoslovakia* with his
mother tongue as Czech. One of his younger brothers listed their parents
as born in *Lithuania, *the other said *Russia*.

Charles naturalization record lists him as being >from *Russia*. His
witnesses are two men with the last name of Alpert. The Millers and the
Alperts all lived in Boston. We don't know if they were related.

Thank you for your ideas and thoughts!
Julie Miller
jumiller6@...
Searching: MILLER, BERNSTEIN, HURWITZ (and their various spellings)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Your thoughts on birthplace variations listed in US Census forms #general

Julie Miller
 

My husband's family wasn't so consistent in completing their US Census
forms. Why might this be? What would you do as a next step to figure out
where they're from?

In 1900, the birthplace of Charles and Sonia (Jennie) Miller was
*Russia*. His son, Benjamin was listed as born in *Massachusetts*.

In 1910 and 1920 the birthplace of Charles and Jennie was listed as
*Russia*. The native tongue is English in 1910 and Jewish in 1920.

In 1930 (after Charles has died), Jennie's mother tongue is listed as
unknown with a servant listed as French.

We can't find Benjamin in a 1910 US Census.

In 1920, Benjamin listed himself and his father as being born in *Russia
*with mother tongues of Russian. He listed his mother as being born in
*France* with a mother tongue of French. His younger brothers listed
their parents as born in *Russia*.

In 1930, Benjamin listed that he was born in *Czechoslovakia* with his
mother tongue as Czech. One of his younger brothers listed their parents
as born in *Lithuania, *the other said *Russia*.

Charles naturalization record lists him as being >from *Russia*. His
witnesses are two men with the last name of Alpert. The Millers and the
Alperts all lived in Boston. We don't know if they were related.

Thank you for your ideas and thoughts!
Julie Miller
jumiller6@...
Searching: MILLER, BERNSTEIN, HURWITZ (and their various spellings)


Granov 1875 Census Translation Project #general

Rhoda Miller
 

A new project, now open for donations, will raise funds for translation of
927 pages of images >from the 1875 Jewish census of Granov, Gaisin
district, Podolia guberniya. This census is a list of Jews assigned to
the town of Teplick, but living in Granov.

Although assigned to Teplik, these Jews are living in Hraniv (Granov).
In the Russian Empire, people were registered in a particular town or
district, but had the ability to live in another town. Although they
might have lived in a town different >from their registration, revision
lists (Russian census) listed them in the town of registration. That
location is where a family's official records were maintained.

Column headings of the 1875 Jewish census are as follows:
- Family number by order
- Family number by revision list
- Surname, name, patronymic (males only)
- Age according to the revision list or assignment
- Where persons were staying at the day of census

Other towns are mentioned throughout this census. For example, one
random entry reads "resides in roadside tavern in the village of
Tsvilikhovka" and another mentions Lukasheva, both nearby towns. It is
for this reason, that the 1875 census of the Jews is a valuable
document. Family members might be residing in a different town which
could be identified on this census.

These records have not been filmed. They were privately purchased by a
group of researchers: Linda Jones Gibbs, Julie Halperson, Rhoda
Miller, and Michael Richman. There are 927 images representing
approximately 464 pages of records as each record is a double
page.Funds raised for this project will be used to translate the
records, entering them into a JewishGen spreadsheet template, and to
prepare the data for posting to the JewishGen Ukraine Database. The
spreadsheets will be available to contributors of $100 or more before
the data becomes available on the JewishGen Ukraine Database. To
donate, go to
https://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=22

For more information, please go to:
https://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/projectdesc/DB_Hraniv.html

I hope that you will consider donating to this new project. I hope
that those of you with Granov ancestry will contact me and work with me to
remember this town and the people who lived there.

Thank you in advance for your support.
Rhoda Miller
Granov (Hraniv) Town Leader
Ukraine SIG
Babylon, NY

Researching CHOLODOWSKY, SALOWE (Granov, Odessa, Ukraine)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Granov 1875 Census Translation Project #general

Rhoda Miller
 

A new project, now open for donations, will raise funds for translation of
927 pages of images >from the 1875 Jewish census of Granov, Gaisin
district, Podolia guberniya. This census is a list of Jews assigned to
the town of Teplick, but living in Granov.

Although assigned to Teplik, these Jews are living in Hraniv (Granov).
In the Russian Empire, people were registered in a particular town or
district, but had the ability to live in another town. Although they
might have lived in a town different >from their registration, revision
lists (Russian census) listed them in the town of registration. That
location is where a family's official records were maintained.

Column headings of the 1875 Jewish census are as follows:
- Family number by order
- Family number by revision list
- Surname, name, patronymic (males only)
- Age according to the revision list or assignment
- Where persons were staying at the day of census

Other towns are mentioned throughout this census. For example, one
random entry reads "resides in roadside tavern in the village of
Tsvilikhovka" and another mentions Lukasheva, both nearby towns. It is
for this reason, that the 1875 census of the Jews is a valuable
document. Family members might be residing in a different town which
could be identified on this census.

These records have not been filmed. They were privately purchased by a
group of researchers: Linda Jones Gibbs, Julie Halperson, Rhoda
Miller, and Michael Richman. There are 927 images representing
approximately 464 pages of records as each record is a double
page.Funds raised for this project will be used to translate the
records, entering them into a JewishGen spreadsheet template, and to
prepare the data for posting to the JewishGen Ukraine Database. The
spreadsheets will be available to contributors of $100 or more before
the data becomes available on the JewishGen Ukraine Database. To
donate, go to
https://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=22

For more information, please go to:
https://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/projectdesc/DB_Hraniv.html

I hope that you will consider donating to this new project. I hope
that those of you with Granov ancestry will contact me and work with me to
remember this town and the people who lived there.

Thank you in advance for your support.
Rhoda Miller
Granov (Hraniv) Town Leader
Ukraine SIG
Babylon, NY

Researching CHOLODOWSKY, SALOWE (Granov, Odessa, Ukraine)


Second Call For Nominations to LitvakSIG Board of Directors 2018 #lithuania

Eden Joachim <esjoachim@...>
 

The nine members of the Board of Directors of LitvakSIG are elected in
overlapping three year terms. The Board determines policies and makes
decisions affecting the organization, especially research priorities.
Monthly Board meetings take place via international conference calls.

The Nominating Task Force is calling for nominations to the Board to fill
the three Board positions whose terms expire this year. The current board
members with expiring terms this year are Carol Hoffman, Dorothy Leivers and
Phil Shapiro. Carol and Dorothy may not seek another term since this is the
end of their third term and so must step down for at least one year.

Any dues paying member in good standing of LitvakSIG is eligible to submit a
nomination, either for themselves or for someone else who is a dues paying
member in good standing. All nominations to the board must include the
nominee's biographical statement emphasizing relevant experience, and a
summary of what skills that person can contribute to the Board. This
information should be submitted to each of the five members of the
Nominating Task Force (emails found at end of this message). There is no
limit as to the number of nominees submitted to the Nominating Task Force;
however, no more than three nominees can be recommended.

The report of the Task Force shall include the qualifications and bios of
each candidate nominated and will be displayed on our Members' website. In
cases in which a candidate is also willing to serve as an officer (to be
elected by the Board), the report of the Nominating Task Force will specify
the office in which such candidate is willing to serve and his or her
qualifications.

The period for submitting nominations for consideration by the Nominating
Task Force began April 25, 2018 and will end as of midnight Eastern Daylight
Time, on June 6, 2018. The Nominating Task Force will announce their
recommended nominees on or before June 20, 2018 as per Article VIII, Section
2 of the LitvakSIG Bylaws.

In addition to the nominations by the Task Force, our Bylaws provide that
any qualified candidates who are not recommended by the Task Force may
nominate themselves, after the Nominating Task force has announced its slate
of nominees. Self-nominations can be sent beginning on June 25 and through
July 9, 2018. Their biographical statements, qualifications, and summary of
what skills they can contribute to the Board will be presented along with
the other nominees on our Members' web site. Submit these nominations to
Barry Halpern, the Secretary of LitvakSIG at barry.halpern@....

All names will be placed on the ballot in alphabetical order. Voting will
take place primarily by e-mail during the weeks before the IAJGS Conference
on Jewish Genealogy in Warsaw, Poland in August 2018. LitvakSIG members who
do not vote before the meeting will be able to vote in person at the
beginning of the LitvakSIG Annual Meeting, Tuesday, August 7, 2018 during
the conference.

Nominating Task Force 2018:

Eden Joachim, Chair, esjoachim@...
Denise Fletcher, dfletcheroz@...
Dorothy Leivers, dorfleiv@...
Jill Anderson, jill.anderson@...
Susan Feinberg, sfeinberg367@...


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Second Call For Nominations to LitvakSIG Board of Directors 2018 #lithuania

Eden Joachim <esjoachim@...>
 

The nine members of the Board of Directors of LitvakSIG are elected in
overlapping three year terms. The Board determines policies and makes
decisions affecting the organization, especially research priorities.
Monthly Board meetings take place via international conference calls.

The Nominating Task Force is calling for nominations to the Board to fill
the three Board positions whose terms expire this year. The current board
members with expiring terms this year are Carol Hoffman, Dorothy Leivers and
Phil Shapiro. Carol and Dorothy may not seek another term since this is the
end of their third term and so must step down for at least one year.

Any dues paying member in good standing of LitvakSIG is eligible to submit a
nomination, either for themselves or for someone else who is a dues paying
member in good standing. All nominations to the board must include the
nominee's biographical statement emphasizing relevant experience, and a
summary of what skills that person can contribute to the Board. This
information should be submitted to each of the five members of the
Nominating Task Force (emails found at end of this message). There is no
limit as to the number of nominees submitted to the Nominating Task Force;
however, no more than three nominees can be recommended.

The report of the Task Force shall include the qualifications and bios of
each candidate nominated and will be displayed on our Members' website. In
cases in which a candidate is also willing to serve as an officer (to be
elected by the Board), the report of the Nominating Task Force will specify
the office in which such candidate is willing to serve and his or her
qualifications.

The period for submitting nominations for consideration by the Nominating
Task Force began April 25, 2018 and will end as of midnight Eastern Daylight
Time, on June 6, 2018. The Nominating Task Force will announce their
recommended nominees on or before June 20, 2018 as per Article VIII, Section
2 of the LitvakSIG Bylaws.

In addition to the nominations by the Task Force, our Bylaws provide that
any qualified candidates who are not recommended by the Task Force may
nominate themselves, after the Nominating Task force has announced its slate
of nominees. Self-nominations can be sent beginning on June 25 and through
July 9, 2018. Their biographical statements, qualifications, and summary of
what skills they can contribute to the Board will be presented along with
the other nominees on our Members' web site. Submit these nominations to
Barry Halpern, the Secretary of LitvakSIG at barry.halpern@....

All names will be placed on the ballot in alphabetical order. Voting will
take place primarily by e-mail during the weeks before the IAJGS Conference
on Jewish Genealogy in Warsaw, Poland in August 2018. LitvakSIG members who
do not vote before the meeting will be able to vote in person at the
beginning of the LitvakSIG Annual Meeting, Tuesday, August 7, 2018 during
the conference.

Nominating Task Force 2018:

Eden Joachim, Chair, esjoachim@...
Denise Fletcher, dfletcheroz@...
Dorothy Leivers, dorfleiv@...
Jill Anderson, jill.anderson@...
Susan Feinberg, sfeinberg367@...