Date   

burial of Mordhar JOINOVICI #general

Lemberski Evelyne
 

Ladies and gentlemen,I search the name of the French cemetery where is
buried Mordhar JOANOVICI or JOINOVICI born December 14, 1898 in Chisnau
(Besserabia)

Thanking you for your help

Evelyne LEMBERSKI
evelynelemberski@yahoo.fr
Saint Maurice
France


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen burial of Mordhar JOINOVICI #general

Lemberski Evelyne
 

Ladies and gentlemen,I search the name of the French cemetery where is
buried Mordhar JOANOVICI or JOINOVICI born December 14, 1898 in Chisnau
(Besserabia)

Thanking you for your help

Evelyne LEMBERSKI
evelynelemberski@yahoo.fr
Saint Maurice
France


Family BROBROWSKI #general

Lemberski Evelyne
 

Ladies and gentlemen,I research : the civil marriage certificate of
Eliezer said Leonard BOBROWSKI born on 10/05/1919 or 10/05/1920 in
Samara or Brest Litowsk and Rachela said Rachel GERZENOWICH born in
Pulstuk on 28/03/1928. They were married on May 17, 1949 in Paris
and the birth certificate of their daughter Regine BOBROWSKI born
July 3, 1951 in Paris (France)

This family arrived in New York on 14/05/1952 by boat >from Le Havre
(France)

If you have other information to communicate to me do not hesitate to
write to me

Thanking you for your help

Evelyne LEMBERSKI
evelynelemberski@yahoo.fr
Saint Maurice
(France)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Family BROBROWSKI #general

Lemberski Evelyne
 

Ladies and gentlemen,I research : the civil marriage certificate of
Eliezer said Leonard BOBROWSKI born on 10/05/1919 or 10/05/1920 in
Samara or Brest Litowsk and Rachela said Rachel GERZENOWICH born in
Pulstuk on 28/03/1928. They were married on May 17, 1949 in Paris
and the birth certificate of their daughter Regine BOBROWSKI born
July 3, 1951 in Paris (France)

This family arrived in New York on 14/05/1952 by boat >from Le Havre
(France)

If you have other information to communicate to me do not hesitate to
write to me

Thanking you for your help

Evelyne LEMBERSKI
evelynelemberski@yahoo.fr
Saint Maurice
(France)


Re: Why so few matches? #dna

David Brostoff
 

On Nov 12, 2018, at 2:21 PM, Jeffrey Mark Paull SaxKat@msn.com wrote:

The combination of both of these factors accounts for the much higher
number of genetic matches that are seen on autosomal DNA genetic match
lists. Reporting less than 100 genetic matches is not uncommon for the
results of a Y-DNA test; I have seen cases where an individual had no
Y-DNA genetic matches reported at all.
Yes -- as a point of reference, with FTDNA, I have over 19,040 autosomal
matches, but only 179 Y-DNA matches at the 12-marker level.

David Brostoff


DNA Research #DNA Re: Why so few matches? #dna

David Brostoff
 

On Nov 12, 2018, at 2:21 PM, Jeffrey Mark Paull SaxKat@msn.com wrote:

The combination of both of these factors accounts for the much higher
number of genetic matches that are seen on autosomal DNA genetic match
lists. Reporting less than 100 genetic matches is not uncommon for the
results of a Y-DNA test; I have seen cases where an individual had no
Y-DNA genetic matches reported at all.
Yes -- as a point of reference, with FTDNA, I have over 19,040 autosomal
matches, but only 179 Y-DNA matches at the 12-marker level.

David Brostoff


Prof Mirsky of Yeshiva University #rabbinic

Neil@...
 

Trying to make contact with the family of Professor Mirsky whose
daughter married Meir Brandwein, son of Meshullam Zusha Brandwein and
Menucha (Nechamah) Adler, lived in Jerusalem, both prominent
rabbinical families.

--
Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately.


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Prof Mirsky of Yeshiva University #rabbinic

Neil@...
 

Trying to make contact with the family of Professor Mirsky whose
daughter married Meir Brandwein, son of Meshullam Zusha Brandwein and
Menucha (Nechamah) Adler, lived in Jerusalem, both prominent
rabbinical families.

--
Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately.


Prof Mirsky of Yeshiva University #general

Neil@...
 

Trying to make contact with the family of Professor Mirsky whose
daughter married Meir Brandwein, son of Meshullam Zusha Brandwein and
Menucha (Nechamah) Adler, lived in Jerusalem, both prominent
rabbinical families.

--
Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Prof Mirsky of Yeshiva University #general

Neil@...
 

Trying to make contact with the family of Professor Mirsky whose
daughter married Meir Brandwein, son of Meshullam Zusha Brandwein and
Menucha (Nechamah) Adler, lived in Jerusalem, both prominent
rabbinical families.

--
Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately.


Searching: Lilli (Lily), daughter of Emma (nee Krause) and Otto Heller #general

Tom Navon <tomnavon@...>
 

Dear friends and colleagues,

As part of my research about Otto Heller (1897-1945), the Austrian
communist of Jewish origin, I am looking for a contact with his only
daughter Lilli, or any of her descendants or relatives.

Lilli (or Lily) was born probably in the late 1920's. In the late
1930's she was in exile in France together with her parents. In 1943
Otto was deported to Auschwitz, and Lilli with her mother Emma to
Ravensbrueck (a women concentration camp in Germany). Otto did not
survive, but Lilli and Emma were liberated and came back to live in
Paris.

Since the information about Heller is scarce - any connection to the
family could be very helpful.

Please pass this message over to anyone that might have any idea how
to reach Lilli or other relatives.

If you have any information that could lead to Lilli, or another
relative - please contact me through tomnavon@gmail.com

Gratefully,
Tom Navon
University of Haifa
Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching: Lilli (Lily), daughter of Emma (nee Krause) and Otto Heller #general

Tom Navon <tomnavon@...>
 

Dear friends and colleagues,

As part of my research about Otto Heller (1897-1945), the Austrian
communist of Jewish origin, I am looking for a contact with his only
daughter Lilli, or any of her descendants or relatives.

Lilli (or Lily) was born probably in the late 1920's. In the late
1930's she was in exile in France together with her parents. In 1943
Otto was deported to Auschwitz, and Lilli with her mother Emma to
Ravensbrueck (a women concentration camp in Germany). Otto did not
survive, but Lilli and Emma were liberated and came back to live in
Paris.

Since the information about Heller is scarce - any connection to the
family could be very helpful.

Please pass this message over to anyone that might have any idea how
to reach Lilli or other relatives.

If you have any information that could lead to Lilli, or another
relative - please contact me through tomnavon@gmail.com

Gratefully,
Tom Navon
University of Haifa
Israel


The Galitzianer: Call for Papers #ukraine

Gesher Galicia SIG
 

Gesher Galicia’s journal, the Galitzianer, invites members and
non-members of Gesher Galicia to share family stories and other
accounts of general interest to genealogists. All submissions should
have a clear connection to Austrian Galicia (1772–1918) or to the
interwar period and the Holocaust in the territory of former Galicia.

In addition, the journal is seeking submissions in the following
specific categories:

** Secrets Beyond the Records: Examples include unusual archival
records >from Galicia or surprising details found in various sources
that have reshaped your understanding of your own family history.

** Education: Examples include the impact of education on your own
family in Galicia, the intergenerational tensions over education for
women, and stories about Galician public schools or the schools
established by Jewish philanthropist Baron de Hirsch.

** Galician Profiles: This category includes biographical profiles of
Jewish writers, musicians, artists, mathematicians, and political
figures who were active in Galicia.

** Other Topics: Jewish emigration >from Galicia (why and by what
route), the Jewish press in Galicia (the language and target
audience), literature published in Galicia in Yiddish or Hebrew.

Prior to submitting an article, prospective authors are encouraged to
contact Jodi Benjamin at submissions@geshergalicia.org with a brief
description of their proposal. Please note that all accepted articles
undergo editorial review and revisions to make sure they conform to
the style of the journal.

For other information about the Galitzianer, including general
instructions for authors, please see:
https://www.geshergalicia.org/the-galitzianer/.

Andrew Zalewski
Editor, the Galitzianer
The Quarterly Research Journal of Gesher Galicia
---
PLEASE DO NOT REPLY TO THIS EMAIL ADDRESS.
Send all inquiries to submissions@geshergalicia.org


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine The Galitzianer: Call for Papers #ukraine

Gesher Galicia SIG
 

Gesher Galicia’s journal, the Galitzianer, invites members and
non-members of Gesher Galicia to share family stories and other
accounts of general interest to genealogists. All submissions should
have a clear connection to Austrian Galicia (1772–1918) or to the
interwar period and the Holocaust in the territory of former Galicia.

In addition, the journal is seeking submissions in the following
specific categories:

** Secrets Beyond the Records: Examples include unusual archival
records >from Galicia or surprising details found in various sources
that have reshaped your understanding of your own family history.

** Education: Examples include the impact of education on your own
family in Galicia, the intergenerational tensions over education for
women, and stories about Galician public schools or the schools
established by Jewish philanthropist Baron de Hirsch.

** Galician Profiles: This category includes biographical profiles of
Jewish writers, musicians, artists, mathematicians, and political
figures who were active in Galicia.

** Other Topics: Jewish emigration >from Galicia (why and by what
route), the Jewish press in Galicia (the language and target
audience), literature published in Galicia in Yiddish or Hebrew.

Prior to submitting an article, prospective authors are encouraged to
contact Jodi Benjamin at submissions@geshergalicia.org with a brief
description of their proposal. Please note that all accepted articles
undergo editorial review and revisions to make sure they conform to
the style of the journal.

For other information about the Galitzianer, including general
instructions for authors, please see:
https://www.geshergalicia.org/the-galitzianer/.

Andrew Zalewski
Editor, the Galitzianer
The Quarterly Research Journal of Gesher Galicia
---
PLEASE DO NOT REPLY TO THIS EMAIL ADDRESS.
Send all inquiries to submissions@geshergalicia.org


Re: Why so few matches? #dna

Jeffrey Mark Paull
 

In response to Cindy Gallard's question, "Why so few matches?," there
is a very simple answer as to why the results of autosomal DNA tests
will virtually always show many more genetic matches than the results
of Y-DNA tests. It boils down to a genetic numbers game. Ancestry,
23and Me, or FTDNA autosomal DNA tests will identify genetic matches
from all of your genetic lines, while the Y-DNA test focuses on a single
genetic line only -- the patrilineal line.

As an example, an autosomal DNA match at the 5th cousin level descends
from a common 4th-great-grandparent, which could be >from any one of 64
different genetic ancestral lines, irrespective of whether that line is
maternal or paternal. A 6th cousin descends >from any one of 128
different ancestral lines, and so on. In contrast, all Y-DNA genetic
matches on an individual's match list descend >from a single patrilineal
line.

Another important factor is the relative number of people in the testing
database. Because there are so many more people who test their autosomal
DNA compared to the number who test their Y-DNA, the chances of finding
genetic matches are much greater in the larger autosomal DNA databases.

The combination of both of these factors accounts for the much higher
number of genetic matches that are seen on autosomal DNA genetic match
lists. Reporting less than 100 genetic matches is not uncommon for the
results of a Y-DNA test; I have seen cases where an individual had no
Y-DNA genetic matches reported at all.

All the Best,

Jeffrey Mark Paull

---
From: Cindy g <gallardc@gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2018 16:10:13 -0700

Over the years I have had 39 people people tested. Typically, the matches run into the thousands if not tens of thousand. I have one person whose test results found less than 100 matches. This was the Y chromosome test. Can anyone explain why this might be?
...


DNA Research #DNA RE: Why so few matches? #dna

Jeffrey Mark Paull
 

In response to Cindy Gallard's question, "Why so few matches?," there
is a very simple answer as to why the results of autosomal DNA tests
will virtually always show many more genetic matches than the results
of Y-DNA tests. It boils down to a genetic numbers game. Ancestry,
23and Me, or FTDNA autosomal DNA tests will identify genetic matches
from all of your genetic lines, while the Y-DNA test focuses on a single
genetic line only -- the patrilineal line.

As an example, an autosomal DNA match at the 5th cousin level descends
from a common 4th-great-grandparent, which could be >from any one of 64
different genetic ancestral lines, irrespective of whether that line is
maternal or paternal. A 6th cousin descends >from any one of 128
different ancestral lines, and so on. In contrast, all Y-DNA genetic
matches on an individual's match list descend >from a single patrilineal
line.

Another important factor is the relative number of people in the testing
database. Because there are so many more people who test their autosomal
DNA compared to the number who test their Y-DNA, the chances of finding
genetic matches are much greater in the larger autosomal DNA databases.

The combination of both of these factors accounts for the much higher
number of genetic matches that are seen on autosomal DNA genetic match
lists. Reporting less than 100 genetic matches is not uncommon for the
results of a Y-DNA test; I have seen cases where an individual had no
Y-DNA genetic matches reported at all.

All the Best,

Jeffrey Mark Paull

---
From: Cindy g <gallardc@gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2018 16:10:13 -0700

Over the years I have had 39 people people tested. Typically, the matches run into the thousands if not tens of thousand. I have one person whose test results found less than 100 matches. This was the Y chromosome test. Can anyone explain why this might be?
...


Re: why so few matches? #dna

Herbert Lazerow
 

Over the years I have had 39 people people tested. Typically, the
matches run into the thousands if not tens of thousand. I have one
person whose test results found less than 100 matches. This was the Y
chromosome test.
There will always be fewer matches on Y-dna testing than on
autosomal testing because you will only match on Y testing if you and
the match are males (that eliminates half the population), and you are
descended in an unbroken male line >from a common male ancestor. That
eliminates many more people.
Bert
--
Herbert Lazerow
San Diego


DNA Research #DNA Re: why so few matches? #dna

Herbert Lazerow
 

Over the years I have had 39 people people tested. Typically, the
matches run into the thousands if not tens of thousand. I have one
person whose test results found less than 100 matches. This was the Y
chromosome test.
There will always be fewer matches on Y-dna testing than on
autosomal testing because you will only match on Y testing if you and
the match are males (that eliminates half the population), and you are
descended in an unbroken male line >from a common male ancestor. That
eliminates many more people.
Bert
--
Herbert Lazerow
San Diego


Announcing the publication the Memorial Book of Stryj, Ukraine by YBIP #ukraine

Joel Alpert
 

The Yizkor-Books-In-Print Project of JewishGen is proud to announce
the publication of its 74th title, “Book of Stryj (Ukraine)” –
“Translation of Sefer Stryj”

The Original Yizkor Book, Edited by N. Kudish, Tel Aviv, Published by
the Former Residents of Stryj in Israel, 1962

Translated by Susan Rosin, Yocheved Klausner, Israel Pickholtz, Ganit
Eiron, Daniella Heller, and Susannah Juni. Cover Design: Nili
Goldman

The translation is hard cover, 11” by 8.5”, 742 pages with all the
illustrations and photographs of the original Yizkor book.

Amazon List Price is $66.95. It is available on Amazon for around
$48. Make sure to look for the lowest price. This is a wonderful
Chanukah Gift for an deserving relative or yourself.

Stryj was first populated by Jews in the middle of the 16th century. The
permit to build the first synagogue was given in 1689. Since the
beginning of their settlement in Stryj the Jews made their living by
selling spirits, wholesale and retail merchandising, providing tax and
customs services and banking for the nobles. After Poland was
partitioned in 1772, Stryj became part of the Austrian Empire. At the
time there were about 440 Jewish families in the town and its suburbs.
After World War I, Stryj briefly became a part of the West Ukrainian
People's Republic (a short-lived republic that existed >from November
1918 to July 1919 in eastern Galicia). In 1919, the area became a part
of free and sovereign Poland. The town had a Jewish population of
10,988 in 1921 and about 12,000 in 1939. Jews were merchants,
craftsmen and many were professionals: doctors, lawyers, engineers,
etc.

The Germans occupied Stryj on July 2nd, 1941 after breaking the
Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact and hundreds of Jews were immediately killed.
Murders and deportations followed and in August of 1943 the Stryj
ghetto and labor camps around town were liquidated. When the Soviet
army occupied Stryj in August 1944 there were only a few Jewish
survivors. No Jewish community was re-established.

This book tells the story of Stryj’s Jews during a period of 400 years
of the existence of their community: their struggles and achievements,
their dreams and hopes, the institutions they established and the many
great and famous personalities >from town.This book serves to
commemorate the once vital and flourishing community of Stryj that no
longer exists.

For more information go to:
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Stryj.html

Alternate names for the town are: Stryy [Ukrainian], Stryj [Polish],
Stry [Yiddish], Stryi, Stri, Stria, Stryje

Nearby Jewish Communities:
Lysyatychi 7 miles NE
Sokolow 9 miles ESE
Mizhrichchya 10 miles SSE
Woloska Wies 13 miles S
Bolekhiv 13 miles S
Stebnyk 13 miles WNW
Medenychi 13 miles NNW
Hnizdychiv 14 miles ENE
Orov 15 miles WSW
Zhydachiv 16 miles NE
Verkhneye Sinevidnoye 16 miles SW
Truskavets 16 miles W
Drohobych 17 miles WNW
Rozdil 18 miles NNE
Berezdivtsi 19 miles NE
Mykolayiv 19 miles NNE
Zhuravno 20 miles E

We hope you find this of interest for you and your family in
discovering the history of your ancestors. This would make a birthday
gift for a loved one.

For orders 4 or more books to one address in the US, UK, Canada or
Australia, we can offer you a significantly reduced price of $30 per
book including shipping (Amazon discount price is about $49 plus
shipping). Email to ybip@jewishgen.org. Consider this as a Chanukah
Gift, or donation to your local university or public library. Email
to ybip@jewishgen.org to get prices for other locations outside of the
US.

Joel Alpert, Coordinator of the Yizkor-Books-In-Print Project


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Announcing the publication the Memorial Book of Stryj, Ukraine by YBIP #ukraine

Joel Alpert
 

The Yizkor-Books-In-Print Project of JewishGen is proud to announce
the publication of its 74th title, “Book of Stryj (Ukraine)” –
“Translation of Sefer Stryj”

The Original Yizkor Book, Edited by N. Kudish, Tel Aviv, Published by
the Former Residents of Stryj in Israel, 1962

Translated by Susan Rosin, Yocheved Klausner, Israel Pickholtz, Ganit
Eiron, Daniella Heller, and Susannah Juni. Cover Design: Nili
Goldman

The translation is hard cover, 11” by 8.5”, 742 pages with all the
illustrations and photographs of the original Yizkor book.

Amazon List Price is $66.95. It is available on Amazon for around
$48. Make sure to look for the lowest price. This is a wonderful
Chanukah Gift for an deserving relative or yourself.

Stryj was first populated by Jews in the middle of the 16th century. The
permit to build the first synagogue was given in 1689. Since the
beginning of their settlement in Stryj the Jews made their living by
selling spirits, wholesale and retail merchandising, providing tax and
customs services and banking for the nobles. After Poland was
partitioned in 1772, Stryj became part of the Austrian Empire. At the
time there were about 440 Jewish families in the town and its suburbs.
After World War I, Stryj briefly became a part of the West Ukrainian
People's Republic (a short-lived republic that existed >from November
1918 to July 1919 in eastern Galicia). In 1919, the area became a part
of free and sovereign Poland. The town had a Jewish population of
10,988 in 1921 and about 12,000 in 1939. Jews were merchants,
craftsmen and many were professionals: doctors, lawyers, engineers,
etc.

The Germans occupied Stryj on July 2nd, 1941 after breaking the
Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact and hundreds of Jews were immediately killed.
Murders and deportations followed and in August of 1943 the Stryj
ghetto and labor camps around town were liquidated. When the Soviet
army occupied Stryj in August 1944 there were only a few Jewish
survivors. No Jewish community was re-established.

This book tells the story of Stryj’s Jews during a period of 400 years
of the existence of their community: their struggles and achievements,
their dreams and hopes, the institutions they established and the many
great and famous personalities >from town.This book serves to
commemorate the once vital and flourishing community of Stryj that no
longer exists.

For more information go to:
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Stryj.html

Alternate names for the town are: Stryy [Ukrainian], Stryj [Polish],
Stry [Yiddish], Stryi, Stri, Stria, Stryje

Nearby Jewish Communities:
Lysyatychi 7 miles NE
Sokolow 9 miles ESE
Mizhrichchya 10 miles SSE
Woloska Wies 13 miles S
Bolekhiv 13 miles S
Stebnyk 13 miles WNW
Medenychi 13 miles NNW
Hnizdychiv 14 miles ENE
Orov 15 miles WSW
Zhydachiv 16 miles NE
Verkhneye Sinevidnoye 16 miles SW
Truskavets 16 miles W
Drohobych 17 miles WNW
Rozdil 18 miles NNE
Berezdivtsi 19 miles NE
Mykolayiv 19 miles NNE
Zhuravno 20 miles E

We hope you find this of interest for you and your family in
discovering the history of your ancestors. This would make a birthday
gift for a loved one.

For orders 4 or more books to one address in the US, UK, Canada or
Australia, we can offer you a significantly reduced price of $30 per
book including shipping (Amazon discount price is about $49 plus
shipping). Email to ybip@jewishgen.org. Consider this as a Chanukah
Gift, or donation to your local university or public library. Email
to ybip@jewishgen.org to get prices for other locations outside of the
US.

Joel Alpert, Coordinator of the Yizkor-Books-In-Print Project

33281 - 33300 of 658037