Date   

Re: Bialystok Photo Album #poland

Mark Halpern
 

Just to let everyone know that there is a surname index to the Bialystok
Photo Album at
https://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/BialyGen/Bialystok_Photo_Album_Surnames.htm.

The book can be found online in the New York Public Library Digital
collection at
https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/5a7a8de0-50d7-0133-a73d-00505686a51c#/

Mark Halpern

On 2018-11-07 08:52, Marya Pollack <merchaviah@gmail.com> wrote:

Hi,

The photo is >from 1950 on p192 of "Bialystok Photo Album of a Renowned
City and its Jews the World Over". Printed in 1951. I can scan the page
but I think if you give me surnames in question it will be more useful.
The book is in Yiddish and English-Compiled and edited by David Sohn.

Hope this helps,
Marya Pollack


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Re: Bialystok Photo Album #poland

Mark Halpern
 

Just to let everyone know that there is a surname index to the Bialystok
Photo Album at
https://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/BialyGen/Bialystok_Photo_Album_Surnames.htm.

The book can be found online in the New York Public Library Digital
collection at
https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/5a7a8de0-50d7-0133-a73d-00505686a51c#/

Mark Halpern

On 2018-11-07 08:52, Marya Pollack <merchaviah@gmail.com> wrote:

Hi,

The photo is >from 1950 on p192 of "Bialystok Photo Album of a Renowned
City and its Jews the World Over". Printed in 1951. I can scan the page
but I think if you give me surnames in question it will be more useful.
The book is in Yiddish and English-Compiled and edited by David Sohn.

Hope this helps,
Marya Pollack


"Tagwerk und Dezimal" #germany

Peter Straus
 

From: Peter Straus <pstrausSF@prodigy.net>
Sent: Thursday, November 8, 2018 1:10 PM
To: 'GERSIG@LYRIS.JEWISHGEN.ORG' <GERSIG@LYRIS.JEWISHGEN.ORG>
Subject: "Tagwerk und Dezimal"

GerSIGgers:
I have been working my way through an article by Roland Paul on the Jews of
Goellheim, the home for at least a century of my STRAUS forebears. He
makes frequent use of the phrase "X Tagwerk Y Dezimal," as an apparent
measure of the value of possessions, where X and Y are numeric values. Can
anyone out there explain what this connotes?
Thanks,

Peter Straus, San Francisco pstrausSF@prodigy.net


German SIG #Germany "Tagwerk und Dezimal" #germany

Peter Straus
 

From: Peter Straus <pstrausSF@prodigy.net>
Sent: Thursday, November 8, 2018 1:10 PM
To: 'GERSIG@LYRIS.JEWISHGEN.ORG' <GERSIG@LYRIS.JEWISHGEN.ORG>
Subject: "Tagwerk und Dezimal"

GerSIGgers:
I have been working my way through an article by Roland Paul on the Jews of
Goellheim, the home for at least a century of my STRAUS forebears. He
makes frequent use of the phrase "X Tagwerk Y Dezimal," as an apparent
measure of the value of possessions, where X and Y are numeric values. Can
anyone out there explain what this connotes?
Thanks,

Peter Straus, San Francisco pstrausSF@prodigy.net


Quest of a Bostonian to trace roots from Turkey to Spain #sephardic

Josh Bookman <bookman.joshua@...>
 

Dear Sephardic SIG Mailing List Discussion Group,

I was forwarded to you all by the Jewish Genealogical Society of
Greater Boston. I believe one of you might be able to help me. For
purposes of citizenship and personal family interest, I am trying to
prove my Sephardic ancestry in Spain. Unfortunately, I've only been
able to trace family roots to Turkey. Given the wonderful resources of
this community, I believe you might help me trace my family's roots
further back.

A 2015 Spanish law offers citizenship to individuals who can have
their Sephardic ancestry confirmed by established Jewish organisations
(along with rigorous language and civics exams). More specifically,
this law requires me to prove to have at least one Sephardic ancestor
who fled Spain due to the expulsion in 1492. My great-grandmother
Fortune Barocas was born in Turkey. She is Sephardic, and I have her
ship log >from Turkey to the United States, but I haven't yet been able
to find census data that proves her ancestors' emigration >from Spain
to Turkey.

The authorities in Spain have extended the deadline to apply for
citizenship until October 2019, giving me more time to prepare a
vetted genealogy. I am considering going to the Consulates of Turkey
and Spain in Boston and their respective Embassies in Washington, D.C.
A Sephardic Studies professor at Brandeis University also suggested
the book Sephardic Genealogy by this list's Coordinator. If any of
you have any additional suggested resources or additional strategies I
could pursue, I would be very grateful.

I would be more than willing (and appreciative) to work with someone
in the Boston area. Look forward to hearing >from you all.

Sincerely,
Joshua Bookman
bookman.joshua@gmail.com


Sephardic SIG #Sephardim Quest of a Bostonian to trace roots from Turkey to Spain #sephardic

Josh Bookman <bookman.joshua@...>
 

Dear Sephardic SIG Mailing List Discussion Group,

I was forwarded to you all by the Jewish Genealogical Society of
Greater Boston. I believe one of you might be able to help me. For
purposes of citizenship and personal family interest, I am trying to
prove my Sephardic ancestry in Spain. Unfortunately, I've only been
able to trace family roots to Turkey. Given the wonderful resources of
this community, I believe you might help me trace my family's roots
further back.

A 2015 Spanish law offers citizenship to individuals who can have
their Sephardic ancestry confirmed by established Jewish organisations
(along with rigorous language and civics exams). More specifically,
this law requires me to prove to have at least one Sephardic ancestor
who fled Spain due to the expulsion in 1492. My great-grandmother
Fortune Barocas was born in Turkey. She is Sephardic, and I have her
ship log >from Turkey to the United States, but I haven't yet been able
to find census data that proves her ancestors' emigration >from Spain
to Turkey.

The authorities in Spain have extended the deadline to apply for
citizenship until October 2019, giving me more time to prepare a
vetted genealogy. I am considering going to the Consulates of Turkey
and Spain in Boston and their respective Embassies in Washington, D.C.
A Sephardic Studies professor at Brandeis University also suggested
the book Sephardic Genealogy by this list's Coordinator. If any of
you have any additional suggested resources or additional strategies I
could pursue, I would be very grateful.

I would be more than willing (and appreciative) to work with someone
in the Boston area. Look forward to hearing >from you all.

Sincerely,
Joshua Bookman
bookman.joshua@gmail.com


Novy Tekov, Slovakia #hungary

Bernard Weill
 

Is anyone familiar with or aware of a Weill family that lived in Novy Tekov just
prior to WWII? I am >from the Weills that lived in Topolcany, only an hour's drive >from Novy Tekov. I am eager to know if I may be related to Novy Tekov Weills. Thank you.

Bernard Weill
New York

Moderator: Have you checked the JewishGen Hungary database? Novy Tekov was Ujbars in
Bars megye, Hungary, prior to the end of World War I.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Novy Tekov, Slovakia #hungary

Bernard Weill
 

Is anyone familiar with or aware of a Weill family that lived in Novy Tekov just
prior to WWII? I am >from the Weills that lived in Topolcany, only an hour's drive >from Novy Tekov. I am eager to know if I may be related to Novy Tekov Weills. Thank you.

Bernard Weill
New York

Moderator: Have you checked the JewishGen Hungary database? Novy Tekov was Ujbars in
Bars megye, Hungary, prior to the end of World War I.


Family Diamant Lebi from Avasfelsofalu (Hungarian or Negresti (Roumainian) #hungary

anita.tarsi@...
 

Dear Colleagues,

Family Diamant Lebi was a huge family living in Avasfelsofalu for many
years, some of them moved to Uzhorod or Ungvar and then dispersed all
over Czechoslovakia and even emigrate to other continents... From
those that stayed at the village only a few of them survived the
Holocaust. I'm looking for information about the family live in
Avasfelsofalu.
The first ancestors we know about, were Mozes Diamant Lebi born circa
1845 and his wife Nina Leah nee Singer, born circa 1850. They had 10
children who adopted between Diamant or Lebi for last name. The family
became somehow strange, buy having siblings different last names...
Was that somehow a tradition at the area?
Hoping to get answers,
Anita Tarsi
Kfar Sava, Israel

Moderator: Have you checked the JewishGen Hungary Database? Always helps to identify
resources already consulted.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Family Diamant Lebi from Avasfelsofalu (Hungarian or Negresti (Roumainian) #hungary

anita.tarsi@...
 

Dear Colleagues,

Family Diamant Lebi was a huge family living in Avasfelsofalu for many
years, some of them moved to Uzhorod or Ungvar and then dispersed all
over Czechoslovakia and even emigrate to other continents... From
those that stayed at the village only a few of them survived the
Holocaust. I'm looking for information about the family live in
Avasfelsofalu.
The first ancestors we know about, were Mozes Diamant Lebi born circa
1845 and his wife Nina Leah nee Singer, born circa 1850. They had 10
children who adopted between Diamant or Lebi for last name. The family
became somehow strange, buy having siblings different last names...
Was that somehow a tradition at the area?
Hoping to get answers,
Anita Tarsi
Kfar Sava, Israel

Moderator: Have you checked the JewishGen Hungary Database? Always helps to identify
resources already consulted.


Diamant Lebi family #subcarpathia

Vivian Kahn
 

Avasfelsofalu was in Szatmar megye, Hungary, and is now in Romania. It =
never was in Sub-Carpathia.

I suggest that you check the Hungary database, where I found a birth =
record for DIAMAND Jentel, daughter of Mozes and wife Nina ZENGER born =
Avasfelsofalu, March 1895. Mozes was >from Avasfelsofalu, Nina >from =
Nagykaroly, now Carei, Romania.

Lebi is most likely a given name, not part of a surname.

Vivian Kahn
JewishGen Hungarian SIG Coordinator



Begin forwarded message:
=20
From: "Anita Tarsi anita.tarsi@gmail.com" =
<subcarpathia@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Subject: [subcarpathia] Diamant Lebi family
Date: November 7, 2018 at 2:16:10 PM PST
To: "Sub-Carpathia SIG" <subcarpathia@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Reply-To: "Anita Tarsi" <anita.tarsi@gmail.com>
=20
Dear friends,
I'm looking for information about the Lebi Diamant family from
Negresti, or in Hungarian Avasfelsofalu, close to the Ukranian border.
Also I would like to know if having two last names was a tradition at
the region. The parents of this family, Mozes born in 1845 and Nina
Leah nee Singer born in 1850 used two family names: Lebi Diamant Ten
children were born, as adults they used one of the last names becoming
a strange family, siblings having different last names...
Hoping to have responses!
Anita Tarsi
Kfar Sava, Israel
=20
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


Subcarpathia SIG #Subcarpathia Fwd: Diamant Lebi family #subcarpathia

Vivian Kahn
 

Avasfelsofalu was in Szatmar megye, Hungary, and is now in Romania. It =
never was in Sub-Carpathia.

I suggest that you check the Hungary database, where I found a birth =
record for DIAMAND Jentel, daughter of Mozes and wife Nina ZENGER born =
Avasfelsofalu, March 1895. Mozes was >from Avasfelsofalu, Nina >from =
Nagykaroly, now Carei, Romania.

Lebi is most likely a given name, not part of a surname.

Vivian Kahn
JewishGen Hungarian SIG Coordinator



Begin forwarded message:
=20
From: "Anita Tarsi anita.tarsi@gmail.com" =
<subcarpathia@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Subject: [subcarpathia] Diamant Lebi family
Date: November 7, 2018 at 2:16:10 PM PST
To: "Sub-Carpathia SIG" <subcarpathia@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Reply-To: "Anita Tarsi" <anita.tarsi@gmail.com>
=20
Dear friends,
I'm looking for information about the Lebi Diamant family from
Negresti, or in Hungarian Avasfelsofalu, close to the Ukranian border.
Also I would like to know if having two last names was a tradition at
the region. The parents of this family, Mozes born in 1845 and Nina
Leah nee Singer born in 1850 used two family names: Lebi Diamant Ten
children were born, as adults they used one of the last names becoming
a strange family, siblings having different last names...
Hoping to have responses!
Anita Tarsi
Kfar Sava, Israel
=20
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


Bezirksrabbiner and Klaus Rabbi #general

Stephen Denker
 

In Germany, several rabbis whom I am researching in Germany during the period
1850 - 1940, held the positions -- "Bezirksrabbiner" or "Klaus Rabbi". I would
like to understand exactly what these positions mean. Was a Bezirksrabbiner
the rabbi of an entire district or town, whose salary was paid by the German
state, and officially appointed to the position by a governing (Jewish)
state-level organization?

Was a Klaus Rabbi the Rabbi of a particular synagogue?

Where can I go for more information?

Stephen Denker
Brookline, MA
Researching Wohlgemuth, Germany


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Bezirksrabbiner and Klaus Rabbi #general

Stephen Denker
 

In Germany, several rabbis whom I am researching in Germany during the period
1850 - 1940, held the positions -- "Bezirksrabbiner" or "Klaus Rabbi". I would
like to understand exactly what these positions mean. Was a Bezirksrabbiner
the rabbi of an entire district or town, whose salary was paid by the German
state, and officially appointed to the position by a governing (Jewish)
state-level organization?

Was a Klaus Rabbi the Rabbi of a particular synagogue?

Where can I go for more information?

Stephen Denker
Brookline, MA
Researching Wohlgemuth, Germany


MyHeritage Free Access to Military Records to Mark 100 Years Since End of World War l #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

To commemorate the 100th anniversary of the end of World War l, MyHeritage
is offering free access to its 47 million worldwide military records. The
records are free >from November 8-12 11:59PM EST.

Go to: https://www.myheritage.com/research/category-3000/military

On the right hand side of the page that opens >from the url above, see, in
Military Records" which gives you a list of the categories of military
records in the free access offer. Clicking on any of the categories will get
you to a search window for that collection. You can search all military
collections by using the search form on the center of the page.

When you put in a name and the results return a green "free" label will
appear next to the record that is included in the free access offer. If the
record is not available then an extract will appear. In the trial example I
did, I received some results with extracts only and others with both the
extract and the original record. To save the record to your computer right
click on your mouse and " click save image as". If it's an extract do a copy
and paste. If you have your tree on MyHeritage there is a "save record" that
you can use to affix to your tree. At the bottom of the page there is a
"cite this record" where you can copy the source information.

If you try to access the records that are not included in the free access
offer you will be invited to subscribe.

I have no affiliation with MyHeritage and am posting this solely for the
information of the reader.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen MyHeritage Free Access to Military Records to Mark 100 Years Since End of World War l #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

To commemorate the 100th anniversary of the end of World War l, MyHeritage
is offering free access to its 47 million worldwide military records. The
records are free >from November 8-12 11:59PM EST.

Go to: https://www.myheritage.com/research/category-3000/military

On the right hand side of the page that opens >from the url above, see, in
Military Records" which gives you a list of the categories of military
records in the free access offer. Clicking on any of the categories will get
you to a search window for that collection. You can search all military
collections by using the search form on the center of the page.

When you put in a name and the results return a green "free" label will
appear next to the record that is included in the free access offer. If the
record is not available then an extract will appear. In the trial example I
did, I received some results with extracts only and others with both the
extract and the original record. To save the record to your computer right
click on your mouse and " click save image as". If it's an extract do a copy
and paste. If you have your tree on MyHeritage there is a "save record" that
you can use to affix to your tree. At the bottom of the page there is a
"cite this record" where you can copy the source information.

If you try to access the records that are not included in the free access
offer you will be invited to subscribe.

I have no affiliation with MyHeritage and am posting this solely for the
information of the reader.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


y-DNA Project of Langsam, Miller, Spira, Schonfeld, and others #general

Moishe Miller
 

Dear Group,

I am working on a y-DNA (only males with direct male-after-male descent)
from Pesach Langsam, born in the first half of the 1700's. His male
descendants now include those with surnames of Langsam, Miller, Spira,
Schonfeld, and others.

If you know of anyone that might want to participate, please contact me
directly via email.

Thank you,

Moishe Miller
Brooklyn, NY
moishe.miller@totalben.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen y-DNA Project of Langsam, Miller, Spira, Schonfeld, and others #general

Moishe Miller
 

Dear Group,

I am working on a y-DNA (only males with direct male-after-male descent)
from Pesach Langsam, born in the first half of the 1700's. His male
descendants now include those with surnames of Langsam, Miller, Spira,
Schonfeld, and others.

If you know of anyone that might want to participate, please contact me
directly via email.

Thank you,

Moishe Miller
Brooklyn, NY
moishe.miller@totalben.com


Anniversary of three historical events of the 20 century #germany

Yvonne Stern
 

This week the world will remember three important historical events
of the 20 century.

The 80th anniversary of the Reichspogromnacht will be on November 9th, 2018.
Crystal Night was the catastrophe before the catastrophe.

During the November 1938 Pogroms in Germany and Austria, more than
1,400 synagogues, prayer rooms and other meeting rooms as well as
thousands of Jewish businesses,shops, apartments and cemeteries
were vandalized. This included my grandparents home at Otto Beckstrasse
in Mannheim. In the days following, approximately 30,000 Jews
were imprisoned in concentration camps where hundreds were murdered
or died as a result of their imprisonment.

51 years later, on November 9th 1989, the Berlin Wall came down.

This week, the world will celebrate the anniversary of that fall.
When access to East Germany returned 29 years ago, it opened a
new world for Jews with German roots. Since then, little by little,
we've regained access to data of our ancestors and the cities where
they had lived and the cemeteries where they were buried.

This Sunday, the world will celebrate the 100th anniversary of
the end to "The War to end all Wars".

On November 11, the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918,
Germany signed an armistice agreement with the Allies in
a railroad car outside Compiegne.

The First World War (1914 - 1918) left 9 million soldiers dead and
21 million wounded. About 100,000 Jews fought on the German side,
12,000 of them were killed in action including my uncle, barely
20 years old.

Yvonne Stern, Rio de Janeiro - Brasil


German SIG #Germany Anniversary of three historical events of the 20 century #germany

Yvonne Stern
 

This week the world will remember three important historical events
of the 20 century.

The 80th anniversary of the Reichspogromnacht will be on November 9th, 2018.
Crystal Night was the catastrophe before the catastrophe.

During the November 1938 Pogroms in Germany and Austria, more than
1,400 synagogues, prayer rooms and other meeting rooms as well as
thousands of Jewish businesses,shops, apartments and cemeteries
were vandalized. This included my grandparents home at Otto Beckstrasse
in Mannheim. In the days following, approximately 30,000 Jews
were imprisoned in concentration camps where hundreds were murdered
or died as a result of their imprisonment.

51 years later, on November 9th 1989, the Berlin Wall came down.

This week, the world will celebrate the anniversary of that fall.
When access to East Germany returned 29 years ago, it opened a
new world for Jews with German roots. Since then, little by little,
we've regained access to data of our ancestors and the cities where
they had lived and the cemeteries where they were buried.

This Sunday, the world will celebrate the 100th anniversary of
the end to "The War to end all Wars".

On November 11, the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918,
Germany signed an armistice agreement with the Allies in
a railroad car outside Compiegne.

The First World War (1914 - 1918) left 9 million soldiers dead and
21 million wounded. About 100,000 Jews fought on the German side,
12,000 of them were killed in action including my uncle, barely
20 years old.

Yvonne Stern, Rio de Janeiro - Brasil

33381 - 33400 of 658037