Date   

Re: First name, "Judel Gersh" #general

Zev Griner <zgriner@...>
 

Judel is pronounced Yudel and is the diminutive for Yehudah or Judah in
English. Gersh could be short for Gershon, or actually pronounced
Hersh, which is the Yiddish name for Tzvi.

Regardless, there are no hard and fast rules for name equivalences
unless someone wants to be true to the Biblical equivalent, like
Yehudah = Judah, above.

I have seen people with the name Hersh given an English name of
Harry/Harold or Harvey. As for Yudel, Judah - I don't know.


Re: Died in Mexico - buried in Philadelphia #general

L. Altman <familysearch@...>
 

If the body is brought to Phialdelphia to be buried there, a burial permit
was probably issued. Also if the body was transported via airlines, there
should be a record of the body in transit both in Mexico and at customs and
then in Philadelphia.

Linda Altman
Raleigh, NC

I know that one can find the place of burial by looking at the death
certificate. But how does one find the place of burial when a person
dies in > Mexico and the body is brought to Philadelphia to be buried? How would
one find > the place of burial in Philadelphia when the death certificate is from
another > country?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: First name, "Judel Gersh" #general

Zev Griner <zgriner@...>
 

Judel is pronounced Yudel and is the diminutive for Yehudah or Judah in
English. Gersh could be short for Gershon, or actually pronounced
Hersh, which is the Yiddish name for Tzvi.

Regardless, there are no hard and fast rules for name equivalences
unless someone wants to be true to the Biblical equivalent, like
Yehudah = Judah, above.

I have seen people with the name Hersh given an English name of
Harry/Harold or Harvey. As for Yudel, Judah - I don't know.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Died in Mexico - buried in Philadelphia #general

L. Altman <familysearch@...>
 

If the body is brought to Phialdelphia to be buried there, a burial permit
was probably issued. Also if the body was transported via airlines, there
should be a record of the body in transit both in Mexico and at customs and
then in Philadelphia.

Linda Altman
Raleigh, NC

I know that one can find the place of burial by looking at the death
certificate. But how does one find the place of burial when a person
dies in > Mexico and the body is brought to Philadelphia to be buried? How would
one find > the place of burial in Philadelphia when the death certificate is from
another > country?


Re: First name, "Judel Gersh" #general

Dr.Josef ASH
 

Shalom, David.
You ask:

----- Original Message -----
From: "David Priever" <brooklyn1960@...>
Today's entry is the name "Judel Gersh". It was found in a record in
the
JRI-Poland.

What would that name translate to in English?
David J. Priever
brooklyn1960@...
I don't know how to translate the names to English. But let us return these
names to their Hebrew origin. They have been changed, passing through
Yiddish:
Yehuda > Yuda > Yudale > Judel
Tsvi (Zvi) -the Hebrew for "deer" > translated into Yiddish as Hirsh >
changed in Russian to Girsh (because Russian has neither "h" sound nor "h"
letter) > Gersh.
So, he was Yehuda-Tsvi. Translate it to English!
Good luck!,
Dr.Josef Ash


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: First name, "Judel Gersh" #general

Dr.Josef ASH
 

Shalom, David.
You ask:

----- Original Message -----
From: "David Priever" <brooklyn1960@...>
Today's entry is the name "Judel Gersh". It was found in a record in
the
JRI-Poland.

What would that name translate to in English?
David J. Priever
brooklyn1960@...
I don't know how to translate the names to English. But let us return these
names to their Hebrew origin. They have been changed, passing through
Yiddish:
Yehuda > Yuda > Yudale > Judel
Tsvi (Zvi) -the Hebrew for "deer" > translated into Yiddish as Hirsh >
changed in Russian to Girsh (because Russian has neither "h" sound nor "h"
letter) > Gersh.
So, he was Yehuda-Tsvi. Translate it to English!
Good luck!,
Dr.Josef Ash


Re: Looking for mystery great grandmother #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Sun, 15 Jan 2006 01:44:12 UTC, jhymoff@... (Jenni Hymoff
Koeppel) opined:

3. The 1900 census states that she had a daughter named Rachel born in
August 1894. Nobody in the family has ever heard of that person. Any ideas
on how to find out who Rachel was?

I'd appreciate any advice in trying to locate these records. Thanks again
for all your help!
If the only record of Rachel is the 1900 Census (when she would have
been six years old), and noone alive ever heard of her, the
implication is that she died early. There is such a case in my own
family, of a daughter of my grandparents of whom I had never heard
until recently because she died at age 12 in 1910.

Is Rachel present in the Census of 1910? At age 16, she would probably
still be living with her parents. Have you checked death records in
the place where she lived?

Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the
URL is: http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address
is not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the
URL above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email
form there.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Looking for mystery great grandmother #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Sun, 15 Jan 2006 01:44:12 UTC, jhymoff@... (Jenni Hymoff
Koeppel) opined:

3. The 1900 census states that she had a daughter named Rachel born in
August 1894. Nobody in the family has ever heard of that person. Any ideas
on how to find out who Rachel was?

I'd appreciate any advice in trying to locate these records. Thanks again
for all your help!
If the only record of Rachel is the 1900 Census (when she would have
been six years old), and noone alive ever heard of her, the
implication is that she died early. There is such a case in my own
family, of a daughter of my grandparents of whom I had never heard
until recently because she died at age 12 in 1910.

Is Rachel present in the Census of 1910? At age 16, she would probably
still be living with her parents. Have you checked death records in
the place where she lived?

Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the
URL is: http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address
is not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the
URL above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email
form there.


Re: Isaac=Jonas=Julian ? #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Sun, 15 Jan 2006 01:42:50 UTC, tom.vene@... (Tom Venetianer)
opined:

Indeed the story of king UNAS can be found on the Internet
<http://www.nemo.nu/ibisportal/0egyptintro/3egypt/3index.htm>.
But according to this page, his name was spelled as UNIS or WENIS.
In Greek it was written as IAUNOS, not IONAS.
How Greeks perceived and spelled the name is pretty much irrelevant.
Not only because Greek, like English, is very good at distorting words
and names >from other cultures, but also because they were literate
only much later than the reign of this king.

Also, one wonder how a Biblical prophet (Jonah), who lived in the 8th
century BCE, would be named after a pharaoh who lived in the 24th century BCE.
Certainly in the 8th century BCE Egypt wasn't the metropolis of Middle
East anymore - the last Egyptian dynasty ended somewhere in the 10th
century BCE.
Leaving aside the vexed question of whether Jonah lived at all (in the
fish or outside it), I don't understand the time problem. There is no
reason to believe that this early king was the only person in Egyptian
history to bear this name; there were likely much later ones, not
necessarily famous. There is also no reason to think that the name was
invented for a specific Israeli of the 8th century BCE. Moshe Rabeinu,
for example, lived over three millenia ago, yet there are people
living today who bear the same name, often inherited >from their Zeide.
You could say the same for any number of Biblical names (leaving
aside, of course, such as "Zrubavel"). Names persist even when their
origin is forgotten, and parents of newborns use them.

If somebody can read hieroglyph characters, the cartouche mentioned
by Stan can be seen on the page above. The first two figures are a desert
hare and waves. Does that spells YU?
Yes.

Maybe UNAS is rooted in the name of goddess UNUT (she was personified
by the desert hare), whereas YONAH does means "dove" in Hebrew.
Perhaps "Unas" is indeed based on "Uniut". Given the hare character,
that seems even likely, so it would be a kind of pun. Yes, "yona" does
mean "dove". There are many examples in which the same combination of
sounds occurs in more than one language, with unrelated meanings. I am
thinking of one right now, involving Yiddish and Russian, but it is, I
fear, unsuitable for a family forum. Another example is the folk
derivation I cited for "Moshe", in which phonetic similarity gives
rise to a sweet story that "explains" his origins and how he became
leader of the exodus >from Egypt.

In comparison with the other totemic Biblical names, "Dove" doesn't
impress as a good one for a little boy. All the others I can think of
("Arie", "Ze'ev", even "H.amor" and "Nah.ash") express some macho
quality that parents might wish for their child to help him survive in
a difficult world. I doubt that any parent before the PC 20th century
thought their son would have a better life for being called "Dove" or
"Pigeon". Of course, there's "The Boy Named Sue".

So, although similar, these two names (Ionah and Yunas) may not have the
same root. BUT, here we have something which is quite curious:
Ionas and Yunas do produce the same Daitch-Mokotoff Soundex code,
namely 164,000! Go figure...
How is it that Nostradamus never stumbled upon this? =:-)8

Of course the original question was if Isaac and Jonas had something in common,
and the clear answer is NO.
RIGHT!

Regards
Tom
Have a good day

Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the
URL is: http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address
is not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the
URL above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email
form there.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Isaac=Jonas=Julian ? #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Sun, 15 Jan 2006 01:42:50 UTC, tom.vene@... (Tom Venetianer)
opined:

Indeed the story of king UNAS can be found on the Internet
<http://www.nemo.nu/ibisportal/0egyptintro/3egypt/3index.htm>.
But according to this page, his name was spelled as UNIS or WENIS.
In Greek it was written as IAUNOS, not IONAS.
How Greeks perceived and spelled the name is pretty much irrelevant.
Not only because Greek, like English, is very good at distorting words
and names >from other cultures, but also because they were literate
only much later than the reign of this king.

Also, one wonder how a Biblical prophet (Jonah), who lived in the 8th
century BCE, would be named after a pharaoh who lived in the 24th century BCE.
Certainly in the 8th century BCE Egypt wasn't the metropolis of Middle
East anymore - the last Egyptian dynasty ended somewhere in the 10th
century BCE.
Leaving aside the vexed question of whether Jonah lived at all (in the
fish or outside it), I don't understand the time problem. There is no
reason to believe that this early king was the only person in Egyptian
history to bear this name; there were likely much later ones, not
necessarily famous. There is also no reason to think that the name was
invented for a specific Israeli of the 8th century BCE. Moshe Rabeinu,
for example, lived over three millenia ago, yet there are people
living today who bear the same name, often inherited >from their Zeide.
You could say the same for any number of Biblical names (leaving
aside, of course, such as "Zrubavel"). Names persist even when their
origin is forgotten, and parents of newborns use them.

If somebody can read hieroglyph characters, the cartouche mentioned
by Stan can be seen on the page above. The first two figures are a desert
hare and waves. Does that spells YU?
Yes.

Maybe UNAS is rooted in the name of goddess UNUT (she was personified
by the desert hare), whereas YONAH does means "dove" in Hebrew.
Perhaps "Unas" is indeed based on "Uniut". Given the hare character,
that seems even likely, so it would be a kind of pun. Yes, "yona" does
mean "dove". There are many examples in which the same combination of
sounds occurs in more than one language, with unrelated meanings. I am
thinking of one right now, involving Yiddish and Russian, but it is, I
fear, unsuitable for a family forum. Another example is the folk
derivation I cited for "Moshe", in which phonetic similarity gives
rise to a sweet story that "explains" his origins and how he became
leader of the exodus >from Egypt.

In comparison with the other totemic Biblical names, "Dove" doesn't
impress as a good one for a little boy. All the others I can think of
("Arie", "Ze'ev", even "H.amor" and "Nah.ash") express some macho
quality that parents might wish for their child to help him survive in
a difficult world. I doubt that any parent before the PC 20th century
thought their son would have a better life for being called "Dove" or
"Pigeon". Of course, there's "The Boy Named Sue".

So, although similar, these two names (Ionah and Yunas) may not have the
same root. BUT, here we have something which is quite curious:
Ionas and Yunas do produce the same Daitch-Mokotoff Soundex code,
namely 164,000! Go figure...
How is it that Nostradamus never stumbled upon this? =:-)8

Of course the original question was if Isaac and Jonas had something in common,
and the clear answer is NO.
RIGHT!

Regards
Tom
Have a good day

Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the
URL is: http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address
is not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the
URL above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email
form there.


Re: Died in Mexico - buried in Philadelphia #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Sun, 15 Jan 2006 01:44:14 UTC, Mjn519@... opined:

I know that one can find the place of burial by looking at the death
certificate. But how does one find the place of burial when a person dies in
Mexico and the body is brought to Philadelphia to be buried? How would one find
the place of burial in Philadelphia when the death certificate is >from another
country?

Thank you very much.

Marie Lubman
Chino Hills, CA
If you know the date of death in Mexico, you can't be far >from the
date of burial. Burial requires a permit, even in Philadelphia, and
there would be an entry in it for the place of burial.

Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the
URL is: http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address
is not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the
URL above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email
form there.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Died in Mexico - buried in Philadelphia #general

Stan Goodman <SPAM_FOILER@...>
 

On Sun, 15 Jan 2006 01:44:14 UTC, Mjn519@... opined:

I know that one can find the place of burial by looking at the death
certificate. But how does one find the place of burial when a person dies in
Mexico and the body is brought to Philadelphia to be buried? How would one find
the place of burial in Philadelphia when the death certificate is >from another
country?

Thank you very much.

Marie Lubman
Chino Hills, CA
If you know the date of death in Mexico, you can't be far >from the
date of burial. Burial requires a permit, even in Philadelphia, and
there would be an entry in it for the place of burial.

Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, SURALSKI: Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: Iasi, Dorohoi, and Mileanca, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better). the
URL is: http://www.hashkedim.com

For reasons connected with anti-spam/junk security, the return address
is not valid. To communicate with me, please visit my website (see the
URL above -- no Java required for this purpose) and fill in the email
form there.


Website update: One Thousand Children #general

Iris Posner <posneri@...>
 

Announcing Addition of Materials Regarding Children of the Holocaust
Rescued by Private American Organizations and Individuals:

In response to requests >from educators and others, One Thousand Children
has updated its website to include multi-media materials in addition to
personal accounts and an extensive annotated resource list.

The website address is http://www.onethousandchildren.org. The resource
list is on site page "Learn More." At the top of this page you can click on
"Images and Sounds," to access video, photographs of artifacts and
recent interviews on Studio J of B'nai B'rith radio with an One Thousand
Children co-founder and, rescuee U.S. Ambassador (Ret.) Richard Schifter,
on the history of the rescues and resettlements.

Should you desire any additional information, please contact us at
contact@...

Regards,

Iris Posner
President
One Thousand Children


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Website update: One Thousand Children #general

Iris Posner <posneri@...>
 

Announcing Addition of Materials Regarding Children of the Holocaust
Rescued by Private American Organizations and Individuals:

In response to requests >from educators and others, One Thousand Children
has updated its website to include multi-media materials in addition to
personal accounts and an extensive annotated resource list.

The website address is http://www.onethousandchildren.org. The resource
list is on site page "Learn More." At the top of this page you can click on
"Images and Sounds," to access video, photographs of artifacts and
recent interviews on Studio J of B'nai B'rith radio with an One Thousand
Children co-founder and, rescuee U.S. Ambassador (Ret.) Richard Schifter,
on the history of the rescues and resettlements.

Should you desire any additional information, please contact us at
contact@...

Regards,

Iris Posner
President
One Thousand Children


The IAJGS wants YOU to be a Director #general

Mark Heckman
 

As Chair of the IAJGS Nominating Committee, it is my pleasure on behalf of the
committee to invite you to consider becoming a Director of the IAJGS.
Directors guide the IAJGS in its mission to promote and support the study of
Jewish family history. Service on the IAJGS Board is a way for you to make an
important contribution to the worldwide Jewish genealogical community.

Elections for the 6 Director positions will take place at the annual IAJGS
meeting, Wednesday, August 16, at the 26th IAJGS International Conference on
Jewish Genealogy in New York City. Directors serve two-year terms.

We urge all who are interested in running for the position of Director to
first read the information about Elections of the IAJGS Board at
"http://iajgs.org/elections.html". This page contains information about the
Board Application Form that must be submitted by all candidates, the number of
meetings board members are expected to attend, and important information about
personal expenses and possible reimbursement.

To apply, please complete and submit a Board Application Form, which can be
found on the web at "http://www.iajgs.org/boardapplication.html". The
Nominating Committee will review all applications before submitting a slate of
candidates to the IAJGS Board. To be reviewed, completed forms must be
received by the Nominating Committee no later than 1 April 2006.

If you do not submit your application by the deadline, be aware that floor
nominations can be made at the annual meeting. See the IAJGS by-laws
(specifically Article VI section 4) for more information about floor
nominations. The by-laws can be found on-line at
"http://iajgs.org/bylaws.html". We strongly recommend that all individuals
nominated >from the floor bring a completed application form to the annual
meeting and submit the form to the IAJGS Secretary before the meeting begins.

We appreciate your interest in and possible service on the Board. Please
don't hesitate to contact us if you have any questions.

The IAJGS Nominating Committee,
Mark Heckman, Chair, President, JGS Sacramento <mrheckman@...>
Elsebeth Paikin, President, JGS Denmark
Mike Posnick, IAJGS Board


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen The IAJGS wants YOU to be a Director #general

Mark Heckman
 

As Chair of the IAJGS Nominating Committee, it is my pleasure on behalf of the
committee to invite you to consider becoming a Director of the IAJGS.
Directors guide the IAJGS in its mission to promote and support the study of
Jewish family history. Service on the IAJGS Board is a way for you to make an
important contribution to the worldwide Jewish genealogical community.

Elections for the 6 Director positions will take place at the annual IAJGS
meeting, Wednesday, August 16, at the 26th IAJGS International Conference on
Jewish Genealogy in New York City. Directors serve two-year terms.

We urge all who are interested in running for the position of Director to
first read the information about Elections of the IAJGS Board at
"http://iajgs.org/elections.html". This page contains information about the
Board Application Form that must be submitted by all candidates, the number of
meetings board members are expected to attend, and important information about
personal expenses and possible reimbursement.

To apply, please complete and submit a Board Application Form, which can be
found on the web at "http://www.iajgs.org/boardapplication.html". The
Nominating Committee will review all applications before submitting a slate of
candidates to the IAJGS Board. To be reviewed, completed forms must be
received by the Nominating Committee no later than 1 April 2006.

If you do not submit your application by the deadline, be aware that floor
nominations can be made at the annual meeting. See the IAJGS by-laws
(specifically Article VI section 4) for more information about floor
nominations. The by-laws can be found on-line at
"http://iajgs.org/bylaws.html". We strongly recommend that all individuals
nominated >from the floor bring a completed application form to the annual
meeting and submit the form to the IAJGS Secretary before the meeting begins.

We appreciate your interest in and possible service on the Board. Please
don't hesitate to contact us if you have any questions.

The IAJGS Nominating Committee,
Mark Heckman, Chair, President, JGS Sacramento <mrheckman@...>
Elsebeth Paikin, President, JGS Denmark
Mike Posnick, IAJGS Board


Yid[den] and Goy[im]--two potentially contentious expressions #general

MBernet@...
 

About 50 years ago in Eilat, Israel, I met a German journalist surnamed Jo
st, a friend of Israel. He showed me his government-issued press credentials
while expressing grave concern: Israel of all nations had copied the
German practice of stamping Jews' documents with a large J (for Jude = Jew)
and labeled him as a Christian on his press card. I frowned, looked and
burst into laughter: Next to his name in German, JOST, someone had repeated it
in Hebrew cursive script (reading >from left to right) tet (T), samekh (S), vav
(O)-yod (J).

Indeed, the Hebrew spelling of "Jost" looked remarkably like "Goy."

Many believe that the expression yiddish term for Gentile, Goy (pl. Goyim"),
is inherently offensive. It is not, but the use of the expression should
always be weighed carefully.

Goy is a very neutral Hebrew term for "nation" (any nation) and the
contemporary Jewish and Yiddish usage for "Gentile(s)" comes >from the Hebrew for
"nations of the world." Care must be taken not to attach a derogatory sense to
the term--and many Gentiles may consider it derogatory. In the Bible and in
Jewish prayer, Goy refers to Jews as a people more than 8 out of 10 times,
not the nations of the world over.

Yid is the perfectly acceptable Yiddish term for Jew--and also touchy. It
is totally unacceptable when used by a non-Jew or in a derogatory sense,
interchangeable with terms like Kike or Jewboy, but Jews use it freely about
themselves and other Jews. One Jew might address another as "Reb Yid," or declare
that some current event is bad for 'die Yidden."

"Yiddish" is the correct term for the language of East European Jews (an
old German dialect with many Hebrew, Aramaic and Slavic words) but not
generally acceptable as an adjective for Jews, their customs, their food etc. (say
"Jewish people, customs, food," etc

In general, if you get a message >from a non-Jewish stranger using the terms
Yid or Yiddish inappropriately, you can usually assume that the term is meant
to offend Jews, and a polite note to this effect would be appropriate in your
response (if any).

Michael Bernet, New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Yid[den] and Goy[im]--two potentially contentious expressions #general

MBernet@...
 

About 50 years ago in Eilat, Israel, I met a German journalist surnamed Jo
st, a friend of Israel. He showed me his government-issued press credentials
while expressing grave concern: Israel of all nations had copied the
German practice of stamping Jews' documents with a large J (for Jude = Jew)
and labeled him as a Christian on his press card. I frowned, looked and
burst into laughter: Next to his name in German, JOST, someone had repeated it
in Hebrew cursive script (reading >from left to right) tet (T), samekh (S), vav
(O)-yod (J).

Indeed, the Hebrew spelling of "Jost" looked remarkably like "Goy."

Many believe that the expression yiddish term for Gentile, Goy (pl. Goyim"),
is inherently offensive. It is not, but the use of the expression should
always be weighed carefully.

Goy is a very neutral Hebrew term for "nation" (any nation) and the
contemporary Jewish and Yiddish usage for "Gentile(s)" comes >from the Hebrew for
"nations of the world." Care must be taken not to attach a derogatory sense to
the term--and many Gentiles may consider it derogatory. In the Bible and in
Jewish prayer, Goy refers to Jews as a people more than 8 out of 10 times,
not the nations of the world over.

Yid is the perfectly acceptable Yiddish term for Jew--and also touchy. It
is totally unacceptable when used by a non-Jew or in a derogatory sense,
interchangeable with terms like Kike or Jewboy, but Jews use it freely about
themselves and other Jews. One Jew might address another as "Reb Yid," or declare
that some current event is bad for 'die Yidden."

"Yiddish" is the correct term for the language of East European Jews (an
old German dialect with many Hebrew, Aramaic and Slavic words) but not
generally acceptable as an adjective for Jews, their customs, their food etc. (say
"Jewish people, customs, food," etc

In general, if you get a message >from a non-Jewish stranger using the terms
Yid or Yiddish inappropriately, you can usually assume that the term is meant
to offend Jews, and a polite note to this effect would be appropriate in your
response (if any).

Michael Bernet, New York


Re: First name, "Judel Gersh" #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 1/15/2006 5:37:41 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
brooklyn1960@... writes:

"Judel Gersh". It was found in a record in the
JRI-Poland.

What would that name translate to in English?

==Judah Gershon is the most likely Hebrew source. How about Justin George
in English? Or Jared Gantry?

Michael Bernet, New York


Re: Pictures of Palestine in the early days--and israel today #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 1/15/2006 2:46:02 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
jerry@... writes:

this web site address. It contains many old pictures (>from the early days
of photography) >from all over the area of Palestine of those days

http://www.eretzyisroel.org/~dhershkowitz/index2.html

==Especially interesting for an earlier century are the photographs of the
Holy Land by the atelier of the Bonfils, a French protestant family that
established a studio in Beirut and photographed the "classical" sites of the
Middle East for sale to collectors. Many of the photos were skilfully colorized.
There is a full collection at Tel Hai museum in Northern Galilee, available
online >from the Israel Government Press Office site (the site also has a full
collection of recent photos of Israel scenery, culture and history.

Michael Bernet, New York