Date   

Romanian translators needed #general

Bob Wascou <robertw252@...>
 

ROM-Sig and JewishGen need some good Romanian
translators who are willing to work on a Romanian
Yizkor book >from Iasi. You must be able to devote time
to this project so that we can get this book on
JewishGen as soon as possible.

If you are interested in helping to translate this
Iasi Yizkor book please contact Terry Lasky, project
coordinator, at talasky@comcast.net.

Bob Wascou
ROM-SIG Resource Coordinator


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Romanian translators needed #general

Bob Wascou <robertw252@...>
 

ROM-Sig and JewishGen need some good Romanian
translators who are willing to work on a Romanian
Yizkor book >from Iasi. You must be able to devote time
to this project so that we can get this book on
JewishGen as soon as possible.

If you are interested in helping to translate this
Iasi Yizkor book please contact Terry Lasky, project
coordinator, at talasky@comcast.net.

Bob Wascou
ROM-SIG Resource Coordinator


searching for Surya Hakier #poland

Safarismom@...
 

Hi
I am doing some research for a family friend who is seeking information on
her cousin Surya Hakier who emigrated to the US (New York to be exact) after
WW2. Any help or information would be most appreciated. Please respond
privately to Charlotte Rutta at safarismom@aol.com

thank you
Charlotte Rutta
Van Nuys Ca


JRI Poland #Poland searching for Surya Hakier #poland

Safarismom@...
 

Hi
I am doing some research for a family friend who is seeking information on
her cousin Surya Hakier who emigrated to the US (New York to be exact) after
WW2. Any help or information would be most appreciated. Please respond
privately to Charlotte Rutta at safarismom@aol.com

thank you
Charlotte Rutta
Van Nuys Ca


Jonava Yizkor Book Translation Underway #lithuania

Susan Goldsmith
 

Dear Yanova (Jonava) Landsleyt and all Litvak SIG members,

Exciting news: the Jonava (Yanova) Yizkor Book translation
is underway, under the auspices of JewishGen's Yizkor Book
Translation Project. I have volunteered to serve as coordinator.

I am grateful to Shaiah Ivensky (Sidney Iwens) who kindly provided
a copy of the Jonava Yizkor Book and inspired my participation in this
project. I had almost finished reading Sidney's memoir,
How Dark the Heavens, when I turned the page to find mention of two
members of my Goldshmidt family >from Kaunas and Jonava who
survived the Shoah. I was in a state of overjoyed disbelief.
I located Sidney and telephoned him immediately. We spoke a long time.
It was the beshert reading of Sidney's book and the ability to reach and
speak with him that led me to find and unite with brothers Avraham and
Meier-Leib Goldshmidt Zoref, and their surviving sister Asnat, in Israel
in the summers of 2004 and 2005.

Our effort will be to translate the entire Hebrew and Yiddish
portions of the book, starting with the Table of Contents and List of
Authors,the Necrology, (a list of residents killed by the Nazis and
Lithuanians), a list of men and boys killed in service to the Russian
Army, and the photocaptions. "Jonava's own" Sonia Kovitz contributed
countless hours to beginthe translation. Due to the demands and scope
of the project, we have retained translator Jerrold Landau to continue.
Translated portions will appear at
www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Jonava/Jonava.html, as soon as the
pages are proofed and funds are raised to pay our translator.

Researchers with Jonava ties will find in the Yizkor Book
crucial genealogical information about our families, unlikely to be
found in any other source. It is essential that we and our families
contribute as generouslyas possible to the translation of the Yizkor
Book. Joyce Field, Director of the Yizkor Book Translation Project,
has estimated the translation cost at $16,000+ U.S. There are at least
120 of us researching Jonava with many more who have family
in nearby shtetlach of Seta, Kaunas, Ukmerge, Vandziogala,and Krakes,
to name a few, whose families may be included in the Yanova Book.

To contribute please go to
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
Scroll down to Jonava, Lithuania. Jewish Gen has numerous concurrent
Yizkor Book translation fundraising projects, so it is important that you
fill in the amount for Jonava.

No contribution is too small. (It must meet JewishGen's $10US minimum).
No contribution is too large. While making a contribution for the Jonava
translation, please consider also making a contribution to JewishGen itself,
without which this project would not be possible. While JewishGen is based
on volunteers, keeping the servers up and running and addressing our
phenomenal exponential growth costs real dollars. While at the site,
you might find of interest a fund-raising program of JewishGen, the
memorial plaques for the Yizkor books. The plaques memorialize your
loved ones and can be placed on the Yizkor page where your ancestor
is mentioned. Details about the program are available on the website.

In order for me to thank you and to confirm that your contributions
are correctly credited to the Jonava account, please let me know the date
and amount of your contribution.

I mention seeking contributions >from our families, as well as giving
ourselves, because the richness of detail and insight in the Yanova Yizkor
Book will be meaningful for family members perhaps not interested in
genealogy as such, but keenly interested in reading what an ancestor
has written, seeing a photo, or learning firsthand how our ancestors
lived and how they survived or died. We are the future generations for
whom this book was published; it is we who will remember and pass on the
memories so carefully set out for us in this book.

In this announcement, below, you will find many of the surnames that
appear in the Yizkor Book. In the book itself, most surnames are followed
by the given names of family members, indications of relationships, maiden
names and sometimes, employment. Occasionally, first names are given
with indication of occupations.

**In appreciation of your contribution, I will email the details
that appear with each name in advance of their appearance on the JewishGen
Yizkor Book site.**

Yanova on the Vilia, Yizkor Book in memory of the Jewish Community
of Yanova, is a tribute to a community; to its members, whose lives were
extinguished by the Nazis and their willing Lithuanian collaborators; and
toits survivors, who generously contributed chapters to the book and/or
provided inspiration, support and aided in its publication. Edited by
Shimeon Noy, with materials collected by Itzchak Burstein, and
illustrations by Larissa Bolnik, the book is more than 460 pages in
length, filled with many, many captioned photos. The book is written in
Hebrew, Yiddish and English. Irgun Yotzei Yanova (Organization of Jonava
Landsleyt in Israel) with the assistance of Jonava landsleyt in the
United States and South Africa,published the book in Tel Aviv in 1972.

The English chapters, pp. 3-35 in the original, may be found as
frames 558-592, on the New York Public Library Yizkor Book website,
http://yizkor.nypl.org/, where the book appears in its entirety. Note
that
the library lists Jonava as Janova in its index. On the Jonava shtetl
website, http://www.mindspring.com/~peggyf/jonava.htm, maintained with
dedication by Peggy Freedman, there is a history of Jonava by Itzak
Judelevitch, excerpted >from the Jonava Yizkor Book section,
Beginning, Growth and Destruction.

As movingly explained in the Introduction, by Itzchak Ben David
Burstein, it was on January 17, 1967, when approximately thirty survivors
met to unveil the memorial plaque for the martyrs of Jonava, that they
decided to publish a book that would perpetuate their town Yanova
for future generations.

An opinion was expressed not to publish a book.
The reasons were that the end of the elders
who remember Jonava will be death, and
the younger generation, the children of those
who came >from the town, born in Israel,
America, or Russia are not interested in such
a topic. Therefore, it would be a shame to
invest so much energy and money into this.
The majority stood firmly on their opinion
with the hope that the 350 natives of the town,
scattered in the Land [of Israel]and throughout
the Diaspora, would leaf through the book and
read it with feelings of honor and love.
Their town would spread out for a second time
before the eyes of their spirit with its cultural
and social institutions, buildings,activists, and
common folk. They claimed that no small
number of the second and third generation
of our town would take an interest in the book,
in order to research their ancestral heritage.

* * *

The reader will certainly discover the unique
characteristics of Yanova, about which he had
not yet learned, as he reads through the book.
To the Jewish residents of this town, to its youth
who were educated with Mapu novels and who
dreamed of the Land of Israel, to those who
have a part in what transpired and what is
transpiring here in the Land, and to the
scattered natives of Jonava wherever they are,
to you this book is dedicated.


As many of you know, Jonava developed on the Vilia River; Jews
began to settle there in the 18th Century. By 1897, 3,975 Jews resided in
Jonava, constituting 80% of the population. Jews were shopkeepers and
skilled craftspeople, providing virtually all supplies and services needed
by the neighboring peasant farmers. Jews also participated in the timber
industry and furniture-making for which Jonava was noted. Although Jews
were expelled >from Jonava by the Russians during WW I, many returned after
the war. Jonava was distinguished by the fact that after WW I as many as
two-thirds of the municipal council were Jewish as were the Mayor and
Deputy Mayor. By the 1930s however, Lithuanians in Jonava formulated a
policy of boycotting Jewish businesses, thereby enabling their own
fledgling shops and services to become established without competition.
The Jewish population in 1940 decreased to 3,000, 60% of the total.
Many Jonava Jews had emigrated to the United States, South Africa and
Palestine; Jews fleeing Poland had arrived in Jonava.

On June 22, 1941, the Nazis invaded Lithuania. On that day, the
Deputy Mayor was killed by a Lithuanian; the following day, 70 Jews were
killed by a battlefield explosion; many Jews were murdered by their
Lithuanian neighbors. On June 26, Jews were rounded up and forced to the
market square where Lithuanians stood ready to murder them. A mortar
exploded in the square, disrupting the annihilation plan, but only for
a few days. >from June 29, 1941 on, 2,108 Jewish citizens of Jonava were
shot in the Girelke Wood just outside Jonava.

Although many Lithuanian shtetlach were not able to publish their own
Yizkor Book due to the fact that even before the Nazis entered Lithunian
towns, the Lithuanians had already slaughtered close to 95% of the Jews,
we are fortunate that Jonava did have survivors, who,as noted above,
took on the harrowing, sorrowful task of remembering their lost families
and town.

The following surnames appear in the Yizkor Book necrology. Please
note that there may be slightly different spellings for the same surname,
eg., Izikovitz and Itzikovitz; these variations will be further proofed and
edited. I did not want to delay contacting you and seeking your
enthusiasm and support.

Draft Necrology Surname List

Abramovitch, Abramson, Avraham The Zeeika,(Footnote in text here:
We apologize that we were not able to determine the full names of a
few of the victims, and are forced to identify them by their nicknames),
Adler, Untershatz, Opnitzky, Opnik, Ivensky, Izraelson, Izakowitch,
Intriligiter, Itzikowitch, Aiker, Alter The Pot Maker, Aronson,
Archikh The Linik, Boz, Boilsky, Bomash The Doctor, Burstein, Baten,
Blumberg, Beilin, Baron, Bronznik, Berzin, Braznikov, Gutler, Gold,
Goldman, Goldstein, Goldschmid, Gurwitch, Gordon, Gorfein, Ginzburg,
Gis, Gelbroit, Glaz, Glazer, Galinsky, Gelfer, Ganis, Garber,Grodski,
Grun, Grossman, Gertner, Greenblatt, Greenberg, Dabol, Dobiansky
Dudak, Davidowitch, Dezent, Deitz, Dembo, Dasnik, Droskin, Honigman,
Heiman, Hirshka The Yellow, Hendler, Hertz The Carpenter, Wolk,
Vidzky, Weiler, Weiner, Wild, Wilk, Vilkomirsky, Vinitzky, Wunder,
Veps The Miller, Wolfe, Valchokovsky, Jochovsky, Zopowitch, Silber,
Zlonker, Zelmanowitch, Zandman, Zak, Urlowitch, Zaks, Chavels,
Chasid, Chanoch, Teitelbaum, Taffer, Tartek, Yag, Yasinowitch,
Yudel The Shochet, Yudelowitch, Yudka The Consul, Josefs, Yuter,
Yonenson, Jonas, Joselowitch, Jalinowitch, Yentke Kapusta,
Janusowitch, Yankelowitch, Yankel The Butcher, Yaffa, Kagan,
Kahansky, Katz, Lan, Loit, Levin, Bilbotzky, Traspolsky, Kairo,
Kairovsky, Levin, Levitz, Lopiansky, Lukman, Liber,
Liberman The Barber, Leichter, Linda The Blacksmith,
Lipschitz The Shochet, Landman, Lantzman, Leffer, Meir,
Movshowitch, Monitz, Miasnik, Milner, Miltz, Milstein, Mines,
Mechnik, Melamedowitch, Manosowitch, Mar, Merbiansky,
Margolis, Recha The Miller (he was known as the son of Recha
rather than Recha being a formal last name), Novichowitch,
Nachumowitch, Nachumke The Tailor, Nemyot, Segal,
Segalovsky, Solsky, Stoller, Silman, Sintochky, Sinka,
Slomim, Slibkin, Sandler, Senior, Sesitzky, Ovadya The Tailor,
Epstein, Palan, Paltz, Pegirsky, Fugir (Pogir), Pozitzer, Furman,
Petrikansky, Pimstein, Plaks, Feldman, Fleischman, Plakser,
Prakt, Ferber, Praboznik, Fried, Friedburg, Friedland,
Friedman, Perlstein, Frank, Perchik, Zibol, Cherniak,
Chernman, Kaper, Koblansky, Kolbiansky, Kopiliansky,
Kushilevitz, Keidansky, Kerzner, Klotz, Klibansky, Klein,
Kalinsky, Kapol, Kniper, Kaplan, Katzenberg, Ram,
Krabtzky, Kronick, Kremenitzky, Ran, Rabiner, Rubin,
Rubinowitch, Rosenberg The Teacher, Reznik, Ribel,
Reibstein, Rikless, Rikliansky, Rashkes, Shabtai (may be a
nickname rather than formal surname), Shoham,
Shulheifer, Shachor, Stein, Steinbach, Strum, Stern,
Simkowitch, Shlomowitch, Shlupsky, Sheltoper,
Shlomins, Shpilansky, Shapira, Sharshab, Shegansky,
Urlowitch, Yaffa, Nachmanowitch

The list is long, and is certainly not complete.
This page is dedicated to filling in missing names.

The Few of the Many Of our Townsfolk who Fought
on the Fronts and Fell in Battle

Atketz, Iker, Biarsky, Berzin, Bereznikov, Goldschmid,
Gurevitch, Grun, Greenberg, Dabol, Dodick, Droskin,
Vichov, Wunder, Chasid, Jag, Levin, Lukman, Magid,
Monosowitch, Milner, Segal, Namiot, Fugir (Pogir),
Fein, Kolbitzky, Klotz, Rashkes, Strum

Please give as generously as you can. If you have any questions,
please do not hesitate to contact me privately. I will keep you informed
of our progress. If you know of others interested in Jonava, please let me
know or share this message with them

Thank you for your support,
Susan Goldsmith
Piedmont CA

GOLDSHMIDT, GITTES (GADIE, GADYE, GIDUT, GDUD), F(P)ILVINSKY,
SHOLOM(SHLOM)(SHLIOM)OVICH, DRUSKOVICH, LANGMAN, NEKRITZ,
RANDMAN, ROCHELSON, ZHIZSMORSKI, ZUKHOVSKI Lithuania
TZOREF, GOLDSHMIT, AMORON, LANGMAN, LUKMAN, RANDMAN, ROZANSKY,
RUSEK, TOBIAS,TRIBUKH, ZILBOVITZ Israel
TOBIAS, ROZHANSKY, FOGEL, PROTAS, RUSEK, TRIBUKH, GUREWICZ, DRASNAN
Belarus


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Jonava Yizkor Book Translation Underway #lithuania

Susan Goldsmith
 

Dear Yanova (Jonava) Landsleyt and all Litvak SIG members,

Exciting news: the Jonava (Yanova) Yizkor Book translation
is underway, under the auspices of JewishGen's Yizkor Book
Translation Project. I have volunteered to serve as coordinator.

I am grateful to Shaiah Ivensky (Sidney Iwens) who kindly provided
a copy of the Jonava Yizkor Book and inspired my participation in this
project. I had almost finished reading Sidney's memoir,
How Dark the Heavens, when I turned the page to find mention of two
members of my Goldshmidt family >from Kaunas and Jonava who
survived the Shoah. I was in a state of overjoyed disbelief.
I located Sidney and telephoned him immediately. We spoke a long time.
It was the beshert reading of Sidney's book and the ability to reach and
speak with him that led me to find and unite with brothers Avraham and
Meier-Leib Goldshmidt Zoref, and their surviving sister Asnat, in Israel
in the summers of 2004 and 2005.

Our effort will be to translate the entire Hebrew and Yiddish
portions of the book, starting with the Table of Contents and List of
Authors,the Necrology, (a list of residents killed by the Nazis and
Lithuanians), a list of men and boys killed in service to the Russian
Army, and the photocaptions. "Jonava's own" Sonia Kovitz contributed
countless hours to beginthe translation. Due to the demands and scope
of the project, we have retained translator Jerrold Landau to continue.
Translated portions will appear at
www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Jonava/Jonava.html, as soon as the
pages are proofed and funds are raised to pay our translator.

Researchers with Jonava ties will find in the Yizkor Book
crucial genealogical information about our families, unlikely to be
found in any other source. It is essential that we and our families
contribute as generouslyas possible to the translation of the Yizkor
Book. Joyce Field, Director of the Yizkor Book Translation Project,
has estimated the translation cost at $16,000+ U.S. There are at least
120 of us researching Jonava with many more who have family
in nearby shtetlach of Seta, Kaunas, Ukmerge, Vandziogala,and Krakes,
to name a few, whose families may be included in the Yanova Book.

To contribute please go to
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
Scroll down to Jonava, Lithuania. Jewish Gen has numerous concurrent
Yizkor Book translation fundraising projects, so it is important that you
fill in the amount for Jonava.

No contribution is too small. (It must meet JewishGen's $10US minimum).
No contribution is too large. While making a contribution for the Jonava
translation, please consider also making a contribution to JewishGen itself,
without which this project would not be possible. While JewishGen is based
on volunteers, keeping the servers up and running and addressing our
phenomenal exponential growth costs real dollars. While at the site,
you might find of interest a fund-raising program of JewishGen, the
memorial plaques for the Yizkor books. The plaques memorialize your
loved ones and can be placed on the Yizkor page where your ancestor
is mentioned. Details about the program are available on the website.

In order for me to thank you and to confirm that your contributions
are correctly credited to the Jonava account, please let me know the date
and amount of your contribution.

I mention seeking contributions >from our families, as well as giving
ourselves, because the richness of detail and insight in the Yanova Yizkor
Book will be meaningful for family members perhaps not interested in
genealogy as such, but keenly interested in reading what an ancestor
has written, seeing a photo, or learning firsthand how our ancestors
lived and how they survived or died. We are the future generations for
whom this book was published; it is we who will remember and pass on the
memories so carefully set out for us in this book.

In this announcement, below, you will find many of the surnames that
appear in the Yizkor Book. In the book itself, most surnames are followed
by the given names of family members, indications of relationships, maiden
names and sometimes, employment. Occasionally, first names are given
with indication of occupations.

**In appreciation of your contribution, I will email the details
that appear with each name in advance of their appearance on the JewishGen
Yizkor Book site.**

Yanova on the Vilia, Yizkor Book in memory of the Jewish Community
of Yanova, is a tribute to a community; to its members, whose lives were
extinguished by the Nazis and their willing Lithuanian collaborators; and
toits survivors, who generously contributed chapters to the book and/or
provided inspiration, support and aided in its publication. Edited by
Shimeon Noy, with materials collected by Itzchak Burstein, and
illustrations by Larissa Bolnik, the book is more than 460 pages in
length, filled with many, many captioned photos. The book is written in
Hebrew, Yiddish and English. Irgun Yotzei Yanova (Organization of Jonava
Landsleyt in Israel) with the assistance of Jonava landsleyt in the
United States and South Africa,published the book in Tel Aviv in 1972.

The English chapters, pp. 3-35 in the original, may be found as
frames 558-592, on the New York Public Library Yizkor Book website,
http://yizkor.nypl.org/, where the book appears in its entirety. Note
that
the library lists Jonava as Janova in its index. On the Jonava shtetl
website, http://www.mindspring.com/~peggyf/jonava.htm, maintained with
dedication by Peggy Freedman, there is a history of Jonava by Itzak
Judelevitch, excerpted >from the Jonava Yizkor Book section,
Beginning, Growth and Destruction.

As movingly explained in the Introduction, by Itzchak Ben David
Burstein, it was on January 17, 1967, when approximately thirty survivors
met to unveil the memorial plaque for the martyrs of Jonava, that they
decided to publish a book that would perpetuate their town Yanova
for future generations.

An opinion was expressed not to publish a book.
The reasons were that the end of the elders
who remember Jonava will be death, and
the younger generation, the children of those
who came >from the town, born in Israel,
America, or Russia are not interested in such
a topic. Therefore, it would be a shame to
invest so much energy and money into this.
The majority stood firmly on their opinion
with the hope that the 350 natives of the town,
scattered in the Land [of Israel]and throughout
the Diaspora, would leaf through the book and
read it with feelings of honor and love.
Their town would spread out for a second time
before the eyes of their spirit with its cultural
and social institutions, buildings,activists, and
common folk. They claimed that no small
number of the second and third generation
of our town would take an interest in the book,
in order to research their ancestral heritage.

* * *

The reader will certainly discover the unique
characteristics of Yanova, about which he had
not yet learned, as he reads through the book.
To the Jewish residents of this town, to its youth
who were educated with Mapu novels and who
dreamed of the Land of Israel, to those who
have a part in what transpired and what is
transpiring here in the Land, and to the
scattered natives of Jonava wherever they are,
to you this book is dedicated.


As many of you know, Jonava developed on the Vilia River; Jews
began to settle there in the 18th Century. By 1897, 3,975 Jews resided in
Jonava, constituting 80% of the population. Jews were shopkeepers and
skilled craftspeople, providing virtually all supplies and services needed
by the neighboring peasant farmers. Jews also participated in the timber
industry and furniture-making for which Jonava was noted. Although Jews
were expelled >from Jonava by the Russians during WW I, many returned after
the war. Jonava was distinguished by the fact that after WW I as many as
two-thirds of the municipal council were Jewish as were the Mayor and
Deputy Mayor. By the 1930s however, Lithuanians in Jonava formulated a
policy of boycotting Jewish businesses, thereby enabling their own
fledgling shops and services to become established without competition.
The Jewish population in 1940 decreased to 3,000, 60% of the total.
Many Jonava Jews had emigrated to the United States, South Africa and
Palestine; Jews fleeing Poland had arrived in Jonava.

On June 22, 1941, the Nazis invaded Lithuania. On that day, the
Deputy Mayor was killed by a Lithuanian; the following day, 70 Jews were
killed by a battlefield explosion; many Jews were murdered by their
Lithuanian neighbors. On June 26, Jews were rounded up and forced to the
market square where Lithuanians stood ready to murder them. A mortar
exploded in the square, disrupting the annihilation plan, but only for
a few days. >from June 29, 1941 on, 2,108 Jewish citizens of Jonava were
shot in the Girelke Wood just outside Jonava.

Although many Lithuanian shtetlach were not able to publish their own
Yizkor Book due to the fact that even before the Nazis entered Lithunian
towns, the Lithuanians had already slaughtered close to 95% of the Jews,
we are fortunate that Jonava did have survivors, who,as noted above,
took on the harrowing, sorrowful task of remembering their lost families
and town.

The following surnames appear in the Yizkor Book necrology. Please
note that there may be slightly different spellings for the same surname,
eg., Izikovitz and Itzikovitz; these variations will be further proofed and
edited. I did not want to delay contacting you and seeking your
enthusiasm and support.

Draft Necrology Surname List

Abramovitch, Abramson, Avraham The Zeeika,(Footnote in text here:
We apologize that we were not able to determine the full names of a
few of the victims, and are forced to identify them by their nicknames),
Adler, Untershatz, Opnitzky, Opnik, Ivensky, Izraelson, Izakowitch,
Intriligiter, Itzikowitch, Aiker, Alter The Pot Maker, Aronson,
Archikh The Linik, Boz, Boilsky, Bomash The Doctor, Burstein, Baten,
Blumberg, Beilin, Baron, Bronznik, Berzin, Braznikov, Gutler, Gold,
Goldman, Goldstein, Goldschmid, Gurwitch, Gordon, Gorfein, Ginzburg,
Gis, Gelbroit, Glaz, Glazer, Galinsky, Gelfer, Ganis, Garber,Grodski,
Grun, Grossman, Gertner, Greenblatt, Greenberg, Dabol, Dobiansky
Dudak, Davidowitch, Dezent, Deitz, Dembo, Dasnik, Droskin, Honigman,
Heiman, Hirshka The Yellow, Hendler, Hertz The Carpenter, Wolk,
Vidzky, Weiler, Weiner, Wild, Wilk, Vilkomirsky, Vinitzky, Wunder,
Veps The Miller, Wolfe, Valchokovsky, Jochovsky, Zopowitch, Silber,
Zlonker, Zelmanowitch, Zandman, Zak, Urlowitch, Zaks, Chavels,
Chasid, Chanoch, Teitelbaum, Taffer, Tartek, Yag, Yasinowitch,
Yudel The Shochet, Yudelowitch, Yudka The Consul, Josefs, Yuter,
Yonenson, Jonas, Joselowitch, Jalinowitch, Yentke Kapusta,
Janusowitch, Yankelowitch, Yankel The Butcher, Yaffa, Kagan,
Kahansky, Katz, Lan, Loit, Levin, Bilbotzky, Traspolsky, Kairo,
Kairovsky, Levin, Levitz, Lopiansky, Lukman, Liber,
Liberman The Barber, Leichter, Linda The Blacksmith,
Lipschitz The Shochet, Landman, Lantzman, Leffer, Meir,
Movshowitch, Monitz, Miasnik, Milner, Miltz, Milstein, Mines,
Mechnik, Melamedowitch, Manosowitch, Mar, Merbiansky,
Margolis, Recha The Miller (he was known as the son of Recha
rather than Recha being a formal last name), Novichowitch,
Nachumowitch, Nachumke The Tailor, Nemyot, Segal,
Segalovsky, Solsky, Stoller, Silman, Sintochky, Sinka,
Slomim, Slibkin, Sandler, Senior, Sesitzky, Ovadya The Tailor,
Epstein, Palan, Paltz, Pegirsky, Fugir (Pogir), Pozitzer, Furman,
Petrikansky, Pimstein, Plaks, Feldman, Fleischman, Plakser,
Prakt, Ferber, Praboznik, Fried, Friedburg, Friedland,
Friedman, Perlstein, Frank, Perchik, Zibol, Cherniak,
Chernman, Kaper, Koblansky, Kolbiansky, Kopiliansky,
Kushilevitz, Keidansky, Kerzner, Klotz, Klibansky, Klein,
Kalinsky, Kapol, Kniper, Kaplan, Katzenberg, Ram,
Krabtzky, Kronick, Kremenitzky, Ran, Rabiner, Rubin,
Rubinowitch, Rosenberg The Teacher, Reznik, Ribel,
Reibstein, Rikless, Rikliansky, Rashkes, Shabtai (may be a
nickname rather than formal surname), Shoham,
Shulheifer, Shachor, Stein, Steinbach, Strum, Stern,
Simkowitch, Shlomowitch, Shlupsky, Sheltoper,
Shlomins, Shpilansky, Shapira, Sharshab, Shegansky,
Urlowitch, Yaffa, Nachmanowitch

The list is long, and is certainly not complete.
This page is dedicated to filling in missing names.

The Few of the Many Of our Townsfolk who Fought
on the Fronts and Fell in Battle

Atketz, Iker, Biarsky, Berzin, Bereznikov, Goldschmid,
Gurevitch, Grun, Greenberg, Dabol, Dodick, Droskin,
Vichov, Wunder, Chasid, Jag, Levin, Lukman, Magid,
Monosowitch, Milner, Segal, Namiot, Fugir (Pogir),
Fein, Kolbitzky, Klotz, Rashkes, Strum

Please give as generously as you can. If you have any questions,
please do not hesitate to contact me privately. I will keep you informed
of our progress. If you know of others interested in Jonava, please let me
know or share this message with them

Thank you for your support,
Susan Goldsmith
Piedmont CA

GOLDSHMIDT, GITTES (GADIE, GADYE, GIDUT, GDUD), F(P)ILVINSKY,
SHOLOM(SHLOM)(SHLIOM)OVICH, DRUSKOVICH, LANGMAN, NEKRITZ,
RANDMAN, ROCHELSON, ZHIZSMORSKI, ZUKHOVSKI Lithuania
TZOREF, GOLDSHMIT, AMORON, LANGMAN, LUKMAN, RANDMAN, ROZANSKY,
RUSEK, TOBIAS,TRIBUKH, ZILBOVITZ Israel
TOBIAS, ROZHANSKY, FOGEL, PROTAS, RUSEK, TRIBUKH, GUREWICZ, DRASNAN
Belarus


Seek Henry LYONS - Queens, NYC - gave P.O.T. Yad Vashem #germany

Volker Biehl <rehaugen@...>
 

Hello,
does anybody know Henry LYONS, in 1977 he lived in Rego Park, Queens, NY USA,
more details: Rego Park, 99-30 59th Ave Apt 1F zip 11368.
In 1977 he gave a testimony for the Yad Vashem database as son of
Henriette SCHOENTHAL born in Koeln, Germany.
I am researching the family of Julius LEVI, her husband, born in Bebra,
Hessen, Germany.

The name and adress of Henry LYONS also appears on the list of unclaimed
funds of the NY state.

Who can tell me, if and how I can get information about Henry LYONS. Regards

Volker Biehl Germany <rehaugen@gmx.de>


German SIG #Germany Seek Henry LYONS - Queens, NYC - gave P.O.T. Yad Vashem #germany

Volker Biehl <rehaugen@...>
 

Hello,
does anybody know Henry LYONS, in 1977 he lived in Rego Park, Queens, NY USA,
more details: Rego Park, 99-30 59th Ave Apt 1F zip 11368.
In 1977 he gave a testimony for the Yad Vashem database as son of
Henriette SCHOENTHAL born in Koeln, Germany.
I am researching the family of Julius LEVI, her husband, born in Bebra,
Hessen, Germany.

The name and adress of Henry LYONS also appears on the list of unclaimed
funds of the NY state.

Who can tell me, if and how I can get information about Henry LYONS. Regards

Volker Biehl Germany <rehaugen@gmx.de>


San Diego Jewish Genealogical Society #general

enalibof@...
 

Submitted by Ellen Naliboff

Meeting: Sunday, Apr 9, 1:00 P.M.
Lawrence Family Jewish Community Center 2nd Floor Sr. Activity Room
4126 Executive Drive in La Jolla

Hands-On Computer Genealogy Workshop

Use the Steve Morse "One-Step" website at http://stevemorse.org to find
ship passenger lists, ship pictures, naturalization records, vital
records and many other genealogical goodies that Dr. Morse demonstrated
to us at the March meeting.

Learn more about finding ancestral sites online using "Google Earth"
and also accessing the complete archives of the "New York Times," both
of which are featured in the winter issue of "Discovery."

Help will be available for using JewishGen, including the JewishGen
Family Finder, Family Tree of the Jewish People and other incredibly
informative and helpful databases.

If you have discovered any new websites of interest, please share them
with us at the meeting.

We will be using the computers at the Lawrence Family JCC Astor Judaica
Library for this program.

Non-members of SDJGS $3.00


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen San Diego Jewish Genealogical Society #general

enalibof@...
 

Submitted by Ellen Naliboff

Meeting: Sunday, Apr 9, 1:00 P.M.
Lawrence Family Jewish Community Center 2nd Floor Sr. Activity Room
4126 Executive Drive in La Jolla

Hands-On Computer Genealogy Workshop

Use the Steve Morse "One-Step" website at http://stevemorse.org to find
ship passenger lists, ship pictures, naturalization records, vital
records and many other genealogical goodies that Dr. Morse demonstrated
to us at the March meeting.

Learn more about finding ancestral sites online using "Google Earth"
and also accessing the complete archives of the "New York Times," both
of which are featured in the winter issue of "Discovery."

Help will be available for using JewishGen, including the JewishGen
Family Finder, Family Tree of the Jewish People and other incredibly
informative and helpful databases.

If you have discovered any new websites of interest, please share them
with us at the meeting.

We will be using the computers at the Lawrence Family JCC Astor Judaica
Library for this program.

Non-members of SDJGS $3.00


Searching the Yad Vashem Database #austria-czech

DKBern@...
 

Hello Austria-Czech SIG:

This may not be news to many of you, but it certainly was for me: It is
possible to find female family members in the Yad Vashem database of Holocaust
victims knowing only their date of birth and given name or nickname.

For several years I have had exact dates >from birth registers in Prague and
Staab for some of my great grandfather's nephews and nieces born in between
1850 and 1900. I was able to find data on three of his nephews but none of his
nine nieces because I had only their given names.

Yad Vashem's "Advanced Search" permits the accuracy of the search criteria to
be specified: Exact, Fuzzy, Soundex and Synonym for names and places, and
Exact, +/- 2, or +/- 5 for the year of the event.

I first searched for "Melanie" (and checked the "synonym box" in case there
was an alternate spelling or a nickname), born 20/07/1894 (exact date). There
are 13 Melanies listed in 1894. Clicking on "More details" displayed the full
date (DDMMYYYY). The search was tedious, but near the bottom of the list was a
Melanie KAUDERSOVA born 20/07/1894. Domestic files in Prague confirmed that
Melanie Kauders was born Melanie Bernard, and supplied a marriage date and names
for her two daughters. Melanie perished at Auschwitz, but I am now searching
for information on one her daughters who may have survived.

Similarly, Elenore, born 02/12/1871 was found in the database to be Eleonora
Laura ZIRKLOVA, possibly the "Lore" previously noted on a family tree. Her
sister, Sofie, born 24/10/1867 was Zofie SABATOVA. I do not yet have confirmation
that their maiden name was Bernard. Both perished, but I can now search for
survivors and descendants.

I hope other A-C SIG members find this information useful. Yad Vashem is to
be commended for the breadth of its database search engine.

Dave Bernard, Sherborn, Massachusetts.


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Searching the Yad Vashem Database #austria-czech

DKBern@...
 

Hello Austria-Czech SIG:

This may not be news to many of you, but it certainly was for me: It is
possible to find female family members in the Yad Vashem database of Holocaust
victims knowing only their date of birth and given name or nickname.

For several years I have had exact dates >from birth registers in Prague and
Staab for some of my great grandfather's nephews and nieces born in between
1850 and 1900. I was able to find data on three of his nephews but none of his
nine nieces because I had only their given names.

Yad Vashem's "Advanced Search" permits the accuracy of the search criteria to
be specified: Exact, Fuzzy, Soundex and Synonym for names and places, and
Exact, +/- 2, or +/- 5 for the year of the event.

I first searched for "Melanie" (and checked the "synonym box" in case there
was an alternate spelling or a nickname), born 20/07/1894 (exact date). There
are 13 Melanies listed in 1894. Clicking on "More details" displayed the full
date (DDMMYYYY). The search was tedious, but near the bottom of the list was a
Melanie KAUDERSOVA born 20/07/1894. Domestic files in Prague confirmed that
Melanie Kauders was born Melanie Bernard, and supplied a marriage date and names
for her two daughters. Melanie perished at Auschwitz, but I am now searching
for information on one her daughters who may have survived.

Similarly, Elenore, born 02/12/1871 was found in the database to be Eleonora
Laura ZIRKLOVA, possibly the "Lore" previously noted on a family tree. Her
sister, Sofie, born 24/10/1867 was Zofie SABATOVA. I do not yet have confirmation
that their maiden name was Bernard. Both perished, but I can now search for
survivors and descendants.

I hope other A-C SIG members find this information useful. Yad Vashem is to
be commended for the breadth of its database search engine.

Dave Bernard, Sherborn, Massachusetts.


Widowers with young children in Galicia #galicia

Israel P
 

Has anyone ever seen any statistics on how often in the mid-late 1800's
women died leaving a husband and young children? I inquire more specifically
about Jewish families in Galicia.

Israel Pickholtz


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Widowers with young children in Galicia #galicia

Israel P
 

Has anyone ever seen any statistics on how often in the mid-late 1800's
women died leaving a husband and young children? I inquire more specifically
about Jewish families in Galicia.

Israel Pickholtz


Re: Dad's Missing 1904 ships manifest #general

Yehudh bn Shlmo
 

spolansm@bellsouth.net wrote:

I have been trying to locate my dad Nathan
SPOLANSKY’S 1904 ships manifest in to
Ellis Island New York City. With no success.
I have seen many cases now of information, even on
port of entry, on Naturalization and other records
being incorrect.

There was a Nathan SPOLANSKY >from Russia that arrived
in Boston in 1906 >from Liverpool on the Cymic. He was
born approx 1883. In the 1910 Census there was a
Nathan SPELANSKY, Russian in Boston born abt. 1885. He put
down 1905 though as immigration date. By WWI Nathan
Spolanksy b. 1885 was in New York. It appears your
family was in the 1930 NY Census, and it also listed
1905 as the immigration date for Nathan.

Sincerely,
Yehudah ben Shlomo
U.S.A.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Dad's Missing 1904 ships manifest #general

Yehudh bn Shlmo
 

spolansm@bellsouth.net wrote:

I have been trying to locate my dad Nathan
SPOLANSKY’S 1904 ships manifest in to
Ellis Island New York City. With no success.
I have seen many cases now of information, even on
port of entry, on Naturalization and other records
being incorrect.

There was a Nathan SPOLANSKY >from Russia that arrived
in Boston in 1906 >from Liverpool on the Cymic. He was
born approx 1883. In the 1910 Census there was a
Nathan SPELANSKY, Russian in Boston born abt. 1885. He put
down 1905 though as immigration date. By WWI Nathan
Spolanksy b. 1885 was in New York. It appears your
family was in the 1930 NY Census, and it also listed
1905 as the immigration date for Nathan.

Sincerely,
Yehudah ben Shlomo
U.S.A.


Re: An unusual way to find a missing relative #general

Nathan Reiss <nreiss@...>
 

Sally Goodman < sbgoody@usa.net > wrote on Thu, 30 Mar 2006 21:15:01 -0800
X-Message-Number: 10

By accident I found a "lost" relative on a US Census by using "Miss"
as a first name. Bingo! There she was.
This brings to mind an experience that I once had in a similar vein. I
visited a cemetery where I believed one of my relatives was buried. I went
to the cemetery office and gave them the name of the person for whom I was
looking and was told that the name couldn't be found. The clerk then asked
me if the person had been a physician, since physicians were sometimes filed
under "D" for "Doctor".

Nathan Reiss
Highland Park, NJ

reiss@rci.rutgers.edu


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: An unusual way to find a missing relative #general

Nathan Reiss <nreiss@...>
 

Sally Goodman < sbgoody@usa.net > wrote on Thu, 30 Mar 2006 21:15:01 -0800
X-Message-Number: 10

By accident I found a "lost" relative on a US Census by using "Miss"
as a first name. Bingo! There she was.
This brings to mind an experience that I once had in a similar vein. I
visited a cemetery where I believed one of my relatives was buried. I went
to the cemetery office and gave them the name of the person for whom I was
looking and was told that the name couldn't be found. The clerk then asked
me if the person had been a physician, since physicians were sometimes filed
under "D" for "Doctor".

Nathan Reiss
Highland Park, NJ

reiss@rci.rutgers.edu


Re: Jarowslaw records #general

Margaret Mikulska
 

Roger Lustig wrote:

Where is Jawroslaw? The JewishGen ShtetlSeeker doesn't list any such
town. On the other hand, there are towns named Jaroslaw in Poland,
Jaroslav in the Czech Republic, Yaroslavy in Russia, and Yaroslava in
Ukraine. Which of these did you have in mind?
"Jawroslaw" must be a typo, a misreading, a mistranscription, etc.

There are indeed at least two towns "Jaroslaw" (one in SE Poland,
another in Lower Silesia) in Poland and several places named similarly.
The name itself is a frequently encountered first name (male), of Slavic
origin.

-Margaret Mikulska
silvagen@gmail.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Jarowslaw records #general

Margaret Mikulska
 

Roger Lustig wrote:

Where is Jawroslaw? The JewishGen ShtetlSeeker doesn't list any such
town. On the other hand, there are towns named Jaroslaw in Poland,
Jaroslav in the Czech Republic, Yaroslavy in Russia, and Yaroslava in
Ukraine. Which of these did you have in mind?
"Jawroslaw" must be a typo, a misreading, a mistranscription, etc.

There are indeed at least two towns "Jaroslaw" (one in SE Poland,
another in Lower Silesia) in Poland and several places named similarly.
The name itself is a frequently encountered first name (male), of Slavic
origin.

-Margaret Mikulska
silvagen@gmail.com