Date   

Records in Bratislava Archives #hungary

M. Amsel-Arieli <nomietai@...>
 

Years ago, I learned that the internal passports
(identity cards, I guess) taken >from the Jews
just prior to the deportations are stored in the
Bratislava Archives--that is, dumped in carton
boxes, hundreds, thousands of them, in haphazard
order--uncatalogued. As I understand it, they
contain pictures--a genealogical and emotional
treasure. Can anyone add more information? Is
there any way to access these cards? Many
Holocaust survivors would give the last years of
their lives just to see pictures of their
families once again. What a mitzvah this would
be!

Melody Amsel-Arieli
Maaleh Adumim, Israel



RESEARCHING
Slovakia: Amsel, Schonfeld, Baum, Landau,Einhorn,Ritter
Bessarabia: Zazulia, Morgenstern,Cushilevitz,Pollak
Galicia: Einstein










__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
http://mail.yahoo.com


Hungary SIG #Hungary Records in Bratislava Archives #hungary

M. Amsel-Arieli <nomietai@...>
 

Years ago, I learned that the internal passports
(identity cards, I guess) taken >from the Jews
just prior to the deportations are stored in the
Bratislava Archives--that is, dumped in carton
boxes, hundreds, thousands of them, in haphazard
order--uncatalogued. As I understand it, they
contain pictures--a genealogical and emotional
treasure. Can anyone add more information? Is
there any way to access these cards? Many
Holocaust survivors would give the last years of
their lives just to see pictures of their
families once again. What a mitzvah this would
be!

Melody Amsel-Arieli
Maaleh Adumim, Israel



RESEARCHING
Slovakia: Amsel, Schonfeld, Baum, Landau,Einhorn,Ritter
Bessarabia: Zazulia, Morgenstern,Cushilevitz,Pollak
Galicia: Einstein










__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
http://mail.yahoo.com


Re: Round trip--Port of New York in 1935 #general

A. E. Jordan
 

Stan Goodman responded to Josephine Rosenblum original posting asking"
Can anyone speculate _why_ a man would take his son on a cruise when
his wife was so close to delivery? saying:

the cruise, if that's what it was, was a filler voyage for the slack
season. To board a Holland-America Line cruise ship, he >> would have
had to go to New York; they didn't call at Boston, and probably still
don't. Certainly in 1935, Atlantic cruise >> ships operated >from New
York -- not >from Fort Lauderdale, and not >from Boston. The thirties
were a different world >from >> the one we live in today.



Shipping is a very easy thing to research during this time frame and
general observations should always be avoided. I did a quick search
twice this week in The New York Times historical archives in response
to postings about ships and shipping issues between 1906 and the 1930s
and both times found some insights for the person asking the questions.

Cruises in the 1930s were not uncommon although fairly expensive for
most people especially when you consider this is the economic
depression era. While Stan is right in saying most of the large liners
did only make cruises during the off season i.e. the winter months when
the North Atlantic rightfully earned its nickname the Frantic Atlantic,
its far too general a conclusion. During the 1930s short summer cruises
outside the USA to avoid the Prohibition Act were also common for
example. The more well to do of our relatives also started making the
"Grand Tour" back to Europe as tourists or to visit family members.
Don't rule out people sailing on cruises in the 1920s and 1930s. By
searching even in the Ellis Island database I have found a number of
relatives cruising to Bermuda or the Caribbean during this era on
holidays.

Also while cruises might not have gone >from all of the major ports
their were lots of ships -- lots more than today -- sailing >from
Boston, Baltimore, Philadelphia, Port Everglades (Fort Lauderdale), New
Orleans, etc. etc. etc. in the 1930s than you would find today. If you
live in Boston today and want to make a cruise in February yes you have
to go to New York or on an airplane to Florida or elsewhere. (Off
subject Holland-America did sail on occasion >from Boston and today
bases a ship for cruising >from Boston in the fall each year.)

In 1930 you could have found a variety of smaller ships mostly carrying
cargo and passengers to just about any destination >from any port. So if
the original poster's family member had just wanted to get to sea >from
Boston they did not need to travel to New York to the Rotterdam. The
surroundings might not have been as pleasant on the ship they could
have taken >from Boston but they could have found a ship >from Boston to
the Caribbean in 1935 without much trouble. Might well have been
sailing with cargo and coming home with bananas as cargo but still they
would have been sailing >from Boston.

Allan Jordan


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Round trip--Port of New York in 1935 #general

A. E. Jordan
 

Stan Goodman responded to Josephine Rosenblum original posting asking"
Can anyone speculate _why_ a man would take his son on a cruise when
his wife was so close to delivery? saying:

the cruise, if that's what it was, was a filler voyage for the slack
season. To board a Holland-America Line cruise ship, he >> would have
had to go to New York; they didn't call at Boston, and probably still
don't. Certainly in 1935, Atlantic cruise >> ships operated >from New
York -- not >from Fort Lauderdale, and not >from Boston. The thirties
were a different world >from >> the one we live in today.



Shipping is a very easy thing to research during this time frame and
general observations should always be avoided. I did a quick search
twice this week in The New York Times historical archives in response
to postings about ships and shipping issues between 1906 and the 1930s
and both times found some insights for the person asking the questions.

Cruises in the 1930s were not uncommon although fairly expensive for
most people especially when you consider this is the economic
depression era. While Stan is right in saying most of the large liners
did only make cruises during the off season i.e. the winter months when
the North Atlantic rightfully earned its nickname the Frantic Atlantic,
its far too general a conclusion. During the 1930s short summer cruises
outside the USA to avoid the Prohibition Act were also common for
example. The more well to do of our relatives also started making the
"Grand Tour" back to Europe as tourists or to visit family members.
Don't rule out people sailing on cruises in the 1920s and 1930s. By
searching even in the Ellis Island database I have found a number of
relatives cruising to Bermuda or the Caribbean during this era on
holidays.

Also while cruises might not have gone >from all of the major ports
their were lots of ships -- lots more than today -- sailing >from
Boston, Baltimore, Philadelphia, Port Everglades (Fort Lauderdale), New
Orleans, etc. etc. etc. in the 1930s than you would find today. If you
live in Boston today and want to make a cruise in February yes you have
to go to New York or on an airplane to Florida or elsewhere. (Off
subject Holland-America did sail on occasion >from Boston and today
bases a ship for cruising >from Boston in the fall each year.)

In 1930 you could have found a variety of smaller ships mostly carrying
cargo and passengers to just about any destination >from any port. So if
the original poster's family member had just wanted to get to sea >from
Boston they did not need to travel to New York to the Rotterdam. The
surroundings might not have been as pleasant on the ship they could
have taken >from Boston but they could have found a ship >from Boston to
the Caribbean in 1935 without much trouble. Might well have been
sailing with cargo and coming home with bananas as cargo but still they
would have been sailing >from Boston.

Allan Jordan


Re: Round trip--Port of New York in 1935 #general

A. E. Jordan
 

Angie Elfassi writes in response to the original question about why
someone was crusing >from New York in 1935:

Here are a few speculations:
1. Business trip
2. Help a relative complete the last leg of his/her journey to USA
3. A free-bee
4. Went to check out the possibility of living there.
5. Health reasons for the boy - exposure to sea air etc.

All interesting and good gueses. I doubt you will find the reason for
the trip but I would add in that in 1935 the USA is very much in the
Great Depression. Depending on the original poster's family situation
the cost of the trip was not inexpensive -- according to an ad I found
in the NY Times for this trip it started at $135 per person. Plus the
train fare to New York. It was not an inexpensive holiday.

Sailing >from Boston in this era to the Caribbean was by no means
impossible althougth >from Boston there would not have been a large and
luxurious a ship as the Rotterdam in 1935. So if this travelered had
been desperate just to get to sea or to the Caribbean in general I
would say they could have traveled >from Boston. To me that says this
person likely had some reason to be aboard the Rotterdam >from New York.
He won the trip in a contest, he needed to get to a specific port the
Rotterdam was going to or ... I guess you could say he just wanted to
sail on the Rotterdam. Holland-America at one point had an advertising
slogan "It is good to be on a well run ship." May be this traveler
understood the meaning of that slogan.

The trip in question I can see >from the same NY Times advert was
promoted by a travel agency called National Tours that had offices in
New York and Boston. May be this man was suffered through a cold snowy
winter in Boston and walked past the travel agency saw a poster in the
window and decided to be a good father to his sons? Lots of possible
explanations, but I would say go with the ones that point to him having
to be on the Rotterdam are the most likely because I recall the
original poster also said the wife was expecting another child a few
weeks later.

If you want information the ship the Rotterdam there is losts of it on
the internet.

Allan Jordan


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Round trip--Port of New York in 1935 #general

A. E. Jordan
 

Angie Elfassi writes in response to the original question about why
someone was crusing >from New York in 1935:

Here are a few speculations:
1. Business trip
2. Help a relative complete the last leg of his/her journey to USA
3. A free-bee
4. Went to check out the possibility of living there.
5. Health reasons for the boy - exposure to sea air etc.

All interesting and good gueses. I doubt you will find the reason for
the trip but I would add in that in 1935 the USA is very much in the
Great Depression. Depending on the original poster's family situation
the cost of the trip was not inexpensive -- according to an ad I found
in the NY Times for this trip it started at $135 per person. Plus the
train fare to New York. It was not an inexpensive holiday.

Sailing >from Boston in this era to the Caribbean was by no means
impossible althougth >from Boston there would not have been a large and
luxurious a ship as the Rotterdam in 1935. So if this travelered had
been desperate just to get to sea or to the Caribbean in general I
would say they could have traveled >from Boston. To me that says this
person likely had some reason to be aboard the Rotterdam >from New York.
He won the trip in a contest, he needed to get to a specific port the
Rotterdam was going to or ... I guess you could say he just wanted to
sail on the Rotterdam. Holland-America at one point had an advertising
slogan "It is good to be on a well run ship." May be this traveler
understood the meaning of that slogan.

The trip in question I can see >from the same NY Times advert was
promoted by a travel agency called National Tours that had offices in
New York and Boston. May be this man was suffered through a cold snowy
winter in Boston and walked past the travel agency saw a poster in the
window and decided to be a good father to his sons? Lots of possible
explanations, but I would say go with the ones that point to him having
to be on the Rotterdam are the most likely because I recall the
original poster also said the wife was expecting another child a few
weeks later.

If you want information the ship the Rotterdam there is losts of it on
the internet.

Allan Jordan


Austria Vienna, Poland and Hungary #general

H Duboff
 

B"H

Hi.

On a 1930 census record, my g-g-aunt Reba ASKIN (who was born 1895) is
listed as having been born in "Austria Vienna." Her mother and father
are listed as having been born in "Austria Vienna" as well. The
language spoken in her home was "Yiddish." Places listed for other
people on that 1930 census page (not connected with Reba's listing and
copied exactly as they were spelled) are: Austria Vienna, Russia
Mosco, Rumania, Unkrania, Lithuania, and Poland. (This is the only
time I've seen Austria Vienna or Russia Mosco.)

On the 1930 census for Reba's parents, the mother is listed as born in
"Austria" and the language spoken in her home there was "Polish" while
the father is listed as born in "Russia" and the language spoken in
the home is "Jewish."

All other census records for Reba's siblings indicate that the mother
was born in "Austria" and the father in "Russia", with "Jewish" as the
language spoken. (I realize that "Yiddish" and "Jewish" are the
same.)

I have a marriage license application for Reba's sister with "Austria
Poland" listed as the place of birth.

My question is thus: Was there a difference, in 1895, among "Austria
Hungary", "Austria Vienna", and/or "Austria Poland" or is it the same
thing?

Thank you,
--
Henoch Duboff

Researching: FAERSTEIN, TICHNER; (Skalo - Austria);
MAILSHANKER/MELSZENKER (Grading/Gorodok Podol. and Buenos Aires -
Argentina); OBLETZ, ROSOFF (Dokshytz - Belarus) ; PINTOV, FINN
(Gluboko - Vilna); RAFKIN/RAVKIN (Dwinsk; ZEMBLE (Lushnitz);DUBOWY
(Zalocie - Austria)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Austria Vienna, Poland and Hungary #general

H Duboff
 

B"H

Hi.

On a 1930 census record, my g-g-aunt Reba ASKIN (who was born 1895) is
listed as having been born in "Austria Vienna." Her mother and father
are listed as having been born in "Austria Vienna" as well. The
language spoken in her home was "Yiddish." Places listed for other
people on that 1930 census page (not connected with Reba's listing and
copied exactly as they were spelled) are: Austria Vienna, Russia
Mosco, Rumania, Unkrania, Lithuania, and Poland. (This is the only
time I've seen Austria Vienna or Russia Mosco.)

On the 1930 census for Reba's parents, the mother is listed as born in
"Austria" and the language spoken in her home there was "Polish" while
the father is listed as born in "Russia" and the language spoken in
the home is "Jewish."

All other census records for Reba's siblings indicate that the mother
was born in "Austria" and the father in "Russia", with "Jewish" as the
language spoken. (I realize that "Yiddish" and "Jewish" are the
same.)

I have a marriage license application for Reba's sister with "Austria
Poland" listed as the place of birth.

My question is thus: Was there a difference, in 1895, among "Austria
Hungary", "Austria Vienna", and/or "Austria Poland" or is it the same
thing?

Thank you,
--
Henoch Duboff

Researching: FAERSTEIN, TICHNER; (Skalo - Austria);
MAILSHANKER/MELSZENKER (Grading/Gorodok Podol. and Buenos Aires -
Argentina); OBLETZ, ROSOFF (Dokshytz - Belarus) ; PINTOV, FINN
(Gluboko - Vilna); RAFKIN/RAVKIN (Dwinsk; ZEMBLE (Lushnitz);DUBOWY
(Zalocie - Austria)


our first project - volunteers needed #danzig #gdansk #germany #poland

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

Dear SIG members,

I am excited to announce that we are ready to begin our first project,
translation of two articles >from German to English (with a small amount
from Hebrew to English). For details, please read this message and see the
Projects section of our website (www.jewishgen.org/danzig), where updates
will be posted as available. If you would like to volunteer, please contact
me.

Title: Translation of "Der Geschichte der Juden in Danzig" (1857) and "Aus
Danzig" (1808)

Volunteers Needed: Project Coordinator, Translators >from German to English,
Translator >from Hebrew to English

All volunteers must sign a JewishGen Volunteer Agreement
(http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen/agree/volunteer.html) in order to
participate, be familiar with Microsoft Word, and be able to work >from .PDF
images. The Project Coordinator should have an excellent command of German
and English, to be able to judge the strengths of translators and organize
the translations accordingly.

Description:
Translations of two articles >from primarily German to English (and short
sections >from Hebrew to English): "Der Geschichte der Juden in Danzig," by
Dr. Abraham Stein, >from Monatsschrift fuer Geschichte und Wissenschaft des
Judentums, year 6 (1857), Nr. 6,7,9,11, 42 pages, and "Aus Danzig," by
Anonymous?, >from Sulamith, year 2 (1808), Nr. 1, 16 pages.

Dr. Abraham Stein was the first liberal rabbi in Danzig (Altschottland), and
this article of his may be the first published history of Danzig Jewry.
Sulamith was the first German-language magazine directed to Jews.

These articles will be available as .PDF files to the Project Coordinator
and translators. Translations will appear on the SIG website.

Best regards,

Logan Kleinwaks
Coordinator, JewishGen Danzig/Gdansk SIG
kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu
near Washington, D.C.


Danzig/Gedansk SIG #Danzig #Gdansk #Germany #Poland our first project - volunteers needed #danzig #gdansk #germany #poland

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

Dear SIG members,

I am excited to announce that we are ready to begin our first project,
translation of two articles >from German to English (with a small amount
from Hebrew to English). For details, please read this message and see the
Projects section of our website (www.jewishgen.org/danzig), where updates
will be posted as available. If you would like to volunteer, please contact
me.

Title: Translation of "Der Geschichte der Juden in Danzig" (1857) and "Aus
Danzig" (1808)

Volunteers Needed: Project Coordinator, Translators >from German to English,
Translator >from Hebrew to English

All volunteers must sign a JewishGen Volunteer Agreement
(http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen/agree/volunteer.html) in order to
participate, be familiar with Microsoft Word, and be able to work >from .PDF
images. The Project Coordinator should have an excellent command of German
and English, to be able to judge the strengths of translators and organize
the translations accordingly.

Description:
Translations of two articles >from primarily German to English (and short
sections >from Hebrew to English): "Der Geschichte der Juden in Danzig," by
Dr. Abraham Stein, >from Monatsschrift fuer Geschichte und Wissenschaft des
Judentums, year 6 (1857), Nr. 6,7,9,11, 42 pages, and "Aus Danzig," by
Anonymous?, >from Sulamith, year 2 (1808), Nr. 1, 16 pages.

Dr. Abraham Stein was the first liberal rabbi in Danzig (Altschottland), and
this article of his may be the first published history of Danzig Jewry.
Sulamith was the first German-language magazine directed to Jews.

These articles will be available as .PDF files to the Project Coordinator
and translators. Translations will appear on the SIG website.

Best regards,

Logan Kleinwaks
Coordinator, JewishGen Danzig/Gdansk SIG
kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu
near Washington, D.C.


"Jotner" #galicia

Jonathan and Leila Kilby <kilby@...>
 

I am searching for information about my family "Jotner". All we know is that
my great-grandfather, Joseph Jotner, had an Austro-Hungarian passport and
was born around 1870. He was on the UK 1901 census living in the East End of
London.

Leila Kilby (nee Jotner)

MODERATOR NOTE: Please remember to put your town, state or country and your
email address with your name. Thank you.


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia "Jotner" #galicia

Jonathan and Leila Kilby <kilby@...>
 

I am searching for information about my family "Jotner". All we know is that
my great-grandfather, Joseph Jotner, had an Austro-Hungarian passport and
was born around 1870. He was on the UK 1901 census living in the East End of
London.

Leila Kilby (nee Jotner)

MODERATOR NOTE: Please remember to put your town, state or country and your
email address with your name. Thank you.


Bierfass Research #galicia

Penny k
 

Through the help of Jewish Gen during the past 4 years I found Bierfass
relatives in Europe, Israel and New York. Many years ago, I was in contact
with someone named Bierfass in South America. I believe my great uncle
emigrated >from Siedliska, Austria (now Poland) to Argentina and I understand
there are Bierfasses elsewhere in Argentina. If you have any information
about Bierfasses in South America or elsewhere, please contact me at
pennyann21@hotmail.com.

Penny Kornstein
Scarsdale, NY

Searching:
Bierfass (Siedliska, Austria)
Gach (Minsk, Russia)
Lieberman (Chmielnick, Poland)
Kleinhandler (Chmielnick, Poland)

MODERATOR NOTE: There are several towns called Siedliska in Galicia,
formerly Austria, now Poland. Try searching your surname of interest
and the town in the All Poland Database and also find out >from relatives
if anyone knows what larger town is nearby.


AGAD record-could "married name" be the maiden name? #galicia

Denise Azbill <famaz1@...>
 

I'm sure this question has been asked a hundred times, but I found what I
think to be a birth record for my aunt in the Stanislawow/Ivano-Frankivsk
AGAD birth records. But, the mother's maiden name is listed to be
"Weidenfeld", which actually would have been her married name. Has this
kind of thing ever come up before, and should I bother sending for the
record?

Thanks much,
Denise Azbill
Las Vegas, NV

_________________________________________________________________
Don’t just search. Find. Check out the new MSN Search!
http://search.msn.click-url.com/go/onm00200636ave/direct/01/


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Bierfass Research #galicia

Penny k
 

Through the help of Jewish Gen during the past 4 years I found Bierfass
relatives in Europe, Israel and New York. Many years ago, I was in contact
with someone named Bierfass in South America. I believe my great uncle
emigrated >from Siedliska, Austria (now Poland) to Argentina and I understand
there are Bierfasses elsewhere in Argentina. If you have any information
about Bierfasses in South America or elsewhere, please contact me at
pennyann21@hotmail.com.

Penny Kornstein
Scarsdale, NY

Searching:
Bierfass (Siedliska, Austria)
Gach (Minsk, Russia)
Lieberman (Chmielnick, Poland)
Kleinhandler (Chmielnick, Poland)

MODERATOR NOTE: There are several towns called Siedliska in Galicia,
formerly Austria, now Poland. Try searching your surname of interest
and the town in the All Poland Database and also find out >from relatives
if anyone knows what larger town is nearby.


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia AGAD record-could "married name" be the maiden name? #galicia

Denise Azbill <famaz1@...>
 

I'm sure this question has been asked a hundred times, but I found what I
think to be a birth record for my aunt in the Stanislawow/Ivano-Frankivsk
AGAD birth records. But, the mother's maiden name is listed to be
"Weidenfeld", which actually would have been her married name. Has this
kind of thing ever come up before, and should I bother sending for the
record?

Thanks much,
Denise Azbill
Las Vegas, NV

_________________________________________________________________
Don’t just search. Find. Check out the new MSN Search!
http://search.msn.click-url.com/go/onm00200636ave/direct/01/


R' Josef PERL #rabbinic

ALROMASO@...
 

Can anyone please tell me any information about Rabbi Josef PERL
regarding where he was born, where he was a rabbi, and about his
family? Thank you for your help.

Sincerely,
Alice Marcus Solovy


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic R' Josef PERL #rabbinic

ALROMASO@...
 

Can anyone please tell me any information about Rabbi Josef PERL
regarding where he was born, where he was a rabbi, and about his
family? Thank you for your help.

Sincerely,
Alice Marcus Solovy


Re: Cousins with different Y-DNA #dna

dathaler@...
 

On 2006.02.17, Eleanor Gordon <Egrdn@aol.com> wrote

Be aware that due to previously unknown adoptions and other factors
there may be upsetting news for some project members. In the
various projects I am part of we have had at least three sets of
cousins who are related in the male line according to the paper
trail but who have discovered that their DNA shows no relationship.
I guess my case is another explanation, that was very frequent in
some shtetls in Galicia where during some periods, as consequence
of conflicts between Jewish religious authorities and civil
authorities, the religious marriage wasn't recognized and
consequently a male received their mother's surname, but of course
not Y-DNA.

With a different civil marriage rule for the next generation, or
after emigration, a male transmitted of course his father's Y-DNA
but mother's surname and only following generation was normal,
father's surname and Y-DNA were jointly transmitted.

My THALER family is >from Ustrzyki Dolne, a town with about 1500 Jews
in the early 1900s, where no vital records remained and THALER was
the most used surname.

I identified two other THALER families in the world >from same shtetl
willing to establish if we have common ancestors. However, we
suppose DNA test is useless because in at least two cases we found
mother surnames before 1914 (Austrian rule).

Regards

David Thaler
Buenos Aires / Argentina


DNA Research #DNA Re: Cousins with different Y-DNA #dna

dathaler@...
 

On 2006.02.17, Eleanor Gordon <Egrdn@aol.com> wrote

Be aware that due to previously unknown adoptions and other factors
there may be upsetting news for some project members. In the
various projects I am part of we have had at least three sets of
cousins who are related in the male line according to the paper
trail but who have discovered that their DNA shows no relationship.
I guess my case is another explanation, that was very frequent in
some shtetls in Galicia where during some periods, as consequence
of conflicts between Jewish religious authorities and civil
authorities, the religious marriage wasn't recognized and
consequently a male received their mother's surname, but of course
not Y-DNA.

With a different civil marriage rule for the next generation, or
after emigration, a male transmitted of course his father's Y-DNA
but mother's surname and only following generation was normal,
father's surname and Y-DNA were jointly transmitted.

My THALER family is >from Ustrzyki Dolne, a town with about 1500 Jews
in the early 1900s, where no vital records remained and THALER was
the most used surname.

I identified two other THALER families in the world >from same shtetl
willing to establish if we have common ancestors. However, we
suppose DNA test is useless because in at least two cases we found
mother surnames before 1914 (Austrian rule).

Regards

David Thaler
Buenos Aires / Argentina